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Start Over You searched for: Collection Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers, bulk 1766-1845 and undated Remove constraint Collection: Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers, bulk 1766-1845 and undated Online Access Available Online Remove constraint Online Access: Available Online

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The majority of the 136 letters in the series were composed by Benjamin Rush, and letters he wrote to Julia during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia form a substantial part of the series. Main topics in the letters include Rush family matters, medical treatments for a wide variety of medical issues, American politics, and the country's relations with European nations. Other topics include mental illness and its treatment, the medical department in the Continental Army, the impact of epidemics upon commerce internationally, reading habits, parenting, and capital punishment.

Among the prominent correspondents who wrote one or more personal or professional letters to Rush or his wife are Abigail Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Thomas Paine, and George Washington. Letters from others to Julia Rush seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family, and offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Included are several manuscript copies Benjamin Rush made of individual letters he penned.

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Box 1, Folder 2
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Adams writes regarding his presenting a copy of Rush's "Medical Inquiries and Observations" to the Emperor of Russia, who is sending Rush a ring in thanks.

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Box 1, Folder 3
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Dickinson writes that he has read with pleasure Rush's essay on female education. He requests Rush's help with another project, "to prepare the public Mind for receiving…the proceedings of the Convention."

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Box 1, Folder 3
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Dickinson writes that he has purchased and perused all the doctor's works and requests his help in diagnosing and treating a child that is in excruciating pain.

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Box 1, Folder 4
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Gates indicates that he will try the remedies Rush suggested. He believes that England is likely to become a despotism, and notes that there is a rumor in New York City that England will defeat America's treaty with France regarding Louisiana.

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Box 1, Folder 5
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Greene writes of his support for Rush's recommendations regarding best methods for preserving the health of the Army. He suggests they print a pamphlet on the topic, to make adoption of the recommendations more likely. He comments on Congress' regulation of hospitals.

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Box 1, Folder 6
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Henderson replies to Rush's letter regarding the debts of a Mr. Carter, assuring Rush that he is in error, all costs for the preparation of coffin and grave have been paid.