Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Guido Mazzoni pamphlet collection, 1572-1946, bulk 1750-1940

Online
860 Linear Feet — 1626 boxes — 49,648 items
This collection of print materials, many of them rare and ephemeral, was assembled over many decades by Guido Mazzoni, an Italian Senator, Dante scholar, professor, and bibliophile. The approximately 49,648 pieces span the years 1572 through 1946, with the bulk dating from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries. Topics range widely and include Italian politics, particularly the rise of Socialism and Fascism; Italian humanities, especially poetry, theater, and opera; Dante studies; patriotic writings, including some by Mussolini and others in his regime; and the history and context of both World Wars. Popular literary and cultural serials abound, many with writings by noted authors, including women writers. Given Mazzoni's background in academics, his friendships with publishers, and his residence in Padova and Firenze, many of the authors are Jewish. Many of the pieces were sent to Mazzoni from former students or colleagues and are inscribed to him. Mazzoni collected many rare pieces from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; broadsides from Napoleonic, Medicean, and Borbonic Italian regions are numerous. Formats represented in the collection include: pamphlets, offprints, clippings, full-issue newspapers (many from the Piedmont), libretti, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, political broadsides, epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one handmade photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with map inserts. About 80 percent of the material is in the Italian language: other common languages include Latin, French, English, German. There are also some publications in Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages. The largest and most developed subject areas, with thousands of pamphlets in each series, relate to Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the early 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from its earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscans to the rise of Fascism in the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections relate to Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially opera and popular music; art history; and religious history. The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented by the collection are too numerous to mention in this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed in this guide. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials on Dante Alighieri and his works number in the thousands.

The Guido Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection spans the years 1572 through 1946, with approximately 46,825 pieces in the collection. The bulk of the material, chiefly in the Italian language, dates from the mid-eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Formats represented include: pamphlets, libretti, clippings, newspapers, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, broadsides (some very large), epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with maps enclosed.

About 80 percent of the materials is in the Italian language, though other languages are represented, most notably Latin, French, English, German, Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages.

This guide offers access to brief descriptive records for each item. Hundreds of pamphlets, particularly the epithalamia, were described more fully in the library's online catalog and can be found by using the subject keywords "provenance" and "mazzoni guido." A full set of more than 30 volumes held by the library offers photocopied images of Mazzoni's handwritten catalog slips for subject and name access to the pamphlets.

Guido Mazzoni assembled his library in several ways. He purchased many items from rare book dealers and other book sellers in Italy, particularly in Padua, Florence, and Bologna. His colleagues and former students sent him thousands of offprints, extracts, and small volumes of their work, most of them inscribed to Mazzoni. He accumulated materials from his work in the Italian Senate, most notably in areas of education, politics, and the humanities. He also acquired either by purchase or by inheritance entire libraries of academic colleagues, some of whom became his relatives by marriage. Some of these names include Giuseppe Chiarini, his father-in-law, and Raffaello Fornaciari.

The importance of the Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection primarily lies in its contribution to the fields of European and Italian studies. It is a broad but selective bibliography - put into material form, as it were - of nineteenth-century European culture and its transition into the twentieth century. The intellectual arrangement assigned to the pamphlets by library staff places them into thirty-one subject areas.

The largest and most developed subject areas, each represented by thousands of pamphlets, are: Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from their earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscan period to the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections include Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially popular music and opera; art history; and religious history. Many individual items, particularly literary publications, are ephemeral, rare, and difficult to locate in the United States and even in Italy.

The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented in the collection are too numerous for this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed below. Suffice it to say that virtually every important poet, dramatist, writer, historian, and political figure of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is represented, and, perhaps more importantly, many minor authors and political figures of those eras whose works are now difficult to find. In addition, prominent scientific individuals of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries are represented in the collection. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials relating to every topic in Dante studies number in the thousands.

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W. R. Wilde note, [Dublin], to Mrs. Simpkinson, undated

1 item
ANS. Accepts invitation.
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W. Robert Leckie papers, 1768-1906 and undated

3 Linear Feet
Although filed under the name Leckie, the collection primarily consists of the papers of two individuals: W. Robert Leckie, and his son-in-law, William Hendrick. The papers of Leckie, who was educated in Scotland, are concerned with construction of public buildings, canals, arsenals, aqueducts, fortifications, masonry of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and surveying and building of walls in the District of Columbia. The papers of Hendrick and those of his wife, after his death, constitute a long record of the sales of plantation products and the purchase of supplies from commission merchants in Petersburg, Virginia, and the operation of a series of corn and grain farms.

The collection is divided into two series: Correspondence and Papers, and Ledgers. The papers of W. Robert Leckie and William Hendrick overlap; both series contain records of Hendrick's ancestors. Both series are arranged chronologically by year.

In the Correspondence and Papers series, the papers of W. Robert Leckie are concerned with the construction of public buildings, canals, arsenals, aqueducts, fortifications, masonry of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal, and surveying and building of walls in the District of Columbia. The papers focus primarily on the prices of commodities used in construction work, rather than on qualities of military architecture itself. Also included are the records of a lawsuit between Leckie and James Couty; papers relative to experiments in the production of lime, cement, and bricks; nine letters from Isaac Roberdeau revealing practices of engineers of the period; and a 91-page bound report of the commissioners appointed by the president for planning the defense of the United States. This report, though undated, was probably made after the War of 1812 and includes extensive details relative to the problems of defense, including topography, waterways, roadways, population, distances, and probable expenses of constructing forts. Some of Leckie's papers reflect his efforts to obtain contracts for the construction of such buildings at the Augusta Arsenal.

The papers of William Hendrick and Mary Ann Leckie, his wife, constitute a long record of the sales of plantation products and the purchase of supplies from commission merchants in Petersburg, Virginia, and the operation of a series of tobacco and corn farms. In addition, Hendrick's children wrote letters from Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Virginia Military Institute, Lexington; and various other academies. Also includes two writing exercise books for children.

In the Ledgers series, among the volumes from Leckie are the following: diary and accounts, 1828-1829, of engineering contracts and cement stone quarries at Shepherdstown, Va., Seneca, Md., Baltimore, and a point near the Monocacy River; a memorandum book containing data for surveying water lines, leveling streets, and building aqueducts in Georgetown and Washington, D.C.; and a memorandum book of John Leckie, associated with his father, W. Robert Leckie. Among the volumes from Hendrick are several plantation account books, a memorandum book, and accounts of a mercantile firm. The account books dated 1799 and earlier were kept by Hendrick’s forbears.

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J. Doane Stott papers, 1748-1999, bulk 1915-1989

4.5 Linear Feet — 1500 items
J. Doane Stott was a Methodist minister (N.C. conference) and missionary to Japan. A.B., Trinity College and B.D., Duke University. Chiefly sermons, clippings, and printed material of J. Doane Stott relating to his missionary work in Japan and ministry in North Carolina, as well as his lecture notes reflecting his time spent at Trinity College and Duke University. Papers also include items relating to Mr. Stott's involvement with CROP (Christian Rural Overseas Program), the Greensboro Urban Ministry, as well as the Lion's Club.

Chiefly sermons, clippings, and printed material of J. Doane Stott relating to his missionary work in Japan and ministry in North Carolina, as well as his lecture notes reflecting his time spent at Trinity College and Duke University. Papers also include items relating to Mr. Stott's involvement with CROP (Christian Rural Overseas Program), the Greensboro Urban Ministry, as well as the Lion's Club.

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Folder

Although most of the Writings and Speeches Series consists of sermons, class assignments, or debates, there is some printed material included if the items contained handwritten notes. The Brotherhood folder contains sermons and other items relating to race relations, mostly within the context of the Methodist church and its relationship with African Americans. The Sermons and Notes folder include several eulogies and many prayers by Mr. Stott and other ministers, which cover a wide range of topics from the scriptures. Some of these sermons have been transliterated into Japanese.

Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers, bulk 1766-1845 and undated

Online
0.8 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 2 volumes
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

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Folder
Online

Contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]. Other materials include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book, as well as an undated presentation note written by Richard Rush.

Folder
Online

The majority of the 136 letters in the series were composed by Benjamin Rush, and letters he wrote to Julia during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia form a substantial part of the series. Main topics in the letters include Rush family matters, medical treatments for a wide variety of medical issues, American politics, and the country's relations with European nations. Other topics include mental illness and its treatment, the medical department in the Continental Army, the impact of epidemics upon commerce internationally, reading habits, parenting, and capital punishment.

Among the prominent correspondents who wrote one or more personal or professional letters to Rush or his wife are Abigail Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Thomas Paine, and George Washington. Letters from others to Julia Rush seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family, and offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Included are several manuscript copies Benjamin Rush made of individual letters he penned.

Container
Box 3, Folder 3
Online

Rush not only detailed her religious thoughts and practiced devotional exercises but also outlined her feelings regarding family matters, especially in regard to her bereavement following her husband's death. She requested intersession for family members, such as when her daughters emigrated to England and Canada and their later return, when they suffered serious illnesses, and blessings for the christenings of her grandchildren. She also noted her general physical and mental health as she aged. Entries are irregular, but often annually mark the New Year and her birthday on March 2nd.

William Alexander Smith papers, 1765-1949

20 Linear Feet — 51 boxes; 9 separately bound volumes
William Alexander Smith was a textile manufacturer and businessman of Ansonville, North Carolina. Collection includes correspondence, account books, business records, and other papers, relating to Smith's career as a merchant, cotton textile manufacturer, farmer, and investor. Includes material relating to the family's agricultural, mercantile, and milling enterprises during the antebellum period, with references to Smith's interests in education, the Protestant Episcopal Church, the Civil War, and the United Confederate Veterans, and to automobile manufacture, banking, commercial finance, cosmetics, furniture, insurance, lumbering, patent medicine, personal loans, self-propelled railway passenger cars, real estate development, tobacco processing, and the mining of gold in Alaska and Montana, copper in Arizona, and mica in North Carolina. Correspondents include Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, Francis Johnstone Murdoch, and George Stephens.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, volumes, printed material and other items relating to the various activities and interests of William Alexander Smith (1843-1934), businessman and investor.

Records of Smith's general mercantile business, 1866-1886, include store accounts, 1875-1886, and a purchase journal, 1875-1877, listing various expenses.

Records of the operation of a store with Charles A. Smith include a ledger, an invoice book, and inventories and financial reports pertaining to the store and its failure.

The management of Smith's farm on the Pee Dee River is documented by records on the cotton trade, prices, the condition of crops, and marketting, and includes agreements with tenant farmers. Records of the Yadkin Falls Manufacturing Company, Milledgeville, North Carolina, 1883-1896, of which William Smith was president, include a letter book, 1887-1888, and an account book, 1876-1887, listing the expenses for the construction of this cotton mill and an inventory of mercantile goods purchased by the company.

For the Eldorado Cotton Mills, Milledgeville, 1897-1906, of which Smith also was president, there are a letter book, 1899-1902; a time book, 1898-1903, a general store ledger, 1900-1903; bank check, dividend check, and deposit books, 1898-1902; correspondence with Tucker & Carter Rope Company which Eldorado supplied with goods, 1898-1902; and records of a legal and financial controversy, 1914-1919.

Other textile mills in North Carolina and South Carolina are the subject of correspondence with Francis Johnstone Murdoch, Episcopal clergyman and textile executive; with Lee Slater Overman, textile executive and U.S. senator; and with James William Cannon, operator of Cannon Mills.

Correspondence with George Stephens, president of the Stephens Company, developers, and officer of the American Trust Company of Charlotte, North Carolina, concerns real estate ventures, such as the development of Myers Park residential area in Charlotte.

Other records relate to investment in the Southern States Finance Company, 1922-1925.

Mining of gold, copper, and mica is the subject of material on the Eagle River Mining Company in Alaska, 1905-1916, the Montana Consolidated Gold Mining Company, 1905-1918, the Monarch Mining and Smelting Company, Wickenburg, Arizona, 1906-1918, and the Spruce Pine Mica Company, Inc., Spruce Pine, North Carolina, 1924-1933.

Papers concerning the insurance business comprise those of the North State Fire Insurance Company and the Dixie Fire Insurance Company, both of Greensboro, North Carolina.

