Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Collection
Document, signed. John Mitchell petitions the Hospital for admittance. The Hospital receives the promise of John Haighton, physician, to supply the patient with clean body linen weekly and to remove the body at his expense, if the patient should die within the Hospital's care.
Collection
ANS. Requests that bearer be given a copy of his work on mineral waters, as well as his book on the liver. Note is attached to short biographical sketch.
Collection
Letter (ALS) informs recipient that Apostoli will send a recent published thesis on his electrical treatment of fibromata.
Collection
ALS. Writes regarding the editing of a publication on Parkinson's disease.
Collection
Manuscript pages from a proposed, but never published second and revised edition of North's book, "A treatise on a malignant epidemic, commonly called spotted fever". Available are photographs of the title page of North's own copy of the book, which bears marginal notes in his hand. Reader is referred to the article by Pleadwell, "A new view of Elisha North ... ", in Annals of medical history, 6 (1924). The manuscript and North's copy form the basis of this essay.
Collection

John Foot Scrapbook, circa 1810s-1870s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

John Foot, Esq., presumably of Westminster, England. Victorian scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Victorian era scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Harold Jantz Graphic Art collection, circa 1400s-1800s 5 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items

Professor of German literature at Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, and Duke Universities. Collector of German baroque literature and German Americana. A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

This material remains unprocessed and undescribed. Prints have been loosely sorted by American, European, or Asian origin and are foldered accordingly.

Collection
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

Collection
Online
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

Collection
Printed burial announcement, Amsterdam, 1775, of the death and remarkable old age of Hermanus van Kleef; silhouette portrait of cut-out colored papers and a lock of human hair, with holograph caption; and autograph translation of both announcement and caption. Collage portrait supposedly of and by van Kleef a few years before his death at the age of 101. English translation by a Dr. Luckhardt, sometime around 1950.
Collection
3 letters (ALS), including a letter of reference, dated May 27, 1839, Edinburgh, for Dr. William Pirrie.
Collection
Letter (ALS) dated Oct. 20, 1830 tendering his resignation as Professor of Physiology at the University of London; a pencil sketch and engravings of drawings by Bell; a copy of a portrait of Bell by J. Stevens and two clippings.
Collection
Document, signed. Certificate of the Massachusetts Medical Society, that Josiah Lamson is qualified to practice medicine. Signed by, among others, Josiah Bartlett and Aaron Dexter.
Collection

MacRae family papers, 1817-1943 10 Linear Feet — 4270 items

Correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida. Alexander MacRae's papers concern Florida plantations and their management, the Seminole Indian War (1842), and settlements in southern Florida. Papers of his son, Archibald MacRae, deal with his life aboard ship as a U.S. naval officer, and with his trips to the Azores, Italy, Sicily, Hawaii, South America, and California during the Mexican War. Other papers pertain to railroad construction and management, North Carolina militia (1832, 1839), a general commission business, life in the Confederacy and Confederate Army during the Civil War, postwar business and industrial development in the Wilmington, N.C., area, and a variety of business enterprises with which the MacRae family was connected. Includes writings and papers of Hugh MacRae.

Collection contains primarily correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of Hugh MacRae and the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida.

From the ante-bellum period there are papers of Hugh MacRae's grandfather, Alexander MacRae, concerning the management of plantations in Florida and the second Seminole War; of Archibald MacRae, pertaining to his career in the United States Navy, including a voyage to the Azores and the Mediterranean Sea, 1838, observation of the British attack on Egyptian forces, 1840, participation in the Mexican War in California, voyage to Hawaii, 1847, and descriptions of political and social events in Chile while part of the United States Naval Expedition to the Southern Hemisphere, 1849-1852; of John Colin MacRae and Henry MacRae, relating to the construction and management of railroads in North Carolina and general construction and transportation development in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia, including correspondence concerning quarrels between the Wilmington and Manchester Rail road, headed by Alexander MacRae, and other North Carolina lines; and of John MacRae and Donald MacRae, concerning their general commission business in Wilmington, North Carolina, founded in 1849, the Endor Iron Works (McIver, North Carolina), begun in 1857, and the political activities of John MacRae in Wilmington.

Civil War papers reflecting army life are those of William MacRae, Robert Bruce MacRae, Henry MacRae, and Walter G. MacRae, all of whom served in the Confederate Army, for the most part in North Carolina and Virginia. Their letters describe numerous battles and skirmishes and depict camp life in the 1st, 5th, and 87th North Carolina Regiments and the 2nd North Carolina Regiment, Cavalry. Letters of Donald MacRae, John Colin MacRae, Roderick MacRae, and Alexander MacRae, Jr., concern conditions at home during the war and family business interests, including the sale of cotton, blockade running, operations of an iron works, manufacture of salt, an epidemic of yellow fever in Wilmington, speculation and economic dislocation at the end of the war, and the occupation of Wilmington by Union troops.

Papers for the years after the Civil War are primarily those of Donald MacRae and his son, Hugh MacRae. Papers of Donald MacRae concern the handling of family real estate; settlement of claims on property in Florida; the guano business, particularly the Navassa Guano Company; general business interests, including the development of Linville, North Carolina, as a resort by the Linville Improvement Company and the Western North Carolina Stage Coach Company; and power development, especially the Great Falls Water Power Mining and Iron Company. The papers after 1890 are increasingly those of Hugh MacRae and concern his business interests, including the Wilmington Street Railroad Company, the Consolidated Railways, Light and Power Company, the Central Carolina Power Company in South Carolina, the Tidewater Power Company, and the Investment Trust Company of Wilmington (North Carolina), and his interest in land development and land reclamation, including the formation of farm communities near Wilmington, the promotion of legislation designed to help tenant farmers acquire their own land and to encourage immigration, the creation of the Carolina Trucking Development Company and the Carolina Real Estate Trust Company, and MacRae's work with the National Economy League and the Southern Economic Council in the 1930s.

The collection contains bills and receipts from many of the businesses in which the MacRae family was interested and a number of volumes dealing with personal and business matters, including works on rural rehabilitation; a diary of Robert Bruce MacRae, 1865-1866; a volume of Hugh MacRae's experiment records, 1909; "Roll of the Wilmington Hibernian Society," 1866-1879; account books of Alexander MacRae; record book of Donald MacRae, Company K, 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the Spanish-American War; letter book of Hugh MacRae, 1899-1900; and mercantile and shipping records for J. & D. MacRae of Wilmington, 1858-1860.

Collection

Chambers Baird papers, 1817-1933 4 Linear Feet — 2,255 Items

Lawyer and businessman, of Ripley, Ohio. Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

Collection

John R. Pendell papers, 1817-1906 2 Linear Feet — 1527 Items

John R. Pendell was a teacher, Baptist minister, and book salesman of Worcester, Mass. and New York. Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.

Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.

Collection

Iveson L. Brookes papers, 1817-1888 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 720 items (inc. 11 volumes)

Online
Collection includes correspondence of a Baptist preacher, landholder, and enslaver in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations, tariff and the nullification controversy, missionary work among enslaved people, student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of antebellum politics. Also discussed are diseases, health, and remedies, Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems along with Brookes' family genealogy and his sermon notes.

Collection contains correspondence of Iveson L. Brookes, a Baptist preacher and landholder in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations; tariff and the nullification controversy; transportation conditions; banking; missionary work among enslaved people; student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of ante-bellum politics; diseases, health, and remedies.

His later correspondence also discusses Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, religious revivals, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, the destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems. Correspondence by descendants includes mining near Potosi, Missouri, race relations in marriage and religion, politics in South Carolina in 1877, Columban College in Washington, D.C.; Brookes' family genealogy, and his sermon notes.

Collection
Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

Collection
4 letters (ALS). Correspondence from Caspar Wistar, Robert Hare and Nathaniel Chapman. Wistar writes regarding quarantine regulations, that, on the one hand, they should prevent the introduction of contagious diseases and, on the other, should not be "burdensome to commerce". Includes transcription of Wistar letter.
Collection
In an ALS to Thomas Poole, Davy inquires after an estate in Nether Stowey he would like to purchase and remarks sadly upon the death of Princess Charlotte. In a holograph note, signed, in French, to the Monsignor de Medici Spada, Davy remarks upon his poor health.
Collection
Professor of American literature, Duke University, Durham, N.C. The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA).

The Jay B. Hubbell Papers span the years from 1816 to 1998, with the bulk of the material documenting Hubbell's career from his early student years in the 1920s until his death in 1979. The collection consists mainly of his professional papers, including correspondence with colleagues and literary figures, articles written by others at his request for the Jay B. Hubbell Center, printed materials inscribed to him and written by him, and unpublished manuscripts. The material chronicles the four decades of Hubbell's career as professor and critic, which he dedicated to the growth and development of American literature as a field of critical inquiry. Among the many significant correspondents or subjects of others' writings are Conrad Aiken, Gay Wilson Allen, Robert Frost, Clarence Gohdes, members of the Hubbell family, Ralph Leslie Rusk, Carl Sandburg, Allen Tate, Arlin Turner, and John Hall Wheelock. Other significant topics covered by the material include the founding of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University, the study and teaching of literature from the American South, the activities of the faculty at Duke University, and the development of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association (MLA). The collection is divided into eight series: Biographical; Correspondence, Alphabetical; Correspondence by Date; Writings and Speeches; Subject Files; Teaching Abroad; Photographs; and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series contains correspondence, manuscripts of his autobiographical writings, financial and legal documents, writings by his siblings, curriculum vitae, and obituaries, all of which chronicle Hubbell's life from his earliest years until his death.

The largest component of the collection contains correspondence from colleagues, former students, and literary figures. The Correspondence, Alphabetical Series consists of many letters from students and colleagues. The bulk of the correspondence gives shape to the nature and status of American literary studies in the early- to mid-twentieth century. In particular, the many letters exchanged among Hubbell, his colleagues, and his students provide insight into the routine professional life of this first pioneering generation of scholars. From job appointments to topics of scholarship, the letters uncover the kinds of professional interests and pressures that influenced the formation of American literary studies. Additional miscellaneous letters are arranged chronologically in the Correspondence by Date Series. These letters mainly represent single items from colleagues, publishers, and minor writers. The same topics are represented here as in the correspondence arranged alphabetically.

Jay B. Hubbell authored numerous articles and books throughout his career which contributed to the bibliography of American literary studies. Samples of such are located in the collection's Writings and Speeches Series. The series is divided into two subseries, the Writings by Hubbell Subseries and the Writings by Others Subseries. The Writings by Hubbell Subseries includes unpublished manuscripts, publication files consisting of correspondence with publishers and review clippings, and printed material consisting of article reprints and reviews. The Writings by Others Subseries contains articles and essays by Hubbell's colleagues and peers, as well as several essays that Hubbell collected on topics of interest to him. It also contains several memoirs which narrate the lives and influence of several key figures in the first generations of American literary scholars.

