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John Jackson McSwain papers, 1910-1941 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — Approx. 6600 Items

Lawyer, Army officer, and U.S. Representative from Greenville, South Carolina. Collection largely consists of letters from McSwain's constituents (1921-1936). Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); Prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain. Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes many speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring.

Collection largely consists of letters from John Jackson McSwain's constituents, dating from 1921 to 1936. Subjects discussed include McSwain's participation in World War I; South Carolina and national politics; South Carolina economic conditions, especially cotton farming and manufacturing; the University of South Carolina and the Citadel (circa 1920-1936); prohibition; New Deal politics and McSwain's changing attitude toward President Roosevelt; McSwain's advocacy of a strong Air Force, and his activities on Congressional committees; and William Randolph Hearst's dislike of McSwain.

The correspondence starts with a few letters from 1910, when McSwain began to take tentative steps towards politics. There are letters relating to Dr. James Woodrow, Sept.2, 1910; and to Woodrow Wilson's campaigns for Governor of New Jersey in 1910 and for the presidency in 1912. There are patronage letters in 1912 and 1913, and a cloth portrait of Woodrow Wilson woven at Clemson College, South Carolina, in 1915.

Other documents refer to McSwain's political office and includes speeches, writings, and printed material, including many clippings and political and military publications. There are also papers relating to Dixon R. Davis, McSwain's private secretary and later postmaster of Greenville, S.C., and Joseph Raleigh Bryson, McSwain's successor in the House of Representatives. Correspondents include Henry H. Arnold, Newton D. Baker, Cole L. Blease, Johnson Hagood, Gabriel Haywood Mahon, Oscar K. Mauldin, Dwight Whitney Morrow, Franklin D. Roosevelt, Charles Pelot Summerall, and Harry Hines Woodring. The latest dates refer to condolences sent following McSwain's death of a heart attack in 1936, and his secretary Dixon Davis's political maneuverings with Joseph Raleigh Bryson following this event.

The digitized cardfiles provide a very detailed discussion of the collection's contents and topics. For access, please consult with a reference archivist.

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Jonathan E. Cox papers, 1885-1938 and undated 30 Linear Feet — Approximately 46,057 Items

Banker and manufacturer of High Point, N.C. May have been a Quaker. The Jonathan E. Cox Papers chiefly consist of the business records of a banker and manufacturer from High Point, North Carolina. Records date from 1885-1938 and include many boxes of business and personal correspondence, chiefly letters to Cox; and a series of manuscript volumes, including journals, daybooks, order books, trial balance books, ledgers, profit-and-loss accounts, bill books, inventory records, rent book, check stubs, mill contracts, a letter book, and an account book of Joseph D. Cox. There are few personal items, but there is some biographical information on Cox's daughter, Clara I. Cox, a Quaker also living in High Point, who was active in civic and humanitarian affairs in that city.

The Jonathan E. Cox Papers chiefly consist of the business records of a banker and manufacturer from High Point, North Carolina. Records date from 1885-1938 and include many boxes of business and personal correspondence, chiefly to Cox from suppliers, builders, creditors, and manufacturers; and a series of manuscript volumes, including journals, daybooks, order books, trial balance books, ledgers, profit-and-loss accounts, bill books, inventory records, rent book, check stubs, mill contracts, a letter book, and an account book of Joseph D. Cox. Business topics in the manuscripts and correspondence include banks and banking, insurance, textile industry, lumber trade, shipping, and the mercantile business. There are few personal items, but there is some biographical information on Cox's daughter, Clara I. Cox, a Quaker also living in High Point, who was active in civic and humanitarian affairs in that city. There is significant political correspondence, chiefly for 1908, when Cox was an unsuccessful candidate on the Republican ticket for governor of North Carolina. Among other subjects represented are universities and colleges (Guilford and Peabody, later part of Vanderbilt University), North Carolina roads, and American participation in World War I. Records are arranged in chronological order with the exception of the last three boxes, which contain the earliest material. Manuscript volumes are housed separately.

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Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Another features a memorial portrait of Secretary of State John Hay (d. 1905). The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography, probably in secondary schools and colleges. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Titles were transcribed from the originals as assigned by the Keystone Company.

Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, China, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Other images include a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913, a memorial portrait of John Hay, Secretary of State (died in 1905), the ship U.S.S. Maine, the "Rough Riders," and a portrait of the American Consul in Cuba. The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.