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Collection

Frank W. Gardner letters, 1938-1947 0.2 Linear Feet — 150 Items

Frank W. Gardner served in the U. S. Army during World War II and was killed in action in Lorraine, France, in 1944. The collection consists primarily of handwritten letters Frank W. Gardner sent home to his wife, Jennie, between 1941 and 1944, during his military service in World War II. Also present are some letters Jennie Gardner mailed to Frank around the time of his death, which document her life on the home front in Arlington, Mass. The collection also contains some letters from the United States War Department, greeting cards, postcards, and photographs. Materials range in date from 1938 to 1947.

The collection consists primarily of handwritten letters Frank W. Gardner sent home to his wife, Jennie, between 1941 and 1944, during his military service in World War II. These frequent letters detail Gardner's day-to-day life in the United States Army. His last letter is dated, Nov. 8, 1944. The letters Jennie Gardner mailed to Frank around the time of his death were marked "Deceased" and returned by the postmaster. These are present in the collection and document Jennie's life on the home front in Arlington, Mass. during 1944. There are also some letters Jennie Gardner received from the United States War Department notifying her of her husband's death. In addition, the collection features some unidentified snapshots, as well as negatives of a military portrait of Frank Gardner.

Collection
Papers of Kindred Avin Ritchie, a sergeant in the US Army Postal Regulating Section in Europe during World War II. The Kindred Avin Ritchie Papers span the years 1939 to 1977, with the bulk of the collection dated between 1943 and 1945. The papers are primarily comprised of correspondence, particularly between Kindred Avin (K.A.) Ritchie and his wife, Sara Meda Henderson (S.M.) Ritchie, while he was serving in the U.S. Army Postal Service during World War II in various locations in the United States and Europe, primarily in France and England. Smaller amounts of materials also were sent from Belgium, the Netherlands, and Germany. Exchanges between K.A. and S.M. Ritchie include candid comments about marriage and sexuality, and references to Army censorship and the scarcity of goods on both sides of the Atlantic. Correspondence from S.M. Ritchie and other family and friends, including K.A. Ritchie's mother Mittie Hahn (M.H.) Ritchie, give a sense of some of the ways in which the war affected those at home. Photographs, programs and playbills, Nazi memorabilia, and other ephemera are included with much of the correspondence.

The Kindred Avin Ritchie Papers span the years 1939 to 1977, with the bulk of the collection dating between 1943 and 1945, and are organized into the Correspondence, Ephemera, Legal, Medical, and Financial Papers, and Photographic Materials Series. The papers are primarily comprised of correspondence, particularly between Kindred Avin (K.A.) Ritchie and his wife, Sara Meda Henderson (S.M.) Ritchie while he was serving the U.S. Army in various locations in the United States and Europe. Playbills and programs, photographs, Nazi memorabilia, and other ephemera are included with much of the correspondence. Additional materials sent to K.A. Ritchie by his mother Mittie Hahn (M.H.) Ritchie and other family and friends make up the rest of the correspondence. Small amounts of financial, legal, and medical papers, photographic material, and miscellaneous ephemera complete the collection. The volume and frequency of correspondence between Kindred Ritchie and Sara Ritchie provide an unusually full portrait of the perspectives and concerns of a married couple separated during wartime. Correspondence from K.A. Ritchie chronicles his leisure activities as well as his encounters with local non-military personnel primarily in England and France, but also in the Netherlands, Belgium, and Germany. Due to military censorship, K.A. Ritchie's letters do not include many direct details about the fighting in Europe. Exchanges between K.A. and S.M. Ritchie include candid comments about marriage and sexuality, and references to Army censorship and the scarcity of goods on both sides of the Atlantic. Correspondence from S.M. Ritchie and other family and friends give a sense of some of the ways in which the war affected those at home.

Collection

Lillian Dimmick Scrapbook, 1942-1947 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Dimmick was a homemaker in Jefferson, Massachusetts. Scrapbook featuring clippings, recipes, check stubs, letters, telegrams, and other material documenting Dimmick's winnings in recipe and music trivia contests.

Scrapbook (07/049; 48 pp.) created by Lillian Dimmick features newspaper clippings, recipes, check stubs, letters, telegrams, and other material documenting her winnings in recipe and music trivia contests sponsored by local news media. Dimmick entered many of the recipe contests using the name "Cousin Michelina." Some war-time recipes feature meat substitutes and other rationed food saving techniques. Prizes included money and theater tickets. In 1946, Dimmick entered a contest sponsored by Robin Hood Flour and won a Frigidaire refrigerator. The scrapbook also contains a photograph of her son Howard with a poem she wrote for him, as well as a radio play entitled, "The Wishing Well." Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection
Roy C. Trimiar was an African-American U.S. Army veteran, who served as a private in the Q.M. Det. SC-CASC, Colored, and the Ser. Det. SC-4th, Colored, 1942-1943. He was born in Homer, Georgia and lived much of his life in Cooleemee, North Carolina. He was married to Lola Wood Trimiar (1909-1996). Collection primarily includes letters from Trimiar to his wife in Cooleemee and Mocksville, NC (89 items). The letters begin with their courtship (1939) in Cooleemee, but mainly date from Trimiar's service in the U.S. Army Colored Troops stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., and Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.

Collection primarily includes letters from Trimiar to his wife, Lola Wood Trimiar, in Cooleemee and Mocksville, NC (89 items). The letters begin with their courtship (1939) in Cooleemee, but mainly date from Trimiar's service in the U.S. Army Colored Troops stationed at Fort Bragg, N.C., and Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. Topics include army life; his jobs; Sunday services; trips to town; concerns about money and (apparently late) payment of wages; opinions of the Japanese; hopes for a discharge because of his age; and strategies to avoid racism. The letters also demonstrate his concern for his wife and their home, including support for her social activities and worry over tight finances, food rationing, and her safety. Includes letters to Trimiar from Lola (17 items) and other friends, receipts, business correspondence, and his draft letter. Acquired as part of the George Washington Flowers Collection of Southern Americana.

Collection
Online
Collection consists of ration coupons, stickers, permits, and certificates for tires, bicycles, typewriters, sugar, shoes, fuel oil, gasoline, and food which were issued by the Office of Price Administration between 1942-1946. There are duplicates for a few items.