The Subject Files Series chronicles some of the major events, interests, and projects of Hubbell's career. His involvement with the Modern Language Association is represented by material filed in the General Files Subseries. Also included in this subseries is material concerning several of his institutional affiliations, including Clemson University, Columbia University, and Southern Methodist University (SMU). Hubbell's papers concerning his many professional projects can be found in the Projects Subseries, such as the Checklist of Manuscripts and the Center for Southern Studies. Information related to many of the subject files can be found throughout the collection, particularly in the Biographical Data and Correspondence Series.

Jay Hubbell dedicated a generous portion of his scholarly career to teaching and students. Besides his interest in different configurations and institutions for furthering learning and scholarship, Hubbell spent several years teaching abroad. The Teaching Abroad Series contains correspondence and incidentals concerning his service at universities in Vienna, Jerusalem, and Athens. This series includes materials which highlight Hubbell's experiences at the intersection of American foreign policy and university teaching, as Hubbell served as a Visiting Expert for the U.S. Army in Vienna as well as a quickly evacuated Visiting Professor in Jerusalem in 1956, during the Arab-Israeli conflict.

The Photographs Series includes photographs of Hubbell, family, and colleagues. The series includes portraits of Hubbell alone as well as with family.

The Clippings Series contains newspaper and journal clippings recording the many significant personal and professional events of Hubbell's life. The series also includes clippings about contemporary events, friends, and colleagues which Hubbell found noteworthy.

Hubbell's papers pertaining to English Department matters and committee assignments can be found in the Duke University Archives. The David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Duke University houses many related collections, particularly in the Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography: the records of American Literature; American Literary Manuscripts; and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section and Southern Literature Discussion Group; and the papers of Gay Wilson Allen, Sacvan Berkovitch, Cathy Davidson, and Arlin Turner.

Collection
ALS, in French. Humboldt writes to P.H. Azais and Jules Berger de Xivrey on politics, philosophy, his expeditions, ethnology, natural history and the influence and inspiration of French thought. In 1966 Fritz Lange, of the Alexander-von-Humboldt-Kommission, writes to the Duke Medical Center Library regarding the Kommission's project to locate world-wide all correspondence to and from Humboldt.
Collection

Alpheus Augustus Hurst papers, 1816-1950 2 Linear Feet — 1340 Items

Ledgers (hard back and composition book), legal documents, family correspondence, almanacs, advertisements, and pamphlets.

Collection
Material includes a letter (ALS), reprints, holograph notes. All material relates to the letter, from Commodore Thomas Macdonough to B.W. Crowninshield, Secretary of the Navy, recommending William Beaumont for service in the Navy.
Collection
William Doddridge Smith was a land owner, Justice of the Peace, and attorney in Clarke County, Virginia. The collection is mainly comprised of diaries, account books, ledgers, and an autograph album from several members of his extended family and covers multiple generations who lived at various times in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and Ohio. Surnames represented are: Page, Smith, Thompson, and Williams. Three of the diaries are written by H.M. Williams (b.1842), who traveled to Cincinnati as a Christian missionary in 1882. Her diaries record her daily activities such as visiting the sick, attending meetings of various social and religious societies, and teaching Sunday school. One notebook was written by Mary Page Thompson (b. 1869) while she attended State Normal School in Baltimore (Md.) 1889, and includes notes on biology, psychology, and religion, including notes on a discussion of Christian missionary work in China. There are several items relating to Philip Doddridge Thompson (b. 1838), a Christian minister who worked in several states and one ledger that indicates that William Doddridge Smith was a Justice of the Peace in Clarke County, Virginia in 1866. The collection also includes one folder of indentures, deeds, and wills, the bulk of which was created during 1816-1854 and is related to the business and legal dealings of William Doddridge Smith and his father, Edward Jaquelin Smith, who were active in Virginia and West Virginia. There is also one folder of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.

Mainly diaries, account books, ledgers, and an autograph album from multiple members of the Page, Smith, Thompson, and Williams families who lived in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and Ohio. Three of the diaries are written by H.M. Williams (b.1842), who traveled to Cincinnati as a Christian missionary in 1882. Her diaries record her daily activities such as visiting the sick, attending meetings of various social and religious societies, and teaching Sunday school. One notebook was written by Mary Page Thompson (b. 1869) while she attended State Normal School in Baltimore (Md.) 1889, and includes notes on biology, psychology, and religion, including notes on a discussion of Christian missionary work in China. There are several items relating to Philip Doddridge Thompson (b. 1838), a Christian minister who worked in several states and one ledger that indicates that William Doddridge Smith was a Justice of the Peace in Clarke County, Virginia in 1866. Collection also includes one folder of indentures, deeds, and wills the bulk of which was created during 1816-1854 and is related to the business and legal dealings of William Doddridge Smith and his father, Edward Jaquelin Smith, who were active in Virginia and West Virginia. There is also one folder of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.

Collection
A collection of letters (ALS) from Brown, including a letter from Brown's grandfather, the Rev. John Brown; photostats, including one of the first page of the first edition of Brown's "Horae subsecivae"; and holograph notes in an anonymous hand.
Collection

Charles Wilkes papers, 1816-1876 7 Linear Feet — 4,566 items

U.S. naval officer and explorer, of Washington, D.C. Family correspondence, chiefly relating to naval cruises of Wilkes and his son, John Wilkes; the U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, to Antarctica, the Pacific Islands, and the Northwest Coast of the U.S., including preliminary planning, the voyage itself with detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina; together with legal and financial papers, writings, printed material, clippings, and other papers. Includes correspondence, 1848-1849, with James Renwick (1792-1863) and others.

The largest section in this collection is the correspondence, 1816-1876. It covers such subjects as the naval cruises of Charles Wilkes and his son, John; the Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842, in terms of preliminary planning, the voyage itself and detailed descriptions of places visited, and publishing the results of the expedition; gold mining and milling in North Carolina; the Civil War; and Wilkes family business ventures in North Carolina. There are many letters written by prominent persons, including a particularly rich section containing letters of scientists in 1848 and 1849. Also there is a lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) and Charles Wilkes correspondence. Other groups of papers are the clippings, financial papers, legal papers, miscellany, printed material, writings, and volumes.

The correspondence covers a sixty-year span, 1816-1876, with the majority of the letters being addressed to Charles Wilkes. The letters commence with one from John Wilkes about obtaining a warrant as a midshipman for his son Charles. Most of the early letters to 1818 are those of John to Charles concerning the son's early naval career and the father's advice pertaining to it.

In the 1820s begin letters from Charles Wilkes while on naval voyages, 1822-1823, describing Rio de Janeiro; Valparaiso; and the earthquake, burial customs, and clothing in Peru. The bulk of the letters for this period fall in 1825, while Wilkes was in Washington, D. C., waiting to take a naval examination for promotion to lieutenant. His letters concern social occasions, visiting friends, and prominent personages, including President and Mrs. John Quincy Adams and a dinner they gave, Mrs. Calhoun, and Prince Achille Napoleon Murat. Wilkes evidently made a conscious effort to contact and get to know the "right" people, pertly to further his career. Other Wilkes letters refer to the court-martial of Commodore Charles Stewart, at which Wilkes was called to testify; two French generals in Washington, Generals Lafayette and Simon Bernard; and steamboat and stagecoach travel.

Letters to Wilkes in 1825 and 1826 relate news about the trade situation in Chile, Simon Bolivar, politics and government in Peru, and U. S. Navy commissions. A lengthy series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters begins in 1828 and continues to 1854. Renwick was an engineer and educator, professor of natural philosophy and chemistry at Columbia, and an authority in every branch of engineering of his day. The letters, which were written primarily to Wilkes and to Jane Wilkes, Renwick's sister, relate to scientific and family matters Letters of Renwick's sons, Henry and Edward, eminent engineers, and James (1818-1895), a noted architect also appear in the papers.

In 1828 and 1829 letters begin in reference to preliminary plans for an exploring expedition. Particularly, Captain Thomas Ap Catesby Jones wrote a lengthy letter on Jan. 2, 1829, about the proposed expedition. President Jackson had given him command of the exploring squadron but later eased him out of command. On May 7 Wilkes wrote to Secretary of Navy John Branch about instruments and charts for the planned expedition.

In the 1820s there begin series of letters among Wilkes family members that continue in varying degrees throughout the collection. Those included in addition to Charles are his brothers John ("Jack''), who resided on a plantation outside Charleston; Henry, a lawyer in New York; and Edmund, also a lawyer in New York; and a sister Eliza (Wilkes) Henry in Albany, N. Y. There is an extended correspondence between Charles and his wife Jane, which runs from 1825 to 1848.

From July, 1830, to May, 1831, Charles Wilkes was on an extended Mediterranean cruise. As a result the collection for this period contains many lengthy letters he wrote to his wife that are replete with detailed descriptions of such locations as Gibraltar, Port Mahon, Algiers, Tunis, Naples, Florence, and Marseilles. In particular there is an expecially good account in September, 1830, of a visit Wilkes made to meet the Bey of Tunis and the prime minister at the palace. Also there is information about the French expedition to Algiers and the reaction to the French troops. Wilkes also demonstrated his interest in cultural and social life through his careful descriptions in Oct., 1830, of the National Museum, the San Carlo Opera, and churches in Naples. He also participated in much social life while visiting France in Dec., 1830.

The letters for 1832 and 1833 fill only a portion of one folder. Of note is a letter, July 28, 1833, by Charles Wilkes's brother John about the South Carolina militia, states rights, Governor Hayne, and politics in South Carolina

A long series of letters from Henry Wilkes in New York to his brother Charles in Washington, D C., appears from 1834 through the 1840s. The topics are primarily business and financial matters, sale and management of property, rental houses, and the Jackson City Association. Henry also wrote concerning elections in New York, riots there, and his attitude toward blacks. Of additional interest are letters in Dec., 1834, one that Charles Wilkes wrote to Secretary of the Navy Mahlon Dickerson about measurements of the eclipse, and one from James Renwick to Wilkes in reference to the U. S. Coast Survey.