Relating to the railroad and the automobile industries are papers of the Edwards Railway Motor Car Company of Sanford, North Carolina, 1923-1927; the David Buick Carburetor Corporation, 1922-1932; the Fox Motor Car Company, 1922-1923; and the Winston-Salem Railway through Ansonville, 1910-1911.

Other business records concern lumbering in North Carolina, 1916-1925; the Carolina Remedies Company of Union, South Carolina, 1922-1925; the W. L. Hand Medicine Company of Charlotte, North Carolina, 1923-1925; the John E. Hughes Company, Inc., tobacco processor of Danville, Virginia, 1922-1924; and the Forsyth Furniture Lines, Inc., 1922-1923.

Records of William A. Smith's activities as purchasing agent, banker, and broker include ledgers, 1873-1933; daybook, 1885-1893; letter and letterpress books, 1867-1895 and 1909-1910; and other account books.

Papers relating to Smith's writings include material on the publication of his Anson Guards: Company Fourteenth Regiment, North Carolina Volunteers, 1861-1865 (Charlotte: 1914), including correspondence with the Stone Publishing Company, and reminiscences of several members of the Guards; papers on the causes and historiography of the Civil War, especially correspondence with Samuel A'Court Ashe, 1920s and 1930s, correspondence with Benjamin Franklin Johnson, 1915-1916, concerning a biographical sketch of Smith in Johnson's Makers of America; correspondence about Smith's pamphlet on the designing of the Confederate flag and the raising of the first flag of secession in North Carolina; and correspondence and genealogical notes used in the writing of Smith's Family Tree Book, Genealogical and Biographical (Los Angeles: 1922).

There are papers concerning the United Confederate Veterans, especially while Smith was commander of the North Carolina Division during the 1920s.

Correspondence, bills and receipts, ledgers, and writings concerning educational institutions relate to Carolina Female College, Ansonville, of which Smith's father, William Gaston Smith, was chairman of the board of trustees; sponsorship of the Nona Institute at Ansonville, 1906-1910, oriented toward the Episcopal Church; the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, of which Smith was a trustee; Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina, which Smith had attended before the Civil War; the education of Smith's adopted son, Bennett Dunlap Nelme, at textile schools and mills, including comment about New Bedford and Lowell textile schools in Massachusetts, 1902-1907, and about North Carolina State College, Raleigh, 1900-1903; controversy over the content of history textbooks used in the state public schools, 1921; and membership on the board of managers of the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Correspondence with Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire and Archdeacon Edwin A. Osborne concerns affairs of the Episcopal Church, its missions, local churches, and the diocese.

Relating to the Freemasons are a history of Carolina Lodge No. 141 of Ansonville and the minutes of the lodge, 1906-1925.

Scattered correspondence and other papers pertain to North Carolina elections, especially the Democratic primary of 1912; the courts; the Democratic Party; county government; the good roads movement, especially in 1916; the family life and political career of Edward Hull Crump of Memphis, Tennessee, who was the son of Smith's first cousin; and politics in Mississippi and Tennessee. Other papers include the steam mill account books, 1851-1861, of Smith & Ingram who operated a sawmill in Anson County and correspondence, 1850-1851, concerning the acquisition of the steam machinery to run the mill; diary and notebook, 1765-1789, of James Auld, farmer, clerk of the court, and operator of a store for Joseph Montfort; North Carolina Argus subscription book, i852-1853; account books, 1840-1857, of blacksmiths; account books, 1835-1858 and 1860-1864, of grist mill operators; ledger, 1835-1845, of William Gaston Smith's mercantile business; account books, 1840s and 1850s, of Joseph Pearson Smith, brother of William Gaston Smith, and operator of a mercantile business; ledger, 1858, of Joseph Pearson Smith, and ledger, 1855-1858, of Eli Freeman, carriage repairman, containing records of the sale and repair of carriages and buggies; deeds and plats; papers relating to the administration of the estates of William Gaston Smith (1802-1879), of John Smith (1772-1854), father of William Gaston Smith, and of Mary (Bellew) Smith (1775-1872), wife of John Smith; cashbook, 1875-1902, of William Alexander Smith; an inventory of notes and accounts receivable; stock dividend ledger, 1931-1934; and the financial reports of Mary (Bennett) Smith, William Alexander Smith's wife, and Bennett Dunlap Nelme, who, after 1926, were the legal guardians of William Alexander Smith.

Description taken from: Davis and Miller, Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980).

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Woody family papers, 1784-1939

9 Linear Feet — 2,389 Items
Family of Quaker merchants and millers residing in Guildford County, North Carolina, with relatives in Indiana and Montana Territory. Collection comprises a rich array of business and personal correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1835-1887) relating to Newton D. Woody, merchant and miller of North Carolina, his Civil War service, and his flight to Indiana in 1865 and eventual return to N.C.; the activities of Frank H. Woody, who traveled to and described life in the territories of Washington and Montana before and after the Civil War. There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by Confederate soldiers, one of whom was in the 21st North Carolina Regiment; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868, as well as economic conditions in North Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also some documents and letters concerning African American life in the South before, during, and after the war. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. Other topics include the activities of Woody relatives who had migrated to Indiana; the activities of the children of Newton and of his brother, Robert Woody, postmaster, miller, and merchant; and the history of the Society of Friends in antebellum North Carolina. Includes legal documents, business records, and minutes of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, N.C.

Papers of Robert Woody, Newton Dixon Woody, and other members of the Woody family include a rich trove of business and personal correspondence; legal and financial papers; printed materials; and manuscript volumes. The papers of this family concern the mercantile and milling businesses of Robert Woody in Chatham County, North Carolina, and Newton Dixon Woody in Guilford County, North Carolina, in the 1850s; the decision of Newton D. Woody to leave North Carolina during the Civil War and his return in 1865; experiences of Frank H. Woody, a lawyer and clerk, in the Washington and Montana territories in the 1860s and 1870s, in which he mentions clashes with Native Americans and settlers, and reports seeing Sherman in 1878. There are also letters with news from relatives living in Indiana.

Other papers include information about temperance meetings, including the General Southern Temperance Conference at Fayetteville, North Carolina, 1835; hog droving; commodity prices in the last half of the 19th century; general economic conditions in North Carolina and the United States in the 19th century; the upkeep of roads in Guilford County; and the experiences of Mary Ann Woody as a student at New Garden Boarding School, Guilford County, 1852-1853. In addition, there is a bill of sale for slaves and a letter from Alabama describing African American celebrations at Christmas, 1857.

There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by a soldier in the 21st North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; and accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. There is also a May 1865 letter saying that John Gilmore of N.C. was dividing land with freed African Americans, and a letter mentioning African American violence during elections in an unspecified state in Dec. 1870.

Volumes in the collection include minutes of meetings of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, North Carolina, 1824-1830; memorandum books; an account book kept during the construction of a Quaker church at High Falls, North Carolina, 1905-1909; minute book of meetings of the Friends of Prosperity, 1913-1914. Other papers in the collection mention camp meetings and religious revivals in North Carolina and their effect on Quakers. There are also financial record books of Robert Woody and Newton Dixon Woody.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of women's work and domestic arts ephemera, 1700s-1940s

1 Linear Foot
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

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File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Assorted printed examples of items related to women-owned business ventures, pay, and income, including: life insurance for women brochures; advertisements and catalogs issued by women for boarding houses, ladies' classes, or gardening or grocery supplies; help wanted advertisements from various businesses, seeking women to hire for work as inspectors and door-to-door sales agents; a pay bill for Champfleurie Garderners' and Labourers' including Thomas and Mrs. McIntyre (1865); tickets, handouts, and circulars for services offered by women; lace specimen samples from Mme. Gurney and Co; a pensioner card for a firefighter's widow. There are some oversize materials in this section, including: a 1922 diploma (43x56 cm) for Nina E. Wilcox, earning a Philosopher of Chiropractic from the National College of Chiropractirs; a broadside advertising a 1914 recital by Louise Thornton, reader and impersonator in Boston; a broadside for Mrs. E. C. Cowdrey, Milliner, in Falls Village, Conn.; a Daly's Theatre playbill from 1884 , printed on fabric, with advertisements for E. A. Morrison's Elegant Bonnets; and a broadside (34 x 42cm) advertising the 1839 sale of two adjoining tenements in Godalming, "Late the Property and Pesidence of the Widow Crouch, deceased; who for many years carrier on the Trade of a Cooper, and for which the Premises are well adapted."

Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889

5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.
Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va., and of the Winn (Wynn) family. The papers of the elder Winn relate to bounty claims of Revolutionary veterans, personal and business affairs, and include information about "Bremo," the plantation of Gen. John Hartwell Cocke. The papers of Philip James Winn relate to his education at the Virginia Military Institute and the University of Virginia, his career in medicine, the service of his brothers in the Confederate Army, and family activities, and include a description of the religious service of the Dunkards, records of the invention and patenting of a "new gate latch," and a letter of William H. Winn describing the battles of Bethel (1861) and Gettysburg (1863). More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the "New Gate Latch"; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

Family and business correspondence of John Winn (d. 1844); of his wife Lucy Winn; and of their numerous children, including Philip James Winn. The correspondence of John Winn, farmer, lawyer, postmaster at Winnsville, captain in the War of 1812, and agent for General John Hartwell Cocke, includes information on Bremo, the plantation of the latter, including also a list of periodicals subscribed to by Cocker and legal cases relative to Revolutionary bounty land.

Correspondence centering around Philip James Winn includes information on the Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, both of which he attended; one letter with a description of the unusual religious services of the Dunkards; a deed for land purchased by a free Negro; records of the invention and patenting of a 'New Gate Latch' by Philip J. Winn; and the interest of various members of the family in law, medicine, agriculture, mechanics, business, religion, and the operation of a stagecoach line between Richmond and Staunton, Virginia.

Collection also Includes a letter of William H. Winn containing detailed descriptions of the battles of Bethel, 1861, and Gettysburg, 1863, in which he participated as a Confederate soldier. More than half the collection consists of receipts and bills connected chiefly with John Winn's work in Revolutionary bounty lands and with Philip James Winn's invention. Twenty-seven volumes include post office accounts of John Winn and of his successor, Philip James Winn; a letter book concerning the 'New Gate Latch'; accounts of the estate of Samuel Kidd; letter books; ledgers; medical notes; and records of births and deaths of slaves.

2 results in this collection

Dismal Swamp Land Company records, bulk circa 1660s-1860s, 1810-1879

4 Linear Feet
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

William W. Renwick papers, 1792-1948 (bulk 1840-1927)

2393 items
William W. Renwick was an enslaver and cotton planter from Newberry and Union counties, S.C. Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

2 results in this collection

William Wilberforce papers, 1782-1837 and undated

Online
1.0 Linear Foot
Political and personal correspondence of William Wilberforce (1759-1833), member of the House of Commons. Many letters relate to his leadership in the movement for Britain's abolition of the slave trade. Correspondence discusses the evils of the slave trade; the slave trade in Dutch, English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish colonies; slavery, especially in the West Indies; the composition and distribution of pamphlets on the slave trade; the attendance of Thomas Clarkson at the Congress of Vienna against Wilberforce's advice; William Pitt's (1759-1806) support of the abolition movement; efforts to interest the Roman Catholic Church in the abolition cause; the determination as to whether abolition could be enforced; and noted English and French leaders and their position on the abolition question. Other topics discussed include British foreign relations; the Church of England; Roman Catholicism in Ireland; politics and government in England, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Trinidad, and Venezuela; elections; French colonies; free trade versus protection; the French Revolution; Greek Independence; Haiti; South Africa; the Society of Friends; the Royal Navy; parliamentary reform; need to reform the penal code; and personal matters including Wilberforce's failing health. Correspondents include British politician William Pitt (the younger); Thomas Harrison, a close friend and a member of the Duke of Gloucester's West India Committee; Hannah More, an English writer and philanthropist; his close friend John Scandrett Harford, Jr. of Blaise Castle (near Bristol, England); George Montagu, Fourth Duke of Manchester; Lord Brougham; Spencer Perceval; Thomas Chalmers; George Canning; and John Bowdler (d. 1815).

