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DoubleTake records, 1908-1999, bulk 1994-1999 53.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 58,872 Items

The DoubleTake magazine records contain story manuscripts with editor's markings, correspondence, photographs and slides, and production files for issue numbers 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection holds story manuscripts (with editor's marks), correspondence, and production files for issues 1-16, 1994-1999. Files of editors Jay Woodruff, Rob Odom, and other editors contain correspondence with writers whose work they were interested in publishing and editing. There are postcards and transparencies used in various issues; and a complete run of the magazine through spring 1999. There are two unidentified files.

Later accessions include production files and correspondence between the magazine's editors and its contributors, also covering issues 1-16.

Accession 2010-0081 includes photographer name files, dating from 1993 (pre-production) through 1998, kept by Alex Harris and other DoubleTake staff. Files were created whenever a photographer corresponded with the magazine, and include copies of correspondence between editors and photographers, slides of sample work, contracts for those who were accepted as contributors, and occasional biographies or other information about the photographer. Some files represent a particular museum's exhibit rather than a personal photographer; these are designated with exhibit titles instead of a photographer's name.

Files are organized alphabetically, and include correspondence from well before the magazine began publication, as well as materials post-dating Harris's departure from the magazine.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Another features a memorial portrait of Secretary of State John Hay (d. 1905). The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Set of 96 black-and-white glass lantern slides used in the United States for the teaching of history and geography, probably in secondary schools and colleges. All of the slides except one were published by the Keystone View Company of Meadville, Pennsylvania. The 97th slide is a clear film transparency of a map of Germany following World War I, published by the Excelsior Illustration Company. Titles were transcribed from the originals as assigned by the Keystone Company.

Images include well-known United States historic sites; landmarks in colonial cities such as Williamsburg and Boston; views and cultural scenes from the Middle East, China, Japan, Hawaii, Korea, and the Philippines; a set of Japanese and Western wedding scenes; and a few images of U.S. troops taken during the Mexican, Cuban and Philippine conflicts and in World War I. One slide shows the ruins of Belleau, France, circa 1918. Other images include a U.S. suffragists' parade in 1913, a memorial portrait of John Hay, Secretary of State (died in 1905), the ship U.S.S. Maine, the "Rough Riders," and a portrait of the American Consul in Cuba. The slides all measure 4 x 3.25 inches. They are accompanied by two booklets with detailed narrative entries for most of the slides.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.