By mid-1836, some correspondence begins to appear concerning preparations for the coming Exploring Expedition. For example, Wilkes wrote to John Boyle, Acting Secretary of the Navy, in July about instruments he needed for the voyage and requesting funds to purchase charts, books, and instruments. In August Wilkes journeyed to England and Europe to obtain scientific instruments for the expedition. In 1837 he wrote to Navy Secretary Dickerson about his dealings with Edward John Dent, a chronometer maker in London, and later about the disposition of instruments purchased for the expedition. Other letters in 1838 discuss the organization of the expedition, who will command it, speculation as to whether or not Wilkes will go, and plans and preparations for staffing and equipment. On June 3, 1838, Mary Somerville, an English scientific writer and astronomer, wrote to Wilkec about various aspects of oceanography which were still possible topics for inquiry on an exploring expedition. In the last half of 1837 are letters about Wilkes's surveying efforts and a report by Mrs. Wilkes on a visit from Dolley Madison.

From August, 1838, to June, 1842, Charles Wilkes was the commander of the U. S. Exploring Expedition. Writing from the U. S. Ship Vincennes to his wife, his letters are generally lengthy and marvelously detailed. Although little information is included about the specifics of the scientific experiments and specimen gathering, there is a wealth of information about the people and places visited. It is possible to include in this sketch only the highlights of information in the letters. Please consult the subjects listed in this Guide for further information. In 1838 and 1839, the voyagers went to Madeira; Brazil; Valparaiso, Chile; Callao, Peru; the Society Islands; and Sydney, Australia. Included is information about the homes, plants, and wine-making in Madeira; the President of Chile; travels to various small islands in the Pacific Ocean; natives; and social occasions. Also Wilkes referred to discipline problems on board ship, the officers in the squadron, the spirit of overall harmony on the expedition, and an apparent lack of support for the expedition by the U. S. government.

In 1840, Wilkes noted his sighting of the Antarctic Continent and then the trip to the Fiji Islands. This latter stop was particularly poignant for Wilkes because his nephew, Wilkes Henry, and a Lt. Underwood were murdered by natives who sometimes practiced cannibalism. The voyage was marred by several personnel problems. Wilkes suspended and sent home Dr. Gilchrist, a surgeon assigned to the expedition, and had difficulties with Joseph P. Couthuoy, a member of the scientific corps whom Wilkes dismissed. Wilkes's use of strict discipline was to result later in a court-martial.

In late 1840 and early 1841, the ships were docked in the Sandwich Islands (Hawaii), where he wrote a detailed account of an adventurous trip to explore the volcanic mountain, Mauna Loa, and of missionaries in Hawaii, In May, 1841, he noted a stop in Oregon and the Columbia River.

Letters in 1842 concern Wilkes's promotion and court-martial. His name was omitted from the list of promotions in the Navy, and he was not promoted to commander until 1843. The court-martial charges were primarily the result of his supposed use of harsh discipline on the expedition. As mentioned previously he was sentenced to be publicly reprimanded.

There begins in the late 1830s and 1840s correspondence between Charles Wilkes and his children, and among the children, which will continue throughout the collection. The children with whom he communicated were John ("Jack") (1827-1908); Jane (1829-[18--?]); Edmund (1833-[18--?]), an engineer; and Eliza (1838-[18--?]). Other family letters include several from Anne de Ponthieu to her cousin Charles Wilkes in the 1830s, and a long series between Henry Wilkes and his sister-in-law Jane Wilkes in the 1840s.

The family correspondence for the remainder of the 1840s during the post Exploring Expedition period includes many letters of Henry Wilkes, brother of Charles, particularly in 1846 and 1847. They concern business and financial matters, coal property in Pennsylvania, and the sale of the Jackson City property.

During this period John Wilkes (1827-1908) wrote from the U.S.S. Mississippi, which was on a cruise to Pensacola, Vera Cruz, and other ports. Contained in his letters is a brief report of Slidell's mission to Mexico, Several of his letters are from Annapolis where John was a midshipman at the U. S. Naval Academy in early 1847. The others were written from the U. S. S. Albany, which he was on board for a surveying cruise to Mexico and the western coasts of Central and South America. While on the cruise in late 1847 and 1848, he wrote to his father descriptions of various stopping places such as the Island of St. Thomas, Curaçao, and Caracas, Venezuela. In 1848 John was appointed Acting Master of the Albany. The next year John's letters to his father consist of those he wrote while on board the U. S. S. Marion, and while attached to his father's Exploring Expedition publication work for which he traveled to Philadelphia, New York, and Washington, D. C.

John's younger brother, Edmund, wrote several letters to his family while he was in school in Philadelphia in 1846 to 1847. The bulk of his letters during this period, though, date from August, 1848, through 1849, from Charlotte, N. C. As a teenager, Edmund was given the responsibility of going to Charlotte to oversee some mining and milling property there. This extensive correspondence consists basically of reports by Edmund to his father and instructions from Charles to his son; as a consequence, much information is revealed about mining and milling efforts in the Charlotte area at this time. Specifically Edmund gave accounts of grinding ore at the Charlotte and Capps Mines, Capps Mine preparations, comments about amalgamation problems, milling ore, and working stamp, grist, and saw mills at St. Catherine's Mills Charles Wilkes owned at least a one-quarter share of the Capps Gold Mine, and also had a share in a co-partnership for the mine called the Capps Company. It was his intention to obtain possession of the engine at the Capps Mine and to provide facilities for others to use it either for shares or by a tribute system. He also wished to make St. Catherine's Mills a business place for grinding all sorts of ores, but none of his ventures in Charlotte was ever very successful or profitable.

In the summer of 1848 Jane Wilkes, the wife of Charles, took a vacation in Newport, Rhode Island, a fashionable summer resort area. Her letters in July describe the people and activities there. Mrs. Wilkes had suffered a leg injury in June, which worsened over the summer. She died in August in Newport while her husband was on a trip to South Carolina and also to Charlotte to inspect family property.

As previously noted there is a series of James Renwick (1792-1863) letters in this collection. The correspondence is particularly heavy for the 1843 to 1849 period. The letters concern reviewing of the manuscript of the Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition and his calculations made from measurements made during magnetic observations on the expedition. Renwick also wrote about his attempt to be appointed to the U. S. Boundary Commission, which failed, and the beginning careers of his three cons.

The period, 1848 to 1849, is an especially rich one for this collection in terms of the correspondence of prominent persons it contains. From 1843 to 1861, Charles Wilkes was assigned to special service, chiefly in Washington, D, C., preparing for publication and publishing the information collected on the Exploring Expedition. Much of his correspondence during 1848 to 1849 deals with describing and cataloging the specimens, such as lichens, collected on the expedition; work on preparing charts; writing, editing, and publishing of volumes; and paying the bills for this work.

In the course of this work Wilkes received letters from many prominent scientists, naval officers, senators and congressmen, and statesmen. Please consult the "List of Selected Persons" in this Guide for an extensive listing of correspondents. Of particular interest are four series of letters: 1. Asa Gray, botanist, to Wilkes from 1849 to 1859, writing about work on the botany of the Exploring Expedition; 2. Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz, zoologist, corresponding to Wilkes from 1849 to 1861, concerning drawings of fish and echinoderm specimens from the expedition; 3. Joseph Henry, scientist and first director of the Smithsonian Institution, writing, 1849 to 1875, about loans of Exploring Expedition specimens; and 4. John R. Bartlett (1805-1886), state official and bibliographer, writing in 1849 about the sales of the Narrative and the publication of a spurious abridgment of the work. Other scientists who corresponded include Isaac Lea, James D. Dana (1813-1895), William D. Brackenridge, Titian Ramsay Peale, William S. Sullivant, and Edward Tuckerman.

The correspondence for the 1850s continues two important themes of the collection: the continuing work concerning the Exploring Expedition, and gold mining and milling in North Carolina. Throughout, there are letters referring to various aspects of the Exploring Expedition work, such as descriptions being made of specimens, appropriations and bills, as well as letters from many prominent scientists. Examples of such letters are Jean Louis Rodolphe Agassiz writing about the classification and drawings of fish specimens, Asa Gray about his work describing the botany of the expedition and William Sullivant's drawings of mosses, Spencer F. Baird about his report on the reptiles, William Sullivant about the engraving of drawings and publication of his work on mosses, and Charles Pickering about his report on the geographical distribution of plants and animals.

Many other prominent persons who were not scientists also corresponded with Wilkes during the 1850s, Of interest is a letter dated April 9, 1851, from President Millard Fillmore to Wilkes thanking him for sending a copy of his work on meteorology.

A very long series of letters between Charles Wilkes and his younger son Edmund continues from the 1840s through the 1850s, Most of the early letters concern the mills at St, Catherine's Mills near Charlotte, N. C.; financial matters; and the fact that the mills are not proving to be a very successful venture, In the summer of 1850, Edmund returned home and then in September began attending the Laurence Scientific School at Harvard to train to be an engineer, The remainder of his letters for this period primarily concern his work as an engineer on railroads in Ohio, particularly in Zanesville. His letters describe hits work, operations of the Central Ohio Railroad, and the many accidents on this railroad in 1858.

The very long series of letters from John to his father Charles Wilkes continues in 1850 until 1852 while John is on board the U.S.S. Marion on a cruise continuing to places such as Rio de Janeiro, China, and Manila Bay. He wrote very lengthy descriptive letters on this cruise. In the summer of 1852 he was working on the calculations for observations of the Exploring Expedition and also corresponded while on trips to Pennsylvania and Ohio.

The remainder of the correspondence of John Wilkes as well as that of some others pertains to mining and milling operations in the Charlotte area. In 1853 John went to North Carolina to be superintendent of the Capps mining operations and presumably to continue work begun by his brother Edmund earlier. John wrote about the condition of various mines, such as the Capps, McGinn, and Dunn mines; mining operations, such as pumping water out of the Capps mine shaft; his brief tenure as agent of the Capps Mining Company; problems with the Capps Company; and continual financial problems. By August, 1855, the Capps Mine was defunct. Charles Wilkes had been President of the St. Catherine's Mining Company. John also became involved in milling operations and sent back reports about the work, progress, and machinery repairs at the St. Catherine's Mills; stamp mills; flour and corn milling; and questions about Wilkes's ownership of St. Catherine's Mills. In 1858 John turned his attention to the Mecklenburg Flour Mills, which he purchased with William R. Myers. Other correspondence concerns a proposed St. Catherine Gold Mining Company, which would have been formed to sell a newly invented machine for reducing metallic ores.

