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Helen Paterson Allingham papers, 1868-1916, 2015 3.6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 11 items

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items. The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte de visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items.

The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte-de-visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

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American Women's Voluntary Services enamel pin, 1940s 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises an pin with the text "American Women's Voluntary Services" on a background of red, white, and blue enamel. The back of the pin is marked "Bastian Brothers Co, Rochester, N.Y."
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Elizabeth Arden letter to Mrs. Hyatt, 1926 June 26 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Elizabeth Arden was a pioneering cosmetics entrepreneur. In this letter, she writes to advise a potential customer on matters relating to health and beauty. Arden advises her to get plenty of rest, eat a balanced diet, and to use products from Arden's Venetian line in order to soothe her chapped hands. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter dated 1926 June 26 written by Elizabeth Arden to a Mrs. Hyatt, who had contacted her for advice after hearing her speak on the radio. Arden writes, "I know that where one is a busy housewife and has many duties in a country home, it is hard to get rest and relaxation. Perhaps you are of the naturally alert, quick, nervous type and use up a lot of energy everyday." Arden advises her to "get a little rest period at least once a day and relax in a quiet room or take a soothing, warm bath and a little nap," as well as to eat a healthy diet. She goes on to recommend products in her Venetian Preparations line that will soothe chapped hands, and encloses her booklet "The Quest of the Beautiful." On letterhead stationery from 673 Fifth Avenue embossed with the Venetian trademark.

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Anna Letitia Barbauld and William Allen poems, 1823 August 23-30 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Anna Letitia Barbauld was an English woman of letters who had great professional success at a time when women writers were still something of an anomaly. She is remembered for her poetry, children's literature, essays, criticism, and editorial works. She was rediscovered when feminist literary critics examined her place in British literary history. Barbauld was also an abolitionist, something she had in common with fellow educator and Stoke Newington resident William Allen. This item is a single small sheet of paper with an autograph manuscript poem by Barbauld on the front dated August 23, 1823, and another one on the back by William Allen dated August 30, 1823. Both poems were aimed at a juvenile audience. It is likely that their common interests and close proximity led them to develop a friendship. Although this was written towards the end of Barbauld's life, it is evidence that they still had at least an epistolary relationship in 1823.

Collection consists of a single piece of paper (20 x 12.5 cm) with an autograph manuscript poem by Anna Letitia Barbauld on the front and a poem called "Follow Me" by William Allen on the back. Barbauld's poem reads as follows: Born to the weighty honours of a name/Whose deeds of mercy England's shores proclaim/Yet know, you may inherit lands or pelf/But must, for praise - for love, be good yourself. It's signed A.L. Barbauld and dated August 23rd 1823. The verso contains a two-stanza autograph manuscript devotional poem by William Allen titled "Follow Me." It is signed Stoke Newington 30 of 8th month 1823. Barbauld and Allen were both educators and abolitionists who lived in Stoke Newington at the time of this writing. These poems are evidence that they had at least an epistolary friendship.

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British women's suffrage societies broadsides and handbills, 1898-1911 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 14 items

Collection contains fourteen broadsides and handbills from British women's suffrage societies, primarily the National Union of Women's Suffrage Societies, but including the Conservative and Unionist Women's Franchise Association and the London Society for Women's Suffrage, as well as one handbill from the Cambridge Daily News. Two broadsides announce suffragist marches, including one in support of women's military service during World War I. Several handbills provide general information on women's suffrage and suffrage societies, others are intended for specific audiences, including working and affluent women. Other topics include protests against use of violence in the suffragist cause, the Conciliation Bill for Women's Suffrage, and positions of various elected officials on the issue. The back of one broadside holds a handwritten excerpt from an unrelated drama.
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Letter and memorial items for Emily Wilding Davison, 1913 0.1 Linear Feet — 5 items

Collection comprises a letter written by "Nonia" on June 16, 1913, regarding how she managed to obtain the Emily Wilding Davison memorial items, including a bulletin for the memorial service, an official program for the funeral procession, and a memorial card. Nonia was likely an upper class woman, for Princess Alice of Teck assisted her in collecting the items; the princess was afraid they would be considered suffragettes. The collection also holds a transcription for the letter.
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Lydia Becker letter and obituary, 1890 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises an undated letter Becker wrote to Lady [Downing?] regarding the fate of an unnamed bill before the House of Lords. She mentions that "... we have done what we could to bring a strong body of earnest, intelligent, feminine opinion to bear on the Peers." She then requests help finding accommodations for upcoming meetings in Exeter. Pasted to the letter, probably dated 1890, is a copy of Becker's obituary.
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Mathilde Blind letter, circa 1889-1896 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Mathilde Blind was a writer and feminist active in late 19th century England. This letter was written by Blind thanking a correspondent for sending her a newspaper clipping containing a review of her work. She expresses gratitude for his thoughtfulness and for his "sympathetic spirit" towards her work.