Collection consists largely of correspondence to and from William Wilberforce, with subjects ranging across abolitionist politics in Great Britain, business correspondence about the West India Committee, and personal family news and health. Correspondents include British politician William Pitt (the younger); Thomas Harrison, a close friend and a member of the Duke of Gloucester's West India Committee; Hannah More, an English writer and philanthropist; his close friend John Scandrett Harford, Jr. of Blaise Castle (near Bristol, England); George Montagu, Fourth Duke of Manchester; Lord Brougham; Spencer Perceval; Thomas Chalmers; George Canning; and John Bowdler (d. 1815).

Letters from this collection, particularly in the 1810s, often reference slavery and Wilberforce's work with abolitionists. In one letter of Aug. 10, 1814, Wilberforce wrote Harrison that he had been able to persuade Thomas Clarkson not to attend the Congress of Vienna. Articles appeared in The Edinburgh Review during 1814 which questioned William Pitt's motives in supporting the abolitionists. Wilberforce (Oct. 22, 1814) wrote Harrison concerning his relations with the younger Pitt (d. 1806), and stated that his belief was that Pitt had been a "sincere friend" of the abolition movement. Other letters for 1814 mention such things as the West India Committee and its membership, including the Duke of Gloucester, Lord Grey, Marquis Lansdowne, and Lord Grenville (Mar. 20 and Apr. 20), and the planned composition and distribution of pamphlets describing the evils of the slave trade and advocating its abolition (Apr. 26 and Oct. 3). The letter of Apr. 26 suggests the establishment of a special board, sanctioned by the King, to see to the composition of such works. Other letters from this period are between Wilberforce and Harford. One letter of Oct. 12, 1814, speaks of French publications which favor abolition and mentions Chateaubriand, Humboldt, Sismondi, and Madame de Staël. It also tells of the Duke of Wellington, the King of France (Louis XVIII), Prince Talleyrand, and the English Prince Regent (later George IV) as being favorable to abolition. A letter of Nov. 23, 1814, continues to speak of abolition in the light of world events, and Wellington and Tallevrand's correspondence with him. One fragment of a strong letter, dated 1815, gives a graphic account of two slave ships. This letter also asks Harford to try to interest the Roman Catholic Church in banning the slave trade. Wilberforce also mentions trying to interest Sir Thomas Acland and Lord Castlereagh in making an attempt to interest the Pope in the abolition of the slave trade. In 1817, Wilberforce was bothered by the hostile pamphlets of one of his opponents, the anti-abolitionist Joseph Marryat. Wilberforce wrote to Harrison concerning this matter on Aug. 4, 1817, and discussed the urgency of having one of James Stephen's speeches in answer to Marryat printed and distributed as soon as possible. Wilberforce recognized the need for much printed material to educate the peoples of all countries, and especially the "unprincipled Frenchmen" (letter of Aug. 5, 1821), in support of abolition of slavery. A July 9, 1816, letter speaks of Zachary Macaulay; and a May 7, 1817, letter tells of a Macaulay letter falling into the hands of Joseph Marryat. Wilberforce also speaks bitterly of Marryat's attack on himself.

The collection also includes letters about conditions and religion in Ireland. A Sept. 8, 1812, letter asks Harford (during his bridal tour of Ireland) to try to ascertain the comparative moral effects of the Catholic and Protestant religions on the peasant and servant classes of Ireland. A Feb. 7, 1827, letter from Charles Forster to Harford tells of the efforts of the Church of England clergy to convert the Roman Catholics in Ireland.

These letters often mention charities, especially the Bible Society. A May 2, 1821, letter speaks of investigating and learning about colleges. Wilberforce speaks of the "experiment" in education being conducted by Harford. This is leading up to Harford's giving land and helping found St. David's College in South Wales in 1822. A Nov. 9, 1827, letter speaks of St. David's College. There is also an 1819 pamphlet for the "House of Protection for the Maintenance and Instruction of Girls of Good Character."

The collection also includes two volumes which record Wilberforce's account with the London banking house of Smith, Payne, and Smiths during 1829-1833. The itemized transactions provide details about his expenditures, including investments and benevolences.

Other topics discussed include the African Institute; agriculture; economic panic among farmers, 1830; the Corn Laws; American Friends; the Treaty of Amiens; the Army Training Bill; the Waterloo campaign; conditions in New South Wales, Australia; British relations with Austria, Brazil, France, Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, the United States, and the Vatican; economic conditions in Austria; Baptists; Baptist missions in India; the Church of England in England, Ireland and other British colonies; patronage and tithes of the Church of England; the Methodist Church; the Moravians, the Church Missionary Society; the Church of Scotland; the Blagdon Affair; censorship of books; emigration to Canada; the Congress of Vienna; the coal trade; economic conditions in England and Scotland; education; St. David's College, South Wales; politics and government in England, France, Ireland, Jamaica, Sierra Leone, Trinidad, and Venezuela; elections; French colonies; free trade versus protection; the French Revolution; Greek Independence; Haiti; South Africa; the Society of Friends; labor; landlords and tenants; manufacturers in Scotland; the textile industry; the Royal Navy; Black officers in the Royal Navy; parliamentary reform; prisons; need to reform the penal code; the use of capital punishment; the poor laws and poor relief; Socinianism; the New Rupture Society; and personal matters, including Wilberforce's failing health.

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William Weaver papers, 1809-1885

Online
4 Linear Feet — 3,387 Items
William Weaver was the owner of the Bath Iron Works (Buffalo Forge, Va.), which made use of enslaved laborers. Collections includes correspondence and business papers documenting the iron industry in antebellum Virginia; the use of enslaved laborers, including lists of enslaved persons; life among laborers; the supply of iron to the Confederate government; the iron industry in the Confederacy; and industrial conditions in Virginia during Reconstruction. Personal correspondence discusses the progress of the Civil War in Virginia and Confederate politics.

Collection contains business papers of William Weaver (1781-1863?), owner of the Bath Iron Works, dealing with the iron industry in Virginia, and containing information on types of items in demand; collection of debts; prices of iron, land, crops, and livestock.

Materials document the hiring and use of enslaved labors in the iron industry, including diet, clothing, wages, and prices of enslaved laborers. There are several lists of enslaved persons with brief physical descriptions and comments on their reliability as workers.

Personal correspondence discusses cholera in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Baltimore, Maryland, 1832; smallpox in Lexington, Virginia; typhoid in Texas, 1853; the activities and pension of a Revolutionary soldier; state and national politics, especially under Andrew Jackson; the completion of the canal from the mouth of the Brazos River to Galveston, Texas, 1853; the election of 1860; vigilance committees in Virginia; the use of substitutes; troop movements through Lynchburg and Richmond, Virginia; food prices; the death of Thomas Jonathan Jackson; and the iron industry during the war.

Letters, 1861-1863, from John Letcher (1813-1884), U. S. congressman, 1851-1859, and governor of Virginia during the Civil War, discuss his message to the Virginia General Assembly concerning state and Confederate affairs in 1861; rumors; the failure of the legislature to provide replacement troops; military actions at Gordonsville and Fredericksburg, Virginia; various Confederate and Union generals; the unlikelihood of European intervention; military activity in North Carolina; and public opinion in the North.

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William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated

31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items
Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

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William T. Richards papers, 1788-1923 and undated, bulk 1845-1903

0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 342 Items
Merchant in Augusta, Georgia. Chiefly correspondence of William T. Richards and his family and friends. Richards was a New England native, and three early letters from the 1840s are from a sister in Danbury, Connecticut. One letter from Chattooga County, Georgia (1865 Aug. 31) speaks of the devastation in that area from the Civil War. An early item is a power of attorney of 1833 from the merchant Joseph Ganahl to Francis Ganahl. Also includes a bill for goods bought in New York, N.Y. in October, 1865; invitations; announcements; and clippings which relate to William Hill, once Secretary of State for North Carolina. One item is an announcement of William T. Richard's retirement in 1903 as treasurer and paymaster of the Georgia Railroad. Some materials relate to the Hill and Thomas families in N.C., but their relation to the Richards family is unknown.

Chiefly correspondence of William T. Richards and his family and friends. Richards was a New England native, and three early letters from the 1840s are from a sister in Danbury, Connecticut. One letter from Chattooga County, Georgia (1865 Aug. 31) speaks of the devastation in that area from the Civil War. An early item is a power of attorney of 1833 from the merchant Joseph Ganahl to Francis Ganahl. Also includes a bill for goods bought in New York, N.Y. in October, 1865; invitations; announcements; and clippings which relate to William Hill, once Secretary of State for North Carolina. One item is an announcement of William T. Richard's retirement in 1903 as treasurer and paymaster of the Georgia Railroad. Some materials relate to the Hill and Thomas families in N.C., but their relation to the Richards family is unknown.

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William Tilghman papers, 1671-1876

2.8 Linear Feet — 5 Boxes, 900 items
Papers concerned with Tilghman's law practice in Chestertown, Md., and his service in the Maryland legislature (1788-1793). Includes genealogical information about Maryland's Eastern Shore, information about economic and agricultural conditions in Maryland in the late 18th century, Tilghman's vicissitudes because of his Loyalist sympathies during the Revolution, his efforts to advance the interests of his constituents while he served in the legislature, and the Tilghman family. Volumes include a digest of legal cases in which Tilghman participated, legal notes, court dockets, and a summary of estate laws in Maryland. Includes three letters from Henry Pearce. Two of these letters are to James Tilghman, William's father, regarding the purchase of Pearce land, slaves, stock, etc.

This collection houses the papers of William Tilghman (1756-1824), lawyer and chief justice of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. They relate chiefly to his law practice in Maryland, 1783-1793, and to his service in the Maryland general assembly, 1788-1793, and include legal papers dealing with litigation, land sales, the collection of debts, notes, the settlement of estates, and other legal matters. Included are deeds, indentures, wills, estate records, court records, and other legal papers relating chiefly to Cecil, Kent, and Queen Anne counties, a roster, 1818-1819, of the citizens of Charles County, scattered papers pertaining to the Church of England in Maryland, occasional references to personal matters, and legal and business papers concerning the family, including papers dealing with loan transactions and with the settlement of the estate of William Tilghman.

The collection also has scattered papers of Tilghman's father, James Tilghman, a lawyer, several bills and accounts of St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, and Charlotte Hall School, Charlotte Hall, Maryland, petitions and acts relating to Tilghman's career in the general assembly chiefly dealing with the settlement of local affairs, including the disposal of reserved lands, an evaluation of land in various counties, and an estimate of the cost of building a turnpike between Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D. C., and other papers dealing with legal and business matters.

The volumes are a digest, 1747-1760, of cases at law in which James Tilghman was an attorney, a System of Law concerning Estates by Richard Tilghman IV, legal notes kept by William Tilghman as a young man, and dockets of William Tilghman in the Kent County court for the March 1794 term.

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William Smith papers, 1785-1860

1 Linear Foot — 328 Items
Correspondence, writings, and printed materials relating to Smith's advocacy for the abolition of slavery in Great Britain and in Britain's colonies in the West Indies. Collection contains notes, statistics, and research on the slave trade between Africa and the British West Indies; slave revolts and the conditions on sugar plantations in the Caribbean; abolitionist tracts discussing moral, economic, and religious opposition to slavery; and diagrams of slave ships documenting conditions for enslaved people and casualty rates during transport. The bulk of the collection's correspondence is addressed to Smith. Letters of William Wilberforce and the Wilberforce family discuss personal affairs, politics, abolition, and other matters. Letters from Thomas Clarkson discuss the antislavery movement. Letters from Smith's constituents discuss politics, social conditions, parliamentary reform, British foreign trade, slavery in the West Indies, and economic conditions. Correspondents include Priscilla Buxton, Thomas Fowell Buxton, and Zachary Macaulay. Also contains a partially unpublished poem of Robert Southey entitled To the Exiled Patriots.

This collection consists of letters and writings to and from William Smith, as well as collected printed materials largely related to Smith's work opposing the slave trade and the abolition of slavery in British colonies in the early 1800s. Outstanding are the 24 letters of William Wilberforce (1759-1833); these discuss such topics as: religion, sickness in the family, his sickness which forced him to leave the House of Commons, his family and his desire for more private life with them, his relatives, political disappointments, trips and engagements, publishers, criminals in Great Britain and their punishment, resolutions and plans for the abolition of slavery, the antl-slavery society, the Jamaica Law, Spanish slave trade, Spanish abolition, William Pitt, Lord Grenville and his estate Dropmore, Dr. Channing, Robert Hall, and Thomas Buxton.