There is considerably less bulk for the 1860s and 1870s than for earlier years, there being one box of material for each of these decades. Certain letters in 1860 begin to mention the possibility of secession. Throughout the Civil War period are references to various battles, ships, naval and army officers, and views on the war. On November 8, 1861, Charles Wilkes commanded that the British mail steamer Trent halt and be boarded. He then searched the vessel, arrested the Confederate commissioners James Mason and John Slidell, and removed them to the U.S. Ship San Jacinto. Wilkes's primary error was in searching a neutral vessel and seizing the agents on board, rather than bringing the ship into port. His actions became quite controversial both in the United States and in Europe. Although the British people were outraged by the events, a majority of Lincoln's cabinet applauded the act. The matter was finally resolved, though, when Secretary of State Seward released the prisoners, realizing that the alternative was war with England. Two letters in 1862, written by Michele Costi, a publicist living in Venice, address this affair. He wrote a strong defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. A copy of Costi's, In difesa del San Giacinto, is contained in the writings. There is no firsthand account by Wilkes of this affair in the collection.

In July and August, 1862, there is a series of letters from Secretary of the Navy Gideon Welles to Charles Wilkes, who was co landing the James River Flotilla at that time. Also in 1862 are various orders about ships, crews, and discharges, as well as letters concerning aspects of the U. S. Navy, such as health, medical care, surgeons, liquor, and deserters. Many of the letters in 1862 and 1863 comment on General George Brinton McClellan, particularly after his removal as commander-in-chief of the U. S. Army; the Wilkes family favored him. In late 1862 and early 1863 letters refer to the fact that Wilkes was passed over for promotion to rear admiral and to his reputation as an officer. His wife Mary had much correspondence attempting to secure the promotion. Wilkes was not promoted to rear admiral on the retired list until 1866. On June 1, 1863, he was detached from the West India Squadron and recalled home. Unfortunately his letters for this period at sea, 1861-1863, are not included in this collection. Only a handful of letters exist for 1864; two of them are from Wilkes to Gideon Welles concerning Wilkes's court-martial.

Family letters during the Civil War are concentrated mainly in 1862 and 1863, while Wilkes was at sea. His wife and two older daughters remained in Washington, D. C., and in their letters they discuss prominent citizens of the city, army generals, naval officers, and activities there. Many letters refer to business and financial matters.

At the conclusion of the Civil War, John Wilkes's letters from Charlotte to his father resume. John was at this time serving as the first president of the First National Bank of Charlotte and had resumed operations at the Mecklenburg Iron Works which he owned. His letters relate to business and economic conditions in North Carolina and the South during Reconstruction, making a start again after the Civil War, and business and financial matters. Wilkes was in a partnership that owned the Rock Island Manufacturing Company; letters refer to its financial problems. In about 1866, Charles Wilkes moved to Gaston County, North Carolina, where he had purchased the High Shoals Iron Works. He had a contract of sale, but no deed, so protracted legal battles ensued. The Iron Works continued to produce batches of pig iron and manufacture nails. Letters in the collection pertain to the Iron Works and its production. Only a few letters exist for 1868 and 1869.

The correspondence for the 1870s consists primarily of family letters, mostly written by John Wilkes to his father. Letters continue about the problems of the Rock Island Manufacturing Company, which had failed in about 1869. Other letters concern the Mecklenburg Iron Works, which was at one time called the Mecklenburg Foundry and Machine Shops, of which he was proprietor. He also referred to the continued question of ownership of the High Shoals Iron Works and the appropriation for the work of the Exploring Expedition in 1870. A few other letters were written by Mary and Edmund Wilkes, who went to live in Salt Lake City in 1871, but returned to New York later.

Other letters for the 1870s pertain to the Exploring Expedition. Charles Wilkes wrote to Lot M. Morrill about publishing the volumes of the work of the expedition. There are letters from Frederick D. Stuart, assistant to Wilkes, concerning funds to finish the publication of the Exploring Expedition volumes. It was difficult in the later years to obtain this funding from Congress.

The two clippings are a picture of Charles Wilkes and an article, 1862, concerning publication of the results of the Exploring Expedition.

The financial papers, 1830-1875, include such items as financial statements, Exploring Expedition statements, bills, receipts, cost estimate, and a bond.

In the legal papers, which span the years 1827-1865, are indentures, many of which are signed by Charles Wilkes and Richard B. Mason, among other parties. Also included are articles of association and other papers for the Jackson City Association, a signed approval by Secretary of the Navy Isaac Toucey of a summons to Wilkes for a trial, and undated plats. There are court documents, such as agreements, summons, a complaint, and a memorandum. Some of these items pertain to litigation concerning a Lynch vs. Wilkes family real estate dispute.

The miscellany consists of papers, 1825-1875. Exploring Expedition items include a memo in 1838 concerning the acting appointments as commanders of Charles Wilkes and William H. Hudson, magnetic measurements, and in 1858 a few items about revisions to various maps and publications of the expedition. Three depositions occur in this section in 1862 concerning fortifications at Drewry's Bluff. They are written by a deserter from the Confederate Navy, a former Confederate soldier, and a New York soldier who had been behind Confederate lines. Other Civil War papers in 1863 and 1864 relate to the court-martial of Wilkes.

The printed material spans the years 1849 to 1874. Included is a broadside that General John James Peck penned on September 20, 1864, entitled, "Siege of Suffolk-Chancellorsville." The purpose of the paper was to debunk the idea that any significant portion of Longstreet's army was transferred to Chancellorsville. In the printed material also is "Report on the High Shoals Property in Gaston County, North Carolina" by F. Winter. This is a proof of the pamphlet written in 1873 concerning the geology of High Shoals. Other titles are "Working the Gold Mines in New Granada," "Prospectus of the American Review, " and "Map of the City of Zanesville."

While the writings cover the two years, 1862 to 1863, most of them are undated. Included is a copy in Italian of "In difesa del San Giacinto," 1862, by Michele Costi. This was a defense of Wilkes's actions in the Trent affair. An English translation of this item was published as a pamphlet under the title, Memoir on the Trent Affair. A copy is housed in the Rare Book Room. Related items are "The Surrender of Mason and Slidell" written in Wilkes's hand and another article, both of which defend his actions in the Trent affair. Copies of "Naval Reform" and "Abuses in the Navy," 1862, are also included. Two folders contain the sixteen-chapter manuscript "Trip to the Far West" by Charles Wilkes in 1863. The narrative is comprised of descriptions of the localities visited, including Pennsylvania, Illinois, Indiana, Milwaukee, the Mississippi River, St. Paul, Iowa (especially Dubuque), St. Louis, Cincinnati, Erie, New York--Buffalo and Niagara Falls, Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York City. "Canal Trip in Peru" is listed as being included with the manuscript but is not a part of this collection. Other undated writings describe various aspects of New York City, iron-clad vessels, New Jersey, and Baltimore.

The volumes, 1823-1847, include account books of Charles Wilkes, a notebook owned by Edmund Wilkes, and "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands." There is an account book for the ship O'Cain, 1823, maintained while Wilkes was on a trip to ports in the South Atlantic on a sealing voyage. Wilkes was in command of the ship, which was fitted out by its owner, Mr. Winship. Other financial records of Charles Wilkes are in three Daybooks of Receipts and Expenses, 1828-1829, 1829-1832, and 1833-1835. Edmund Wilkes kept the notebook in 1847 while he was a student in Philadelphia. Evidently it was from a chemistry course. Charles Wilkes wrote "Notes related to Fejee [sic] Islands" from July 15 to August 7, 1840, while on the Exploring Expedition.

Two oversize items are in oversize storage: "Map of the World shewing [sic] the Extent and Direction of the Wind and the Route To Be Followed in a Circumnavigation of the Globe" by Charles Wilkes, 1856, and a broadside, including a plat of several lots of Charles Wilkes's land in Washington, D. C. for sale, May 12, 1874.

Collection
William H. Scovill (1796-1854) of Waterbury, Connecticut, businessman and founder of the Scovill Manufacturing Company; and Rebecca Beecher (1800-1876), of Kent, Connecticut. The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill and Rebecca Beecher during a long period of geographic separation and secret engagement from 1817 to 1820. Materials in the collection range in date from 1816 to 1864.

The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill and Rebecca Beecher during a long period of geographic separation and secret engagement from 1817 to 1820. Also included are four letters to Rebecca from acquaintances including William's sisters, Caroline and Sarah; one letter from William to his brother, James; and one unrelated letter written in 1864? to a Miss Fannie R. Sissons. The letters between William and Rebecca are roughly balanced in number, at first alternating between the two until March of 1818. Thereafter, only Rebecca's letters to William are included in the collection until June of 1819, and only William's letters to Rebecca are included from August, 1819, until August, 1820, although it is clear they each continued to receive replies from the other.

William and Rebecca wrote to each other about their letter writing; their own social life, activities, and plans; and the activities and temperament of mutual acquaintances. Whereas William writes openly of his love for Rebecca and his hope of becoming worthy to be her public suitor, Rebecca's letters are more circumspect, although encouraging in her professed pleasure at receiving his letters and concern for his well-being as he deals with homesickness and loneliness. In November of 1818, Rebecca writes of reports she received concerning William's behavior in Pennsylvania. She claims not to believe the rumors, but cautions him that it is important to associate with reputable people. Although in August of 1820, William is still clearly hopeful in his letter and addresses her as "My Dear Rebecca," the next and last related letter in the collection is from Sarah and Caroline Scovill to Rebecca, congratulating her profusely on her marriage to Mr. Foote.

Collection
Letter (ALS) to Nahum Capen, restating the argument of Caldwell's book, Phrenology Vindicated, and Anti-Phrenology Unmasked, and a letter (ALS) to Reverend Samuel Gilman, relating to personal matters.
Collection
Online
Hugh James Rose (1795-1838) was a priest in the Anglican church, a writer, and a theologian. Sam Hammond (1948-2021) was the Duke Chapel carillonneur from 1968-2018 and was a music librarian and rare book cataloger in the Duke University Libraries. The Sam Hammond research collection on Hugh James Rose includes an original letter written by Hugh James Rose, copies of Rose's papers held at other repositories, printed copies of Rose's works, analysis, and correspondence, among other materials.

The Sam Hammond research collection on Hugh James Rose includes an original letter written by Hugh James Rose, copies of Rose's papers held at other repositories, printed copies of Rose's works, analysis, and correspondence, among other materials.

Collection

Paul Hamilton Hayne papers, 1815-1944 and undated 13.8 Linear Feet — about 4930 items

Correspondence, diaries, notes, scrapbooks, clippings, and literary manuscripts of Hayne and his family. The papers illustrate Hayne's career and refer to Russell's Magazine (which Hayne edited), literary criticism, Southern writers, American literature, politics, including Reconstruction in South Carolina, and other subjects.

Includes Hayne's diaries (1864-1884), largely composed of comments on correspondence and notations of ideas and events, and manuscript copies of poems, many autographed, by Hayne's son, William Hamilton Hayne.

