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Collection

Workers' Defense League records, 1940-1949 0.2 Linear Feet — 38 items

The Workers' Defense League was an American socialist organization devoted to promoting labor rights. Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization.

Collection comprises material mailed by the Workers' Defense League primarily as part of fundraising efforts, particularly on the part of legal cases undertaken by the organization. The main case was that of Odell Waller, a Virginia sharecropper sentenced to death in 1940 for killing his white landlord. Arguing that the landlord had cheated Waller and that he had in any case acted in self-defense, the WDL raised money for Waller's defense, lobbied for the commutation of his sentence, and mounted a nationwide publicity campaign on his behalf. The effort was unsuccessful, and Waller was executed on July 2, 1942. Other cases included Alton Levey, Rosario Chirillo, and Tee Davis; the organization worked in support of federal regulation to repeal poll taxes. Items include brochures on the Waller case, luncheon and dinner invitations, a tear sheet for an advertisement, action alerts, flyer announcing a contest and a mass meeting in New York, and contribution forms with mailing envelopes.

Also includes a fundraising mailer (1946 May 16) related to Tee Davis and sent by Lillian Smith, the author of the novel STRANGE FRUIT. Tee Davis was an African American from Arkansas who was sentenced to ten years in prison for assault with intent to kill. His crime was firing a shotgun towards the bottom of the front door to his home while an intruder tried to break in. The intruder was a white sheriff looking for thieves.

Collection
Since the 1960s, and particularly after the Stonewall uprising of 1969, the modern women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) have produced their own magazines, journals, newspapers, and newsletters as a strategy for unifying and galvanizing their constituencies. These periodicals served to inform movement activists about pertinent actions, news stories, and cultural trends unreported by the mainstream media. The Women's and Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender (LGBT) Periodicals Collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection comprises individual issues of periodicals produced by or reporting on organizations involved in the women's rights and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender rights movements (LGBT) of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. A wide variety of periodical genres are represented here, including literary and art journals, newspapers, organizational newsletters, and popular culture magazines. The periodicals in this collection were donated by individuals, purchased, or separated from manuscript collections. Manuscript collections held by the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library from which periodicals were separated are the Catherine Nicholson Papers; the Dan Kirsch Papers; the Kate Millett Papers; the Irene Peslikis Papers; the Minnie Bruce Pratt Papers; the Margaret McFadden Papers; and the Charis Books and More-Charis Circle Records. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The original collection numbered forty-one boxes. Additions in 2009, 2011 and 2012 expanded the collection.

Collection

"Woman: the World Over": a lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern, 1901 49 items — 1 box; 1 pamphlet binder — 48 glass lantern slides; one printed booklet — Slides measure 3 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches — 48 glass slides; 1 printed booklet.

Online
Collection consists of a commercially produced set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides entitled "Woman: The World Over," published in 1901 by Riley Brothers in Bradford, England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set lists 53 slides in all, and contains detailed lecture-format captions. The women in the portraits represent nations around the world. Subjects include women of different classes; married women and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, with children, and in roles which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. Other slides show women working in agricultural, service, and industrial settings, and gambling and climbing mountains. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters of the Women's Christian Temperance Union. Lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, and changing social norms as the 20th century begins. One slide is black-and-white. All titles are original, as is the slide sequence. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of a nearly complete lecture set of 48 hand-colored glass lantern slides published in England. The original printed booklet accompanying the set bears the full title, "Woman: the world over. A lecture to accompany a series of 54 photographic transparencies for the optical lantern." The price appearing on the booklet is sixpence.

The booklet lists 53 slides in this set, and contains detailed lecture-format captions which would be read aloud as the slides were projected. The series is incomplete: numbers 28, 47, 48, 51, 53, and 54 are not present. Titles are also printed along the mount edges of each slide but are obscured in a few cases by black repair tape. All titles are original, as is the slide order. The titles and lecture script contain historical terms and language that may be offensive to modern-day audiences. The slides measure 3 1/4 inches square (83 x 83 mm).

