Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Subject Women authors, American Remove constraint Subject: Women authors, American

Search Results

collection icon

The Chris Costner Sizemore Papers span the time period 1952-1989, with the bulk of the papers dating between 1956 and 1979. The collection consists largely of correspondence; diaries and writings by Sizemore; publicity centered on film and book promotions or speaking engagements; materials related to her appearances; interviews and documentary materials (including film, video- and audiocassettes); and assorted materials including photographs, legal and financial papers. Most items relate to Sizemore's struggle with multiple personality disorder (dissociative identity disorder), both personally through letters, writings, and diaries, and publicly through interviews, documentary media, and news clippings. The papers provide an in-depth look into the life of a woman with a rare disorder who later came to clearly articulate her life to the public and become a mental health advocate. A biography was written by her doctors in 1957, Corbett Thigpen and Hervey Cleckley, called The Three Faces of Eve. It was turned into a film the next year. Under the pseudonym, Evelyn Lancaster, Sizemore co-authored The Final Face of Eve with James Poling in 1958. In 1977 she wrote, under her given name, the autobiography I'm Eve. The Correspondence Series is arranged chronologically, and consists primarily of incoming letters. Dr. Corbett Thigpen, the doctor to deliver the original diagnosis of multiple personality disorder, is prominent in much of the collection. This series documents his relationship to Sizemore during treatment and continuing well into the 1970s. He corresponded with Sizemore about his writings, revealing much about the publication of The Three Faces of Eve (book), and its subsequent movie release. The series also contains correspondence with other doctors, family members, Sizemore's editors and publishers, and organizations for which she lectured. The Writings Series is comprised primarily of the holograph manuscript, typescript, final galley proofs, and paperback edition of I'm Eve, the memoir written by Sizemore with the help of Elen Pittillo. This comprehensive view of the book's publication is represented from handwritten copy to final edition. The Writings Series also includes some short descriptions of Sizemore's life and examples of her poetry, as well as a few writings by others. There are six diaries in the Diaries Series, kept during parts of the 1950s and 1970s. Within these volumes, Sizemore discloses inner thoughts, which reveal very personal information about enduring mental illness and its effects on her family. The Publicity Series includes news clippings and journal articles about Sizemore and multiple personality disorder, as well as media related to her published works. The Events Series contains materials and ephemera related to Sizemore's public life of art shows, lectures, broadcasts, and appearances, often for mental health organizations. It also contains materials from her book tour for The Three Faces of Eve. The Photographs Series contains pictures from these events and of Sizemore's family life. The Additional Materials Series contains financial and legal papers, medical files, and identifying documents. There is also an Audio Visual Materials Series that contains interviews and documentary materials that again reflect the public's interest in Sizemore's life, as well as her own desire to document and share her experiences in writing, speaking, and art. Included is a documentary film by Dr. Thigpen, and video and audiocassettes of television interviews, other appearances, and of family members discussing a shared past (sound quality of some of the audiocassettes is very poor).

collection icon

Dorothy Allison papers, 1965-2010 92.5 Linear Feet — 69,375 Items

Dorothy Allison is an author and feminist who has written numerous books and short stories, including Trash (1988), Bastard Out of Carolina (1992), and Cavedweller (1998). The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works), personal and professional correspondence, research materials and subject files, her personal journals, and other materials. Includes some photographs, electronic files, and oversize materials. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Dorothy Allison Papers include drafts and manuscripts of her writings (including Bastard Out of Carolina, Trash, Cavedweller, and other works). All of Allison's unpublished works are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Personal and professional correspondence, including exchanges with her publishers and other authors, are held in the chronological and work files. The collection also contains Allison's research materials and subject files, covering topics on feminism, lesbianism, sexuality, pornography, writing, and other related files. Allison's journals, dating from 1985 through the 2000s, consist of both handwritten and electronic formats, with all of the electronic journals printed for the archive. All of Allison's journals are RESTRICTED and require permission from the creator prior to use. Also included are materials from her speaking engagements, workshops, and other professional activities. There are a variety of special formats within the collection, including some photographs, electronic files, audio tapes, video cassettes, DVDs, and oversize posters.

Collection was acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

collection icon
Eleanor Foa Dienstag is a feminist activist, writer, and corporate communications specialist. These materials document her professional life and include drafts of her writings, research on Renée Richards, media appearances, and materials related to the production of her books Whither Thou Goest and In Good Company.

