Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Italian public health documents declaring ships and goods to be disease-free, 1630-1818

14 items — 2 boxes
Fourteen single-sheet printed documents issued by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargoes, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning bubonic plague. Cities include Venice, Brindisi, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, and Trieste. Almost all bear small woodcuts chiefly of patron saints and coats of arms, and official seals and stamps. Handwritten annotations include dates, itineraries, and, in the case of maritime shipping, the names of ships and owners. Some note the type of cargo and a few list the names of crew members, with age, stature, and other details. Most are in Italian but several also include some Latin. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Fourteen single-sheet printed documents, issued from 1630 to 1818 by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargo, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning plague. Most are in Italian, but several also include some Latin.

Nine of these bills of health originated in Venice, with others from Brindisi, Guastalla, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, Segna, San Martino, and Trieste. They range in size from 6 x 8 1/4 to 12 x 16 1/2 inches. Almost all bear one or more small woodcuts such as patron saints and coats of arms; blindstamps and seals are also often present.

Typical handwritten content on the front and sometimes back of the sheet gives the name of the ship's owner and his ship, the ship's itinerary, number of containers ("Colli"), and type of cargo. A few of the documents also include lists of crew members, with names, ages, and stature. A few terms of interest that appear include "lazzeretto," indicating a place of quarantine, and "epizootico," a medical term for a non-human epidemic or agent. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Japanese medical manuscript notebooks, 1810-1849 and undated

3.5 Linear Feet — 63 Items
The sixty-three manuscript volumes in this collection range from 10 to 154 pages, and were created in Japan from about 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students. The notebooks usually take one of two forms: transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations, and bodies of knowledge written up as manuals by well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū and Takenaka Bunpō. Topics covered include herbal medicines and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eyes and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly for cancers, tumors, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; treatment of wounds; suturing; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. Some notebooks contain black-and-white and color hand-drawn illustrations - many full-page - of surgeries, close-ups of suturing, bandages and wrappings, osteopathic manipulations, and medicinal plants. In most cases, the author or copyist recorded details such the place and time of the lecture and the name of the medical school. There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians, and to earlier dates for the work being copied - these range from 1677 to 1796. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The sixty-three Japanese manuscript volumes in this collection were created from 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students, and document Japanese medical training and practice during the time also known as the Edo period, and the conjoining of Chinese-inspired materia medica with current Western medical practices introduced primarily by the Dutch. The notebooks range in length from 10 to 154 pages, and typically take the form of transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations; in many cases the writer recorded the place and time of the demonstration and the name of the medical school. There are also volumes which represent the collected knowledge of well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū but also Takenaka Bunsuke (Nanpō). There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians.

The copyists and note-takers signed their names at the end of the volumes; the name Yamanaka Shūsai Hideyuki appears most frequently; also appearing frequently are the names of editors and proofreaders, and corrections and later annotations in red ink are found in a number of the manuscripts. In addition to the contemporary dates, there are many references to the earlier manuscript versions being copied: these dates range from 1677 to 1796.

The topics covered by the volumes range widely, and include: herbal medicine and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eye and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly on cancers, swellings, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; the treatment of wounds; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. There are several volumes containing illustrative drawings, some hand-colored and others are black-and-white; they include detailed images of surgical procedures and close-ups of suturing; examples of bandages and wrappings; osteopathic manipulations; and medicinal plants.

One volume in particular stands out above the rest, consisting of over ninety carefully drawn, full-page, hand-coloured illustrations, nine of which are double-page, displaying patients with dislocated limbs, skin cancer, or requiring sophisticated bandages, as well as illustrations of internal organs and one page with surgical instruments. One of the illustrations is a realistic portrait of Hanaoka Seishū, with a beard and spectacles (probably imported from Holland), showing him excising a cyst from a patient. At the end of the volume, two different explanatory texts in Kanbun (classical Chinese read in the Japanese manner) provide comments in the volume about the diseases and their treatment.

Each codex in the collection is composed of leaves of rice paper, with hand-sewn bindings and soft covers, and calligraphy in black and red ink. Some of the texts are written in Shino Japanese (Chinese reading style) using all Kanji characters, while other texts are in Shino Japanese written in 19th-century characters - the language of the educated class in Japan. At least one volume (Vol. 21) contains Dutch words for medicinal compounds. The script reads back to front; the script is laid out in vertical columns that are read from right to left across the page. In some cases, pages or sections and covers are missing, and some volumes bear traces of insect damage, but for the most part, the volumes are remarkably well-preserved.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. In the case of missing titles, a title was supplied from content by library staff. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters, and some older calendar dates are also given in modern Western dates. Illegible or untranslatable text is indicated by blank lines.

Volumes are arranged in this collection guide in two series: sets of notebooks, and single volumes. The items in the sets are linked by common themes or bodies of knowledge, and range from two to eleven volumes. They include collections of works by one physician, as well as sets of manuals and lecture notes on topics such as obstetrics and gynecology, metallurgy, opthalmology, pox and skin diseases, and others. Single volumes are housed after the sets.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters.

Each volume has been assigned a unique institutional identifier.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Charles L. Abernethy Sr. papers, 1713-1972, bulk 1907-1959

85 Linear Feet — 160 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 60,855 items
Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. (1872-1955) was a Democratic Congressman representing eastern North Carolina from 1922-1935. His professional papers consist chiefly of correspondence and records from his law practice and legal cases, with smaller amounts of writings and speeches, financial papers, printed materials, diaries, and some personal papers, including early deeds. There is also a large group of photographs, photo albums, and clippings scrapbooks chiefly documenting Abernethy's political career. One album from 1907 contains postcards of Beaufort, N.C.; another contains photographs of a three-month Congressional trip to Alaska, 1923, and includes images of President and Mrs. Harding and a diary transcript of the trip. Other items include some papers of his son, Charles Laban Abernethy, Jr., also a lawyer, and a volume of his poetry.

The collection principally comprises a large series of correspondence and legal records accumulated by North Carolina lawyer and politician Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. during his tenure as U.S. Congressman. There are papers relating to the senior Abernethy's law practice and business dealings in Beaufort and New Bern, N.C. (including legal papers concerning land development in Carteret County, Cape Lookout, and Horse Island maintained by both father and son).

Other materials include deeds and other early papers, political speeches, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks of Abernethy's political career, a diary, and the Abernethy coat-of-arms. There are also papers assembled by Abernethy's son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., a lawyer in his father's firm, and a volume of his poetry.

A lare group of photographs and albums includes a photograph album containing snapshots the elder Abernethy took during a congressional trip to Alaska for three months of 1923 (including photographs of President and Mrs. Harding), as well as a typescript of his diary from the trip; and an album containing postcards of Beaufort, N.C, in 1907, featuring a celebration of either the 200th anniversary of the town's founding or the opening of passenger and rail service to the town (or both).

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History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated

16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items
Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Sir Anthony Musgrave papers, 1739-1966

8.0 Linear Feet — 16 boxes
Collection contains professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave, of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda Field Musgrave; and of her father, David Dudley Field, lawyer and law reformer. Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life and education, the Unitarian Church, his career in New York and the compilation of that state's civil, penal, and criminal codes, law reform, and his wife, Jane Lucinda Hopkins Field. Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings, pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica, 1877-1883, but also St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, British Columbia, 1869-1872, Natal, 1872, South Australia, 1873, and Queensland, 1883-1888. Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence, letters with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australian politics, and autobiographical and genealogical information.

Collection includes the professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave (1828-1888), British colonial official; of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda (Field) Musgrave (1833-1920); and of her father, David Dudley Field (1805-1894), lawyer and law reformer.

The Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life; his education at Stockbridge Academy and at Williams College, including bills and receipts, and correspondence about student life and professors; religion, especially the rise of the Unitarian Church; his early career in New York; law reform; the compilation of civil, penal, and criminal codes for New York, and as a model for other states; international law, including maritime law and admiralty courts; the reform of municipal government; the Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations, 1870s; the Institut de Droit International; the laying of the Atlantic Cable, 1866; and the Hague Peace Conference, 1899. Personal correspondence includes letters, 1830s, with the Hopkins family, Mark, Harry, and his future wife, Jane Lucinda; and letters, 1870-1894, with the Muegrave family. Also in the collection are clippings pertaining to the Field and Hopkins families; some legal papers; diaries, 1875-1894, of David Dudley Field; Recollections of My Early Life, Written in the Spring of 1832, by Field; his commonplace book, 1824-1827; his Autobiography, 1805-1836; a journal, 1831-1835, containing comments on his studies and reading; a journal, 1836, principally concerning the fatal illness of his wife; journals, 1836-1837 and 1851, describing his travels in Europe, volume of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field containing recollections of her youth, written in 1832, and a journal, 1833-1835, Poetical Extracts of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field; Personal Recollections of David Dudley Field written in 1892; and correspondence, 1898, relating to a biography of Field written by his brother, Henry Martyn Field.

Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica. Jamaican materials, 1877-1883, concern the case of Pulido v. Musgrave, colonial rule, the immigration of laborers to Jamaica, the membership of the Legislative Council, the reorganization of the judicial system, colonial defense, customs, commercial relations with the United States and Canada, and Cuban revolutionaries in Jamaica. Other papers pertain to the administration of St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, especially concerning the Newfoundland fisheries. British Columbia, 1869-1872; Natal, 1872, including information on native policy, education and marriage, the constitution, and relations between Natal, the Transvaal, and the Zulus; South Australia, 1873; and Queensland, 1883-1888. There are letters concerning Sir Anthony's writings on political economy, 1870s, as well as pamphlets of his works; correspondence, 1887, concerning the formation of the Westminster Review Company and the publication of the Westminster Review; a Private Letter Book, 1868-1878, containing confidential letters to other officials and personal correspondence; a scrapbook, 1874-1881, with reviews of his writings, and information on the social, economic, and political affairs of Jamaica and South Australia; and a Memorial Scrapbook, 1868-1908, comprised of pictures, clippings, telegrams and letters concerning the death of Sir Anthony.

Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence; letters, 1890-1901, with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australia, including information on the federation of Australia, the Australian constitution, labor unrest, the separation movement, and his work as chief justice of Queensland and of Australia; letters, 1910-1911, dealing with Anglican mission work among miners and loggers in British Columbia; "Notes for My Sons," containing biographical information about herself and her relatives; and a scrapbook, 1810-1913, of letters from prominent persons. Other materials include correspondence, 1918-1920, of Mark Hopkins III concerning the work of the Red Cross in France. letters, 1886-1891, from Dudley Field Musgrave (1873-1895), son of Sir Anthony, describing life as a naval cadet and his service in the Mediterranean; correspondence and printed material pertaining to railroads, especially the Berkshire Street Railway Company of Stockbridge; pictures of the Field and Musgrave family members; and genealogical material on the Field, Musgrave, Hopkins, Byam, Sergeant, Dyett, and Abbott families.

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Miscellaneous French Documents, 1781-1918

0.1 Linear Feet — 15 Items
Collection contains fourteen French documents written between the 18th century and the 20th century. The contents of these documents are broad in scope from sales accounts to personal letters to official government documents. Of note are several documents that refer to American cities such as Augusta, Baltimore, Philadelphia, and Savannah. Several of the documents are written by or are addressed to fairly prominent historical figures: British Ambassador Charles Stuart, Minister of the Interior Alexandre-Auguste Ledru Rollin, General Joseph Léopold Sigisbert (Hugo), and Cardinal Jean-Sifrein Maury.
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Edmund Jennings Lee II papers, 1746-1963

9 Linear Feet
Correspondence, legal papers, and financial records concerning Edmund Jennings Lee’s law practice, estate settlements, and personal family matters. Subjects include Confederate refugees in Canada, the formation of West Virginia as a state, conditions of Virginia in 1865, and bridge and turnpike construction and management. Includes family writings and diary entries from Henrietta Bedinger Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee III, and Edwin Gray Lee. Also includes bills, receipts, and financial ledgers from Edmund Jennings Lee’s law practice.

The Edmund Jennings Lee II Papers have been divided into four series: Correspondence, Personal Files, Legal Papers, and Financial Records. The majority of materials concern Lee’s legal practice and business interests in Shepherdstown, WV. Materials include letters between Lee and his brothers, Charles Henry Lee, Richard Henry Lee, and Cassius Francis Lee; letters concerning family matters; legal briefs, documents, land surveys, bill, receipts, and financial ledgers from Lee’s legal practice; and miscellaneous family papers and writings, including diaries from Henrietta Bedinger Lee, Edmund Jennings Lee III, and Edwin Gray Lee.

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Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Johnson family papers,, 1798-1943

3 Linear Feet
Alabama family whose members were instrumental in founding the Alabama School for the Deaf in Talladega. The Johnson family's papers chiefly contain letters (1927-1930) from Nellie Hall Johnson (wife of Joseph Henry Johnson Jr.), of Talladega, Alabama, to her son, Seaborn Johnson, while he was a student at Alabama Polytechnic Institute and elsewhere. Other papers represent three generations of the Johnson family in Alabama and Georgia, and include correspondence, some legal and financial papers, student papers from the University of Alabama, and printed material. Of particular interest is the 1861 muster roll of the Alabama Rifles, and items referring to the sale of slaves. Other topics in the family papers include life in Cave Spring, Georgia and the history of Hollins College. Persons represented include Abner Darden, Joseph Henry Johnson Jr., and the Asbury and Darden families.

The Johnson family's papers chiefly contain letters (1927-1930) from Nellie Hall Johnson (wife of Joseph Henry Johnson Jr.), of Talladega, Alabama, to her son, Seaborn Johnson, while he was a student at Alabama Polytechnic Institute and elsewhere. Other papers represent three generations of the Johnson family in Alabama and Georgia, and include correspondence, some legal and financial papers, student papers and writings from the University of Alabama, and miscellaneous printed material.

The legal papers contain several early land deeds and plats for Georgia and Alabama. Some of the deeds and bonds were Abner Darden's. Darden was the father-in-law of Joseph Henry Johnson. Other legal records are those of Mary E. Latimer as guardian of the minor heirs of Richard V. Asbury, will of Joseph H. Johnson, undated constitution and by-laws for the formation of the Cave Spring (Ga.) Mechanic's Aid Association or Joint-Stock Company to sell family groceries, and interrogations taken by Abner Darden for a lawsuit in Polk Co., Ga., relative to the financial condition of Woodland Female College. Among the financial records are those of Abner Darden, Richard V. Asbury, Mary E. Latimer, inventories of the sale of personal property of the late William Darden of Taliaferro Co., Georgia, on Nov. 10, 1842, and of the sale on Dec. 22, 1842, of his slaves, which includes prices.

Among the miscellaneous papers are a copy of the original muster roll of the Alabama Rifles (Alabama 1st Infantry Regiment, Company "D") Apr. 3, 1861, of which Joseph H. Johnson was captain, and a commission of Johnson as a representative of the Grand Commandery of Knights Templar of Kentucky to the Grand Commandery of Alabama, May 28, 1870. Printed items include a list of Georgia officials, circa 1857, that shows that the state senators and representatives were either of the Democratic or American Party; a memorial article on Abner Darden by his lifelong friend Alexander H. Stephens, July 30, 1877; and the June 8, 1893, issue of The Messenger of Talladega printed on silk and devoted solely to the life, career, and death of Dr. Joseph H. Johnson.

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Admittance cards, 1811-1880

0.2 Linear Feet — 98 cards; 1 box
.Admittance, matriculation, and "Order of Lecture" cards are from a number of medical students from 1811-1880 in the University of Pennsylvania, Jefferson Medical College, Long Island College Hospital (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Harvard University Medical School, Philadelphia School of Anatomy, New Hampshire Medical Institution, Berkshire Medical Institution, and St. Bartholomew's Hospital (London, England). They contain the autographs of the most eminent professors of the day: i.e., Samuel Gross, Franklin Bache, Benjamin Rush, Austin Flint, Samuel Jackson, S. Weir Mitchell, J. K. Mitchell, Charles D. and James A Meigs, John Barclay Biddle, et al. The St. Bartholomew's Hospital card is signed by Ludford Harvey, John P. Vicent, and John Abernethy, the latter (1764-1831) being an eminent English surgeon and founder of the Medical School of St Bartholomew's. The "Order of Lecture" cards from Jefferson Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania list curricula, faculty and their residences, schedules of lectures and texts.Admittance cards, 1850-1853, are for courses at the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia. They include two matriculation cards for William D. Watson of Chatham County, N. C., dated Nov., 1850, and Oct., 1852, and an examination card Oct., 1852-1853, which is signed by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell as professor of Anatomy, Surgery and Physiology. Dr. Watson returned to Chatham County after his graduation. His house was destroyed during the Civil War. The portion of his medical library saved and stored in a neighboring attic eventually was placed in the historical Collection of the library of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

.Admittance, matriculation, and "Order of Lecture" cards are from a number of medical students from 1811-1880 in the University of Pennsylvania, Jefferson Medical College, Long Island College Hospital (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Harvard University Medical School, Philadelphia School of Anatomy, New Hampshire Medical Institution, Berkshire Medical Institution, and St. Bartholomew's Hospital (London, England). They contain the autographs of the most eminent professors of the day: i.e., Samuel Gross, Franklin Bache, Benjamin Rush, Austin Flint, Samuel Jackson, S. Weir Mitchell, J. K. Mitchell, Charles D. and James A Meigs, John Barclay Biddle, et al. The St. Bartholomew's Hospital card is signed by Ludford Harvey, John P. Vicent, and John Abernethy, the latter (1764-1831) being an eminent English surgeon and founder of the Medical School of St Bartholomew's. The "Order of Lecture" cards from Jefferson Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania list curricula, faculty and their residences, schedules of lectures and texts.