The slides and lecture notes were originally arranged in six series, retained in this description: Woman in Society; The Domestic Woman; Woman in Subjection; Emancipated Woman; Woman the Breadwinner; and Angelic Woman.

The women in the portraits represent races, cultures and nations around the world, among which British Guiana, China, Iceland, India, Japan, Netherlands, the Philippines, Russia, Switzerland, Tonga, Tunisia, and the U.S. There are portraits of women with high social status, married women, and women in courtship; there are women depicted in their homes, women with children, and in roles of subjugation which the lecture suggests are little more than slaves. A few images include men.

The series "Woman the Breadwinner" includes agricultural, craft, and industrial scenes, and a slide of women nurses attending to patients. The "Emancipated Woman" series includes an actress, a group of nurses, and women mountaineering. There is one slide of the Women's Temple in Chigago, headquarters for the Women's Christian Temperance Union from 1892 to 1926. Titles are present on the edges of most of the glass slide mounts, and are listed in full in the booklet.

The booklet's lecture notes refer to problematic social conditions for women, particularly regarding marriage, as well as changing social norms as the 20th century begins. The series ends with romantic images of ideal women, chiefly through the lens of courtship and beauty. Most of the missing slides are from this group.

The set held by the Rubenstein is numbered 1239 in the lecture booklet. There is no date on either the slides or the booklet, but the Women's Temple in Chigago, completed in 1892, provides the earliest date. A slide entitled "Wife of the Khedive" helps provide the latest date: the Egyptian title "Khedive" was last used in 1914. The Lucerna Magic Lantern Web Resource (viewed online November 8 2017) gives the publisher as the Riley Brothers of Bradford, Yorkshire, England, and the publication date as 1901.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture and the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection

Virginia Woolf's oak writing desk, between 1904-1907 2.5 Linear Feet — 67.4 x 126 x 87.7 cm; 26.5 x 49.5 x 34.5 inches

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath. Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Writing desk at which one would stand, designed and owned by Virginia Woolf. The sloping top of the desk features a central panel in two pieces, with hinges at the top. The panel lifts to reveal a storage compartment underneath.Two drawers are located below the storage area, one on each side of the desk. There are metal pulls on each drawer. The left-hand drawer pull surrounds a flower medalion; the medalion on the right-hand drawer is missing. The drawers and desk top each feature a metal lock, but no keys are present. Quentin Bell painted the figure of Cleo holding a trumpet on the top of the desk. He painted the rest of the desk, except the back, in grays with black accents. There are random spatters of paint present on all surfaces.

Collection
Vera Brittain was an English writer and pacifist activist best known for her World War I memoir Testament of Youth. The Vera Brittain letter to critia and editor John Middleton Murry concerns matters relating to the publishing and financing of Murry's literary, socialist, and pacifist magazine The Adelphi. Brittain also writes of her pacifism as it relates to concerns about nuclear warfare in the immediate aftermath of World War II.

Consists of a single typescript letter from Brittain to the critic and editor John Middleton Murry dated September 13, 1946. Single-page, with text on front and back written on letterhead reading "2 Cheyne Walk, Chelsea S.W.3." Brittain comments on the revival of Murry's The Adelphi, and on strategies to finance such literary magazines. The second part of the letter discusses her opinions on methods of pacifist activism, particuarly as related to nuclear war. The postscript discusses the forthcoming publication of John Hersey's 1946 book Hiroshima. She comments, "If only the world could read it, the 'next war' would move much further off." It is signed "Vera."

Collection

Tijuana Bibles collection, 1930s-1998 3 Linear Feet — 500 items

Tijuana Bibles, also known as eight-pagers or dirty little books, were small eight-page publications of cartoon erotica and pornography that became popular during the 1930s and 1940s. This collection includes about 400 Tijuana Bibles, some of them duplicates; a few folders of erotica drawings and drafts by an unknown artist; and printed material about Tijuana Bibles, published from the 1970s through the 1990s.

