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Consists of approximately 50 posters the bulk of which consist of corporate promotions depicting notable African Americans or significant moments in African American history and culture. Posters include biographical sketches of African American writers, scientists, professional athletes, soldiers, civil rights workers and celebrity entertainers. Participating companies include Anheuser-Busch (Budweiser), Army National Guard, CIBA-GEIGY, Columbia Artists Management, Federal Home Loan Bank, Honeywell, Nabisco and Pepsi. Also included in the collection are a number of promotional posters produced by and for the NAACP that address the organization's campaigns to reduce poverty, school dropouts and voter registration, as well as calls to join the NAACP. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture and the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.
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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

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Alonzo Reed letters, 1864-1866 0.1 Linear Feet — 21 items — 21 items

Union soldier in the 102nd Regiment Infantry, U.S. Colored Troops. Collection consists of 21 personal letters of Alonzo Reed written while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Reed seems to have written some of the letters himself, while others were written for him by friends; all are addressed to his mother. He seems to have been in a camp in Detroit, Michigan, then was stationed in Hilton Head, S.C. in the summer of 1864; he remained there until 1865, when he was sent to Charleston, S.C., and then to Savannah, Georgia, and back to eastern S.C. for the duration. The letters indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, but also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations. Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, and life as a soldier in the midst of war. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.

Collection consists entirely of 21 personal letters from an African American Union soldier, Alonzo Reed, written to his mother while stationed in South Carolina during the latter part of the Civil War. Some of the letters were written by Reed, some by other individuals, and indicate that Reed's regiment was often on picket duty, though they also provide some descriptions of warfare and the ransacking of plantations during marches. A brief sketch of the letters is also included in the collection folder.

Reed, who was nearly illiterate, provides brief insights into daily camp life in terms of references of illnesses, hunger, not being paid for many months, life as a soldier in the midst of war, and the desire to have news, photos, and writing supplies from home. Reed occasionally refers to the reception they received from both whites and blacks in the South. He also writes about fixing railroad supply lines and utilizing surrendered Confederate soldiers to aid in this work. In November 1864, he inquires as to whether African American men are being allowed to vote in the North and indicates that they are in the South. Arranged in chronological order.

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American slavery documents collection, 1757-1924 and undated 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder

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Collection of manuscript items relating to American slavery assembled over a number of decades by the staff of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Collection contains items documenting the sales, escapes, and emancipations of enslaved people from colonial times through the Civil War, and to a lesser extent, materials relating to slavery in the United States dating from the post-emancipation period.

The collection brings to light details of the lives and deaths of enslaved and free Africans and African Americans in the southern United States, primarily in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, but also in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. There are also six albumen studio portrait photographs, mounted on card stock, dating from the second half of the 19th century, along with a copper token from the American Colonization Society, dated 1833.

Items have been foldered individually, with the inventory reflecting their titles, geographic origin, and date (if known).

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Collection consists of 60 small black-and-white photographs dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, belonging to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist and activist who traveled extensively and lived in West Africa, where most if not all of these images originated. The majority of the images are portraits of Amy Ashwood Garvey's many male and female acquaintances in Africa, who include female friends, politicians, heads of states, lawyers, and students. Other subjects include locales and native inhabitants of Nigeria and other unidentified places; gatherings such as meetings, a funeral, and a public hanging; and street and market scenes. Although there are photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, the majority are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s. The travel snapshots are likely to have been taken by Amy Ashwood Garvey, but there are images that were sent to her by individuals as mementos, and some images of her taken by another unidentified person. Acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, this collection of 60 small black-and-white photographs belonged to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist, activist for African and African American human rights, and first wife of Marcus Garvey. Most of the travel snapshots were likely to have been taken by her, but there are several that were clearly sent to her by individuals, and some that feature Amy Ashwood Garvey and were taken by another person. Although there are some photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, most are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s.

