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Start Over You searched for: Collection History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s Remove constraint Collection: History of Medicine artifacts collection, 1550-1980s Online Access Available Online Remove constraint Online Access: Available Online

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Artifact-box 160, Item hander0002
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Zeiss compound monocular microscope with mechanical stage. Signed: Carl Zeiss, Jena, No. 41871. Brass and black laquer on a cast-iron base. This microscope has the jug handle design which was introduced in 1898. Basically a hand grip was added to the limb of the microscope; at its best, the handle was integrated and sleek. The style did not last long and ended before 1920. White lettering on the cast-iron horseshoe base indicates the microscope once belonged to Dr. Frederic Moir Hanes, chair of the Department of Medicine.

Dr. Carl Zeiss founded a business in Jena, Germany and began making microscopes in 1847. His was the dominant optical firm in the world from the beginning of the 20th century through 1945 when it was seperated into two firms following partition of Germany after World War II. Many firms have been associated with the Zeiss firm and have produced Zeiss products under license or as partners. Bausch & Lomb, which originated in Rochester, NY in 1853, was among those.

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Artifact-box 202, Item hander0004
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11 pairs of eyeglasses and spectacles: 1. "Harlequin" style with rhinestone frames. 1950s. 2. Spectacles, wire-rimmed 3. Spectacles, wire-rimmed 4. Pince-nez spectacles; round glass, silver frame. With case. 5. Bifocals; oval glass, gold frames. With case. 6. Pince-nez spectacles; oval glass, no frame, chain missing. With case. 7. Reverse half glasses (distance only); silver frame. With case. 8. Spectacles; round glass, silver frame with incised design. With case. 9. Bifocals; round glass, no frame, silver chain with hook. With case. 10. Pince-nez spectacles; oval glass, no frame, chain missing. With case. 11. Pince-nez spectacles; round glass, gold frame. With case.

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Artifact-box 196, Item hander0005
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Cornealschalen fur Lichtkoagulator. Ten glass lenses in wooden case.

Contact lenses were delivered with Duke Medical Center's first light coagulator (1950s?). Doris Duke donated the money for it. The machine was invented by Gerd Meyer Schwickernath.

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Artifact-box 199, Item hander0006
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Ophthalmology instruments: four ivory handled instruments, marked Tiemann. Two stainless steel handled instruments, marked Germany: KNY-Scheerer. Wooden case with Tiemann label. New York: George Tiemann & Co. Instruments are from several different date ranges. George Tiemann & Co. has supplied surgical instruments since 1826.

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Artifact-box 152, Item hbeyer0001
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Compound monocular. Unsigned. Brass with wooden carrying case. The microscope attaches to a brass fitting on the top of the case which then acts as a base. Accessories included are brass opticals, a bull's-eye condenser, and ivory specimen slides.

In the 18th century there was a demand for microscopes which could be kept in a small space and carried into the field. The "pack-away" microscope reached its heyday between 1790 and 1830. Such instruments were made for the amateur market since no serious microscopist would want to keep dismantling his instrument. The Cary-type microscope came in a limited variety of sizes. This is one of the larger versions.