The Tijuana Bibles Collection consists of about 400 Tijuana bibles, some printed material about the bibles and the phenomenon as a whole, and an anonymous author's sketches and drawings of characters and plots.

The Tijuana bibles include a wide range of characters, many inspired by (or lifted from) mainstream media and celebrities. The most frequently used characters were from newspaper comic strips, including Andy Gump, Betty Boop, Blondie and Dagwood, Dick Tracy, Ella Cinders, Dumb Dora, Wimpy, Pete the Tramp, Tillie the Toiler, and Popeye. Other bibles include generic figures such as travelling salesmen (including a vacuum cleaner man, a book salesman, a radio salesmen, and so on); parodies of real people, including Nazis, boxer Joe Louis, and other celebrities; or versions of popular movie heroines, such as Snow White or Mae West.

The collection held in Rubenstein Library consists largely of Tijuana bibles, but also include other small pornographic cartoon or comic joke books, similar in design and in manufacturing quality, but not entirely true to the "traditional" form of a Tijuana bible. There are also Tijuana bible reproductions in this series.

The manuscript materials accompanying the bibles consist of drafts and sketches for two strips, one featuring Wahoo and the other featuring Li'l Abner and Daisy Mae. Also included is a draft of "Fritzi Ritz in 'Kisses for Sale'." This series also includes pornographic drawings of generic female characters, some with and some without text. These do not appear to be taken from any particular Tijuana bible. All of the manuscript material is anonymous and undated.

Finally, the collection also includes a series of books about Tijuana bibles, compiled by the collector, including reprints of some of the bibles as well as essays or historical introductions to the genre. These books were published between 1971 and 1998.

Collection

Stone Circles records, 1995-2012 11.4 Linear Feet — 19 boxes

The Stone Circles records contain materials documenting the history of the organization. These include press clippings, board meeting minutes. staff and financial information, program files, newsletters, event information, and correspondence.

Established in 1995, Stone Circles is a leading organization in the national movement toward a more spiritually-based form of activism. SC has introduced thousands of social change leaders and organizations to spiritual and reflective practice through workshops, retreats, trainings and strategic convenings. Stone Circles at the Stone House is located in Mebane, NC on 70 acres of farmland.

Collection
Mary Cary Packard (1858-1936) and Sarah F. (Florence) Martin (1864- ) were professional nurses trained Boston and based in Baltimore from 1887, where they managed the Robert Garrett Hospital for Children as well as the Robert Garret Sanitarium for Children in rural Mount Airy, Maryland. Collection comprises a 109-page manuscript memoir of Mary Packard's life, assembled by Sarah F. Martin around 1936, and a 20-page handwritten autobiography by Martin, 1940, wih a few photographs and booklets pasted in. The Packard memoir contains a detailed biography, 34 photographs, clippings, memorabilia, cards, and letters, all captioned in detail by Martin. The collection documents the lifelong friendship and professional lives of the two women, their family, friends and colleagues, and their Baltimore home, "Clovelly." Other topics include the history of Maryland's public health system and children's hospitals, and the genealogies of the Alden, Cary, Packard, and Parker families of eastern Massachusetts. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collection and the Bingham Center for Women and Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises two items: a 109-page scrapbook memoir of Baltimore-based professional nurse Mary Cary Packard, assembled by her close companion and colleague Sarah F. Martin starting in 1934 and completed shortly after her friend's death in 1936, and a shorter handwritten autobiography by Martin narrating her own life, created around 1940.

The Packard memoir starts with the 1934 dedication, and a 10-page biography of Packard's life and career in public health and nursing, handwritten in ink by Martin. Subsequent album pages abound with news or literary clippings; humorous verses and lyrics (some composed by Packard); memorabilia; postcards, Christmas and Valentine cards, and letters; and professional literature from nursing associations referring to the activities and accomplishments of Mary Cary Packard.