The collection comprises a single autograph manuscript letter on a single folded sheet of paper with text on three sides dated June 19, but lacking a year. The manuscript address given at the top of the first page reads: Holly Cottage, The Mount, Hampstead, London, N.W. In the letter, Mathilde Blind writes to thank an unknown male correspondent for sending her a clipping from the Liverpool Mercury containing a review of one of her works. Blind writes, "Sitting here this evening, somewhat tired, somewhat despondent, there comes to me your letter. I cannot tell you how it cheered and strengthened me. There is something profoundly stirring in the thought that far away, among the great unknown multitude of one's fellow beings, there are people who have entered into one's work with a kindly sympathetic spirit."

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Nadia Boulanger note to R.I., 1963 October 6 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a single autograph manuscript note dated 1963 with a Paris return address from the conductor and composer Nadia Boulanger to her friend "R.I." Boulanger inquires after his recent illness and encourages him to carry on his work in the future. The note's recipient is likely the composer Robert Irving.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note (dated 1963 October 6) from the French composer and conductor Nadia Boulanger to a sick friend identified as "R.I." It's likely that the recipient was the conductor Robert Irving. Boulanger inquires as to what advice he's received from his doctors, and mentions her own recent illness. She says that her faith has "brought moral relief to the physical suffering." She asks after his plans and hopes for the future, "in spite of all that makes regular work so difficult." Boulanger writes her address at the bottom of the note: 35 Rue Ballu, Paris IX.

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Margaret Bourke-White note to Mort Weisinger, 1946 December 14 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Photographer Margaret Bourke-White writes to comic book editor Mort Weisinger commenting that she likes a story and that "it ought to be swell with the cartoons." The note likely refers to a comic book about Bourke-White published in 1947.

Collection comprises a single autograph manuscript note (dated 1946 December 14) on letterhead stationery from the Ambassador Hotel, Chicago. Photographer Margaret Bourke-White writes to the comic book editor Mort Weisinger, "It's a good story and I like it very much. Ought to be swell with the cartoons." Bourke-White likely refers to a comic book about her life published in 1947.

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Vera Brittain letter to John Middleton Murry, 1946 September 13 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Vera Brittain was an English writer and pacifist activist best known for her World War I memoir Testament of Youth. The Vera Brittain letter to critia and editor John Middleton Murry concerns matters relating to the publishing and financing of Murry's literary, socialist, and pacifist magazine The Adelphi. Brittain also writes of her pacifism as it relates to concerns about nuclear warfare in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Consists of a single typescript letter from Brittain to the critic and editor John Middleton Murry dated September 13, 1946. Single-page, with text on front and back written on letterhead reading "2 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea S.W.3." Brittain comments on the revival of Murry's The Adelphi, and on strategies to finance such literary magazines. The second part of the letter discusses her opinions on methods of pacifist activism, particuarly as related to nuclear war. The postscript discusses the forthcoming publication of John Hersey's 1946 book Hiroshima. She comments, "If only the world could read it, the 'next war' would move much further off." It is signed "Vera."

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Pearl S. Buck letter to Frances Perkins, 1939 May 24 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Pearl S. Buck was an American writer best known for her depictions of rural Chinese life. Her bestselling novel The Good Earth was awarded the Pulizer Prize, and she was the first woman to win the Nobel Prize in Literature (1938). This letter is written by Buck to Frances Perkins, then Franklin D. Roosevelt's Secretary of Labor, the first woman to hold a cabinet post. Buck thanks Perkins for congratulating her on winning the Nobel Prize. She writes that the award, "was given as much to America and China as it was to me."

The collection consists of a single autograph typescript letter from the author Pearl S. Buck to the U.S. Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins. Perkins had written to Buck to congratulate her for winning the Nobel Prize in Literature for 1938. Buck responds, "It is very kind of you indeed to write me as you have about the Nobel Prize. It adds a great deal to the pleasure of this award, which I cannot but feel was given as much to America and China as it was to me." Buck's return address is given as "209 The Manor, 333 E. 43rd Street, New York City."

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May Byron letter to Rev. Edwin J. Matthews, 1932 August 23 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

May Byron was a prolific British author best known for her children's books including a series of biographies and abridgements of J. M. Barrie's Peter Pan. In this letter, she responds to Rev. Edwin J. Matthews' request for the most important life lesson she's learned and for a list of her publications. Byron responds that she couldn't possibly sum up her life's experiences into one lesson, and that she can't provide a list of her publications because she's lost track of them. She does note that most of her children's books are still in print and have "been going on selling for some 20 years."

Collection consists of a single autograph manuscript letter written by May Byron to Reverend Edwin J. Matthews. Byron's return address is "c/o British Weekly" and Matthews' address is "The Rectory, Calstone, Calne, Wiltshire." Matthews had written to ask Byron, "the one lesson which has been most impressed upon me by my life's experiences." Byron replies, "These experiences have been so wide, so varied, and in several respects so unique that I could not possibly sum up their results in one lesson." Matthews had also asked Byron for a list of her writings, and she replies that she's unable to do so because she's lost track of them. She states that both the British Museum and the Library of Congress had asked her for a similar list, and she was unable to help them, in part because of her use of pseudonyms, and also because of her many years' work as a journalist. She concludes by stating that most all her writings are currently out of print, except for her children's books, "which have been going on selling for some 20 years."