Collection contains professional papers of Eleanor Foa Dienstag, feminist activist, author, journalist and corporate writer. Materials include Dienstag's writings and appearances in print media, a run of the Outsider's Newsletter, files related to books, Whither Thou Goest and In Good Company : 125 years at the Heinz table, 1869-1994, as well as files related to unfinished biography of transgender activist and tennis champion Renée Richards.

collection icon

Judy Juanita papers, 1967-2016 3 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Judy Juanita (b. 1946) is a poet, author, and teacher based in the San Francisco Bay Area. This collection includes drafts and other materials from her debut novel, Virgin Soul, as well as correspondence and subject files from her research and activism in the Black Panther Party.

The first series, Biographical Materials, contains material related to Juanita's public appearances, coursework, transcripts, resume, and personal correspondence. The MFA coursework contains early writing that she did under the name "Judy Hart."

The second series, Writing, is primarily made up of content related to her novel, Virgin Soul, and includes notes, fragments, rough drafts, character sketches, reviews, and financial information. Further writings include novel drafts, play scripts, poetry, and short stories. In addition to handwritten and typewritten drafts, many works contain final, published drafts.

The third series, Subject Files, includes research materials related to Virgin Soul, including the history of West Oakland and of San Francisco State University during the 1960s. Also in this series are notes on writings, interviews with Juanita, press clippings, and posters.

collection icon

Kentucky Foundation for Women records, 1985-2017 62.0 Linear Feet — 168 Gigabytes

Sallie Bingham was the founder and first Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women and profoundly shaped its goals. The overall purpose of the Foundation is to support feminist women in the arts. The collection includes materials about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art, and women's culture. Additionally, the collection includes grant applications and files, files for the publication, The American Voice, and information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, among other materials.

The Kentucky Foundation for Women Records span the dates 1985-2017. The collection provides a rich source of information about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art and women's culture. The records of the Foundation include a range of materials, primarily a large number of grant files, including applications and supporting materials of those awarded grants. Also notable are the files for its publication, The American Voice, which include correspondence, copy-edited drafts of poetry and other writings, business records, other publications, miscellaneous ephemera, broadsides, and books of poetry. In addition, there is information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, miscellaneous correspondence, subject files, annual reports, newsletters, and brochures. The records consist primarily of files, but videocassettes, audiocassettes, and compact disks are also included. The collection is divided into four series: Administrative Files, Project Files, American Voice Files, and Grant Files.

The Administrative Files Series contains Foundation newsletters; administrative correspondence; minutes of Board of Directors meetings; and financial, legal and tax papers. The Project Files Series contains papers on short-term special projects, as well as long-term projects such as the Hopscotch House and the Wolf Pen Women Writers Colony. The American Voice Files Series contains information regarding the publication of the feminist literary journal The American Voice. The series contains correspondence between the editors ( Frederick Smock and Sallie Bingham) and contributors; copy-edited drafts of poetry, prose, and non-fiction essays; business records; broadsides; chapbooks (i.e. hand-bound books); miscellaneous publications; and a partially complete run of the journal. Some of the better-known authors to be published in The American Voice include: Paula Gunn Allen, Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Jorge Louis Borges, Kay Boyle, Jo Carson, Andrea Dworkin, Elaine Equi, Doris Grumbach, Joy Harjo, Fenton Johnson, Robin Morgan, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Firor Scott.

Finally, the largest series, the Grant Files Series, contains documentation on the evolution of the Foundation's grant program over the years, as well as files on those projects that received grant monies from the Foundation from 1986 to 1993. The Foundation awarded grants to both men and women, though women are in the majority. The grants supported the work of visual artists, writers, scholars, musicians, composers, documentary and fiction filmmakers, playwrights, painters, sculptors, puppeteers, quilters and other fabric artists, political activists, advocates for physically handicapped women, and those concerned with women and religion and women's employment issues. A unique concern of the grant givers was supporting the exploration and improvement of the situation of women in Appalachia, encouraging women to explore and study the wilderness, and defining and encouraging the emerging field of Ecofeminism.

The addition (Accession 2001-0012) (2208 items, 3.8 lin. ft.; dated 1986-1999) continues to document the process of publishing The American Voice. Materials include correspondence, board minutes, grant applications and evaluations, financial statements, video (3) and audio (4) cassettes and one audio compact disc, and information files for volumes 32-49. Also included are writings by Sallie Bingham. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (Accession 2007-0126) (5 lin. ft.) consists primarily of files documenting the organization's grant program, and also includes project files, files related to the feminist literary journal The American Voice, publications, and files from Hopscotch House.

collection icon
Family of Irish origin living in Pennsylvania, Baltimore, and Washington, D.C. Family and business correspondence and invention papers of an Irish Catholic family living in Pennsylvania, Baltimore, Md., and Washington, D.C., whose members engaged in promoting inventions. The papers center on John Francis McMullen (1830-1900), and his wife, Lavelette (Johnson) McMullen. Includes letters from relatives in Ireland, from Virginia cousins and friends, from nuns of the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary, from business acquaintances, from friends traveling in the U.S. and Europe, and from the novelist Mary Johnston; and papers relating to the settlement of a disputed legacy left to Mary McMullen by Miss Jane Agnes Riggs, the last of the children of George Washington Riggs, Washington banker. Also includes manuscripts of the Confederate poet, John Banister Tabb, writings of Dysart and Mary McMullen, letters and poems of William Hand Browne, editor, author, and librarian, and correspondence of Mary McMullen which gives glimpses of the Riggs family.