Also found in the scrapbook are 34 pasted-in photographs in the form of well-captioned albumen cartes-de-visite, cyanotypes, and gelatin silver prints. These are numerous portraits and snapshots of Packard, and a few of Martin, and photos of family, friends, nurses and physicians, and patrons of medical institutions such as the Jacobs and Garrett families. Other photographs offer views of hospital buildings, schools, and ancestral homes and towns. In addition, there are a number of photographs taken by Packard and Smith of the medical staff at the Garrett Sanitarium for Children in Mount Airy, Md., and photos of the exterior and interior of their home, "Clovelly," built for Packard in 1912 in the Baltimore suburb of Ten Hills. There are no depictions of the interiors of medical institutions or nursing schools. A handful of photographic postcards depicting hospitals and other locations are also present in the memoir.

The shorter 20-page "Miss Sallie" manuscript is an autobiography written by Sarah F. (Florence) Martin, and consists of a handwritten personal narrative which details her origins in Massachusetts, her nursing training, her career in Baltimore, and her friendship with Mary Cary Packard. Four photographs, one of Martin at six months old and another of her in nursing uniform, and two booklets from a Woman's Club accompany the narrative.

Together, the two manuscripts richly document the lifelong friendship and careers of the two women and their association with friends, neighbors, and colleagues. Topics well-represented in these two memoirs include the early decades of the nursing profession in the United States, the development of Maryland's public health system and children's medical institutions; the genealogies of the Alden, Cary, Packard, and Parker families of eastern Massachusetts; and the history of the Cary family of Clovelly (Devon), England.

Collection
Over 200 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over a third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, her daughters Lucy Saltar and Frances "Fanny" Saltar, and Elizabeth's cousins Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon. Dozens of other letters come from family friends and relatives, male and female, from prominent families in Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, New York, and some from the Midwest and New England states. Topics include courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and some discussions of finances. There are a few references to slavery and to enslaved people and servants. Letters sent during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863; one discusses African American troops and their role in the war, and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman. A few earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially in and around Baltimore and Philadelphia. Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The papers consist almost entirely of 266 pieces of correspondence dating from 1759–1880, written by women of the Saltar and Gordon families of Pennsylvania and Maryland between themselves and other family relations. Over one-third of the letters date before 1825. The principal correspondents are Elizabeth 'Betsy" Gordon Saltar, the family matriarch, Lucy Saltar, Frances "Fanny" Saltar, Mary Gordon, and Polly Gordon. There are also single letters from other female members of the Saltar family and a handful of letters from men, some of whom were Saltar family members. The letters are organized by correspondent name, ending with a group of letters addressed to unidentified individuals.

The manuscript pages total approximately 765, primarily bifolios, almost all written in ink. There are also four additional manuscripts: an invitation; a sheet of paper with receipts; and a memorandum and bond concerning a land sale. A number of later letters are accompanied by addressed envelopes, some with stamps.

The correspondence is almost entirely comprised of women writing to other women: mothers to daughters; daughters to mothers; and cousins to cousins; and friends to each other. Over half of the collection comprises letters to and from a family matriarch, Elizabeth Gordon Saltar, living at her residence at Magnolia Grove (near Frankford, Pa.), and a large group of letters sent by various correspondents to her daughter Fanny Saltar, who was one of the family's historians. Also present is a large group of correspondence between cousins Elizabeth Gordon Saltar and Mary Gordon, as well as letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's other daughter Lucy Saltar, and letters addressed to Elizabeth Gordon Saltar's cousins, Mary Gordon and Polly Gordon.

Other families who correspond and/or are mentioned often in the letters: Bowne, Brooks, Bunyan, Coleman, Drexel, Hartshorne, Howell, Lardner, McMurtrie, Morgan, Morris, Stillman, Tilghman, Ulstick, Van Dykes, and Wharton. Many of these are prominent families from Pennsylvania or Maryland. One letter from a Bowne in series 7 contains a partial family tree of the Bownes and Saltar families. Most of these letters are found in the Fanny Saltar series.