A number of the letters from Smith's many correspondents stand out. There are a number of letters around 1790 from various societies and committees discussing the abolition of slavery and approving Smith's actions; some of them also mention Wilberforce. A letter from J. Yule in Edinburgh of August 13, 1792, tells of the poor Scottish peasants who are being driven from their lands to make room for sheep which are more profitable. Three letters from James Muir between 1793 and 1797 discuss the case of his son who has been banished for fourteen years for Joining the Society for Parliamentary Reform. A letter from John Longley on January 31, 1796, tells of a book which he has just published on parliamentary reform and discusses various aspects of the English government from the viewpoint of a reformer. Thomas Coke on March 16, 1809, writes of the different slavery laws in Jamaica. A lengthy 1813 letter from Andrew Wedderburn, a Jamaica plantation owner, discusses the condition of the enslaved people after a storm, their food supplies, sickness and death, his attitude toward their care, the various uses of the land, the crops raised, the market for produce, the purchase and hiring of slaves. A number of letters from Bermuda, Nevis, St. Vincent, Barbados, and Berbice contain similar discussions. An unusually good letter comes from a planter in St. Vincent, April 4, 1816. Some of these planters' letters give in rather emphatic terms the case of the planters against the abolition of slavery. There is copy of a sermon preached at Port Royal, Jamaica, June 7, 1822, on the anniversary of the great earthquake (1692) which contains a very frank and oven criticism of the moral life of Port Royal.

One significant in the collection is a letter in very tiny handwriting from John Horseman, July 15, 1817, which includes the text of Robert Southey's poem entitled "To the Exiled Patriots." The only known publication of the poem is in Samuel Taylor Coleridge's Essays on His Own Times, (1850) I, 19-20. Horseman's edition of the poem contains sixteen stanzas as compared to Coleridge's ten. In addition eight of the lines are different in the two editions.

Several letters from Thomas Clarkson between 1825 and 1827 discuss the methods to be used in the drive for complete abolition of slavery. A letter from T. Gisborne in 1829 accuses Smith of being a Papist. A lengthy petition in 1829 signed by 95 principal native inhabitants of Bombay, India, protests to the House of Commons against certain grievances and asks redress. A letter of Gilbert Shelton in Bermuda in 1832 comments with keen insight on the recent Reform Act, on Irish independence, and on the types of Christian missionaries in the West Indies; later letters from him give considerable details regarding the purchase of a life insurance Policy in England. Different letters in 1833 tell of the methods and problems involved in the abolition of slavery. A letter from James Stephen announces Wilberforce's death, July 29, 1833; also a letter from Wilberforce's son, Robert, tells of the death. There is a copy of a petition to Rev. H. W. Wilberforce signed by 127 members of both houses of Parliament requesting that William Wilberforce be buried in Westminster Abbey and that they be granted permission to attend the funeral. Several letters between the Clarksons and William Smith shortly offer Wilberforce's death concern Robert Wilberforce's proposed life of his father and his ideas of attacking some of Thomas Clarkson's claims for himself in the abolition movement.

The correspondents in this collection include: M. Babington, J. Barham, Richard Bickell, Henry Bright, Richard Brodbelt, Priscilla Buxton, Thomas Powell Buxton, Catherine Clarkson, Thomas Coke, Benjamin Cooper, John Frederick Garling, T. Gisborne, Andrew Grant, Robert Grosvenor, George Hibbert, John Horseman, Robert Harry Inglis, John Longley, Men Leith, Zachary Macaulay, A. Mavrocordato, James Muir, J. Plymley, D. Power, William Rathbone, Gilbert Salton, Philip Sansom, John Scott, B. Shank, Granville Sharp, E. Sharpe, James Stephen, W. Villers, Andrew Wedderborn, James Weeker, Barbara Ann Wilberforce, Robert I. Wilberforce, William Wilberforce, John Wright, and J. Yule.

In addition to the letters mentioned above, there is extensive evidence in the miscellaneous papers and the printed material on slavery. It includes Smith's notes and research on: spies in the slave trade, deaths (of crew and captives) on slave ships, food carried on slave ships, methods of obtaining slaves in Africa, conditions of Africans in Africa, British exports to Africa, eyewitness accounts and lists of witnesses, general information on the West Indies, estates and plantations, diseases and epidemics, population, mistreatment of slaves, breeding of slaves versus importation, description of a riot in Barbados in 1823 and the destruction of a Methodist chapel, printed petitions from the West Indies showing the increasingly difficult financial position of the sugar planters due to high taxes, shipping costs, and low prices, lists and copies of British Laws concerning slavery in the colonies, a planter's plan for the emancipation of slaves over a period of 34 years, conditions of slaves in French colonies, papers comparing the raising of sugar cane in the West Indies and in the East Indies and India, letters regarding the abolition of slavery in Ceylon, speeches in Parliament or manuscripts of books, Parliamentary resolutions, printed statements for and against slavery, history of the movement for abolition, newspaper excerpts, and magazine articles.

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William Sims papers, 1770-1860

3.6 Linear Feet — 385 Items

Correspondence, financial papers, and legal documents, concerning William Sims' extensive plantation holdings in South Carolina. Includes two account books. Correspondence is primarily related to business matters, including cotton trade and prices; the price and availability of slaves; and the beginnings of a textile industry on the plantation. Local and state politicians in South Carolina are often mentioned, as is the general economic plight of the Southern planter in the period (ca. 1819-1830), and currency problems in the state (ca. 1826-1830). One personal letter effusively describes newly settled land in Mississippi and the quality of the cotton grown there.

Detailed financial papers form the bulk of the collection, and concern the cotton trade (including weights, bale numbers, shipping, prices, and sales), and household and plantation expenses. Legal papers are confined to deeds, documents of land litigation, military commissions, and documents relating to slaves, such as indentures and lists of slaves on the plantation. Also includes genealogical information on the Sims family.

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William Saunders note, undated, [between 1800-1817].

1 item
ANS. Requests that bearer be given a copy of his work on mineral waters, as well as his book on the liver. Note is attached to short biographical sketch.
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William Patterson Smith papers, 1791-1943

26.4 Linear Feet — 22,305 Items

Personal and business correspondence of William Patterson Smith (1796-1878), merchant and planter of Gloucester County, Virginia; and of his son-in-law Isaac Howell Carrington (1827-1887), provost marshal at Richmond (1862-1865) and attorney in Pittsylvania County and Richmond, Va.

Approximately one-half of the collection consists of the business papers and correspondence of Thomas and William P. Smith in conducting their mercantile firm in Gloucester and a grain trade throughout the Chesapeake area, with connections in New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, London, and the West Indies. The nature of these records is: bills, notes, receipts, bills of lading, orders, sales accounts, chancery court records, writs, estate papers, account books, indentures, wills, stock certificates, inventories, bank books, bonds, etc. The papers prior to 1800 are those of Warner Lewis, John Lewis, John Powell, William Armistead, and William Taliaferro, and deal largely with the administration of estates. Around 1810, Thomas Smith and John Tabb formed a mercantile firm which lasted until 1826, when Tabb withdrew. The Smiths continued this firm until the Civil War. The store was general in nature, handling groceries, clothing, machinery, furniture, etc; while the firm also carried on an extensive trade in grain. William P. Smith was also a partner with Thomas T. Wiatt in a mercantile firm located in Weldon, N.C., 1818-circa 1860. The Smiths were men of broad commercial interests and were quite interested in land speculation in Texas, Arkansas, and West Virginia, internal improvements in Virginia and North Carolina, stocks and bonds, banks and banking, property and fire insurance, improvements in agricultural machinery, fertilizers, and farming methods. Abundant price data on slaves, horses, clothing, dry goods, all grains, drugs, farm implements, groceries, whiskeys, cotton, tobacco, and lands is found between 1815 and 1860.

The combined personal and business papers give a broad view of life in Tidewater Virginia from 1800-1875, and throw light on Richmond, Va., 1850-1865; Goochland Co., Va., 1850-1870; and Charlotte, Halifax, and Pittsylvania counties, Va., 1845-1880. Besides the subjects already mentioned, information can be found on social life and customs, recreations and amusements; religious life; slavery in all its aspects; free African Americans; the county militia system; Virginia and U.S. politics, 1820-1880; the Hussey and McCormick reapers; agricultural societies; the panics of 1819 and 1837; cotton, corn, wheat, barley, oats, and sugar cane cultivation; secondary (various academies) and higher (Yale University, University of Virginia, University of N.C., College of William and Mary, Virginia Military Institute, Washington College, U.S. Military Academy); the Seminole War; Mexican War and annexation of Texas; Thomas S. Dabney in Mississippi; California gold rush; trips to Philadelphia, New York, the Virginia Springs; Virginia Constitutional Conventions of 1829 and 1850; abolition and secession sentiments; iron, cotton, and wool manufacture; military and civilian life during the Civil War, especially Richmond 1861-1865, and Gloucester County under Union occupation; "contrabands"; Confederate military hospitals; taxation by Confederate government; freedmen raids; confiscation of property; Union blockade of Chesapeake Bay; the U.S. military prison at Newport News; freedmen; Reconstruction; coal lands in the Kanawha Valley; and phosphate mining in Tennessee.

Correspondents include: Joseph R. Anderson, Thomas August, John Strode Barbour, George William Booker, Alexander Brown, Charles Bruce, Philip Alexander Bruce, William Jennings Bryan, Allen Taylor Caperton, Jacob D. Cox, William W. Crump, Edward Cross, Thomas S. Dabney, John Reeves Jones Daniel, John Warwick Daniel, Beverley Browne Douglass, Tazewell Ellett, Benjamin Stoddard Ewell, William Stephen Field, Henry D. Flood, Thomas Frank Gailor, William B. Giles, William Wirt Henry, Johns Hopkins, Maria Mason (Tabb) Hubbard, William J. Hubbard, Obed Hussey, Edward Southey Joynes, John Pendleton Kennedy, John Lamb, John Lewis, Warner Lewis, John B. Lightfoot, Harriet (Field) Lightfoot, William Gordon McCabe, Alfred Thayer Mahan, C. Harrison Mann, Matthew Fontaine Maury, Joseph Mays, William G. Minor, Richard Channing Moore, Samuel Mordecai, Richard Morton, Philip N. Nicholas, John Patterson, Samuel Finley Patterson, Thomas Lewis Preston, William Cabell Rives, Theodore Roosevelt, John Roy, Winfield Scott, John Seddon, Francis Henney Smith, Gustavus Woodson Smith, William Alexander Smith, William Nathan Harrell Smith, George E. Tabb, Henrietta A. Tabb, Henry W. Tabb, John Henry Tabb, John Prosser Tabb, Philip M. Tabb, Philip A. Taliaferro, William Booth Taliaferro, Christopher Tompkins, Christopher Quarles Tompkins, Harriet P. Tompkins, Maria B. Tompkins, Theodore Gaillard Thomas, John Randolph Tucker, James Hoge Tyler, John Tyler, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, Abel Parker Upshur, Henry P. Van Bibber, Charles Scott Venable, James A. Walker, Benjamin R. Wellford, Henry Horatio Wells, Thomas Woodrow Wilson, William L. Wilson, William L. Wilson, and Levi Woodbury.

1 result in this collection

Massie family papers, 1766-1920s

3.0 Linear Feet — 3 boxes and 1 oversize folder.
The William Massie family owned several plantations in Virginia in the 18th and 19th centuries, and owned several hundred enslaved people during this time. This collection contains the papers and records of several members and generations of the Massie family, based at the Pharsalia plantation in Nelson County, Virginia. Family members represented include Thomas Massie; his children, including Thomas Massie Jr. and William Massie; William Massie's widow, Maria Massie, who inherited Pharsalia; as well as several grandchildren, including Martha, Hope, Florence, and Bland Massie. The bulk of the material in the collection dates from William Massie's ownership and management of Pharsalia, including the purchases and labor of dozens of enslaved men, women, and children in the mid-1800s. The collection also includes detailed agricultural and financial accounts, weather logs, land surveys and plots, a plantation ledger, and family and business correspondence.