Admittance cards, 1850-1853, are for courses at the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia. They include two matriculation cards for William D. Watson of Chatham County, N. C., dated Nov., 1850, and Oct., 1852, and an examination card Oct., 1852-1853, which is signed by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell as professor of Anatomy, Surgery and Physiology. Dr. Watson returned to Chatham County after his graduation. His house was destroyed during the Civil War. The portion of his medical library saved and stored in a neighboring attic eventually was placed in the historical Collection of the library of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

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Asian maps collection, 1771-1945

4.0 Linear Feet — 10 items
The Asian Maps Collection comprises maps of Korea, China, and Japan, dated from 1771-1945. Several of the maps are full color, and include woodblock prints.

The Asian Maps Collection comprises maps of Korea, China, and Japan, dated from 1771-1945. Several of the maps are full color, and include woodblock prints. Several maps include information on military installments. A few maps include hand-written notations.

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Picture File, 1700s-1980s, bulk 1814-1950

Online
50 Linear Feet — Approximately 6050 items
The Picture File was created and maintained beginning in the 1950s by the Duke University Manuscript Department staff and its institutional successors as a vertical file of pictorial works separated from manuscript collections as well as acquired individually. The collection is large and diverse, with images dating from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Engravings feature prominently, with photographs a close second. The predominant genre is portraits of political and military leaders, authors, artists, physicians, scientists, and others. Members of the Duke family and others from Durham, N.C. are also present. In the Socialist Party Series there are numerous images of leader Eugene Debs. Topics range widely, with a focus on American history, including the Revolutionary and Civil Wars; history and culture of the southern U.S.; and U.S. and European politics. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. The dominant formats are engravings and photographs. Specific formats include: cartes de visite, cabinet cards, and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes (cased and uncased); engravings, lithographs, and other mechanical prints; caricatures and cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; small souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. There are a few cyanotypes and negatives.

The images offer views from most of the southern United States, especially North and South Carolina and Virginia. Many images are from Europe, with a smaller number from Japan and China; a large variety of other countries and locations are represented by a few images. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C. Many political and military leaders and notable personages, primarily from the U.S. and Europe are present in portraits and caricatures; there are numerous images of Eugene Debs, U.S. Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Subjects Series is eclectic, including advertising, cartoons, tobacco, ships, and images from conflicts: Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and devastation both rural and urban. There are also scenes from the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and both World Wars. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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Collection of papers and manuscripts relating to British Colonial India, 1737-1947

0.5 Linear Feet — 47 Items
This assembled collection of 47 documents, largely manuscript letters, covers nearly the entire span of British rule in India and is arranged in rough chronological order. The collection includes governmental reports, personal correspondence, and a printed map. Most of the documents are quite short though there are a few longer pieces and collections including a plan for opium sales, a series of reports on Indo-American trade, and a long letter on army discipline prior to the Vellore Revolution.

Miscellaneous items relating to the history of India, especially during the period of British rule, including a manuscript (12 pp.), 1798, by John Baird discussing a plan for increasing the opium trade in India; letters, 1799-1800, from Sir James Henry Craig, commander of a British division in Bengal, concerning the military situation in India; letters, 1801-1802, from John Chamier, chief secretary to the Madras government, pertaining to his desire for a seat on the Madras Council and future reforms; manuscripts, 1796-1805, discussing various aspects of the import and export trade between India and America, recording statistics and noting products involved; a map, 1820, of portions of Nagpur and Rewa provinces; and a letter, 1849, from Tomas Boaz requesting funds for a college to train Indian clergymen.

Other materials include a list, 1849, of goods purchased from Boston, Mass., merchants; letter, 1866, from Henry R. E. Wellesley, Madras 1st Light Cavalry, describing his duties and the climate in India, hunting trips, British politics, and the Sepoy army; letter, 1867, from Francis Napier, Tenth Baron Napier, governor of Madras, concerning the structure of the Indian government and his desire for a strong central government; letter, 1879, from General Frederick Sleigh Roberts, First Earl Roberts, discussing parts of his campaign in Afghanistan; letter, 1880, from Sir William Milbourne James criticizing British military ventures into Afghanistan; and a letter, 1882, from General Frederick Sleigh Roberts objecting to British policy of abandoning Kandahar and expressing fear of a Russian advance.

Additional items include a letter, 1883, from John Wodehouse, First Earl of Kimberley, secretary of state for India, concerning the Rajputana railway and the Egyptian telegraph; letters, 1886, from Sir Herbert Hope Risley discussing his work on a census glossary and on marriage customs in Bengal; letter, 1893, from Sir Henry Mortimer Durand, foreign secretary in India, discussing his book, Helen Trevelyan; letter, 1902, from Sir Evelyn Baring, First Earl of Cromer, pertaining to plans for the Indian railway; letter, 1915, from Sir Stephen George Sale reviewing the legal basis for viceroyalty in India; letter, 1930, from Sir William Malcolm Hailey criticizing English newspapers for using India as an issue against the Labour Party and discussing the Indian Congress Party; and a letter, 1947, of West Bengal, discussing some of the changes in India since Independence.

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Abbot Family papers, 1733-1999 and undated, bulk 1860-1910

19 Linear Feet — 10 boxes
The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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John Abercrombie letters, 1839 and undated

3 items
3 letters (ALS), including a letter of reference, dated May 27, 1839, Edinburgh, for Dr. William Pirrie.
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Alexander Sprunt and Son records, 1779-1960

Online
6082 items
Cotton firm from Wilmington, N.C., that for a short period was probably the largest cotton exporting house in the United States. Collection includes account books, ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase and sales journals, inventories, other subsidiary books, and some office files and correspondence. Goods were purchased from the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas, and other states and processed in the firm's compress facilities and sold to Great Britain, France, Germany, and elsewhere in Europe.

The collection consists of an extensive, but incomplete, set of account books, remnants of the office file and James Sprunt's correspondence (personal as well as business letters and papers), and pictures. Among the account books there are long series of ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase books, and stock inventories that document the company's operations between the 1870s and 1950s. The ledgers date between 1889 and 1952, and there are private ledgers for 1907 through 1931. The volume of minutes covers 1919-1930, but there are a few others among the offices files along with financial statements, 1885-1915, important legal documents of the partnership and corporation, and assorted other papers.

Correspondence and other papers of James Sprunt and the company date between 1884 and 1952, but they are numerous only for 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921. The letters date mostly to 1904-1910, and 1919-1921, and are largely files of James Sprunt, reflecting his activities in business and interests in secular and theological education, the Presbyterian church in the U.S., and North Carolina history. Notable correspondents and subjects are Alexander Sprunt (1815-1884), Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), Alexander Sprunt (b. 1898), James Sprunt (1847-1924), Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, Francis Herman Packer, John Miller Wells, John Campbell White, Edward Jenner Wood, The Laymen's Missionary Movement, and the Presbyterian mission at Kiangyin, China. Account books, minutes, and correspondence are available also for a number of domestic and foreign subsidaries and branch offices, but these are often quite fragmentary. More than thirty pictures, mostly photographs, illustrate the firm's staff, workers, physical plant, and employees as well as other scenes.

Also included are some papers representing various domestic and foreign subsidiaries and branch offices, especially Champion Compress and Warehouse Company, the Wilmington Compress and Warehouse Company, Alexander Sprunt & Son (of Delaware, a holding company), and the company's offices in New York City and Le Havre, France.

Information about the company's history can be found in: James Sprunt's letters of Nov. 6, 1908; Apr. 9, 1909; Jun. 7 and Oct. 22, 1919; an article in Wilmington's Morning Star from Feb. 11, 1921; and Dictionary of American Biography.