Among the places from which letters were sent are areas in Pennsylvania, Maryland, New York State, New Jersey, Illinois, Ohio, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Paris (France), and Rome (Italy). Cities represented are Boston, Baltimore, Charleston, New York, Brooklyn, Philadelphia, and others. Many letters were sent to or from Magnolia Grove, the Saltar plantation home near Philadelphia.

Topics tend to focus on societal mores and customs of the times as experienced by married and single women of land-owning classes: courtship; marriage; religion; pastimes; visits and travel; and the welfare of family members and friends. There are many references to illnesses such as measles, bowel complaints, eye conditions, diphtheria, tumors, and mental illness, with many details on treatments and outcomes. There are also long passages and references to grief and mourning on the death of loved ones, and fairly frequent mentions of finances.

The letters written during the Civil War discuss events centered around Pennsylvania, particularly in 1863, as well as a comment on friends going off to war, and one letter discusses African American troops and the circumstances surrounding the recruitment of the 3rd United States Colored Troops' commander, Benjamin C. Tilghman, whom the Saltars knew from Philadelphia. Earlier letters speak of the War of 1812, especially of events around Baltimore.

Acquired by the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards.

Family papers documenting the Lefroy, Caperton, and Montague familes, representing the families in Sallie Bingham's matrilineal line. These materials belonged to Sallie Bingham's mother, Mary Caperton Bingham, until her death, when they went to Sallie; her sister, Eleanor Bingham Miller; and their niece, Emily Bingham. Two figures documented in these papers, Helena Lefroy Caperton and Sallie Montague Lefroy, are the focus, along with her mother, of Sallie Bingham’s 2014 book, The Blue Box. Includes genealogies, letters, wills, a bill of sale, short stories and other writing, speeches, a prayer book, list, a few clippings, and Irish and English postcards. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Renee Chelian Papers, 1981-1995 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes

Renee Chelian founded the Northland Family Planning Center, a women's healthcare and abortion clinic in the Detroit area. The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to the Northland Family Planning Center, including materials related to anti-abortion groups picketing the clinic, as well as materials related to Chelian's involvement with national women's healthcare organizations.

The Renee Chelian papers include professional papers related to Chelian's clinic, Northland Family Planning in Detroit, Michigan, and her work with national organizations including the American Civil Liberties Union and the National Organization for Women. Materials relate mostly to her work at the Northland Family Planning clinic during the 1990s and include newspaper clippings, photographs, pro-choice and anti-abortion materials, completed surveys from patients, family, and friends who visited the clincs, and administrative documents related to escort training, office supplies, and staff information.

The collection also contains materials, such as hate mail and pamphlets, related to anti-abortion groups and their picketing of the Northland Family clinic. Folders titled Saturday contain photographs of the picketors and picketing information of the anti-abortion protesting at the clinic. Materials also relate to other anti-abortion materials, including papers related to the harassment of other abortion providers and the murder of Dr. David Gunn, and anti-clinic organizations such as Operation Rescue, Life Dynamics, Prolife Action League, Feminists for Life, crisis pregnancy centers and leaders such as Randall Terry and Joe Scheidler.

Also included are materials from other women's health organizations and campaigns, including Stand Up For Women, Project Choice, and Operation Rescue. Some of the anti-abortion materials contain explicit images.

Collection

Parker Pillsbury diaries, 1864-1896 2 Linear Feet — 33 pocket diaries

Parker Pillsbury (1809–1898) was an American minister, lecturer, newspaper editor, and advocate for abolition and women's rights. The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries offer a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years, particularly his work fighting for the rights of women and African Americans and promoting Free Religion. Pillsbury records his interactions with leading social reformers of the nineteenth century, including William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher and Theodore Tilton among many others. His entries occasionally are accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

The collection is composed of 33 pocket diaries Parker Pillsbury kept for the years 1864 to 1896. The diaries contain a consistent, uninterrupted record of Pillsbury's life during these years.