Family and business correspondence and invention papers of the McMullen family, spanning the years 1783-1969, with the majority of the material dating from about 1880-1945. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Pictures, Financial Papers, Invention Papers, Miscellaneous, and Volumes.

The papers of John McMullen (1791-1870), inventor, consist of correspondence concerning family matters in Ireland; McMullen's efforts to assist relatives in gaining passage to the United States, the operation of his farm in Sinking Valley in Pennsylvania; a trip to England, 1850-1851, to sell his inventions; the invention of machines to knit stockings and fish nets; patents; the receipt of the Exhibitor's Medal for a machine shown at the Exhibition of the Works of All Nations at the Crystal Palace, London, England, in 1853 including a letter from President Millard Fillmore notifying him of the award; and an exhibition of a knitting machine at the New York Crystal Palace at the Exhibition of the Industry of All Nations in 1854.

The papers of John Francis McMullen (1830-1900), son of John McMullen, and of his wife, Lavalette (Johnston) McMullen (d. 1941), daughter of John Warfield Johnston, senator from Virginia, include correspondence while John Francis McMullen attended St. Mary's College, Baltimore, Maryland; letters from William Hand Browne (1828-1912), editor and librarian, describing his travels in the South during the early years of the Civil War; personal and family correspondence with friends and relatives, including letters from Senator Johnston containing references to his political activities; letters from the Sisters of the Order of the Visitation of Holy Mary concerning the education of the McMullen daughters at various schools run by the order; letters of Jean de Hedonville describing cattle ranching in Montana, life on the Crow Indian Reservation, and a camping trip to Yellowstone National Park; correspondence relating to the settlement of the estate of John Warfield Johnston; and business correspondence concerning his father's inventions and cattle raising.

Correspondence of the children of John Francis and Lavalette McMullen consists of letters of Mary McMullen, principally while a companion to Jane Agnes Riggs, daughter of George Washington Riggs, Washington banker, describing Riggs family history and their travels in Europe and the United States before World War I; letters to Mary from her cousin, novelist Mary Johnston (1870-1936); family letters of John Francis McMullen II (d. 1944), an engineer; letters of Benedict Dysart McMullen, writer, while serving with the American Red Cross in Europe during World War I; correspondence of Joseph Benjamin McMullen (d. 1965), inventor, concerning his many inventions, including aerial "drop" bombs during World War I, automobile accessories, kitchen utensils, household gadgets, and pressure and pull firing devices and collapsible vehicles during World War II; and papers relating to the settlement of a disputed legacy left Mary McMullen by Jane Riggs and correspondence concerning the sale of much of the inheritance. Also included are papers relating to the estates of the various members of the McMullen family; invention papers consisting of patents and descriptions of the work of John McMullen and Joseph B. McMullen; bills and receipts; lists of library books and Catholic publications purchased; manuscripts of William Hand Browne, John Bannister Tabb, Mary McMullen, and Dysart McMullen; and miscellaneous reports, certificates, and invitations from the many schools the McMullens attended.

Volumes consist of various business books of John McMullen and John Francis McMullen; subscription for the Catholic Church of Sinking Valley, 1830s; volumes of Joseph B. McMullen concerning his inventions; notebooks of writings and clippings of Mary McMullen and Dyeart McMullen; album of snapshots of their home, "Woodley," near Ellicott City, Maryland; and notebooks of Nicketti McMullen containing copies of old letters and data. There are also photographs of various members of the McMullen family and of homes at Wytheville, Thorn Springs, and Ellicott City.