Major correspondents include Edward Bok, Jefferson Davis, Charles A. E. Gayarré, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sidney Lanier, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Thomas Nelson Page, James Platt, Margaret Junkin Preston, Francis S. Saltus, William Gilmore Sims, Edmund C. Stedman, Alexander H. Stephens, Algernon C. Swinburne, Henry Timrod, Moses Colt Tyler, and John Greenleaf Whittier.

The addition (accession #2000-0273) (250 items; 2.2 linear feet, dated 1831-1886, contains transcriptions of selected letters, typed and annotated by Rayburn Moore as he edited A Man of Letters in the Nineteenth-century South (1982). Many of the original letters may be found in Duke University's David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Collection

Annie Jennings papers, 1815-1929 1 Linear Foot — Approx. 521 Items

Resident of Brownsville, Maryland and wife of Samuel Jennings, Jr. Papers of Maryland resident Annie (Fouch?) Jennings include business documents of Samuel Jennings, David Fouch, and Samuel Jennings Jr., farmers and millers of wheat in Washington County, Maryland; land deeds and surveys; debts; tax listings; correspondence concerning family matters and social life in Maryland, Iowa, Illinois, and South Dakota; papers related to the English estate of William Jenners; Sunday School lessons of the 1870s; and genealogies of the Fouch and Jennings (or Jenners) families. Volumes include an account book, 1852-1853, of David Fouch (?) for milling flour, and a route book, 1882-1883, of Fred O'Brian.

These papers fall into two parts, both of which were collected by Annie (Fouch?) Jennings, wife of Samuel Jennings, Jr. The first division contains business papers of her family: Samuel Jennings, David Fouch, and Samuel Jennings, Jr., farmers and millers of wheat in Washington County, Maryland. Land deeds and surveys, debts, tax listings, and mercantile accounts are accompanied by Fouch and Jennings, or Jenners, genealogies. Two tax slips in 1862 show Washington County Commissioners imposing a tax to raise bounty money to encourage volunteers, The second half of the papers contain many letters from descendants of Samuel Jennings, Sr., commenting on social life in Maryland, Iowa, Illinois, South Dakota, and elsewhere in the U.S. In 1878 the family was involved in a suit to obtain part of the English estate of William Jenners. A clipping at the end of the papers reviews this case. Mention is made of the Church of the Brethren, and a number of Sunday School lessons are dated from the 1870s. Volumes include an account book, 1852-1853, of David Fouch (?) for milling flour, and a route book, 1882-1883, of Fred O'Brian.

Collection
Papers include a receipt of payment for attendance by Wistar upon a Wm. Cohen, and an 1839 invitation card to a Wistar Party.
Collection
Beverly Preston Morriss was a physician of Amherst Co. Va. Collection includes correspondence and personal and professional papers of Morriss and of his family (chiefly 1848-1947). The material refers to the Civil War, medical administration in the Confederate Army, enslaved people, professional and family matters, and politics. Includes printed matter (mainly 1850-1875) concerned with politics and social reform.

Correspondence and personal and professional papers of Morriss and of his family (chiefly 1848-1947). The material refers to the Civil War, medical administration in the Confederate Army, enslaved people, professional and family matters, and politics. Includes printed matter (mainly 1850-1875) concerned with politics and social reform.

Collection
White agent and representative for the Cherokee, merchant, lawyer, and trader, of Haywood Co., N.C. Collection includes correspondence, account books, day books, ledgers, and other papers, relating to Thomas's life in western North Carolina; the removal of the Cherokee and the status of those who remained; the development of intrastructure including turnpikes and railroads in North Carolina; Civil War fighting in east Tennessee; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and his private business operations as a white trader among the Cherokees. Includes records of Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties, and business correspondence and accounts of Thomas's son, also William Holland Thomas, a merchant and farmer of Jackson County, N.C.

Collection contains letters and papers of William H. Thomas (1805-1893) concerning his life and businesses in western North Carolina; his role as a white agent representing the Indians in negotiations and communications with the U.S. government; the removal of the Eastern Band of Cherokee on the Trail of Tears; the legal and financial conditions of Cherokee who remained behind in North Carolina; the building of roads and railroads through Western North Carolina; fighting during the Civil War in East Tennessee, including Thomas's leadership of Thomas's Legion in the Confederate Army; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and private business of Thomas, including some documentation of his declining health and his institutionalization for mental instability. There are also account books, day books, and ledgers showing a record of goods bought and sold in Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties. Included also are business correspondence and miscellaneous accounts, 1875-1890, of his son, William Holland Thomas, Jr., merchant and farmer of Jackson County, North Carolina.

Collection
Henry W. Jones was a farmer, lawyer, magistrate, and distiller from Granville County, North Carolina.

Correspondence and Assorted Family Material is primarily personal correspondence sorted by year. One folder contains handwritten genealogical information about Jones and his lineage. Almost all of the correspondence is addressed to Henry W. Jones, though most of the correspondence came after his death in late 1871 or early 1872, and is addressed to a son, Edward H. Jones of Oxford, N.C. Nearly all of the correspondents, both before and after 1871/1872, were children and children-in-law of Henry W. Jones, most of whom resided in Hopkins Co., Ky. The notable exceptions to this are John and Alice Beasley, a son-in-law and daughter who lived in Tex., and P. H. Gooch, a nephew who lived in Farmington, Mo. Agriculture and family matters are the dominant subjects covered by the correspondence. One family matter of particular interest was an effort by some of Henry W. Jones's children, particularly Soloman W. Jones, a local Methodist preacher, to convert their father to Christianity. These same letters also document the revivals that swept Kentucky in the 1850s. There are also several letters that comment on life in the C.S.A. Army, including ones by E. H. Jones (55th Regiment, N.C. Troops) and B. F. Jones (17th Regiment, N.C. Troops).

The first portion of Legal and Financial Papers contains individual folders with records relating to Jones's career as a magistrate (tax records, election rolls, and warrants) as well personal financial information (distillery taxes and personal tax receipts). The remainder of the series is general financial and legal correspondence sorted by year. This series also contains several account books for business partnerships between Jones and his father-in-law, David Parker.

The final series--Printed materials, clippings, and printed work--contains newspaper clippings, political pamphlets, and other printed material related to farming, legal issues, as well as North Carolina and national politics.

Collection
ALS to and from Cooper. Includes two notes from Catherine Cooper, Cooper's daughter, to Mr. and Mrs. Balderson and an anonymous recipient, and a note from W. Smith to Ann Cooper, Cooper's wife. Among Cooper's correspondents are well-known English physicians, scientists, and his patients. They include: A. Marcet, H. Halford, C.M. Clarke, J. Ingles, R. Leston, Sir C. Locock, Sir J. McGregor, A. Monro, Dr. Browne of Glasgow, Sir W. Lawrence, Sir C. Aldis, B. Travers, Dr. J.C.W. Lever, W.F. Montgomery, Dr. J. Kidd, Dr. Balderson, Dr. W. Prowl, H.S. Seton, J. Soogood, and B. Whittaker. Letters relate to personal and professional matters. The letters are in English. However, an ALS from Charles de Greti and an ANS from Pierre Moquet are in French. In his letters to Marcet, Cooper expresses strong opinions regarding the political situation in England and on the Continent during the Napoleonic wars. In his letters to Cooper, Kidd discusses the subject of medical reform. Seton's gossipy, personal letters relate to the royal family.
Collection
ALS to his sister, Helen, and her husband, Henry F. Jones, in which he describes his legal career and life in New Orleans. He refers to epidemics of yellow fever and cholera and notes that the climate is considered to be beneficial to tuberculosis patients.
Collection

Henkel Family papers, 1812-1953 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — 165 Items

Solomon, Ambrose, and Socrates Henkel were prominent Lutherant churchmen active in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Correspondence (1812-1894), account books, and notes for sermons, articles and lectures, belonging to the Henkel family. The primary authors are Solomon and Ambrose Henkel, and their nephew, Socrates Henkel, prominent Lutheran churchmen. Includes information on the Lutheran Church in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and on the publishing house Henkel Press, Inc., at New Market, Virginia. Some of the material is in German. The correspondence touches on many subjects, chiefly church matters, but there is a small group of Civil War letters from Henkel family members recounting battles (Fort Sumter; Mine Run, Va.), Union occupation, and camp life. One letter from 1860 mentions the hanging of an abolitionist. Also included is a diary begun in 1802, written by Paul Henkel, with a transcription; there are also miscellaneous writings, items relating to religious music, and advertisements.

The Henkel Family Papers span the years from 1812-1953 and include correspondence (1812-1894), account books, and notes for sermons, articles and lectures, belonging to the Henkel family. The letters are described individually in this inventory. The primary authors are Solomon and Ambrose Henkel, and their nephew, Socrates Henkel, prominent Lutheran churchmen. Includes information on the Lutheran Church in Virginia, Tennessee, and North Carolina, and on the publishing house Henkel Press, Inc., at New Market, Virginia. Some of the material is in German. The correspondence touches on many subjects, chiefly church matters, but there is a small group of Civil War letters from Henkel family members recounting battles (Fort Sumter; Mine Run, Va.), Union occupation, and camp life. One letter from 1860 mentions the hanging of an abolitionist. Also included is a diary begun in 1802, written by Paul Henkel and transcribed by R. R. H. Baur; there are also miscellaneous writings, items relating to religious music, and advertisements.

Collection

Cornelius Bowman Campbell papers, 1812-1904 0.2 Linear Feet — 144 items

Cornelius Bowman Campbell graduated from the Oneida Institute in New York, and was an abolitionist and an advocate for temperance and women's suffrage. Collection includes outgoing and incoming letters for Cornelius Bowman Campbell, a few manuscripts by him, and Campbell family papers.

Collection includes outgoing and incoming letters for Cornelius Bowman Campbell, a few manuscripts by him, and Campbell family papers. The outgoing letters were written by Campbell to his father, and topics include Grahamism and water cures, health of family members, his debts and money-making pursuits, and his attendance at Oneida Institute. There is only occasional mention of his abolitionist and temperance beliefs and work. The majority of the incoming letters were written by Campbell's friends made through the Oneida Institute, and among the topics are slavery and abolition; temperance; politics, including activities of Whigs and Democrats; possibilities regarding settling in Vineland, New Jersey; and a few letters regarding women's suffrage activities. Includes letters from William G. Allen, Henry B. Blackwell, Laura C. Holloway, Wendell Phillips, and Parker Pillsbury. There is one letter (1904) that dates past Campbell's death; it is not addressed directly to Campbell. The Campbell manuscripts are items he wrote during his tenure at the Oneida Institute. The Campbell family papers include letters primarily written to Cornelius Bowman Campbell's parents, Rebecca (Whitcomb) and Hezekiah Campbell, a few of which date before Cornelius' birth, as well as three manuscripts. In addition to several letters discussing genealogical information for the Campbell and Whitcomb families, there is an indenture (1812) for Hezekiah to learn the shoe making trade.