Pillsbury wrote daily or nearly daily about the details of his life recording both the mundane and the profound. A typical entry begins with the weather and his location before providing the names of those with whom he met or correspondeded that day, events he attended, lectures he gave, or work he did. Pillsbury writes about his interactions with William Lloyd Garrison, Frederick Douglass, Abby Kelley and Stephen S. Foster, Gerrit Smith, Wendell Phillips, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, Lucretia Mott, the Allcott family, Robert Ingersoll, Charles Sumner, Henry Ward Beecher, Theodore Tilton and many other leading social reformers of the nineteenth century. His entries are occasionally accompanied by tipped in newspaper clippings about national events.

Due to their consistency and span, the diaries provide a decades' long chronology of Pillsbury's involvement with and importance in the major social reform movements of the late nineteenth century, and in particular, the women's rights movement with which he closely associated during these years. The diaries show him to be a ceaseless traveler, moving up and down the east coast, throughout New England, and through western New York and the Midwest, as he lectured, preached, attended women's suffrage conventions, and otherwise attempted to advance the causes of equal rights for women and African Americans and Free Religion.

The diaries illustrate his close and sustained relationship with major figures in the women's rights movements. He writes of his work as joint editor with Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony of the Revolution from 1867 to 1870, and his continued friendship and partnership with Anthony in the following decades. He often visited her in Rochester, they lectured together, and he served as her advisor when she was put on trial in Albany by the State Supreme Court for voting without the right to do so.

Collection
North Carolinians Against Racist and Religious Violence (NCARRV) was an activist group based in Durham, NC from 1983-1997 that worked to document hate crimes and hate groups including white supremacists, assist victims, raise awareness, and influence public policy across the state, and these records document their work. Collection includes founding documents, bylaws, meeting files, board meeting documents, photographs, audiovisual materials, administrative materials, grants and grant applications, incident reports, publications, subject and extensive newspaper clippings on racist violence and white supremacy movements in North Carolina.

The North Carolinians Agaist Racist and Religious Violence records document the history of this grassroots activist organization. Collection materials include administrative files, publications, press releases, meeting materials, notes, grants and grant applications, clippings, subject files, photographs and audiovisual materials.

The Administrative Materials series contains files generated by NCARRV's daily work, including letterhead stationery and forms, personnel files, an audit report, licensing documentation, event photographs, incident reports documenting individual hate crimes, NCARRV business meetings, and project files including Hold On! a video produced by NCARRV about hate crimes in Robeson County, NC. There is also documentation of their youth projects and workshops, as well as a grant-funded educational project at NC Central University. That project examined police community relations, an advisory board of police chiefs across the state that looked at how to improve police relationships with communities of color, and published a report called No Reverence For Life.

The Publications and Public Messaging series contains NCARRV's publications and public relations materials, including Annual Reports, Special Reports, Newsletters, Updates, press releases, and other public messaging files.

The Development series contains materials relating to NCARRV's fund-raising activities. It includes files with information about individual membership donations and grant funding. There is a card file with member information as well as routine correspondence. The bulk of this series consists of information from funding organizations and NCARRV's grant application materials.

The Research Files series consists chiefly of NC newspapers clippings on the topic of racist violence from NCARRV's subscription to the Carolina Clippings Service. Also included are photographs documenting hate group marches, subject files, and research and class notes. There are publications from nonprofit groups whose mission relates to NCARRV's. These materials consist of pamphlets, essays, reports, newsletters, periodical issues, and annual reports.

The Audio/Visual series consists of 18 audiocassettes and 42 videocassettes. The audiocassetes contain recordings of phone messages left by Klan members, KKK rallies, and a recording of Mab Segrest speaking at a "Hands off My Neighbor" symposium. The videotapes chiefly consist of copies of and research for "Hold On!: Robeson County's Fight for Justice" produced by NCARRV in 1988. Other video contents include trial coverage, a 1990 Gay Pride March in Raleigh, and recordings of television news shows about racism.