collection icon
Minnie Bruce Pratt was born in Selma, Alabama in 1946 and raised in nearby Centreville. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa and a doctorate in English Literature from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. An award-winning poet, Pratt has published collections of both poetry and essays. Pratt began teaching and grass roots organizing in North Carolina in the 1970s, and has continued her work as a professor and activist through 2008, the time of this writing. Pratt frequently makes speaking appearances at conferences and universities across the United States. Pratt has two sons, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, from her marriage (1966-1975). As of 2008, Pratt resides with longtime partner, transgender activist and author Leslie Feinberg. The collection dates primarily between 1975 and 2005 and focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. A Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Major works represented are Pratt's poetry and essay collections The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, and The Dirt She Ate. Other series in the collection are Correspondence; Family, consisting of early correspondence, mementos, photographs, and genealogical information; Activism, files of newspaper clippings, fliers, and correspondence related to Pratt's grass roots organizing; Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera. Notable correspondents include Mumia Abu-Jamal, Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers contain materials dating from the 1870s to 2005, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1975 and 2005. Materials in the collection document Pratt's work as a teacher, poet, writer, and activist. Specifically, the collection focuses on women's studies, sexual and gender identity, sexuality, and Pratt's fight against racism, sexism, imperialism and other forms of intolerance. The collection is organized into ten series: Writing, Correspondence, Family, Activism, Teaching, Financial, Photographs, Audiovisual Material, Printed Material, and Ephemera.

The Writing Series comprises drafts, proofs, and galleys related to Pratt's major works through 2003, as well as materials related to shorter pieces by Pratt, reviews, print interviews, materials related to Pratt's editorial work, and personal journals. The series also contains materials pertaining to the outside funding from grants and speaking appearances that Pratt obtained to support herself as a writer. Subseries include: Journals, The Sound of One Fork, We Say We Love Each Other, Crime Against Nature, Rebellion: Essays 1980-1991, S/HE, Walking Back Up Depot Street, The Dirt She Ate, Feminary, Workers World, Other Writings, Grant Applications, Interviews, Gigs, and Manuscripts by Others.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence Pratt sent and received after 1966, the year of her marriage. Subseries include: Personal Correspondence, Literary Correspondence, and General Correspondence. Notable correspondents include Dorothy Allison, Judith Arcana, Elly Bulkin, Chrystos, Holly Hughes, Audre Lorde, Adrienne Rich, and Mab Segrest.

The Family Series contains materials related to Pratt's childhood and relatives, including legal and business papers, genealogical information, correspondence, mementos, and photographs. The bulk of the material dates to the twentieth century, but a few documents and several photographs date to the nineteenth century. Subseries include Brown-Carr Family, Pratt Family, Minnie Bruce Pratt, Ransom Weaver and Ben Weaver, and Leslie Feinberg.

The Activism Series documents Pratt's work as an activist supporting diversity and fighting intolerance. The series comprises newspaper clippings, fliers, correspondence, and logisitical arrangements pertaining to Pratt's organizing, conference attendances, and personal research. Subseries include: Anti-Ku Klux Klan, Fayetteville, National Endowment for the Arts, and Other Issues.

The Teaching Series documents Pratt's work as an educator at various universities, primarily The Union Institute and Hamilton College. The series comprises course syllabi, materials to supplement teaching, seminar evaluations, contracts, general faculty documents, catalogs, newspaper clippings, and correspondence. The series contains correspondence from Mumia Abu-Jamal during his application process to The Union Institute for graduate studies.

The Financial Series consists of tax returns for the years 1981 to 2004 as well as detailed narratives carefully documenting deductions taken by Pratt related to her writing and teaching career.

The Photographs Series contains photographs documenting events and individuals in Minnie Bruce Pratt's life, with descriptions provided by the donor.

The Audiovisual Material Series contains miscellaneous audiovisual material pertaining to Pratt's speaking engagements, interests, and personal life. The series includes speeches and readings given at gigs, interviews, audio correspondence, programs related to lesbian issues, and instructional materials. Materials are organized into subseries depending on format and include Audio Cassettes, Compact Discs, and Videos. Use copies will need to be created before items can be accessed by researchers. Additionally, interviews are restricted unless permission from the interviewee is obtained.

The Printed Material Series contains periodicals, booklets, printed essays, and chapbooks arranged alphabetically by title. Subjects represented include poetry, women's studies, feminism, lesbianism, and the Ku Klux Klan. A number of periodicals were removed from this collection and added to the Women's and LGBT Movements Periodicals Collection. Minnie Bruce Pratt's personal library comprising several hundred books including her own work and anthologies containing her work have been cataloged separately.

The Ephemera Series comprises miscellaneous items collected by Pratt and chiefly contains t-shirts, buttons, and posters related to Pratt's activism, the conferences and demonstrations she attended, and Feminary. Posters also document Pratt's book relases, speaking appearances, seminars, and courses. Additional items include candlesticks given to Pratt upon her marriage to Marvin Weaver, a birthday coffee mug from Leslie Feinberg, pens with printed logos, a stamp, and a vibrator, and pair of handcuffs given to Pratt by students from Iowa.