Almost if not all the photographs were taken in Africa, where Garvey traveled and lived after her divorce with Marcus Garvey in 1922. Other locations may include Ghana and Benin. Personal subjects include portraits, candid and formal, of the many male and female friends and acquaintances of Amy Ashwood Garvey, including politicians and heads of state; and native inhabitants, including a portrait of a tribal chief with two women, probably his wives. Most are in Western dress, but some are in traditional clothing. Amy Ashwood Garvey appears in at least three of the prints, and there is a portrait of the President of Liberia, William Tubman, with whom she had a serious long-term relationship. Other images include street and market scenes; school groups; a parade, meetings and ceremonial visits; a public hanging; a funeral gathering; and views of river landings, probably the River Niger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Cleveland Sellers is a veteran civil rights activist who helped lead the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. The Cleveland Sellers Papers consist of SNCC and other Civil Rights-era publications and correspondence, including items from the Holly Springs COFO office and the Virginia Students' Civil Rights Committee.

Collection contains assorted printed materials, publications, correspondence, and clippings related to the activities of SNCC and its affiliates during the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. Materials have been sorted into series: Publications, Correspondence, Holly Springs Project, Virginia Students' Civil Rights Committee, Statements/Press Releases/Flyers, and Subject Files.

Much of the material is ephemeral and scattered; some authors are unknown. There are some items that have evidence of water damage or mold and are in poor physical condition.

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Courtland Cox papers, 1963-2021 and undated 3.0 Linear Feet — .05 Gigabytes

Courtland Cox is a civil rights activist and former member of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and the manager and co-owner of the Drum and Speak Bookstore. The Courtland Cox Papers consist of Drum and Spear materials, materials related to his tenure as the Secretary General of the Sixth Pan-African Congress, as well as subject files.

Collection contains materials related to Cox's management of the Drum and Spear Bookstore and Press, his tenure as the Secretary General of the Sixth Pan-African Congress, and his collected civil rights era subject files.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Daniel A. Collins papers, 1942-1986 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 100 Items

Dr. Daniel Collins was a dentist from South Carolina, and the first African American on the faculty of the School of Dental Science at the University of California at San Francisco. The Daniel A. Collins Papers span the years 1946-1986 and document aspects of the career and life of Collins, politically active Bay Area resident. The collection consists of a few items of correspondence; newspaper clippings about personal friends and family members; copies of his transcripts from UC Berkeley; materials on the history of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and other documents. The papers also house a folder of records from the Cocoa Merchants' Association of America in which Collins was involved through his import business, Beacol Enterprises, Ltd., for which there are also a few records. Photographs from trips to Indonesia and Africa complete the collection. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Daniel A. Collins Papers span the years 1946-1986 and document aspects of the career and life of Collins, politically active Bay Area resident and the first African American on the faculty of the School of Dental Science at the University of California, San Francisco. The collection is arranged alphabetically by folder title or format group, and consists of a few items of correspondence; newspaper clippings about personal friends and family members; copies of his transcripts from Berkeley; materials on the history of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, Collins' 1981 honors program from the Bay Area Urban League, and a few other miscellaneous documents. The collection also houses records from 1956-1961 from the Cocoa Merchants' Association of America in which Collins was involved through his import business, Beacol Enterprises, Ltd., for which there are also a few records. Color snapshots from his 1978 trip to Indonesia and black and white professional photographs taken from his 1960s trips to Africa complete the collection. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Henry Heyliger photograph album of occupied Japan, 1947 .3 Linear Feet — 1 box — 3 items

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Collection comprises an accordion-bound photograph album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger, named numerous times in the album. Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to a few formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing African American soldiers marching, working at the base, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. There are two U.S. photographs, showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, and an Atlantic City postcard. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises a 9 1/4 x 13 inch accordion-bound album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger. His name is found in the album in photograph captions, in an inscription to him on another soldier's portrait, and on a postcard addressed to him.

Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing the men around base, marching, working, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. Also found laid in is a newspaper clipping. A few of the pages are separated from the original bindings.

Included in the album are two snapshots taken in the U.S., showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, as well as an Atlantic City color postcard addressed to Henry Heyliger at a military base in San Francisco (crossed out, with Los Angeles military address added), from "Doris," who is probably the Doris Hensley in a photograph mounted on the same page as a larger color hand-tinted) photograph of Henry Heyliger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.