Collection
Holograph documents, signed. Receipts of payments made by the town of Salisbury to Dr. Asahel Humphrey, as well as Drs. M.A. Lee and William Walton.
Collection
Laura "Tibbie" Roberts is a life-long activist for women's rights and has been repeatedly honored for her community service and volunteering in North Carolina and abroad. The collection consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0084) (3.6 lin. ft.; 2700 items; dated 1970s-2000s) consists of correspondence, conference materials, awards, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera from the life and volunteering of Tibbie Roberts. Items of note include her materials from the North Carolina Council of Churches, the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women in Beijing (1995), North Carolina Council for Women, the National Women's Conference in Houston (1978), and the United Methodist Church's United Methodist Women Southeast Jurisdiction. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The accession (2009-0150) (0.6 lin. ft.; 200 items; dated 1970s-1995) consists largely of scrapbooks from Roberts' conferences in the 1990s, including her trips to China, Singapore, and Malaysia as part of the Fourth Annual World Conference on Women, the NGO Forum on Women, and the World Methodist Conference, and her trip to Israel as part of an excavation course. Also included are materials from a filmstrip promoting the Equal Rights Amendment.

Accession (2010-0131) (0.1 lin. ft.; 25 items; dated 1979-1997 and undated) comprises material primarily related to support for the Equal Rigths Amendment. Includes printed material, newspaper clippings, 15 color photographs, and an ERA necklace medalion.

Accession (2011-0108 and 2011-0123)(0.2 lin. ft.; 8 items; dated 1811-2011 and undated) includes a family deed regarding land in Craven County; a letter; printed items on women and religion, one of which is annotated by the donor; and a piece of ephemera with a quote from the ERA on the front and a Bible verse on the back.

Collection

Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes papers, 1811-1990s and undated, bulk 1905-1981, bulk 1905-1981 6.2 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — Approximately 4650 items — 4650 Items

Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original research materials. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape in North Carolina entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography

The Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes Papers date from 1811 to the 1990s, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1905 to 1981. Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original materials used in his research. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into the bureaucratic and institutional exigencies of American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines.

The Gohdes Papers are divided into seven series: Biographical Data, Correspondence, Author Files, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Scuppernong , and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series briefly sketches the major events of Gohdes's life. It consists of only a few items, including a one-page sketch by Gohdes of his career's highlights, and photocopies of Gohdes's obituaries. Further biographical information, especially pertaining to Gohdes's academic life, can be culled from materials in the Correspondence Series.

The Correspondence Series contains letters exchanged with university administrators, publishers, colleagues, librarians, and literary figures. The series is divided into four subseries, American Literature , Lewis Chase, Duke University, and General. The bulk of the correspondence concerns professional and academic affairs, such as appointments, editorships, research and reviews, and publishing. Included are exchanges between Gohdes and Duke University administrators about English Department and American Literature affairs, as well as between Gohdes and contemporary literary critics about the study of American literature. There are also several documents that illuminate Gohdes's political affiliations and social concerns.

Materials on approximately fifty authors, largely major British and American writers, are in the Author Files Series and were originally gathered by Gohdes and his colleague, Lewis Chase. The folders contain a variety of information on the represented authors, in an equally varied mix of formats: clippings, notes, lectures, student papers, photographs, and reproductions or photocopies of original writing.

Included in the Subject Files Series are materials relating to several projects and interests which engaged Gohdes during his career. These include: bibliographies, poetry, travel narratives and the American West, and the United Nations' Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/American Literature Section's Best American Books List. The bibliographies collected in this series reflect Gohdes's interest in this genre, as he participated in and edited many such projects throughout his career.

The Writings and Speeches Series contains manuscript and printed materials in two subseries: Writings by Gohdes and Writings by Others. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries includes manuscripts of short stories, poetry, and academic essays, as well as notes and notecards. The manuscripts also contain folders pertaining to unfinished projects and writings. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries also contains several folders of printed materials, consisting of reprints and reproductions of as well as advertising and promotional materials for Gohdes's published writings. This subseries consists almost entirely of reprints that are inscribed to Gohdes by the authors.

Materials relating to the writing and research of Gohdes's last published book, Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines, are in the Scuppernong Series. Three subseries make up this series: Correspondence, Research and Notes, and Publication Materials. Correspondence plus photocopied articles and essays about the grape and agricultural production form the bulk of the series. Also included are Gohdes's many notes and notecards, as well as reviews and materials relating to the book's publication.

The Clippings Series contains the few clippings that are not housed in the Author Files Series. These clippings mostly consist of articles relating to literary figures.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the records of American Literature and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section, as well as the papers of many of Gohdes's colleagues, such as Jay B. Hubbell and Arlin Turner.

Processing Note:

Roman numerals and transcribed titles taken from the original folders have been appended to certain folders, such as the Contemporary Poetry Selections.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.

Collection

Goodrich-Baker family papers, 1811-1952 and undated 0.4 Linear Feet — Approx. 300 Items

The Goodrich and Baker families hailed from Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois. Collection comprises letters, with a few other items, mostly to and from members and friends of the Baker and Goodrich families of Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois, chiefly in the 19th century. Included are letters to Union soldiers and letters from Turkey and India in the 1870s and 1880s.

Collection comprises letters, with a few other items, mostly to and from members and friends of the Baker and Goodrich families of Maine, New Hampshire, Iowa and Illinois, chiefly in the 19th century. Included are letters to Union soldiers and letters from Turkey and India in the 1870s and 1880s.

Collection

Walter Lee Sutton papers, 1811-1947 5.8 Linear Feet — 1,409 Items

The Walter Lee Sutton Papers span the period 1811 to 1947 with the bulk dating from 1883 to 1939. Three generations of the interrelated Anderson, Danforth, Sutton, and Wynn families are represented in the collection. While the collection primarily focuses on Sutton, many of the earlier papers relate to his wife's family, the Wynns and Danforths, her paternal and maternal relatives respectively.

The majority of the collection consists of courtship letters between Walter Sutton and Harriet (Hattie) L. Wynn (1883-1886), and ledgers and daybooks of the general merchandising businesses Heard and Sutton and W. L. Sutton. Therefore, the major strengths of the collection include its delineation of courtship customs in the 1880s and its depiction over a thirty-five period of a small general merchandising firm. While the correspondence spans the period 1811 to 1936, there are very few letters that date between 1814 and 1830, thereby leaving several years virtually uncovered in the collection.

The general merchandising businesses of Heard and Sutton and W. L. Sutton sold a variety of items including farm implements, wagons, buggies, hardware, groceries, dynamite, oil, gas, clothing, and dry goods. Because of the time period covered by these accounting records, one can readily see the transition from “horse and buggy days” to the increasing influence of the automobile. Besides business records, the account books also contain a few domestic accounting records for the Sutton family. Regular customers include members of the Anderson, Sutton, and Heard families. In some there are details about employees, including the number of days they have worked or days missed. Other volumes include an estimate of the amount of lumber sold, the amount of hay cut, or which fields were used for cotton picking.

Sutton's cashbook, 1907-1909, not only delineates the cash received and paid out, but also identifies several products Sutton sold. Some of these entries also include names of companies or persons from whom he received products. While there are separate account books for ice (1909 June-1910 Oct.) and cotton ginning (1908 Oct.-Feb. 1912), ice and cotton ginning accounts are also included in some of the other W. L. Sutton Company ledger and daybooks for other years.

The daybooks commonly itemize lists of goods received. Volume 17 includes a list of bank deposits for the years 1922 to 1927, while in later years 1932 to 1939, bank deposits are typically recorded in the daybooks for the period covered by the daybooks. Also in volume 17, for the years 1923 and 1924, deposits are listed for merchandisers' accounts.

In one instance, the ledger for the W. L. Sutton Company had been used earlier for another purpose. Volume 34 contains a list of debts and credits for merchandisers' accounts for the period January 1, 1936 to March 31, 1937, while at the front of the volume there are records for the Danburg Baptist Church Women's Missionary Society, 1910 to 1921.

Volume 37, “Cotton Accounting Book” (1920-1927) includes Sutton's accounting records for his work as a cotton merchant. The accounting records indicate that Sutton shipped cotton to various companies including: Barnett and Company, Athens, Ga.; Georgia Cotton Growers Co-op Association; Rowland Company, Athens, Ga.; Washington Warehouse Company, Washington, Ga.; and George W. Wright, Augusta, Ga.

Loose materials, chiefly business receipts, were laid into several accounting books. Included are receipts from merchandisers who provided goods to the W. L. Sutton Company and from various warehouses and companies where cotton was shipped. There is also a contract for ice between W. L. Sutton and Pope Manufacturing Company indicating that Pope will sell ice to the W. L. Sutton Company.

Other Sutton accounting records indicate that he sold lumber, kept accounts for the Dansburg School District Board of Education, maintained records for the buying and use of livestock, and kept a record of personal expenses.

Additional financial records include a blacksmith account book kept by Samuel Danforth (1836-1838) and one for a boarding house in Washington, Ga. maintained by Harriet Brown Danforth (1857-1860). Promissory notes and a statement of receipts and disbursements for the estates of Samuel K. Wynn (Hattie's father) and Walter L. Sutton are among the other financial papers.

Among the earliest letters is a series that begins during the War of 1812 and continues to 1814 between George Reab in New York and others concerning his military service. (Reab married Almira S. Brown in 1816 and is a great aunt of Hattie Wynn.) Letters concern whether Reab could be asked to bear arms against the British again since he had been held as a prisoner of war by them and had later been released on parole. Reab stated that he should not be asked to bear arms, invoking the French parole d'honneur as the reason, which is a pledge or oath under which a prisoner of war is released with the understanding that he will not again bear arms until exchanged. It is unclear from the correspondence whether Reab was successful. By April 1813 he had been appointed 3rd lieutenant in the United States 13th Infantry Regiment and by 1816 he had retired from military service. The collection contains a list of officers, including George Reab, Jr. in the 13th Infantry Regiment of the United States Army, which is dated July 31, 1812.

Correspondence from Almira B. Reab during the 1840s to family and friends in New York and Vermont describe how she adjusted to life in the south. Originally from New York, she lived with her sister Harriet B. Danforth and her family in Danburg, Ga. at the time these letters were written.