This collection contains correspondence, plantation records, deeds, inventory, surveyor's plats, architectural drawings, weather memoranda, crop memoranda, and other papers, received or created by the Massie family. The bulk of the material dates from William Massie's ownership of Pharsalia plantation, and his plantation volumes document the production and agricultural trade of crops and products such as wheat, hemp, flour, bacon, oats, corn, tobacco, rye, apples, whiskey, and wool. These volumes are thorough, with near-daily entries about the weather, different stages of planting and reaping, and the production or yields of different crops, including his orchards, pigs, and horses. Many papers in the collection consist of business letters and financial logs about prices, crop yields, and local commerce. There are also occasional family and personal correspondence, with ongoing conversations about estate planning and divisions (particularly between William and Thomas Massie) as well as health news and reports on different childrens' education. Scattered throughout the collection are records documenting the Massie's reliance on slave labor, including many bills of sale for enslaved men, women, and children, as well as transactional correspondence about the hiring and use of enslaved laborers for field work, harvesting, couriering, quarry work, canal work, wagon driving, weaving, and other skilled trades. Also included in the collection is a commonplace book belonging to Thomas Massie, Sr., with notes about his crops as well as different copies of contracts and agreements he made for management of his plantation. There is an inventory and appraisal of the household and estate held by William Massie at his death in 1862. There are some drawings and maps of different lands, including plans for farming, as well as some architectural drawings of additions to Pharsalia from the mid-1800s. The collection contains some Civil War era materials, including documents relating to Maria Massie's management of the plantation following William's death, and the impressment of different horses, goods, and enslaved people into laboring on Confederate fortifications during the war. There is a deposition by Thomas Massie detailing his Continental Army service (1833); letters surrounding the Massie's hiring of a female teacher for their children in the 1840s; business correspondence between Massie and agents or contacts in Richmond, Staunton, and Lynchburg over different prices and quality of products; postwar correspondence about servant wages; and a detailed description of the Chicago fire (1871).

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File
Box 3

Bound volume, 173 pages, approximately 20x32cm, consisting of chronological entries by William Massie recording the various agricultural activities of the Pharsalia, Tyro, and Level Green plantation lands, with additional notes regarding weather or other events. Entries tend to be brief, for example: "Finished cutting the wheat" (1828 June 26). Some entries indicate which area of the plantation was being farmed, such as Newground, Old Ground, or various fields. Crops include wheat, oats, tobacco, apples, barley, clover, hemp, sweet potatoes; others entries record the killing of hogs, shearing sheep, and birth of foals. This book does not seem to include entries with names or groups of enslaved people, although their labor is indirectly implied. Later in the book, Massie began arranging entries by "Crop Memorandum," "Weather Memorandum," and "Orchard Memorandum."

File
Box 1

Assorted manuscript documents from the Massie family, arranged chronologically. Items include land surveys and hand drawn plot maps; correspondence from acquaintances and business contacts regarding crops and prices for tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, hemp, and other agriculture; planning and maps for planting fields, raising pigs, or other farming activities; some family correspondence about travel plans and different health of various family members. Includes some exchanges between Thomas Massie and his sons, William and Thomas Massie, as well as between the two brothers themselves; also includes small amount of correspondence to Sarah Massie. Includes a deed with a seal granting land to Thomas Massie from Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas in 1814. There are at least two references to sales of enslaved people. One is a note from William Garland to Massie, offering to send a courier with a "boy with him - if you think proper to take him at the six hundred dollars, Mr. Ware will deliver to you a Bill of Sale." A later bill of sale, issued in Lynchburg on 1815 August 5, notes that William Massie purchased "negro woman by the name of Lady and her son Bob" for six hundred seventy five dollars, from Davidson Bradford.

William Law papers, 1761-1890

2.4 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,863 items (including 20 vols.)
Collection has personal and business correspondence of William Law, the Dubose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage. As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel Dubose, include records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers. Included also are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, mostly post 1839, include letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839, frequent letters from member of the Cooper and Dubose families, and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often in financial difficulties. J. R. Law was a planter in the Sumter District of South Carolina and in Madison County, Fla., after 1848. Miscellaneous materials include a description of the Alabama River and environs, 1815, accounts of trips to Red Sulphur Springs and other springs in Virginia, 1835, and Civil War letters from William Law's son discussing camp life.

This collection contains personal and business correspondence and papers of William Law (1792-1868), planter, merchant, and leader of the local militia, the DuBose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage.

As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel DuBose, including records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers.

Also included in the collection are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Cyrus Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, largely confined to the period after 1839, fall into three categories; letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839; frequent letters from members of the Cooper and DuBose families; and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often involved in financial difficulties. Letters from James Robert Law are concerned with planting operations in Sumter District, South Carolina, and, beginning with 1848, in Madison County, Florida.

There are also a description of the Alabama River and its fertile lowlands by William I. DuBose written from Fort Claiborne, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1815; accounts of a trip to Red Sulphur Springs as well as other springs in Virginia in 1835; a long account by James R. Law relative to a marl bed on his Sumter plantation, and Civil War letters from William Law's son revealing numerous incidents of camp life.

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William Johnston Cocke papers, 1682-1977, bulk 1900-1960

6.4 Linear Feet — 2121 Items
Rhodes scholar and lawyer of Asheville, N.C. Collection is divided into the following categories: Correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); Writings (1682-1965); Speeches (1896-1965); Miscellany (ca. 1908); Clippings (1792-1975); Printed materials (1865-1977); Volumes (1886-1954); Pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an Alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. Most of the material spans the years 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests; family correspondence and photographs; clippings; and scrapbooks. Cocke's many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; and travels in Europe. Some letters refer to Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew.

Collection reflects the varied interests of Cocke. It is divided into the following categories: correspondence (1815-1969, some transcribed); writings (1682-1965); speeches (1896-1965); miscellany (ca. 1908); clippings (1792-1975); printed materials (1865-1977); volumes (1886-1954); pictures, late 19th and early 20th centuries; and an alphabetical file (1787-1977), arranged by topic. The collection covers a wide variety of topics and time periods, but most of the material has dates in the span 1900-1960. Included are personal correspondence and materials relating to Cocke's political and civic interests. His many correspondents include Sam Ervin, B. Everett Jordan, and Terry Sanford. Correspondence topics include the Democratic Party; life as an American law student in England; English law compared to American law; travels in Europe; Thomas Wolfe, whom Cocke knew; publishing efforts; and a meeting with Lady Astor and the future King Edward VII. Other items include family letters; manuscripts by Cocke's mother, Nola, including "My Reminiscences of the Sixties (1861-1865)" about the Reconstruction era in Tenn.; clippings regarding a proposed N.C. constitution amendment requiring a literacy test for voter registrants in the 1860s; speeches by William Cocke, Sr., mayor of Asheville, N.C.; a guardian's account book later turned into a scrapbook; a large campaign scrapbook for Senate candidate Alton Asa Lennon; Cocke-Dilworth family photographs and many albumen prints of Europe. Topics in the alphabetical file include civic clubs; United World Federalists, Inc.; the attempt to establish the state of Franklin in what is now western N.C.; legal cases regarding horse stealing, a slave sale, and other topics; court reform in N.C. and the Bell Committee; and the Commission on International Cooperation under the N.C. Dept. of Conservation and Development.

1 result in this collection

William Holland Thomas papers, 1814-1900s and undated

30 Linear Feet
White agent and representative for the Cherokee, merchant, lawyer, and trader, of Haywood Co., N.C. Collection includes correspondence, account books, day books, ledgers, and other papers, relating to Thomas's life in western North Carolina; the removal of the Cherokee and the status of those who remained; the development of intrastructure including turnpikes and railroads in North Carolina; Civil War fighting in east Tennessee; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and his private business operations as a white trader among the Cherokees. Includes records of Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties, and business correspondence and accounts of Thomas's son, also William Holland Thomas, a merchant and farmer of Jackson County, N.C.

Collection contains letters and papers of William H. Thomas (1805-1893) concerning his life and businesses in western North Carolina; his role as a white agent representing the Indians in negotiations and communications with the U.S. government; the removal of the Eastern Band of Cherokee on the Trail of Tears; the legal and financial conditions of Cherokee who remained behind in North Carolina; the building of roads and railroads through Western North Carolina; fighting during the Civil War in East Tennessee, including Thomas's leadership of Thomas's Legion in the Confederate Army; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and private business of Thomas, including some documentation of his declining health and his institutionalization for mental instability. There are also account books, day books, and ledgers showing a record of goods bought and sold in Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties. Included also are business correspondence and miscellaneous accounts, 1875-1890, of his son, William Holland Thomas, Jr., merchant and farmer of Jackson County, North Carolina.

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File
Volume M:3924

North Carolina and Tennessee. Alternative title: "Register of persons who wish reservations under the Treaty of July 8, 1817." Includes names and places of residence and occasionally other remarks such as "enrolled for Arkansas."

Folder

Thomas's assorted correspondence along with extensive notes, loose account pages, and other miscellaneous items are sorted chronologically by year into General Papers. There are also volumes with travel diaries for various business ventures and letterbooks with copies of his incoming and outgoing correspondence. This series documents his various businesses and investments, his Confederate service during the Civil War, his work as an Indian agent, and his family life and friendships. Additional material on his work with the Eastern Band of Cherokee can be found in the Cherokee Papers Series; additional contracts, reports, and petitions relating to railroads and turnpikes can be found in the Infrastructure Series.

William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters, 1695-1991, bulk 1800-1899

3 Linear Feet — 34 Items
William Helfand is a scholar of pharmaceutical history and art, and collector of ephemera and art related to medicine. The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats, to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The William H. Helfand Collection of Medical Prints and Posters consists of 34 prints and posters realted to the history of medicine and pharmacology, dating from 1695 to 1991, with the bulk of the prints dating from 19th century. Paris, France is the provenance for many of the posters, but several hail from England and the United States. The posters are represented in two formats: lithographs and engravings, some of which are hand colored. Ranging in size from 5"x8" to 19"x23", the prints include caricatures, political satire, comics and advertisements, dealing with a range of subjects from quacks, alchemy, charlatans and cheats to pastoral and hospital scenes. George Cruikshank and Honoré Daumier are represented amongst the artists. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

William Henry papers, 1806-1834

3 items
Three signed letters: William Hey, surgeon, writes to William Henry about calculi; Henry invites scientist Michael Faraday on request of the Committee of the Manchester Royal Institution to give a course of lectures on chemistry; Henry replies to Thomas Thompson's request for advice on how to dispose of the minerological collection of his brother-in-law, and mentions geologist William Buckland.

Three letters. William Hey, surgeon, writes William Henry about calculi. In a signed letter from 1831, Henry invites Michael Faraday on request of the Committee of the Manchester Royal Institution to give a course of lectures on chemistry. Informs him, however, that the Institution may not be able to supply all of the desired laboratory equipment. In the last letter, Henry replies to Thomas Thompson's request for advice on how to dispose of the minerological collection of his brother-in-law, William Phillips, and mentions geologist William Buckland.

1 result in this collection

William Henry Hall papers, 1736-1862

1020 items
The Hall family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, were enslavers and owners of tobacco plantations. Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

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Folder

The bills and receipts contain many an "acct. sale" of tobacco, listing custom duties, charges, etc., in tobacco shipping. Estate inventories for Major Henry Hall, 1758, Thos. Lane, 1790-98, John Hall, 1795, and Mrs. Ruth Hall, 1803, include enslaved people and list possessions. Many mercantile and household accounts are included.

There are 7 volumes dated 1765-1902. Six are account books, two that belonged to John Hall and 4 to William Henry Hall. There is one volume that belonged to Harriet Hall.