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Jean-Louis-Marie Alibert letter, Paris, undated

2 items
Letter (ALS) describes a treatment for a skin condition. Includes translation. Includes translation.
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Gay Wilson Allen papers, 1801-1988

33 Linear Feet — 5,500 Items
Gay Wailson Allen (1903-1995) was a university professor, author, and Walt Whitman scholar. Collection consists of correspondence, notebooks, printed material, essays, and other writings, literary manuscripts, scrapbooks, teaching materials, pictures, books, clippings, offprints, periodicals, and sale catalogs. The focus of the collection is Allen's career as an university professor and Walt Whitman scholar. In particular Allen's activities as a professor at New York University and as a lecturer at Nagono, Japan in 1955, are documented. The history of Whitman criticism is an important theme. There is a large amount of research material on Whitman, both of Allen and other literary scholars. These include Evie Allison Allen, Clara Barrus, Charles N. Elliot, Clifton Joseph Furness, Emory Holloway, Peter Mitilineos, Hans Reisiger, and Henry Scholey Saunders. The Correspondence Series contains original correspondence acquired by Allen of Richard Watson Gilder, Alice James, and William James. This series also contains the correspondence of Roger Asselineau, Fredson Bowers, Oscar Cargill, Malcolm Cowley, Charles E. Feinberg, Milton Hindus, Emory Holloway, Sholom Kahn, and Frederik Schyberg. There are no strictly personal papers in the collection.

The Gay Wilson Allen Papers span the years 1801 to 1988, but the bulk of the collection occurs during the years 1925 to the 1970s. They consist of correspondence, notebooks, printed material, essays and other writings, literary manuscripts, scrapbooks, teaching materials, pictures, books, clippings, offprints, periodicals, and sale catalogs. The focus of the collection is Allen's career as a university professor and Walt Whitman scholar. In particular Allen's activities as a professor at New York University and as a lecturer at Nagono, Japan in 1955, are documented. The history of Whitman criticism is an important theme. There is a large amount of research material on Whitman, both of Allen and other literary scholars. These include Evie Allison Allen, Clara Barrus, Charles N. Elliot, Clifton Joseph Furness, Emory Holloway, Peter Mitilineos, Hans Reisiger, and Henry Scholey Saunders. The Correspondence Series contains original correspondence acquired by Allen of Richard Watson Gilder, Alice James, and William James. This series also contains the correspondence of Roger Asselineau, Fredson Bowers, Oscar Cargill, Malcolm Cowley, Charles E. Feinberg, Milton Hindus, Emory Holloway, Sholom Kahn, and Frederik Schyberg. There are no strictly personal papers in the collection.

Allen's career, both as a professor and Whitman scholar, is documented in several series. The Walt Whitman Materials Series and the Scrapbooks Series relate to his Whitman research. In the former series the Commemorations and Societies Subseries and the Popular Culture Subseries also document the ever increasing interest in Whitman's life and works during the twentieth century. The Correspondence Subseries and the Pictures Subseries contain copies of letters and pictures relating to Whitman and his age. The Correspondence Series also contains extensive letters concerning Allen's early teaching career, his dealings with several presses, and the marketing and reception of his The Solitary Singer, a Whitman biography.

The papers of six Whitman scholars are in the Walt Whitman Scholars Series. It suggests the international range both of Whitman scholarship and of Allen's interests. In addition to the interest in Whitman she shared with her husband, Evie Allison Allen was also a skilled translator of Germanic languages. Charles N. Elliot and Emory Holloway, as well as Canadian Henry Scholey Saunders, were Whitman collector-scholars who interacted with both Allen and Furness. The late Peter Mitilineos was one of Allen's students and was particularly interested in the writings of Italian Whitman scholar Pasquale Jannacone. Professor and Mrs. Allen both had an interest in the writings of German Whitman scholar Hans Reisiger.

The Clifton Joseph Furness Papers Series documents the history of Whitman criticism from Whitman's day to the start of Allen's biography of Whitman, The Solitary Singer. Allen used some of Furness's research materials to write the book. The Clara Barrus Papers Subseries contains her research materials on the relationship between Whitman and John Burroughs. In fact Barrus was a close friend of Whitman's friends Burroughs and Thomas Biggs Harned. The subseries includes portions of Barrus's correspondence, her research materials, and the manuscript of her study of Whitman and Burroughs, entitled Whitman and Burroughs, Comrades. The Correspondence Subseries contains correspondence with a number of Whitman friends, scholars, and collectors. The Writings Subseries chiefly reflects the results of the information Furness collected on Whitman during the 1930s and 1940s. Furness began three major Whitman projects: a definitive biography, an extensive bibliography, and a study of his reception in New England, tentatively entitled "The Bull in the China Shop." None of these works were published during Furness's lifetime.

Collections in the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library related to the Gay Wilson Allen Papers include the American Literature Papers and the Trent Collection. Collections at other institutions related to the Gay Wilson Allen Papers include papers of Clara Barrus and Emory Holloway at the University of Virginia, papers of Henry Scholey Saunders at Brown University, and papers of Charles N. Elliot at the Library of Congress.

Provenance Note on the Clifton Joseph Furness Papers Series

Gay Wilson Allen acquired Clifton Joseph Furness's papers in 1948, but Furness had acquired some of Clara Barrus's papers shortly before her death in 1931. In turn Barrus, in her role as the literary executor of John Burroughs, had acquired some of Burroughs's papers in the years before his death in 1921. Apparently, Barrus had originally planned to write an extensive study of Whitman and his followers, based on materials found in her Research Files, but she apparently later decided to narrow its focus to a study of the relationship between Whitman and Burroughs. During Burroughs's last years she retyped some of his correspondence with Whitman and related figures, and in her own hand transcribed Burroughs's comments on each letter. With the help of Furness, Barrus published her last book, Whitman and Burroughs, Comrades in 1931. About that time, Furness acquired the materials found in the Clara Barrus Papers Subseries.

Furness was in close contact with other Whitman friends, scholars, and collectors, and spent years collecting information on Whitman. None of these projects were published during his lifetime.

In 1948, New York University professor Gay Wilson Allen was able to persuade the university to purchase for his use Furness's papers, which by now included papers from Barrus and Burroughs as well. David Goodale and Henry Scholey Saunders agreed to cooperate with Allen in the publication of Furness's Whitman bibliography. In about l951 Allen acquired Saunders's revised copy of the portion of Furness's Whitman bibliography concerned with "Biography and Criticism," Part 6 (of 11). After Furness's death Allen, with the help of some of the Furness Papers, wrote a Whitman biography, which eventually became The Solitary Singer.

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Charles Roberts Anderson papers, 1806-1993 and undated

15.9 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,200 Items
Author and professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document his active career as professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University. Included are research materials on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C., and on American literary figures such as Paul Hamilton Hayne, Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and others. Additional material includes correspondence and files on Anderson's publications; lectures and files related to teaching; travel diaries and keepsakes; and other papers related to his family history and academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail elements of life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insight into the state of literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect the dates of the content of original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The Charles Roberts Anderson Papers span the dates 1806-1993 and document the active literary career of Anderson, who was professor of American literature at Duke University and Johns Hopkins University and a reknowned international lecturer. Included are research materials on Paul Hamilton Hayne and other Southern literary figures. Also contains writings and research files on the subjects of Anderson's books and edited volumes, especially Emily Dickinson, Henry James, Sidney Lanier (to whom Anderson was related), Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, and other American literary figures, including Walt Whitman, William Faulkner, and Mark Twain. Additional material includes files on his research and publications on the intellectual life of Charleston, S.C.; correspondence and files on other publications; lectures and files related to teaching, including two audiotapes of Anderson's lectures on Dickinson; travel journals, keepsakes, and two films on Charleston, S.C. and Stratford, England; and other papers related to the Anderson family history and his academic career. Copies of correspondence and other documents by Anderson's research subjects, particularly Hayne, detail social conditions and life in the South in the nineteenth century. In addition, material in this collection chronicles the academic life of Anderson and provides insights into the state of American literary scholarship and publishing in the mid-twentieth century. Early dates usually reflect original material photocopied by Anderson in the course of his research. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

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Charles Wesley Andrews papers, 1808-1901

6 Linear Feet — 14 boxes — 3,640 Items
Protestant Episcopal clergyman, Shepherdstown, W. Va. Correspondence, journal (in letter form) of travels in Europe and the Near East in the 1840s, and other papers relating to church affairs, to the American Colonization Society, to conditions in Virginia before, during, and after the Civil War, and to such schools as the Episcopal High School and the Theological Seminary at Alexandria, Va., Woodberry Forest School, Orange, Va., Washington College (now Washington and Lee), Va., Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and others. Includes genealogical material on the Meade, Page, Custis, Fitzhugh, Robinson, Mines, and Boteler familes of Virginia.

Correspondence, journal (in letter form) of travels in Europe and the Near East in the 1840s, and other papers relating to church affairs, to the American Colonization Society, to conditions in Virginia before, during, and after the Civil War, and to such schools as the Episcopal High School and the Theological Seminary at Alexandria, Va., Woodberry Forest School, Orange, Va., Washington College (now Washington and Lee), Va., Kenyon College, Gambier, Ohio, and others. Includes genealogical material on the Meade, Page, Custis, Fitzhugh, Robinson, Mines, and Boteler familes of Virginia.