Collection

Melanie Dornier photographs, 2013-2016 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 110 color inkjet prints — 11 3/4 x 8 inches

Collection consists of two documentary photography series taken in India by Melanie Dornier. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital photographs, taken in 2016, recording daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The images convey the human impacts of woman-specific crimes and social justice, and the role of the police station and its female officers as a safe haven for distressed and abused women. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India" document the daily life and experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, daughter, police officer, and boxer, 2013-2016. All prints measure 11 3/4 x 8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of two documentary photography series by Melanie Dornier taken in India. "Mahila Thana: All Women Police Station" is comprised of 56 color digital prints. The photographs - taken during 2016 - record daily life inside the walls of the All Women Police Station of Gurugram, Haryana. The 54 color digital prints in "Punch My Face: Women's Boxing in India, document the experiences of Meena Kumari, a wife, mother, buffalo owner, police officer, and boxer, between 2013 and 2016.

In an artist's statement Dornier describes that in 2012, "...the safety issues of the Indian women and gender violence were brought to the fore by the news of the gang rape and death of a young student in New Delhi, India. Since then funding and action plans have been implemented all around the country. In Gurugram, the millennium city in the state of Haryana, it was decided to open an All Women Police Station (AWPS) as in each of Haryana's districts and this was completed in August 2015. The project 'Mahila Thana,' which is 'All Women Police Station' in Hindi, documents the daily life inside the walls of the AWPS of Gurugram."

On "Punch My Face," Dornier reflects that, "Meena Kumari was born in December 1982 to a modest rural family. Now she is reaching the end of her boxing career and she hopes to soon become a police inspector. In 2001, Meena was one of the first Indian women to become a boxer and enjoyed visibility on the international scene. Her first major fight was confronting her father who believed boxing was not a respectable activity for a woman. Despite this Meena worked harder and harder and quickly reached the national and international stage in the flyweight category (51KG). Back then, female boxers were trained with young boys due to the shortage of women in the ring...at the end of 2016 and at the end of this photo documentary, we see Meena in the first months of her third pregnancy."

Dornier is the winner of the 2017 Bettye Lane Award for Feminist Photography, sponsored by the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts and the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection

Margery Sved papers, 1972-1985 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

Margery (Margie) Sved, PhD is a psychiatrist practicing in the Triangle area of North Carolina. She champions issues related to women and members of the LGBTQ community in medicine.The Margery Sved papers document women's health organizations and events in the Triangle area from the 1970-80's, including a notebook from a conference sponsored by AMWA (American Medical Women's Association) at Duke in 1980 on Leadership for Women in Medicine. There is also a file on an early conference of lesbian physicians.

The Margery Sved papers contains materials documenting women's health organizations and events in the Triangle area of North Carolina from 1972-1985, including educational materials, notes from conferences and workshops related to women and minorities in medicine, and publications on women's health.

Collection
Lydia Bailey was a prominent 19th century Philadelphia printer. The Lydia Bailey account statement itemizes a printing job commissioned by John Steele of the Port of Philadelphia. The job consisted of labels for imported liquor, wine and tea for use on the cargo of commercial ships.

Manuscript document signed by Lydia Bailey, listing 65 itemized expenditures dated March 8-29, 1823, totaling $141.50 for "Printing certificates of spirits, wines & teas imported in the first quarter of 1823." It begins "Genl. John Steele, Collector of the Port of Philadelphia/To Lydia R. Bailey," and concludes with a certifying statement, and a receipt for payment in full signed by Bailey. Each entry specifies the quantity of certificates printed and the name of the ship for which each lot is destined. There is also a single entry for "1000 copies blanks for inspectors."

Collection
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

Collection
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
Collection

Lisa Jaronski zine collection, 1992-2005 5.4 Linear Feet — 9 boxes

A collection of about 470 zines, mostly of the personal nature, mostly written by women, acquired during the period of the late 1990s to early 2000s.

Collection consists of zines primarily from the U.S., with a small number from Canada, Australia, and New Zealand. Many of the zines were acquired through trade and larger organized swaps referred to as “Lazy Jane’s Zine Trades” arranged by the collector (ie: send in 30 copies of your zine, get 30 unique zines back from the other participants).