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Sarah J. Ewing diary, 1868 December 17-1869 July 17 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a diary (49 pages) Sarah Ewing maintained in ink, focusing on the domestic abuse she suffered from her husband, including verbal and physical abuse. One entry also records her husband's arrest for an assault that took place outside the home. By the end of the diary, Sarah has left her husband in fear for her safety, taking with her the baby. After visiting the house in order to retrieve more clothing, she ends the diary with a note that she is not a thief, "I had never in my life before removed or taken away from H.H. [Haydon House] any articles of clothing or jewelry of any sort." Marginal notes made by an unidentified writer in pencil indicate that the diary may have been used in legal or other proceedings on her behalf.
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Dr. J. H. Fairfax certificate, 1831 February 21 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a certificate written by Fairfax stating that he examined Alsy (Alice), who was a slave being hired out to Charles Mothershead in Westmoreland Co., Va. He found that she had procidentia uteri (her entire uterus was outside the vagina), which caused her to be unable to work. He added, "She may be made useful by the application of an instrument properly adjusted, to keep the part from coming down."
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Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams, 1843 May 8 1 item — 1 folder

Sophia Foord was a 19th century teacher in Massachusetts who was involved with the abolitionist, utopian socialist, and feminist movements. The Sophia Foord letter to Robert Adams mainly concerns the Northampton Association of Education and Industry, a utopian socialist community.

Three-page letter from Sophia Foord of Northampton, MA to Robert Adams of Pawtucket, RI regarding the Northampton Association of Education and Industry. Abolitionists Lydia Maria Child and William Lloyd Garrison are also mentioned, as is the Underground Railroad. A section is missing from the top of the first leaf, affecting text on the second page.

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Julia Ellsworth Ford letter to Helen Hoke, 1935 October 16 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Children's book author and socialite Julia Ellsworth Ford writes to fellow children's book writer Helen Hoke offering an introduction to the Yeats family while Hoke is in Dublin. Ford particularly wishes Hoke to meet Elizabeth Yeats because of her printing work with the Cuala Press. She writes that she considers William Butler Yeats the greatest poetic genius to emerge from England and Ireland in the 20th century, but that it will be difficult to meet him because he "is more or less a recluse because of writing all the time."

Collection consists of a single two-page autograph typescript letter on letterhead stationery dated 1935 October 16 with manuscript postscript. Julia Ellsworth Ford writes to Helen Hoke offering an introduction to members of the Yeats family while Hoke is in Dublin that winter. Ford particularly wants Helen to meet Elizabeth Yeats because of her work printing with the Cuala Press; Ford owns a complete set of their books. Ford writes that she had hosted the father, John Butler Yeats, in New York, where he stayed until his death in 1922. If Hoke wishes to meet William Butler in Ireland, she should ask Elizabeth, but that he "is more or less of a recluse because of writing all the time."

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Margaret Fuller letter, 1840 December 14 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Margaret Fuller was a teacher, journalist, and critic. Collection comprises a letter (1840 December 14) Margaret Fuller wrote to her uncle to request a meeting to review her mother's letter.

Collection comprises a letter (1840 December 14) Margaret Fuller wrote to her uncle to request a meeting to review her mother's letter.

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Isabella S. Gardner diary, 1852-1874 and undated 0.6 lin. ft. Linear Feet — 8 items

Collection comprises a printed 1853 "West of England Pocket Book or Gentleman's Diary with an almanack" presented to Isabella Gardner by her husband in 1852. Gardner filled the volume with routine diary entries, usually briefly mentioning the weather and the health of family members, whether they were any visitors, along with any travel or activities and with whom the family took tea or had dinner. More unusual entries have to do with a tooth extraction, the birth of Frank, and a fire at their home. Entries became less frequent from October to December 1853. Also, several pages list household accounts and amounts paid, usually for food and servant salaries. Several items post-dating the diary were laid-in, including four brief letters to and from family members, a recipe for a throat tonic, a note with dates of ancestors, and a religious flier. A child later made drawings in available spaces on pages of the diary.
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Sarah J. Hale letter to Mathew Carey, 1823 March 9 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection comprises a letter from the 19th century writer and editor Sarah J. Hale to the prominent Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey thanking him for his contribution to Hale's charity benefiting Boston seamen.

The collection consists of a single signed autograph letter with text on one side from Sarah J. Hale to the Philadelphia publisher Mathew Carey. Hale thanks Carey for his subscription to her charity, the Seaman's Aid Society and Mariner's House of Boston for the year 1822-1823. Hale also inquires about local interest in a Philadelphia organization that teaches needlework as a means of economic empowerment to poor women.