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Georges Apostoli letter, Paris, undated

1 item
Letter (ALS) informs recipient that Apostoli will send a recent published thesis on his electrical treatment of fibromata.
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Jean Louis Arnal note, undated

1 item
Note (ANS).
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Jacques Arsene d'Arsonval letter, Paris, to "Cher Confrere et Ami.", undated

1 item
Letter (ALS) to "Cher Confrere et Ami"
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Benjamin Guy Babington note, undated

1 item
Note (ANS). Accepts an invitation to dinner.
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Fox and Backhouse family papers, 1673-1930s

1 Linear Foot
Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse were members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in England in the mid-1800s. Their son, Edmund Backhouse, married Juliet Fox in 1848. This collection contains personal correspondence between members of the different connected Quaker families based in England, as well as some diaries, genealogical notes, and other printed ephemera from the family. Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and other ephemeral materials relating to the Fox and Backhouse families, along with materials relating to nineteenth century Quaker communities and families in England. The bulk of the collection is correspondence between different members of the Backhouse family, including Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, their son Edmund Backhouse and his wife Juliet Fox, and their grandson Jonathan Edmund (Jed) Backhouse. Caroline Fox is also a routine correspondant. The letters discuss family news, personal activities and travel, religious sentiments.

There are two excerpts of diaries which appear to be by different authors and may relate to Hannah Chapman Backhouse's travels to the United States in the 1830s, or to another family member's travels in Europe or the Middle East. The handwriting of these pages is challenging and the excerpts are unattributed and appear to be undated, so more research would be helpful.

Also present in the collection are some writings, including essays and poetry, typically spiritual or relating to prayer, as well as some honorifics for Edmund Backhouse and a copy of his obituary. There are some manuscript riddles, some watercolors, and some sketches of scenes and still lifes. The collection also includes some ceremonial documents, including a letter from the Society of Friends declaring support for Hannah and Jonathan Backhouse's travels to the United States.

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John Backhouse papers, 1740-1956

12 Linear Feet — 30 boxes; 1 oversize folder — 4,480 Items
Merchant and British Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs. Business and personal correspondence of the Backhouse family, principally of John Backhouse. Material for the 18th and early 19th centuries reflects the family's mercantile operations, including efforts to collect pre-Revolutionary debts in America. Other papers relate to Backhouse's career as Commissioner and Receiver General of the Excise Office and Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, his service as private secretary to George Canning, his service with the diplomatic corps, his art collection, and his mercantile associates in Amsterdam and Hamburg. Other subjects include the Board of Control under Canning, and the British consulates at Canton and Amoy. Family correspondence contains numerous references to the Foreign Office and to relations with Circassia, France, Greece, Russia, Turkey, and the United States. Letters and diaries of Backhouse's son, George, and his wife include references to the slave trade and describe their life in Havana while he was commissary judge there. There are also thirteen Cabinet circulars (1835-1837) from the British Foreign Office and marked for return to either Backhouse or Strangways. These abstracts of intelligence were based on confidential reports received from the British ambassadors in Paris, Berlin, Lisbon, Madrid, Constantinople, and Petersburg, and relate chiefly to French, Russian, and Spanish politics.

Business and personal correspondence of the Backhouse family, principally of John Backhouse. Material for the 18th and early 19th centuries reflects the family's mercantile operations, including efforts to collect pre-Revolutionary debts in America. Other papers relate to Backhouse's career as Commissioner and Receiver General of the Excise Office and Under Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, his service as private secretary to George Canning, his service with the diplomatic corps, his art collection, and his mercantile associates in Amsterdam and Hamburg. Other subjects include the Board of Control under Canning, and the British consulates at Canton and Amoy. Family correspondence contains numerous references to the Foreign Office and to relations with Circassia, France, Greece, Russia, Turkey, and the United States. Letters and diaries of Backhouse's son, George, and his wife include references to the slave trade and describe their life in Havana while he was commissary judge there.

There are also thirteen Cabinet circulars (1835-1837) from the British Foreign Office and marked for return to either Backhouse or Strangways. These abstracts of intelligence were based on confidential reports received from the British ambassadors in Paris, Berlin, Lisbon, Madrid, Constantinople, and Petersburg, and relate chiefly to French, Russian, and Spanish politics.

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Matthew Baillie letters, [London], 1819-1820 and undated

5 items
2 letters (ALS), 1 holograph note, and 2 clippings. Includes a prescription "for Dewar Esqr." and a note to "Richard Reeves Esq."
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Chambers Baird papers, 1817-1933

4 Linear Feet — 2,255 Items
Lawyer and businessman, of Ripley, Ohio. Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

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Frank Baker collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated

Online
50 Linear Feet — approximately 18,000 items
Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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Frank Baker collection of Methodist circuit plans, 1777-1984 and undated

8.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 2000 items
Consists predominantly of circuit plans from the Methodist Church (Great Britain) and the earlier churches that merged to form it in 1907 and 1932: the Wesleyan Methodist Church, the Primitive Methodist Church, the United Methodist Free Churches, and the United Methodist Church (Great Britain). These circuit plans, collected by Frank Baker, document the history, growth, and organization of the itinerancy, established by John Wesley in the early years of the church when Methodism began to spread into the rural areas of England. The plans feature detailed schedules of where the itinerant preachers, known as circuit riders, were to appear and preach each week.

The Frank Baker Collection of Methodist Circuit Plans, 1777-1984 and undated, consists predominantly of circuit plans from the Methodist Church (Great Britain) and the earlier churches that merged to form it in 1907 and 1932: the Wesleyan Methodist Church, the Primitive Methodist Church, the United Methodist Free Churches, and the United Methodist Church (Great Britain). These plans document the history, growth, and organization of the itinerancy, established by John Wesley in the early years of the church when Methodism began to spread into the rural areas of England. The circuit plans feature detailed schedules of where the itinerant preachers, known as circuit riders, were to appear and preach each week.

Items in the 19th Century and Overseas Circuits Series were donated in the 1970s and were organized at the item level and encapsulated in the early 1980s. Items were numbered in the order in which they were encapsulated, which bears no relationship to alphabetical order or circuit organization. They are currently boxed in numerical order in three boxes with the following number ranges: Box 1: items 1-240; Box 2, items 241-390; Box 3: items 391-527. Items in the 20th Century Series, numbering around 800 to 1000 items, were donated in the late 1980s and are organized to the folder level.

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Frank Baker papers, 1641-2002 and undated, bulk 1740-1995

112.7 Linear Feet — Approx. 90,000 items — Approx. 90,000 Items
Scholar, editor, collector, and Duke University faculty member specializing in the history of English and American Methodist history, and the life and career of minister John Wesley. Collection documents the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the founder and Methodist minister John Wesley. Materials are arranged in the following series: Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Materials; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Topics covered include: the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University libraries; the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the Church of England; the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodist history; music and hymnology; and material on the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as Charles Wesley and many other Wesley family members, William Grimshaw, and Francis Asbury. Printed material abounds, and includes many maps, articles, clippings and newspapers, pamphlets, and religious music.

The Frank Baker Papers date from 1641 through 2002, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1800s to the 1990s. The collection houses correspondence, articles, pamphlets, extensive subject and research files, clippings, publicity, a few audio recordings and microfilm, and other materials documenting the professional career and life of Frank Baker, historian of Methodism and particularly of the life and career of minister John Wesley, considered the founder of British Methodism. The collection is arranged in the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Baker Collections Files; Correspondence; Libraries and Archives; Ministry; Personal Files; Printed Material; Professional Service; Scrapbooks and Albums; Subject Files; Teaching Materials; and Writings and Research. Many of the series are divided into subseries, and two are also followed by an Oversize Materials subseries. Note that early dates usually represent reproductions, not originals, although the collection does house some original research materials.

Topics covered by the materials in the collection include: the history and development of Methodism and of the Wesley family; the history of the Church of England, and the Methodist Church in England, the U.S., and other countries; the development of academic research on Methodism and its publications; the history of the Baker book and manuscript collections in the Duke University Libraries; music and hymnology; and the development of the Wesley Works Series, a publishing project headed by Baker. There are abundant research materials on notable individuals associated with Methodism such as John and Charles Wesley, many other Wesley family members, and others such as William Grimshaw and Francis Asbury.

The largest series is the Subject Files (122 boxes), research files assembled by Baker on approximately 1500 topics related to the Wesley family and the history of Methodism and the Methodist Church. Another large series is Writings and Research (48 boxes), containing files of research notes, correspondence, print materials, and publicity related to each of Baker's published works. There are also many student writings in the collection and other materials related to Baker's teaching. Among the Personal Files are biographical files on Frank Baker; awards and honors; travel-related items, and two portrait photographs of Baker's parents. Baker's personal hobbies are reflected in the stamp collecting materials and a group of Victorian-era monogram and crest albums and "libri amicorum," or friendship albums that round out the collection.