The collection contains three diaries, one kept by Harriet Brown Danforth and her daughter Emma. Harriet's entries (1858, Jan. 3-1859, Nov. 30) primarily denote when she attended church and in some instances the Biblical scriptures which were read, while Emma's entries (1860? Aug. 26-Dec. 13) concern teaching school. The other two diaries were kept by Walter (1885, Aug. 15-Dec. 23). Several entries relate to Hattie Sutton, while others concern the “liquor issue.” Miscellaneous financial information is found in them as well.

Other items in the collection include minutes and bylaws of debating societies, 1853-1855, including the Pine Grove Polemic Society, Philomathian Society, and the Sandtown (Sandtown was formerly known as Hyde) Polemic Society; an undated handwritten arithmetic book; miscellaneous poetry (1816, 1846 and undated); school notes; minutes of the Willis A. Sutton P.T.A. in Danburg, Ga.; Walter Sutton's Sunday School superintendent record book for 1891; obituaries for various Sutton and Wynn family members; several printed graduation exercise programs from Danburg High School; other miscellaneous writings; and a few photographs.

Papers in the collection indicate that Walter Sutton was having financial difficulties in the late 1890s and early 1900s. In 1897 and later in the 1920s, he was reminded by his creditors that he had outstanding debts. Legal papers from the 1930s also indicate he was suffering from monetary adversities. A petition filed by the American Agricultural Chemical Society for non-payment of debts (1934, Jan. 12) was apparently paid off later that year by selling some of Sutton's land. The agricultural depression during this period was probably a factor in his economic downturn.

Collection

C. C. Clay papers, 1811-1925 20 Linear Feet — 8,568 Items

Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882) was a lawyer, U. S. Senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter from Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. He was married to Virginia Carolina (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915). His father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) was a U.S. Congressman and Governor of Alabama. Collection includes personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay, and of his father, Clement Comer Clay; his mother, Susanna Claiborne Withers Clay; his wife, Virginia Caroline Tunstall Clay; and brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay. Letters deal with family matters, including Alabama and Washington, D.C., social life, education, the management of cotton plantations, civic affairs in Huntsville; state and national politics and elections; Clay Sr.'s governorship; Clay Jr.'s service in both the U.S. and Confederate senates; ante-bellum politics; the organization of the Confederacy; Reconstruction politics, including Clay Jr.'s arrest, imprisonment, and his wife's efforts to obtain his release; Clay Jr.'s efforts to retrieve his property and re-establish farming operations, and to settle his father's estate; Virginia Clay's dissatisfaction with Reconstruction period social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts to operate the plantation after her husband's death.

Personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882), lawyer, U.S. senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter; of his father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866), lawyer, planter, U.S. congressman and senator, and governor of Alabama; of his mother, Susanna Claiborne (Withers) Clay (1798-1866); of his wife, Virginia Caroline (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915), who wrote A Bell of the Fifties: Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South, 1853-1866: Put into Narrative Form by Ada Sterling (New York: Doubleday, 1904); and of his brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay, and of their wives.

Letters deal with family matters, including education of the elder Clay's three sons at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; management of two or more cotton plantations and approximately fifty slaves; civic affairs in Huntsville; state politics, 1819-1860; Democratic and Whig party alignments, rivalries, and disputes; presidential elections, especially in 1844, 1852, and 1856; Clement Comer Clay's governorship, 1835-1837. the Creek War, 1836; the panic of 1837, Clement Claiborne Clay's election as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1853 and his reselection in 1857. Other political matters referred to include the Compromise of 1850; Kansas-Nebraska difficulty; break with Stephen A. Douglas; Democratic Convention of 1860; secession; and organization of the Confederate government. Personal letters refer to social life in Alabama and in Washington, D.C.; visits to springs and health resorts; and Clement Claiborne Clay's travels for his health through Florida, 1851, and later to Arkansas and Minnesota.

Subjects of the Civil War years include Clement Claiborne Clay's political activities in the Confederate States Senate; his relations with Jefferson Davis; Federal raids on and occupation of Huntsville, consequent disruption of civilian life, and demoralization of slaves; J. W. Clay's publication of the Huntsville Democrat in various towns; Clay's defeat in the election of 1863 for the Confederate Senate; his and other agents' work in Canada, assisting in the return of escaped Confederate prisoners to Confederate territory; plots of a general revolt in the Northwestern states designed to join these states to the Confederacy; the Democratic Convention of 1864; Horace Greeley's efforts for peace, 1864; plans and execution of the Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, 1864; Clay's return from Canada, and the final days of the Confederacy.

Material relating to the aftermath of the Civil War concerns accusations against Clay for complicity in Lincoln's assassination, Clay's surrender to Federal authorities, his imprisonment at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and the efforts of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay to obtain her husband's release. Papers for the period 1866-1915 generally pertain to personal matters, principally Clay's poverty, his attempts to retrieve his confiscated property, the settlement of his father's estate, efforts to re-establish farming operations, and his years in the insurance business, 1871-1873, with Jefferson Davis; and Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's dissatisfaction with a restricted social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts in later years to operate the plantation. There are occasional references to political affairs.

The volumes consist of an executor's book of the estate of C. C. Clay, Sr., 1866-1869; letter books, 1864-1865; letterpress copy covering insurance business; memorandum books, 1853-1864, containing a mailing list of constituents and other notations; notebook, 1835-1841, containing college lecture notes; receipt books; legal fee book, 1814-1815; scrapbooks, ca. 1848-1903, one of which contains plantation accounts, 1870-1873, and minutes of the Madison County Bible Society, 1820-1830; and the diaries and scrapbooks, 1859-1905, of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay.

Correspondents include Jeremiah S. Black, E. C. Bullock, C. C. Clay, Sr., C. C. Clay, Jr., David Clopton [Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's second husband], W. W. Corcoran, J. L. M. Curry, Jefferson Davis, Varina Davis, Benjamin Fitzpatrick, U. S. Grant, Andrew Johnson, L. Q. C. Lamar, Clifford Anderson Lanier, Sidney Lanier, Stephen R. Mallory, Nelson A. Miles, James K. Polk, John H. Reagan, R. B. Rhett, E. S. Shorter, Leroy P. Walker, Louis T. Wigfall, and William L. Yancey.

Description above taken from Guide to Cataloged Collections in the Manuscripts Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980)

Collection

Admittance cards, 1811-1880 0.2 Linear Feet — 98 cards; 1 box

.Admittance, matriculation, and "Order of Lecture" cards are from a number of medical students from 1811-1880 in the University of Pennsylvania, Jefferson Medical College, Long Island College Hospital (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Harvard University Medical School, Philadelphia School of Anatomy, New Hampshire Medical Institution, Berkshire Medical Institution, and St. Bartholomew's Hospital (London, England). They contain the autographs of the most eminent professors of the day: i.e., Samuel Gross, Franklin Bache, Benjamin Rush, Austin Flint, Samuel Jackson, S. Weir Mitchell, J. K. Mitchell, Charles D. and James A Meigs, John Barclay Biddle, et al. The St. Bartholomew's Hospital card is signed by Ludford Harvey, John P. Vicent, and John Abernethy, the latter (1764-1831) being an eminent English surgeon and founder of the Medical School of St Bartholomew's. The "Order of Lecture" cards from Jefferson Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania list curricula, faculty and their residences, schedules of lectures and texts.Admittance cards, 1850-1853, are for courses at the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia. They include two matriculation cards for William D. Watson of Chatham County, N. C., dated Nov., 1850, and Oct., 1852, and an examination card Oct., 1852-1853, which is signed by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell as professor of Anatomy, Surgery and Physiology. Dr. Watson returned to Chatham County after his graduation. His house was destroyed during the Civil War. The portion of his medical library saved and stored in a neighboring attic eventually was placed in the historical Collection of the library of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

.Admittance, matriculation, and "Order of Lecture" cards are from a number of medical students from 1811-1880 in the University of Pennsylvania, Jefferson Medical College, Long Island College Hospital (Brooklyn, N.Y.), Harvard University Medical School, Philadelphia School of Anatomy, New Hampshire Medical Institution, Berkshire Medical Institution, and St. Bartholomew's Hospital (London, England). They contain the autographs of the most eminent professors of the day: i.e., Samuel Gross, Franklin Bache, Benjamin Rush, Austin Flint, Samuel Jackson, S. Weir Mitchell, J. K. Mitchell, Charles D. and James A Meigs, John Barclay Biddle, et al. The St. Bartholomew's Hospital card is signed by Ludford Harvey, John P. Vicent, and John Abernethy, the latter (1764-1831) being an eminent English surgeon and founder of the Medical School of St Bartholomew's. The "Order of Lecture" cards from Jefferson Medical College and the University of Pennsylvania list curricula, faculty and their residences, schedules of lectures and texts.

Admittance cards, 1850-1853, are for courses at the Jefferson Medical School in Philadelphia. They include two matriculation cards for William D. Watson of Chatham County, N. C., dated Nov., 1850, and Oct., 1852, and an examination card Oct., 1852-1853, which is signed by Dr. S. Weir Mitchell as professor of Anatomy, Surgery and Physiology. Dr. Watson returned to Chatham County after his graduation. His house was destroyed during the Civil War. The portion of his medical library saved and stored in a neighboring attic eventually was placed in the historical Collection of the library of the University of Pennsylvania Medical School.

Collection

Gales & Seaton records, 1811-1868 1 Linear Foot — 297 Items

Collection contains the business papers of Joseph Gales, Jr., and William W. Seaton, editors of the National Intelligencer. Correspondence pertains to subscriptions, advertising, announcements and letters to the editors. Some prominent names appear in the subscription correspondence. Of particular interest are fifty-six transcripts of Congressional speeches, resolutions, and motions. These were presented for publication and are marked for editing. Among the authors of the manuscripts are Henry Clay, James K. Polk, Martin Van Buren, and Daniel Webster. Many are signed. Part of the Harry L. and Mary K. Dalton Collection.

Collection
ALS. Mease writes to John Jones of New York, on business matters; to Thomas Young of Savannah, on horticulture; to John Thompson, regarding the life of Charles Thomson; and to John F. Watson, with a reference to William D. Williamson.
Collection

Raven Ioor McDavid papers, 1810-1985 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 176 items.