William D. Smith papers, 1816-1921

0.75 Linear Feet
William Doddridge Smith was a land owner, Justice of the Peace, and attorney in Clarke County, Virginia. The collection is mainly comprised of diaries, account books, ledgers, and an autograph album from several members of his extended family and covers multiple generations who lived at various times in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and Ohio. Surnames represented are: Page, Smith, Thompson, and Williams. Three of the diaries are written by H.M. Williams (b.1842), who traveled to Cincinnati as a Christian missionary in 1882. Her diaries record her daily activities such as visiting the sick, attending meetings of various social and religious societies, and teaching Sunday school. One notebook was written by Mary Page Thompson (b. 1869) while she attended State Normal School in Baltimore (Md.) 1889, and includes notes on biology, psychology, and religion, including notes on a discussion of Christian missionary work in China. There are several items relating to Philip Doddridge Thompson (b. 1838), a Christian minister who worked in several states and one ledger that indicates that William Doddridge Smith was a Justice of the Peace in Clarke County, Virginia in 1866. The collection also includes one folder of indentures, deeds, and wills, the bulk of which was created during 1816-1854 and is related to the business and legal dealings of William Doddridge Smith and his father, Edward Jaquelin Smith, who were active in Virginia and West Virginia. There is also one folder of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.

Mainly diaries, account books, ledgers, and an autograph album from multiple members of the Page, Smith, Thompson, and Williams families who lived in Virginia, West Virginia, Maryland, North Carolina, and Ohio. Three of the diaries are written by H.M. Williams (b.1842), who traveled to Cincinnati as a Christian missionary in 1882. Her diaries record her daily activities such as visiting the sick, attending meetings of various social and religious societies, and teaching Sunday school. One notebook was written by Mary Page Thompson (b. 1869) while she attended State Normal School in Baltimore (Md.) 1889, and includes notes on biology, psychology, and religion, including notes on a discussion of Christian missionary work in China. There are several items relating to Philip Doddridge Thompson (b. 1838), a Christian minister who worked in several states and one ledger that indicates that William Doddridge Smith was a Justice of the Peace in Clarke County, Virginia in 1866. Collection also includes one folder of indentures, deeds, and wills the bulk of which was created during 1816-1854 and is related to the business and legal dealings of William Doddridge Smith and his father, Edward Jaquelin Smith, who were active in Virginia and West Virginia. There is also one folder of correspondence, photographs, clippings, and ephemera.

1 result in this collection

William C. Thornton papers, 1805-1854

0.5 Linear Feet
Correspondence of the related Compton, Thornton, Treadway, and Wainwright families of London, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, centering around William C. Thornton.

The following description has been transcribed from the card catalog, which was composed in 1951:

The central figure of this correspondence, which is largely that of the related Compton Thornton, Treadway, and Wainwright families of London, Virginia, and Pennsylvania, is William C. Thornton. By 1817 he was associated with John G. Smith and Co. of Richmond. Between then and May 1820, he took a position with the U.S. Bank in Richmond. Within a few years he had left the bank and was in a mercantile business near Prince Edward Court House, Virginia, with his brother-in-law, Thomas Treadway, Sr. After two years, he sold out and went to New York, where he went into business with Thomas Treadway, Jr., Thomas Sr.'s nephew. He later entered the U.S. Bank in Philadelphia, where he remained until the early 1840s when he returned to business.

In a letter of August 1805, Townsend Compton writes from London about several members of his family and the fear there of an invasion by Napoleon's forces; in Dec. 1816, he writes of the depression in England, blaming Pitt's measures for nearly ruining the country, and stating that Spain and Ferdinand VII would disgrace a nation of barbarians. A later letter from Compton (May 1, 1820) comments further on England's depression, and speaks of the success of actors Kean and Matthews.

There are also letters to Rachel, Rebecca, and Abraham M. Church; James Martin; letters from Medmor Goodwin (1817); Mary Treadway in 1826 to Rebecca Thornton, wife of William C. Thornton; letters to Rebecca from her sister Caroline in Farmville; Sarah H. Thornton and M.F. Thornton to their uncle, William J. Wainwright; a series of letters starting in Oct. 1839 from T.T. Treadway at the University of Virginia to his aunt and his cousin, Edward C. Thornton of Philadelphia; Elizabeth Russell Norwood of Boston to her friend Mrs. William Wainwright (including a letter from Aug. 1842 regarding women's rights); a letter from T.T. Treadway of Prince Edward in 1842 discussing slaveholding; a letter from Newton, CT., in Jan. 1844 about temperance debates and lectures; letters to Sarah A. Thornton from her friends; and a letter from Mary Treadway in Dec. 1852 commenting on Uncle Tom's Cabin.

1 result in this collection

William Clark Grasty papers, 1788-1906 and undated (bulk 1800-1869), bulk 1800-1869

10.9 Linear Feet — 8,175 Items
General merchant, Pittsylvania Co., Va. Correspondence, account books, daybooks, fee books, invoices, ledgers, memoranda books, records of sales, inventories, and letterpress copybooks, chiefly 1800-1869, of three generations of general merchants of Pittsylvania Co., Va. Business interests included a general store, a tavern, a blacksmith shop, a simplified type of banking, and the keeping of a post office. Large amounts of tobacco were bought and sold before the Civil War. Post-war records indicate a large volume of trade in Peruvian guano and commercial fertilizers. Partners in the firm included Philip L. Grasty and other members of the Grasty family, John F. Rison and Samuel Pannill. Includes letters (1849-1867) of John S. Grasty, a Presbyterian minister, referring to North Carolina agriculture, slave hiring, Unionist sympathy among the Dutch population of Botetourt Co., Va., and the devastation of Fincastle, Va., during the war.

Correspondence, account books, daybooks, fee books, invoices, ledgers, memoranda books, records of sales, inventories, and letterpress copybooks, chiefly 1800-1869, of three generations of general merchants of Pittsylvania Co., Va. Business interests included a general store, a tavern, a blacksmith shop, a simplified type of banking, and the keeping of a post office. Large amounts of tobacco were bought and sold before the Civil War. Post-war records indicate a large volume of trade in Peruvian guano and commercial fertilizers. Partners in the firm included Philip L. Grasty and other members of the Grasty family, John F. Rison and Samuel Pannill. Includes letters (1849-1867) of John S. Grasty, a Presbyterian minister, referring to North Carolina agriculture, slave hiring, Unionist sympathy among the Dutch population of Botetourt Co., Va., and the devastation of Fincastle, Va., during the war.

1 result in this collection

William C. Holgate papers, 1798-1911 and undated bulk 1799-1887

3 Linear Feet — Approx. 1,605 Items
Railroad investor and land speculator of Defiance, Ohio. Family, business, and legal papers (chiefly 1799-1887) of William C. Holgate, of his father, Curtis Holgate, and of William's daughter, Fannie Holgate Harley. Papers before 1852 relate mostly to legal and business affairs of Holgate and his father, including investments in Ohio land and New York railroads; papers of his daughter begin in 1872 and are concerned with family affairs, but also include references to birth control, abortions, a smallpox epidemic, and the education of women. Includes letters from students at Hamilton College and the University of Vermont in the 1830s; papers relating to land speculation; and material pertaining to the economic development of Defiance, Ohio, and internal improvements and education in Ohio for the period from 1830-1840.

Family, business, and legal papers, dating chiefly from 1799-1887, of William C. Holgate, of his father, Curtis Holgate, and of William's daughter, Fannie Holgate Harley. Papers before 1852 relate mostly to legal and business affairs of Holgate and his father, including investments in Ohio land and New York railroads; papers of his daughter begin in 1872 and are concerned with family affairs, but also include references to birth control, abortions, a smallpox epidemic, and the education of women. Includes letters from students at Hamilton College and the University of Vermont in the 1830s; papers relating to land speculation; and material pertaining to the economic development of Defiance, Ohio, and internal improvements and education in Ohio for the period from 1830-1840.

1 result in this collection

William Boone Douglass papers, 1809-1948

8.75 Linear Feet
William Boone Douglass (1864-1947) was a white lawyer, engineer, and surveyor from Corydon (Harrison Co.), Indiana who was known for his survey work in the southwest United States. Collection includes correspondence, genealogical material, maps, photographs, notebooks on the Pueblo Indians, and other papers of Douglass and of various members of the Boone and Douglass families.

Collection includes a biographical sketch of Douglass, correspondence of the Boone and Douglass families, genealogical information and research, financial and legal documents, material related to Douglass' survey work and national parks, printed and visual material, and writings.

Correspondence pertains to family matters, the Kansas-Nebraska question, the passing of the first overland mail from California through Cassville, Missouri in 1858, elections to be held in Indiana in 1860, Douglass' surveying activities, establishment of a National Park of the Cliff Cities of New Mexico, the securing of power from Boulder Dam, and other matters. There are several Civil War letters from both Union and Confederate soldiers. There is a large amount of correspondence for Douglass' parents, Benjamin P. Douglass and Victoria Boone, as well as for his son, William Boone Douglass, Jr.

The financial and legal documents include receipts, account books, deeds, a court docket from an unidentified court, and patent case files and diagrams. Also of note is an 1814 deed of emancipation for Sally and Champion, two formerly enslaved people, who were emancipated by William Vincett in Harrison County, Indiana.

Booklets, brochures, and publications cover a wide range of topics and locations, including traveling in Santa Fe, N.M., the Transylvania Company and the founding of Henderson, K.Y., and the history of U.S. coinage laws.

Material related to Douglass' survey work consists of notes, writings, and drawings about the different sites that he surveyed, particularly those in present-day Utah, Arizona, and New Mexico, as well as maps and plats. Douglass' published "Notes on the Shrines of the Tewa and Other Pueblo Indians of New Mexico" (1917) is included in the writings. Also included are many photographs of Utah, New Mexico, and the Southwest. These photographs show natural formations, the surveyors, and also Pueblo peoples and customs, including Santiago Naranjo, Francisco Naranjo, and the Pueblo peoples' traditional Buffalo Dance. The Notebook on Pueblo Indians, Vol. I, contains descriptions of Douglass' visit to the San Ildefonso Pueblo and his observations of dwellings, meals, symbols, and rituals, with particular attention paid to the Scalp Dance. Vol. II contains notes on the Tewa language, cardinal colors and locations, clans, culture, and history, as well as Douglass' notes on other publications that address the Tewa language and Pueblo peoples. Douglass' survey work prompted him to advocate for the establishment of a "National Park of the Cliff Cities of New Mexico"--material related to this effort, including proposed legislation and maps, is in the collection.

Correspondence, clippings, and the material related to Douglass' survey work make mention of the indigenous groups and individuals he encountered, including the Paiute, Navajo, and Pueblo peoples and Jim Mike, Santiago Naranjo, and Francisco Naranjo. Most of the material about Jim Mike addresses his role in leading Douglass to the natural bridges in Utah, including what is now known as Rainbow Bridge National Monument.

2 results in this collection

William Beaumont papers, 1816-1944

5 items
Material includes a letter (ALS), reprints, holograph notes. All material relates to the letter, from Commodore Thomas Macdonough to B.W. Crowninshield, Secretary of the Navy, recommending William Beaumont for service in the Navy.
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William Baskerville Hamilton papers, 1700-1975

80 Linear Feet — 53,700 items

Correspondence, memoranda, and reports, relating to Hamilton's teaching career; reasearch notes for his work in antebellum Mississippi history, particularly the Territorial period, and for biographies of William Wyndham Grenville, Baron, and William Murray, Earl of Mansfield; and personal and family papers. Includes ca. 9,000 British historical manuscripts donated by Hamilton, cataloged separately by the repository. Correspondents include Nash Kerr Burger, Hubert Creekmore, Eudora Welty, and other Mississippi literary figures.

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William and James Trahern account books, 1803-1827

12 Volumes
William and James Trahern were merchants in Brunswick (Brunswick Co.), Virginia. Merchants' accounts, including daybooks, 1803-1806, and a record of cotton storage, 1825-1827, of William Trahern; and daybooks, 1806-1822, and an index of James Trahern.

Merchants' accounts, including daybooks, 1803-1806, and a record of cotton storage, 1825-1827, of William Trahern; and daybooks, 1806-1822, and an index of James Trahern.

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Westel Woodbury Willoughby letter, [Fairfield, New York], undated

1 item
ALS. Letter of recommendation for Doctor Forester Dexter.
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Westall Family papers, 1790-1986 (bulk 1880-1986) and undated

6 Linear Feet — 2,226 Items
Prominent family from Asheville, NC. Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photographs of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

Includes papers of several different members of the family including correspondence, clippings, speeches, and writings of Virginia Westall in her capacity as aide to General R. L. Eichelberger; papers from family's various civic capacities; WWI and WWII correspondence; military records; family photographs and clippings; other personal correspondence including some related to cousin Thomas Wolfe; photos of Asheville; Westall genealogy; some poetry, a journal, other writings; business papers including those concerning violin making and some from a family member's construction business in Asheville.