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Henry Dunster Baker papers, 1794-1953

3 Linear Feet — 280 Items
U.S. consul official and newspaper editor and publisher. Correspondence, scrapbooks, clippings, pamphlets, pictures, and genealogy, reflecting Baker's consular career and the Baker, Dunster, Griffiths, Speir, and Willis families of the U. S., Great Britain, and Australia. The papers relate to family affairs, Baker's work as consul (1907-1911) in Tasmania, as commercial attache in Russia during World War I, and as an opponent of trade with Russia (1930-1931). Includes some clippings and pictures (1916-1927) from the Trinidad consulate.

Papers of Henry D. Baker (1873-1939), U.S. consular official and newspaper editor and publisher, contain correspondence, clippings, genealogy, printed material, pictures, and volumes. The bulk of the papers before 1900 refer to the Griffiths, Speir, Willis and Austin families of England and Australia, related through Baker's wife, Gwyneth Griffiths. They concern family matters, and the service of Charles Ralph Griffiths (1790-1850) as British vice consul and consul at Buenos Aires, 1823-1846. Material after 1900 relates to the consular career of Henry Baker in Tasmania, 1907-1911, Bombay, 1913-1914, and Trinidad, 1916-1927; Baker's service as commercial attache at Petrograd, Russia; and his opposition to trade with Russia, 1930-1931. Tasmanian Scrapbook, 1907-1911, includes clippings, photographs, and pictures relating to Tasmania, Australia, New Zealand, and the islands of the Bass Straits. Scrapbook, 1911-1933, contains pamphlets, articles, speeches, pictures, clippings and letters concerning relations with Russia during World War I and in 1930-1931, and Baker's activities in the United States, Trinidad, Tasmania, India, and New Zealand. There are also printed copies of books by Baker and by Charles H. Baker; family photographs and copies of portraits, especially from the Griffiths family; photographs of Trinidad and Baker's trip to Persia, 1916; and photographs of "Erryd," Victorian home of the Griffiths in Wales. Printed material consists of speeches, articles and pamphlets by and about Baker. The clippings, 1910-1951, include articles by and about Baker and items about the countries in which he served. An extensive genealogical folder contains information about the Baker and Dunster families of America and the Griffiths, Speir, Willis, Hart, and Blondeau families of England and Australia.

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Ballard's Valley and Berry Hill Penn Plantation records, 1766-1873

6 Linear Feet — 244 Items
Plantations in St. Mary's Parish, Jamaica. Records of sugar and livestock plantations in St. Mary's Parish, Jamaica. The material prior to 1837 is chiefly plantation records. Later papers include letters from managers of the estate to the owners describing crop conditions and potential land sales and leases, the end of the apprenticeship system in 1838, the importation of Chinese laborers in 1846, sugar traders' reaction to the repeal of the corn laws in that year, and plans for the erection of a Church of England chapel in 1848 The plantation records reveal the number and condition of enslaved people or apprentices and stock, purchases of goods, accounts payable, size of crops, and sales of sugar, rum, and cattle.

This series contains 235 items and 9 volumes of the records of sugar and livestock plantations, Ballard's Valley Plantation and Berry Hill Penn, in St. Mary's Parish, Jamaica. The material prior to 1837 is chiefly plantation records, including financial papers and account books. The plantation records reveal the number and condition of enslaved people or apprentices and stock, purchases of goods, accounts payable, size of crops, and sales of sugar, rum, and cattle. Later papers include letters from managers of the estate to the owners describing crop conditions and potential land sales and leases, the end of the apprenticeship system in 1838, the importation of Chinese laborers in 1846, sugar traders' reaction to the repeal of the corn laws in that year, and plans for the erection of a Church of England chapel in 1848.

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William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated

31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items
Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

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Admiral Robert Barrie papers, 1765-1953

Online
6 Linear Feet — 735 Items
Admiral Sir Robert Barrie (1774-1841) served in the British Navy and participated in the Vancouver expedition, 1791-1795; the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars; the War of 1812; and served as naval commissioner in Canada, 1819-1834. Collection includes papers relating to Admiral Barrie's experiences in the Vancouver expedition, 1791-1795; the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars; the War of 1812; and his service as naval commissioner in Canada, 1819-1834. Included is a small group of material relating to the 31st Regiment of Foot in Florida and Britain during the 1760s and 1770s when the Admiral's father, Dr. Robert Barrie, was surgeon's mate. Correspondents include Thomas Manby and James Macnamara.

The collection consists primarily of family papers in which some naval correspondence is intermingled. The letters of Sir Robert and Lady Julia Barrie are numerous. There are letters by Admiral Gardner, Dorothy (Gardner) Clayton, and various naval officers and members of the family. There are groups of legal papers, biographical sketches, genealogy, financial accounts, and photographs.

Family relationships and associations are extensive and are represented by comment, legal documents, and genealogies. The families include: Clayton, Cornwall, Cracraft, Cririe, Dixon, Fothergill, Gardner, Humphrys, Ingilby, Lyon, Shuttleworth, and Uppleby. A small group of photographs includes Sir Robert Barrie, William Barrie, John and Olivia (Page) Fothergill, John and Kitty (Leadbetter) Uppleby, Leadbetter and Eliza (Barrie) Uppleby, Charles Clotworthy Wood, Swarthdale House, and others.

The papers were still owned by the family as late as the 1950s. On Feb. 28, 1951, Charles John Ormond Barrie wrote about them to James S. Matthews of the Vancouver City Archives. Ten years earlier (Aug. 19, 1941) he listed several series of letters, some of which are no longer in the collection--correspondence from Lord Aylmer, Sir George Cockburn, Sir John Franklin, and George Vancouver. The covers for a few of these letters remain in the collection. The covers for letters by Admiral Gardner and copies of letters by Barrie indicate other absent manuscripts. Some papers may have been destroyed during Barrie's lifetime.

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Josiah Bartlett document, Boston, 1817, Oct. 2

1 item
Document, signed. Certificate of the Massachusetts Medical Society, that Josiah Lamson is qualified to practice medicine. Signed by, among others, Josiah Bartlett and Aaron Dexter.
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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of portraits and images of women, 1600s-1940s

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. A small portion of the ephemera collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women.

Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. Examples of women depicted include: Mother Damnable, Moll Cutpurse, Catherine de Medici, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Martha Hatfield, and Madame de Genlis. One item is a relief sculpture of the bust of Martha Washington. A small portion of the collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a copy of a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers. Many of the items in this collection are loose pages which have been copied or removed from bound volumes.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of Women's Education Ephemera, 1806-1948

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of women's work and domestic arts ephemera, 1700s-1940s

1 Linear Foot
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

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Alonzo G. Beardsley papers, 1787-1897

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,597 items (including 1 vol.)
This collection, largely the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley (founded c. 1868), also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded them, including John Porter, judge and state senator. During the 1850s the collection also includes the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. From 1840 to 1860 the papers concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States. The Civil War period papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy, U.S. Representative from Cayuga County, N.Y. include mention of appointments and promotions; aid to wounded soldiers; defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863, civilian morale, and the activities of Southern sympathizers. Post Civil War materials include the papers of the Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. Letters after 1870 include information about gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872, and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. There is also genealogical material for the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

This collection contains mostly the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley, also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded this firm. The early papers, beginning about 1800, center on John Porter, judge, state senator, and law partner of New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop. In about 1840 the Porter letters merge into those of William Allen, and for the next fifteen years the correspondence reflects Allen's legal practice and depicts life in Auburn, New York. The letters of Alonzo Beardsley begin about 1842, but it is not until 1855 that he and Allen become partners. During the 1850s the papers also include the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. For the most part, papers during 1840-1860 concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States.