Collection consists primarily of Raven Ioor McDavid's writings and other materials. Writings include his reviews and a large number of his articles, bibliographies, and speeches. Other items include correspondence (one letter from Jay B. Hubbell and its reply); documentation of the work of the Linguistic Society of America's Technical Committee on Language and Cognitive Development; parts of "The Mirth of a Nation: America's Great Dialect Humor," edited by McDavid; a post-revolution (around 1810?) Haitian tax merchandise inventory for confectioner Bernard Rambier, written in French; and McDavid's obituary.
Collection

Correspondence, legal and financial papers, ledger (1853-1923), and memoranda, of a society organized for the improvement of the social, moral, and religious condition of seamen who visited the port of Wilmington, N.C. The society also operated a hospital.

Collection
Nathan H. Hill was a teacher in Lincolnton (Lincoln Co.), N.C. Collection includes letters to Nathan H. Hill concerning his work teaching freedmen in Lincolnton, N.C., including letters from Albion W. Tourgée. The collection also consists of letters from family members and others, receipts, material related to Guilford College, and several items about the Quakers' work with African Americans after the Civil War.

Collection contains chiefly correspondence, dates ranging 1830-1950, to and from Nathan H. Hill concerning his work teaching freedmen in Lincolnton, N.C., as well as family correspondence and other documentation from members of the Hill, Usher, Wright, Jones, Self, Bostick, and Thornburg families and their friends and associates. Family correspondence relates to routine family matters and everyday life. Of particular interest are several letters from Albion W. Tourgée, founder of the Bennett College, a historically black college for women in Greensboro, N.C. In these letters, Tourgée discusses conditions of former plantation lands in the South and states that he will encourage people from the North to purchase these lands. Nathan Hill also received frequent correspondence from George Dixon, a Quaker from Yorkshire, England who was also involved with the freedmen's schools in North Carolina. These letters, bulk dates ranging 1865-1867, describe the Quakers' work with African-Americans after the Civil War, especially the freedmen's school in Lincolnton, N.C.

The papers also include legal documents, dates ranging from 1810-1927, and financial documents, dates ranging 1823-1915, as well as some undated documents. The materials consist primarily of bills receipts, letters granting power of attorney, letters of indenture, statements of debt repayment, insurance paperwork, vouchers for property rental, and other materials relating to property, debts, and other public concerns, primarily in Randolph County, N.C.

There are a small number of bound materials such as a grade school register, voter registries, and an undated day book. The collection also contains printed materials relating to church activities and Guilford College.

Collection
The sixty-three manuscript volumes in this collection range from 10 to 154 pages, and were created in Japan from about 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students. The notebooks usually take one of two forms: transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations, and bodies of knowledge written up as manuals by well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū and Takenaka Bunpō. Topics covered include herbal medicines and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eyes and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly for cancers, tumors, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; treatment of wounds; suturing; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. Some notebooks contain black-and-white and color hand-drawn illustrations - many full-page - of surgeries, close-ups of suturing, bandages and wrappings, osteopathic manipulations, and medicinal plants. In most cases, the author or copyist recorded details such the place and time of the lecture and the name of the medical school. There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians, and to earlier dates for the work being copied - these range from 1677 to 1796. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The sixty-three Japanese manuscript volumes in this collection were created from 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students, and document Japanese medical training and practice during the time also known as the Edo period, and the conjoining of Chinese-inspired materia medica with current Western medical practices introduced primarily by the Dutch. The notebooks range in length from 10 to 154 pages, and typically take the form of transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations; in many cases the writer recorded the place and time of the demonstration and the name of the medical school. There are also volumes which represent the collected knowledge of well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū but also Takenaka Bunsuke (Nanpō). There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians.

The copyists and note-takers signed their names at the end of the volumes; the name Yamanaka Shūsai Hideyuki appears most frequently; also appearing frequently are the names of editors and proofreaders, and corrections and later annotations in red ink are found in a number of the manuscripts. In addition to the contemporary dates, there are many references to the earlier manuscript versions being copied: these dates range from 1677 to 1796.

The topics covered by the volumes range widely, and include: herbal medicine and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eye and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly on cancers, swellings, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; the treatment of wounds; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. There are several volumes containing illustrative drawings, some hand-colored and others are black-and-white; they include detailed images of surgical procedures and close-ups of suturing; examples of bandages and wrappings; osteopathic manipulations; and medicinal plants.

One volume in particular stands out above the rest, consisting of over ninety carefully drawn, full-page, hand-coloured illustrations, nine of which are double-page, displaying patients with dislocated limbs, skin cancer, or requiring sophisticated bandages, as well as illustrations of internal organs and one page with surgical instruments. One of the illustrations is a realistic portrait of Hanaoka Seishū, with a beard and spectacles (probably imported from Holland), showing him excising a cyst from a patient. At the end of the volume, two different explanatory texts in Kanbun (classical Chinese read in the Japanese manner) provide comments in the volume about the diseases and their treatment.

Each codex in the collection is composed of leaves of rice paper, with hand-sewn bindings and soft covers, and calligraphy in black and red ink. Some of the texts are written in Shino Japanese (Chinese reading style) using all Kanji characters, while other texts are in Shino Japanese written in 19th-century characters - the language of the educated class in Japan. At least one volume (Vol. 21) contains Dutch words for medicinal compounds. The script reads back to front; the script is laid out in vertical columns that are read from right to left across the page. In some cases, pages or sections and covers are missing, and some volumes bear traces of insect damage, but for the most part, the volumes are remarkably well-preserved.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. In the case of missing titles, a title was supplied from content by library staff. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters, and some older calendar dates are also given in modern Western dates. Illegible or untranslatable text is indicated by blank lines.

Volumes are arranged in this collection guide in two series: sets of notebooks, and single volumes. The items in the sets are linked by common themes or bodies of knowledge, and range from two to eleven volumes. They include collections of works by one physician, as well as sets of manuals and lecture notes on topics such as obstetrics and gynecology, metallurgy, opthalmology, pox and skin diseases, and others. Single volumes are housed after the sets.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters.

Each volume has been assigned a unique institutional identifier.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection
ALS. Correspondence from Jesse Foot and his nephew, Jesse Foot, Jr., who succeeded him in his practice, to the publishers and printers John Nichols (1745-1826) and his son John Bowyer Nichols (1779-1863), relating to the publication of Foot's work. Foot, Jr., informs Nichols of his uncle's death. In a pair of letters Foot inquires into the date of birth of William Johnstone Strathmore.
Collection
William Boone Douglass (1864-1947) was a white lawyer, engineer, and surveyor from Corydon (Harrison Co.), Indiana who was known for his survey work in the southwest United States. Collection includes correspondence, genealogical material, maps, photographs, notebooks on the Pueblo Indians, and other papers of Douglass and of various members of the Boone and Douglass families.

Collection includes a biographical sketch of Douglass, correspondence of the Boone and Douglass families, genealogical information and research, financial and legal documents, material related to Douglass' survey work and national parks, printed and visual material, and writings.

Correspondence pertains to family matters, the Kansas-Nebraska question, the passing of the first overland mail from California through Cassville, Missouri in 1858, elections to be held in Indiana in 1860, Douglass' surveying activities, establishment of a National Park of the Cliff Cities of New Mexico, the securing of power from Boulder Dam, and other matters. There are several Civil War letters from both Union and Confederate soldiers. There is a large amount of correspondence for Douglass' parents, Benjamin P. Douglass and Victoria Boone, as well as for his son, William Boone Douglass, Jr.

The financial and legal documents include receipts, account books, deeds, a court docket from an unidentified court, and patent case files and diagrams. Also of note is an 1814 deed of emancipation for Sally and Champion, two formerly enslaved people, who were emancipated by William Vincett in Harrison County, Indiana.

Booklets, brochures, and publications cover a wide range of topics and locations, including traveling in Santa Fe, N.M., the Transylvania Company and the founding of Henderson, K.Y., and the history of U.S. coinage laws.

Material related to Douglass' survey work consists of notes, writings, and drawings about the different sites that he surveyed, particularly those in present-day Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, as well as maps and plats. Douglass' published "Notes on the Shrines of the Tewa and Other Pueblo Indians of New Mexico" (1917) is included in the writings. Also included are many photographs of Utah, New Mexico, and the Southwest. These photographs show natural formations, the surveyors, and also Pueblo peoples and customs, including Santiago Naranjo, Francisco Naranjo, and the Pueblo peoples' traditional Buffalo Dance. The Notebook on Pueblo Indians, Vol. I, contains descriptions of Douglass' visit to the San Ildefonso Pueblo and his observations of dwellings, meals, symbols, and rituals, with particular attention paid to the Scalp Dance. Vol. II contains notes on the Tewa language, cardinal colors and locations, clans, culture, and history, as well as Douglass' notes on other publications that address the Tewa language and Pueblo peoples. Douglass' survey work prompted him to advocate for the establishment of a "National Park of the Cliff Cities of New Mexico"--material related to this effort, including proposed legislation and maps, is in the collection.

Correspondence, clippings, and the material related to Douglass' survey work make mention of the indigenous groups and individuals he encountered, including the Paiute, Navajo, and Pueblo peoples and Jim Mike, Santiago Naranjo, and Francisco Naranjo. Most of the material about Jim Mike addresses his role in leading Douglass to the natural bridges in Utah, including what is now known as Rainbow Bridge National Monument.

Collection

Silas Weir Mitchell papers, 1809-1915 and undated 1.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder — 747 Items

U.S. physician, neurologist, and author. Papers date from 1809-1915 and include correspondence and documents sent to Mitchell relating to matters personal and professional. Transcripts are often present. Principal correspondents include his relative Mitchell Henry, his publisher Frank H. Scott, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jeffries Wyman, Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard, Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, Anna Eliot Ticknor, Sir W. T. Gairdner, Louis Lee Lawrence, Charles Leonard Moore, Julian Stafford Corbett, Harrison S. Morris, T. Lauder Brunton, Sir William Osler, and Hideyo Noguchi, among others. A complete list of correspondents is available in the collection. Papers are arranged chronologically. The principal language is English, although there are some letters in French and German. Also includes a set of Mitchell's diplomas. The papers form part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers of physician and neurologist Silas Weir Mitchell date from 1809-1915 and comprise over 700 documents and correspondence sent to Dr. Mitchell relating to matters both personal and professional. Transcripts are often included. Principal correspondents include his relative Mitchell Henry, his publisher Frank H. Scott, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jeffries Wyman, Charles-Éduoard Brown-Séquard, Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, Anna Eliot Ticknor, Sir W. T. Gairdner, Louis Lee Lawrence, Charles Leonard Moore, Julian Stafford Corbett, Harrison S. Morris, T. Lauder Brunton, Sir William Osler, and Hideyo Noguchi, among others. A complete list of correspondents is available in the first box of the collection. A set of Mitchell's diplomas is also included.

The Silas Weir Mitchell papers form part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.