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Wesley Works archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996

80.5 Linear Feet
The Wesley Works Editorial Project, founded in 1960, is an international and inter denominational consortium of scholars that is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The Wesley Works Archive, dating from 1676 to 1996, with the bulk ranging from 1724-1791 and 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). The collection consists of that portion of the project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's editor and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy, who have participated in the Project. There is much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing; materials in the collection also throw light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The Wesley Works Archive, 1676-1996 and undated, bulk 1724-1791, 1960-1996, forms part of the working papers of the Wesley Works Editorial Project (WWEP). Formed in 1960, this international and inter denominational consortium of scholars is producing a complete critical edition of the works of John Wesley, the 18th century Church of England clergyman who was a primary founder of Methodism. The collection consists of that portion of the Project's documents gathered by Frank Baker during almost four decades of service as the WWEP's General Editor, Textual Editor, and main bibliographer, and consists of the correspondence, writings, research, printed materials, photocopied manuscripts, proofs, and other materials produced by Baker and the many other historians, theologians, and clergy who have participated in the Project. Because John Wesley preached, wrote, and published so widely, the content of the research materials required for a full edition of his writings necessarily contains much information not only about the founding and early history of the Methodist and Wesleyan Methodist Churches, but also much information about the history of religious thought and dissent in 18th century England, the Evangelical Revival, and the history of publishing. Beyond the ostensible purpose of the WWEP, however, the modern correspondence and scholarly debate contained in these papers also throws light on such topics as scholarly publishing and textual criticism.

The collection also sheds light on the history and mechanics of the transmission of texts. That is, while the reproduced printed materials here document the complex publishing and textual history of the thousands of editions of Wesley's writings to appear in his lifetime alone, at the same time the original writings of modern scholars involved in the WWEP document how older texts are researched and recovered from the past, all for the purpose of establishing a present authoritative text to be passed on to the future.

Series in the Wesley Works Archive are arranged to correspond to the unit structure of the thirty-five volume Bicentennial Edition. Described more fully below, the initial sixteen series of the archive and the sixteen units and thirty-five volumes of the Bicentennial Edition are as follows: Sermons (1-4); Explanatory Notes upon the New Testament (5-6); A Collection of Hymns for the Use of the People called Methodists (7); Worship (8); The Methodist Societies (9-10); The Appeals to Men of Reason and Religion and Certain Related Open Letters (11); Doctrinal and Controversial Treatises (12-13); Social/Political Tracts (14); Catechetical/Educational Works (15); Editorial Works (16); Medical Writings (17); Journals and Diaries (18-24); Letters (25-31); Oxford Diaries (32); Bibliography (33-34); and Index and Miscellanea (35). A concluding seventeenth series, General Files, gathers materials about the overall history and organization of the WWEP.

The history of the Wesley Works Editorial Project already extends more than fifty years, from its inception in 1960 to the 2011 publication of The Methodist Societies: The Minutes of Conference. This volume, as the seventeenth to be published, marks the halfway point of the entire Bicentennial Edition, which will comprise thirty-four volumes plus a concluding general index volume. Although the General Files are placed as the final series in order to avoid interrupting the parallel structure of series and volumes, they actually mark the best place to begin an overview of the collection, since their various folder groups document much of the administrative history of the Project. Overviews and details of the Project's inception, history, institutional support, and editorial guidelines are best found in the folder groups for the Board of Directors and the Editorial Board. The history of the actual content, intellectual structure, and presentation of volumes can be found in such groups as grouped under such categories as Editorial Procedures and Bulletins of the WWP. Most of the latter were issued by Frank Baker in the 1970s and contain much detail about the content and style choices that were being made for various volumes. The General Files also contain materials that may relate to more than one unit of the Bicentennial Edition, as well as some Wesley publications not selected for inclusion, especially his Explanatory Notes Upon the Old Testament.

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Wesley family papers, 1726-1889 and undated

Online
3 Linear Feet — 46 Items
The brothers John Wesley (1703-1791) and Charles Wesley (1707-1788) were Church of England clergymen and two of the founders of Methodism; Sarah Wesley (1726-1822) and Sarah Wesley (1759-1828) were the wife and daughter of Charles Wesley. The Wesley family papers span the years 1726-1889 and mainly comprise the correspondence of John and Charles Wesley, with single items from the wife and daughter of Charles, both named Sarah; there is also an inventory of John Wesley's library taken at the time of his death, 1791, and a photograph album, 1889, of English sites related to the Wesleys and the history of Methodism. Correspondence discusses John Wesley's life as a student at Lincoln College, the administration of Kingswood School, the brothers' mission to Georgia in the 1730s, and Methodism's eventual separation from the Church of England. Correspondents and people mentioned in the letters include the Countess of Huntingdon, George Whitefield, James Oglethorpe, Joseph Benson, and Samuel Bradburn.

The Wesley family papers, 1726-1889 and undated, comprise correspondence, poems, sermons, affidavits, and other documents of the brothers John Wesley (1703-1791) and Charles Wesley (1707-1788), both Church of England clergymen and two of the founders of Methodism; of Sarah Wesley (1726-1822), wife of Charles; and of Sarah Wesley (1759-1828), daughter of Charles and Sarah.

John Wesley's letters discuss his life as a student at Lincoln College; the administration of Kingswood School, Bath; his conflict with the Countess of Huntingdon; his involvement with the funeral sermon for George Whitefield and Whitefield's estate; and various other topics including the appointment of ministers. Charles Wesley's letters discuss details of the Wesley brothers' experiences on their mission to Georgia, including their relationship with James Oglethorpe, and his regrets over the Methodists' separation from the Church of England. Correspondents and persons mentioned include Samuel Wesley (brother of John and Charles), Eliza Bennis, Joseph Benson, Samuel Bradburn, James Kenton, and Samuel Lloyd.

Other materials include an inventory of John Wesley's library at the time of his death; a signed affidavit concerning a major chapel of British Methodism, opened in Nottingham in 1783; a photograph album of places in England associated with the Wesley family and the history of Methodism; and some infant baptismal clothing (a christening gown) attributed to the Wesley family.

Original correspondence housed in Box 1 available by prior request only. Use copies are in Box 2.

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Washington Duke papers, 1764-1987

Online
2.6 Linear Feet — Approximately 967 Items
Collection contains business and financial papers, chiefly of Washington Duke. Business and financial papers relate to the tobacco and textile industries and include some early financial records of W. Duke, Sons and Company. Other financial records pertain to Duke's generosity to relatives and to educational institutions such as Trinity College (now Duke University). Personal papers consist of correspondence, the Duke family genealogy, photographs, and memorabilia from the dedication of the Duke Homestead.

The bulk of the papers of Washington Duke, a tobacco manufacturer and philanthropist, date from 1890 to 1905, but the papers include items as early as 1764 and as late as 1987. The collection is a created one; materials from several sources have been brought together to form the Washington Duke Papers. The collection relates primarily to the financial and philanthropic interests of Washington Duke after his retirement from W. Duke, Sons and Company in 1880. There are five series: Correspondence, Financial Papers, Genealogical Papers, Legal Papers, and Miscellaneous Papers.

The Correspondence Series begins with two letters (photocopies) written by Washington Duke in 1863, when he was preparing to enter the Confederate Army. After the war Mr. Duke began establishing his tobacco business. This series contains no correspondence for the period 1865-1889. The bulk of the correspondence covers the period 1890-1905, after Mr. Duke had retired from the tobacco business. These letters reveal his financial and philanthropic interests after retirement. Letters come from the following sources:

  • 1. Relatives, seeking aid or sending thanks for gifts.
  • 2. Methodist Episcopal Church, South, members and ministers seeking assistance for church buildings, furnishings, orphans, widows, and missionaries.
  • 3. Schools and colleges asking for aid or expressing appreciation for aid given. Louisburg Female College, Rutherford College, Trinity College and Kittrell College were among those writing about finances. The orphanage at Oxford was supported for a number of years. Many students, both black and white, sought financial assistance from Mr. Duke in the way of scholarships or loans.
  • 4. Business associates or would-be partners seeking financial assistance or employment. These letters are largely concerned with textiles and tobacco. For example there are letters reflecting Mr. Duke's encouragement of black capitalism in the founding of the Coleman Manufacturing Company at Concord, N.C.
  • 5. People who were ill or unlucky, many of them very impoverished.

The letters in the Correspondence Series dated 1975-1976 are concerned with Washington Duke's dealings with the J. W. Scott and Company in Greensboro, N.C. (1871) and the nomination of St. Joseph's A.M.E Church in Durham to the National Register of Historic Places. This series does not include any original letters written by Washington Duke.

The Financial Papers Series consists of records of Washington Duke's business interests and philanthropy. The oldest volume is a ledger (1873-1877), kept at the time Washington Duke and his sons moved their factory from the farm to Durham. Duke tobacco products were being shipped to markets from Maine to California, including locations in frontier Montana. An account book for the Durham Warehouse covers the period 1876-1884 and gives an interesting glimpse of the beginnings of Duke tobacco organization. Records were kept of purchases of tobacco, promotion trips to Europe and Australia (1883-1884), and the entry of George Washington Watts into the firm (1878).

A summary of the personal finances of Washington Duke is noted in financial papers dating from 1893 until the time of his death in 1905. These records include a journal, ledger, cashbook, and check stubs. They are parallel in content and supplement each other; they appear to have been the work of his private secretary, James E. Stagg.

The journal (1893-1905) indicates gifts to family, relatives, and individuals, as well as transactions with institutions such as the White Rock Baptist Church, St. Joseph's AME Church, Louisburg Female College, and the Durham Conservatory of Music. Businesses noted include the American Tobacco Company, the Virginia-Carolina Chemical Company, Cary Lumber Company, together with a number of cotton mills, railroads, and banks.

The cashbook (1893-1905) lists, in more detail, dividends from investments as well as donations to individuals and institutions over a period of a decade or more. Washington Duke was consistently generous to his immediate family and his many nieces and nephews. His tithing to the church covered gifts to the Main Street Methodist Church, ministers, Negro churches, orphanages and schools. With the coming of Trinity College to Durham, he made generous contributions to its finances, including small gifts to the baseball team and to the library for book stacks. The check stubs cover the period 1899 to 1905. The final entry refers to the balance transferred to his sons after Washington Duke's death.

The ledger (1893-1904) contains accounts listing mills, railroads, and other property. Also included are notations concerning rents, personal expenses, tithes and repairs. Many names of Durham citizens appear here.

The Genealogical Papers Series contains the Washington Duke family Bible (1861) as well as family trees and correspondence regarding lineage and descendants of Duke family members. The bulk of the material is photocopies from the James B. Duke Papers, including copies of letters which detail what Washington Duke remembered about his family.

The Legal Papers Series includes copies of court, marriage, and property records pertaining to the Duke family and its settlement in Orange County, in the vicinity of present-day Durham, N.C. Other papers include a copy of Washington Duke's last will and testament (1900) and the indenture establishing the Doris Duke Trust (1925).

The Miscellaneous Papers Series is composed of pictures, clippings, and general materials. The pictures are primarily photographs of homes, people, and tobacco factories. They have no dates and many are copies of originals on permanent loan to the Duke Homestead, a National Historic site. The homes include those of Taylor Duke (presumed) and Washington Duke, as well as interior views of rooms at the Duke Homestead. There are pictures of Washington Duke and of his statue and of three buildings on the Duke Farm used as tobacco factories prior to the move to Durham.

Clippings are family and business related dating from 1890-1987. A Memorial Album of notices on the death of Washington Duke (1905) is arranged alphabetically by city.