For the Civil War period there are the 1860s papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy from Cayuga County, New York, a U.S. representative. Topics include appointments and promotions, aid to wounded soldiers, defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of the 5th, 111th, and 138th New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863 and its enforcement, and civilian morale and the activities of Southern sympathizers, especially in 1863. Pomeroy's correspondence also concerns patronage, party organization and rivalry, and service to constituents. From 1865 to 1870 there is much family correspondence, particularly letters to Nellie Bisby of Attica, New York. Between 1865 and 1868 many papers appear from Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. After 1870 letters of Alonzo Beardsley relate to miscellaneous subjects, such as gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872; the Oswego Starch Company; and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. Numerous legal papers and documents reflect all phases of the Osborne firm's work. There is a large amount of related printed matter. The collection also included genealogical material on the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

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William Beaumont papers, 1816-1944

5 items
Material includes a letter (ALS), reprints, holograph notes. All material relates to the letter, from Commodore Thomas Macdonough to B.W. Crowninshield, Secretary of the Navy, recommending William Beaumont for service in the Navy.
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Theodric Romeyn Beck letter, [Fairfield, New York], between 1815 and 1840

1 item
Letter (ALS). Requests of Mr. Little, a bookdealer, the account against the Western College of Physicians and Surgeons for various medical journals.
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Bedinger and Dandridge Family papers, 1752-2000

30 Linear Feet — 13,000 Items
Bedinger and Dandridge families of Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York. Collection consist of journals, correspondence, poems, reviews, and other papers of the Bedinger, Dandridge, Washington, Henry Clay, and Adam Stephen families, of Virginia, Kentucky, and Ohio; and of the Cornwall, Lawrence, Mitchell, Walter Bowne, and Rufus King Southgate families, of Connecticut, Maine, and New York primarily created or collected by Caroline Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The papers fall into six classes: journals and fragments of journals of Danske Dandridge (1864-1909), Henry Bedinger (1830s), and Daniel Bedinger (1811); correspondence and material on Kentucky and the northern Shenandoah Valley during the Revolutionary period; family correspondence, genealogies, and memoirs used in writing the Bedinger family history; papers of Henry Bedinger, the American Minister to Denmark in the 1850s; poems, reviews and literary correspondence of Danske Dandridge, and poems and prose of her father, Henry Dandridge, and of her daughter, Serena Catherine Dandridge; and horticultural writings of Danske Dandridge.

Collection includes the correspondence and papers of five generations of families from Virginia, West Virginia, Kentucky, Ohio, and New York chiefly created or collected by Carolina Danske (Bedinger) Dandridge. The primary portion of the collection is made up of the personal and family papers of Danske Dandridge (1858-1914), a writer and horticulturist. From 1866 to her marriage in 1877, Danske Dandridge's correspondence is concerned with social life in Virginia and Washington, D.C., and with family matters. Her literary correspondence begins in the early 1880s and continues until the year of her death. Correspondents include John Esten Cooke, Edmund C. Stedman, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, and Thomas W. Higginson. There are sustained exchanges of letters with William Hayes Ward, editor of The Brooklyn Independent which published much of her work; with the poet Lizette Woodworth Reese of Baltimore; and Margaretta Lippincott. Material on gardening begins to appear in the papers for the 1890s and includes a large number of letters and eleven notebooks.

Danske Dandridge's family correspondence continues with here sister Mrs. J. F. B. (Mary Bedinger) Mitchell, and her brother, Henry Bedinger IV, as well as with her numerous cousins.

Correspondence of Adam Stephen Dandridge (1844-1924) reflects his career in the West Virginia House of Representatives and his business as a seller of farm machinery.

Correspondence and papers of Serena Katherine (Violet) Dandridge, daughter of Danske and Adam Stephen Dandridge, bear on her career as an illustrator for the zoologist Hubert Lyman Clark, and reflect her interest in women's suffrage and the Swedenborgian Church. There are also twelve volumes of her writings in manuscript.

Correspondence and papers of Danske Dandridge's father, Henry Bedinger Dandridge III, include letters on literary subjects from Thomas Willis White, Philip Pendleton Cooke, and Nathaniel Beverly Tucker; papers from his years as a member of the United States House of Representatives from 1845 to 1849; records of his service, 1853-1858, first as a consul and then as minister of the United States in Sweden and in particular his negotiation of the treaty with Sweden in 1857; and his notebooks containing poems and comments on social life in Virginia.

Letters of Caroline B. (Lawrence) Bedinger, mother of Danske Dandridge, to her husband's family in the South and her relatives in New York concern her experience as a young woman in Washington, D.C., and Virginia; her stay in Copenhagen; the Civil War experiences of her husband's family and her own; family life; and the education of her children.

The collection contains a large number of transcripts made by Danske Dandridge from originals in the possession of various branches of her family, including the Swearingens, Shepherds, Morgans, Rutherfords, Worthingtons, Washingtons, Kings, Brownes, and Lawrences for the period from the American Revolution to the Civil War. There are also copies of letters and documents from the Lyman C. Draper manuscripts at the University of Wisconsin. Essentially, they are the papers of three brothers, George Michael Bedinger (1756-1843), Henry Bedinger II (1753-1843), and Daniel Bedinger (1761-1818), and their descendants and connections. Among the many subjects discussed are warfare with Indigenous Americans and conditions on the Virginia frontier; descriptions of the events of the Revolution; trading in salt and fur; experiences of Americans held prisoner by the British during the Revolution; flour milling in the Potomac valley; trade and transport of farm commodities; travel on the Mississippi to New Orleans, 1811-1812; James Rumsey and the development of the steamboat; the settling of Kentucky and Ohio, descriptions of Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and Baltimore at various times from 1800 to 1860; antebellum social life, South and North; and extensive comments on politics through 1860, particularly on the opposition to Federalism and the early Democratic-Republican Party.

Description taken from Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University. (1980).

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Charles Bell papers, 1830 and undated.

8 items
Letter (ALS) dated Oct. 20, 1830 tendering his resignation as Professor of Physiology at the University of London; a pencil sketch and engravings of drawings by Bell; a copy of a portrait of Bell by J. Stevens and two clippings.
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James Martin Bell papers, 1768-1870 and undated

15 Linear Feet — 40 boxes — 13,604 Items
Lawyer, political leader, ironmaster, railroad promoter, and banker, of Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania. Correspondence and business papers reflecting the major part played by Bell and his family in the economic development of central Pennsylvania and other areas. Among the subjects dealt with are the building of internal improvements, the charcoal iron industry in the Juniata Valley, land titles and speculation, and early growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad under J. Edgar Thomson and others, tariff bills, the economic cycle of booms and depressions, the evolution of the monetary and banking system, telegraph companies, coal mining, Lake Superior copper mining, and Bell's active interest in Whig and Republican Party politics. Papers of the Civil War period illustrate the impact of the conflict on the business community in the North, and on the people of Pennsylvania during Confederate raids and invasions. Some papers relate to tests of Pennsylvania iron made at the Washington Navy Yard by Captain Dahlgren, to Bell's service as agent of Jay Cooke in floating Federal loans in Pennsylvania, and to the effect of the war on the banking system. Included are two early railroad broadsides from Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad (1856 and 1867).

Correspondence and business papers reflecting the major part played by Bell and his family in the economic development of central Pennsylvania and other areas. Among the subjects dealt with are the building of internal improvements, the charcoal iron industry in the Juniata Valley, land titles and speculation, and early growth of the Pennsylvania Railroad under J. Edgar Thomson and others, tariff bills, the economic cycle of booms and depressions, the evolution of the monetary and banking system, telegraph companies, coal mining, Lake Superior copper mining, and Bell's active interest in Whig and Republican Party politics. Papers of the Civil War period illustrate the impact of the conflict on the business community in the North, and on the people of Pennsylvania during Confederate raids and invasions. Some papers relate to tests of Pennsylvania iron made at the Washington Navy Yard by Captain Dahlgren, to Bell's service as agent of Jay Cooke in floating Federal loans in Pennsylvania, and to the effect of the war on the banking system. Included are two early railroad broadsides from Bellefontaine and Indiana Railroad and Union Pacific Railroad (1856 and 1867).

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Bryant Bennett papers, 1767-1902, bulk 1840-1875

2 Linear Feet
Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

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Benson-Thompson Family papers, 1803-1936

3 Linear Feet — 864 Items
Recorded earlier as the Benson Family Papers. Includes materials from the related families of Elias Benson, physician, of Marion Co., Alabama, and John Ford Thompson, officer of the Alabama Militia. The families emigrated from Greenvilee and Spartanburg counties, S.C., to Alabama in the early 1800s. Personal correspondence and business papers of the Benson, Thompson, and Moore families who migrated from Greenville County and Spartanburg County, South Carolina, to Alabama. Correspondence between the groups in South Carolina and Alabama is concerned for the most part with family matters. However, political events are occasionally discussed, and a number of letters, 1836-1840, deal with the Alabama militia. The collection includes letters reflecting conditions in Alabama during the Civil War; several items on medical education at the University of Louisiana (Tulane University), 1866-1868; and records of the Marion (Alabama) Grange, No. 95, 1873-1876.

This collection is arranged into 5 series, based on format: Printed Matter and Volumes, Bills and Receipts, Legal Papers, Miscellany, and Letters and Correspondence. Each of these series is arranged chronologically.

Dr. Elias Benson (1788-1843) was a native of Spartanburg District, S. Carolina, from which he and two brothers, Abner (d. 1836) and Nimrod Earle (1794-1854), moved to Alabama early in the 1800s. Another brother, Williss, remained in South Carolina. Elias Benson was at Marion at least by 1821 when the first letter of the collection is addressed to him there. A biographical sketch of Nimrod Earle Benson appears in Thomas McAdory Owen's History of Alabama and Dictionary of Alabama Biography (Chicago, 1921).

