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Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

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Collection consists of a 44-page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, that documents the history of Fort Des Moines as a Women's Army Corps training center, and more specifically the 404th Women's Army Corps (WAC) band, the first African American female band in the United States military. In addition to the approximately 100 photographs, there are photographic postcards, and clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The scrapbook begins with a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from 8 December 1941, followed by a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings and photo postcards documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The second half of the scrapbook documents the African American women's band, with photographs showing the women in and out of uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Scenes include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and band members enjoying off-duty pastimes. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of a forty-four page scrapbook belonging to an unidentified compiler, documenting the history of Fort Des Moines, Iowa, as a Women's Army Corps (WAC) training center, and the 404th Women's Army Corps band, the first African American female band in the United States military. The scrapbook contains 100 photographs, all but one black-and-white, ranging in size from 2 x 3 inches to 7 1/2 x 8 3/4 inches. The creator also included photographic postcards as well as clippings from official Fort Des Moines publications. The covers for the scrapbook are missing.

The first page contains a photograph of the front page of the Honolulu Star-Bulletin from December 8, 1941. The following early pages provide a short history of Fort Des Moines, with clippings documenting its conversion to the first Women's Army Auxiliary Corps training center. The clippings are augmented by photo postcards depicting the grounds, along with one showing a woman blowing a bugle into a oversize megaphone.

Documentation of the African American women's band begins on page 21, with a group portrait. Other photographs show the women in uniform; many of the photographs are signed or are otherwise identified in ink. Images include the practice room, women marching with instruments, and off-duty band members relaxing, riding bicycles, traveling together, preparing for sleep, or playing with pets. There are at least two photographs of Major Charity Adams Earley, the first commissioned African American WAC.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.