The correspondence and other papers of the 1820s and 1830s are especially extensive for Elias Benson and his relatives in Alabama and South Carolina. Elias and Abner Benson have numerous letters, and Williss and Nimrod Earle Benson are also represented, especially in the 1830s. The correspondence usually concerns personal and business matters, but several notable exceptions relate to politics in South Carolina and a manufacturer and politicians in Alabama. On Dec. 5, 1831, Andrew Barry Moore (d. 1847 or 1848), cousin of Gov. Andrew Barry Moore of Ala., writes from South Carolina about the nullification controversy and the agitation throughout the state by the Free Trade Association. On July 23, 1832, Abner Benson is in South Carolina where he comments on the political battle between nullifiers and their opponents. Later on Jan. 15, 1835, Thomas N. Dawkins comments from Union Court House on the discord among the nullifiers in his county. He notes a general approval of the late compromise but expects the old party divisions to continue. On Oct. 2, 1838, Williss Benson of Greenville District, S.C., describes the circumstances of the shooting of Richardson Earle by William Lowndes Yancey who was then living near Greenville. A number of other letters are from either Greenville or Spartanburg. On Oct. 10, 1829, Nimrod E. Benson writes about a young attorney who is a candidate for circuit solicitor. This attorney, George Thomas Goldthwaite, later served as Chief Justice of Alabama and U.S. Senator.

The Bensons were closely related to the family of Gov. Andrew Barry Moore. He was a nephew of General Thomas Moore, whose daughter Patsy married a Benson; this is indicated by his will. Family letters indicate that Patsy was the wife of Dr. Elias Benson. The early Moore family correspondence represents part of the family in the Spartansburg District, S.C., and is scattered from about 1827 into the mid-1830s. The most frequent correspondent is Andrew Barry Moore, cousin of Gov. Moore of Alabama. Benson and Moore letters of the 1820s concern the settlement of the estate of General Thomas Moore (1759-1822), father of A.B. Moore of S.C. and Mrs. Benson. Gov. Moore was a principal official of the Marion Steam Mill Company when it was organized in Sept. 1836; a copy of its preliminary articles of association is filed with the Legal Papers.

John Ford Thompson married Mary Eleanor Benson, daughter of Elias Benson. He lived at or near Greenville, S.C., prior to his migration to Perry County. Letters are addressed to him and his mother at Greenville in the 1820s. He and a brother were educated at Greenville College in Tennessee during the mid-1820s. By at least the mid-1830s he was in Alabama. He engaged in farming, surveying, and business. From 1836-1840, Thomas was Brigadier General in command of the 14th Brigade of the Alabama Militia. He died in the early 1850s.

Thompson has letters and business and legal papers throughout the first half of the 1800s, and they become numerous by the late 1830s. Various members of the Thompson family are represented. The most significant part of his letters concerns the Alabama Militia. He was commissioned Brigadier General of the 14th Brigade on Oct. 17, 1836. Thompson held this position until his resignation was accepted by Gov. Arthur P. Bagby on Sept. 26, 1840. During 1836-1840 the correspondence relates to various aspects of the militia and includes letters from a number of superior and subordinate officers. Topics include the militia code, militia organization, its effectiveness, finances, encampments, and future development.

During August 1849 and 1850, John F. Thompson visited Talladega Springs because of his bad health. He comments on the accommodations and the company at this resort.

On June 9, 1846, Thomas Benson discusses the raising of volunteer companies in Perry County for the Mexican War.

Although there are only a few scattered soldiers' letters, the Civil War is well represented on the home front by the letters of Mrs. John F. Thompson. Letters are numerous for the early years and scarce later on. Mary Eleanor (Benson) Thompson writes to two sons and a brother, and her letters are interesting for their descriptions of wartime Marion. Her reaction to the secession crisis of 1860-1861 appears in letters to son Elias at the University of Alabama.

The Thompsons attended St. Wilfred's Episcopal Church at Marion, and Mrs. Thompson's letters have comments upon it and the rector and bishop between 1859 and 1863.

The young Bensons and Thompsons were educated at various colleges and universities which are represented in this collection. During 1823-1826, John F. Thompson and his brother, Beverly J. Thompson, attended Greeneville College in Greeneville, TN. Among the correspondence from this period are letters from their fellow students and the college president. There is also an itemized account of their school expenses. In the 1840s, Thomas Benson with to the University of Nashville, and correspondence from that period reveals tuition charges, political engagement on campus, and public events he attended. Elias Benson Thompson, son of John F. Thompson, graduated from the University of Alabama in 1861. During 1859-1861 he wrote several letters, and his career is reflected in an extensive series of letters from his mother at Marion. Reach to the secession crisis is often expressed in these letters. After the Civil War, Elias Thompson studied medicine, which he later practiced at Marion. His medical degree was from the University of Louisiana at New Orleans. Elias wrote several letters from medical school in the 1866-1868 period, commenting on the Medical Dept. and its professors.

The correspondence is not extensive after the 1860s, and consists of letters from various members of the family. Robert Benson Evins, grandson of John F. Thompson and a lawyer and legislator, has some personal and family letters in the later decades. Elias B. Thompson was an officer of Marion Grange, No. 95, of the Patrons of Husbandry. The collection's Miscellany includes records of the Marion Grange, 1873-1876, with quarterly reports and accounts from the period.

John F. Thompson's diary dates from Jan. 1-Dec. 19, 1841, and includes a few entries for Oct. 1844-Jan. 1845. It is a detailed account of his activities and includes references to many people in the community.

1 result in this collection

Jane L. Berdes papers, 1525-1993

79.5 Linear Feet — 46,000 Items

The Jane L. Berdes Collection (1525-1993) has as its focal points the four Venetian welfare institutions known as the Ospedali Grandi and their role as providers of musical training for girls and women. The inclusive dates for the collection begin with the dates of primary materials Berdes collected and extend through her lifetime. The collection consists primarily of Berdes's research notes and materials on the Ospedali Grandi, and photocopies or microfilms of primary sources, including musical scores in manuscript and printed editions. It also contains correspondence, photographs, recordings and printed materials. Berdes identified the maestri of the Ospedali Grandi, the music performed, and the names of over 800 women who were members of the cori , but relatively little is known about them individually with the exception of Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen. In addition, the collection features general materials pertaining to other women in music throughout history. The user is advised that some photocopies are unattributed and, where Berdes did not indicate composer or author, no attempt has been made to provide one. The archive contains very few of Berdes's personal papers.

The bulk of the collection is found in the Research Notes and Materials Series, which contains information gathered in preparation for her books on the Ospedali Grandi and Maddalena Lombardini Sirmen (MLS). The heart of this series is the Ospedali Grandi data designated as "Raw Materials," which contains information culled from primary sources and arranged by subject. Most subseries provide documentation for Raw Materials, including copies of primary and secondary sources, pictures of instruments and iconography, and a bibliography. Similar materials pertaining to Sirmen are here also, as is general information about women in music.

The Music Series contains manuscripts and early printed editions of music performed at the Ospedali Grandi in the form of photocopies or microfilms (printed scores in modern edition are grouped with Printed Materials). There is particular emphasis on the compositions of Sirmen, including some recordings of her music. Works by Bertoni, Galuppi, Hasse, Jommelli, Vivaldi and others are grouped alphabetically by composer. The Correspondence Series contains both general professional correspondence and "Thesis Correspondence," that is letters from other scholars, libraries, archives, museums, and churches in Italian, French and English concerning the Ospedali Grandi and Sirmen. The Miscellaneous Series includes Berdes's other publications on both musical and nonmusical subjects, music criticism, course notes from classes she taught or attended, and memorabilia from her years at Oxford University. A selection of pertinent reference books from Berdes's library is found in the Printed Material Series, as are some libretti, and musical scores by Vivaldi in modern edition.

The user is advised to consult Box #1 for an introduction to the contents of the collection. It contains a copy of Berdes's book Women Musicians in Venice: Musical Foundations, 1525-1855; two copies of her dissertation, entitled Musical Life at the Four Ospedali Grandi, 1525-1855; two binders described by the donor as "the road map to the collection" and a videotaped review of its contents prepared by Berdes.

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Ernst von Bergmann letter, Berlin, undated [before 1907]

1 item
Letter (ALS) concerning corrections to a report.
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Nicholas Biddle letters, 1817-1840, and undated.

5 items
4 letters (ALS). Correspondence from Caspar Wistar, Robert Hare and Nathaniel Chapman. Wistar writes regarding quarantine regulations, that, on the one hand, they should prevent the introduction of contagious diseases and, on the other, should not be "burdensome to commerce". Includes transcription of Wistar letter.
1 result in this collection