General materials relate to the Duke Homestead and include a variety of other printed and manuscript items. Among them are a Tribute to Bishop Marvin, ca. 1877 (photocopy); Resolution of Thanks and Appreciation, St. Joseph's AME to Washington Duke, 1902; a Resolution by the Board of Directors of the Fidelity Bank in memory of Washington Duke (1905); and a manuscript list of persons sending condolences/flowers on the death of Washington Duke, 1905. Photostats of two records in the C.S.A. Archives in the National Archives are concerned with the Civil War career of Washington Duke. One, dated April 4, 1864, is a report for Co. A of the Camp Guard by Captain George B. Baker, Assistant Quartermaster at Camp Holmes, Raleigh. The second item is a list of men who signed up for three years service in the Confederate Navy. Washington Duke's signature appears on both of these documents.

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Washington Dearmont papers, 1787-1944 and undated, bulk 1851-1930

5 Linear Feet — Approximately 5200 Items
Farmer and salt agent, of Clarke Co., Va. Routine family and business correspondence, some of it relating to Dearmont’s position as a salt agent. A few Civil War letters contain orders preparatory to the march on Harper’s Ferry and concern the procurement of salt and horses. Later correspondence concerns Mamie Dearmont and relates in part to women in politics in Colorado, 1912. Other topics of correspondence include Virginia politics, and school life at Eastern College, Front Royal, Va., and at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. There are also business records of the following persons: George Weaver, a merchant at White Post; Greenbury W. Weaver; the postmaster at White Post; G. C. Hamill; and William Berry of Clarke County. The earliest dates refer to financial ledgers and other volumes; one of these contains ledgers of G. C. Hamill and of Washington Dearmont.

Routine family and business correspondence dating from 1787 to 1944, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1851-1930. A portion of the records relate to Dearmont’s position as a salt agent. A few Civil War letters contain orders preparatory to the march on Harper’s Ferry and concern the procurement of salt and horses. Later correspondence concerns Mamie Dearmont and relates in part to women in politics in Colorado, 1912. Other topics of correspondence include Virginia politics, and school life at Eastern College, Front Royal, Va., and at the Medical College of Virginia in Richmond. There are also business records of the following persons: George Weaver, a merchant at White Post; Greenbury W. Weaver; the postmaster at White Post; G. C. Hamill; and William Berry of Clarke County. The earliest dates refer to financial ledgers and other volumes; one of these contains ledgers of G. C. Hamill and of Washington Dearmont.

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Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975

4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items
The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

3 results in this collection
Folder

Most of the earliest items pertain to Mrs. Walton's family, the Bakers, who had settled in Hingham, Massachusetts at least by the eighteenth-century. Letters to Mrs. Walton comprise a major segment of this series, including those to her from her father, James Baker, 1880-1882. Included are courtship letters from George Walton, a physician who attended Eleanore Walton while she was convalescing near Deland, Florida. Most were written from 1891-1892, after she returned to her home in Chicago. Letters from George Walton after the marriage suggest financial hardship and indicate that the couple was frequently separated from the beginning of their marriage and during the early childhood of their son Loring. After 1895, there is a gap in the correspondence.

Also included is George Walton's 1896 diary of a trip via wagon from Indiana to Florida. Later material and correspondence in the series pertains to Eleanore Walton's work as a clubwoman and motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri from the 1920s to 1948, when she retired and moved to Durham, N.C. to live with her son Loring Baker Walton, who was on the faculty at Duke University.

The papers of Loring Baker Walton, make up a separate and larger series in this collection. An extensive series of correspondence between Eleanor and her son is located there.

Walter Lee Sutton papers, 1811-1947

5.8 Linear Feet — 1,409 Items

The Walter Lee Sutton Papers span the period 1811 to 1947 with the bulk dating from 1883 to 1939. Three generations of the interrelated Anderson, Danforth, Sutton, and Wynn families are represented in the collection. While the collection primarily focuses on Sutton, many of the earlier papers relate to his wife's family, the Wynns and Danforths, her paternal and maternal relatives respectively.

The majority of the collection consists of courtship letters between Walter Sutton and Harriet (Hattie) L. Wynn (1883-1886), and ledgers and daybooks of the general merchandising businesses Heard and Sutton and W. L. Sutton. Therefore, the major strengths of the collection include its delineation of courtship customs in the 1880s and its depiction over a thirty-five period of a small general merchandising firm. While the correspondence spans the period 1811 to 1936, there are very few letters that date between 1814 and 1830, thereby leaving several years virtually uncovered in the collection.

The general merchandising businesses of Heard and Sutton and W. L. Sutton sold a variety of items including farm implements, wagons, buggies, hardware, groceries, dynamite, oil, gas, clothing, and dry goods. Because of the time period covered by these accounting records, one can readily see the transition from “horse and buggy days” to the increasing influence of the automobile. Besides business records, the account books also contain a few domestic accounting records for the Sutton family. Regular customers include members of the Anderson, Sutton, and Heard families. In some there are details about employees, including the number of days they have worked or days missed. Other volumes include an estimate of the amount of lumber sold, the amount of hay cut, or which fields were used for cotton picking.

Sutton's cashbook, 1907-1909, not only delineates the cash received and paid out, but also identifies several products Sutton sold. Some of these entries also include names of companies or persons from whom he received products. While there are separate account books for ice (1909 June-1910 Oct.) and cotton ginning (1908 Oct.-Feb. 1912), ice and cotton ginning accounts are also included in some of the other W. L. Sutton Company ledger and daybooks for other years.

The daybooks commonly itemize lists of goods received. Volume 17 includes a list of bank deposits for the years 1922 to 1927, while in later years 1932 to 1939, bank deposits are typically recorded in the daybooks for the period covered by the daybooks. Also in volume 17, for the years 1923 and 1924, deposits are listed for merchandisers' accounts.

In one instance, the ledger for the W. L. Sutton Company had been used earlier for another purpose. Volume 34 contains a list of debts and credits for merchandisers' accounts for the period January 1, 1936 to March 31, 1937, while at the front of the volume there are records for the Danburg Baptist Church Women's Missionary Society, 1910 to 1921.

Volume 37, “Cotton Accounting Book” (1920-1927) includes Sutton's accounting records for his work as a cotton merchant. The accounting records indicate that Sutton shipped cotton to various companies including: Barnett and Company, Athens, Ga.; Georgia Cotton Growers Co-op Association; Rowland Company, Athens, Ga.; Washington Warehouse Company, Washington, Ga.; and George W. Wright, Augusta, Ga.

Loose materials, chiefly business receipts, were laid into several accounting books. Included are receipts from merchandisers who provided goods to the W. L. Sutton Company and from various warehouses and companies where cotton was shipped. There is also a contract for ice between W. L. Sutton and Pope Manufacturing Company indicating that Pope will sell ice to the W. L. Sutton Company.

Other Sutton accounting records indicate that he sold lumber, kept accounts for the Dansburg School District Board of Education, maintained records for the buying and use of livestock, and kept a record of personal expenses.

Additional financial records include a blacksmith account book kept by Samuel Danforth (1836-1838) and one for a boarding house in Washington, Ga. maintained by Harriet Brown Danforth (1857-1860). Promissory notes and a statement of receipts and disbursements for the estates of Samuel K. Wynn (Hattie's father) and Walter L. Sutton are among the other financial papers.

Among the earliest letters is a series that begins during the War of 1812 and continues to 1814 between George Reab in New York and others concerning his military service. (Reab married Almira S. Brown in 1816 and is a great aunt of Hattie Wynn.) Letters concern whether Reab could be asked to bear arms against the British again since he had been held as a prisoner of war by them and had later been released on parole. Reab stated that he should not be asked to bear arms, invoking the French parole d'honneur as the reason, which is a pledge or oath under which a prisoner of war is released with the understanding that he will not again bear arms until exchanged. It is unclear from the correspondence whether Reab was successful. By April 1813 he had been appointed 3rd lieutenant in the United States 13th Infantry Regiment and by 1816 he had retired from military service. The collection contains a list of officers, including George Reab, Jr. in the 13th Infantry Regiment of the United States Army, which is dated July 31, 1812.

Correspondence from Almira B. Reab during the 1840s to family and friends in New York and Vermont describe how she adjusted to life in the south. Originally from New York, she lived with her sister Harriet B. Danforth and her family in Danburg, Ga. at the time these letters were written.

The collection contains three diaries, one kept by Harriet Brown Danforth and her daughter Emma. Harriet's entries (1858, Jan. 3-1859, Nov. 30) primarily denote when she attended church and in some instances the Biblical scriptures which were read, while Emma's entries (1860? Aug. 26-Dec. 13) concern teaching school. The other two diaries were kept by Walter (1885, Aug. 15-Dec. 23). Several entries relate to Hattie Sutton, while others concern the “liquor issue.” Miscellaneous financial information is found in them as well.

Other items in the collection include minutes and bylaws of debating societies, 1853-1855, including the Pine Grove Polemic Society, Philomathian Society, and the Sandtown (Sandtown was formerly known as Hyde) Polemic Society; an undated handwritten arithmetic book; miscellaneous poetry (1816, 1846 and undated); school notes; minutes of the Willis A. Sutton P.T.A. in Danburg, Ga.; Walter Sutton's Sunday School superintendent record book for 1891; obituaries for various Sutton and Wynn family members; several printed graduation exercise programs from Danburg High School; other miscellaneous writings; and a few photographs.

Papers in the collection indicate that Walter Sutton was having financial difficulties in the late 1890s and early 1900s. In 1897 and later in the 1920s, he was reminded by his creditors that he had outstanding debts. Legal papers from the 1930s also indicate he was suffering from monetary adversities. A petition filed by the American Agricultural Chemical Society for non-payment of debts (1934, Jan. 12) was apparently paid off later that year by selling some of Sutton's land. The agricultural depression during this period was probably a factor in his economic downturn.

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Vause W. Marshall papers, 1768-1940

1 Linear Foot — 494 Items

Collection consists of correspondence, legal documents, bills, receipts, Civil War muster rolls, clippings and business printed matter, and a diary.

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Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Folder

Legal papers include lists of enslaved people of Hyde Park and Beverly Place plantations, and related documentation of purchases and expenses; travel documents and passports; the wills of John, Frances, and Fanny Knight and William M. Beall; land deeds, indentures and partnership papers, 1784-1859, including many related to the Beall family and business partners; and a certificate document from the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

Valentine Mott papers, 1806-1854 and undated.

10 items
Autograph letters and documents, signed. Includes letters to his father and brother from England, on British politics towards the United States and on the Continent; to Dr. Pollock informing him that he is unable to find a copy of his (Mott's) eulogy on Dr. John Revere; letters of recommendation; and receipts.
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United Methodist Church records, 1784-1984, bulk 1800-1940

Online
48.8 Linear Feet
The United Methodist Church Records are comprised primarily of bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes that document the administrative life of church units (circuits, charges, and churches) in the N.C. Conference (1784-1974, bulk 1841-1919) and the Western N.C. Conference (1884-1962, bulk 1893-1932) of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (MECS). Counties in N.C. represented in the collection include Alamance, Ashe, Bladen, Burke, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cleveland, Dare, Davidson, Durham, Forsyth, Gates, New Hanover, Iredell, Lincoln, Perquimans, Randolph, Rowan, Yadkin, and Wake. However, this collection does not include complete runs of any set of bound minutes, correspondence, or other documentation for any N.C. county or district. There are also bound volumes of N.C. Conference, MECS, district conference minutes (1866-1939); financial, administrative, and legal records for the Board of Missions and Church Extension of the Western N.C. Conference, MECS (1909-1952); bound journals of annual conference meetings of the N.C. Conference, MECS (1838-1913); as well as some district, conference, and national records for non-N.C. conferences and for the MECS and the Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC). National records include correspondence and financial records from the American Mission in North Africa, MEC (1909-1952). Although the entire collection dates from 1784-1984, the bulk of the material dates from 1800-1940.

The United Methodist Church Records are comprised primarily of bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes that document the administrative life of smaller church units (circuits, charges, and churches) within the N.C. Conference (1784-1974, bulk 1841-1919) and the Western N.C. Conference (1884-1962, bulk 1893-1932) of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (MECS). Counties in N.C. represented in the collection include Alamance, Ashe, Bladen, Burke, Caswell, Catawba, Chatham, Cleveland, Dare, Davidson, Durham, Forsyth, Gates (also Va.), New Hanover, Iredell, Lincoln, Perquimans (also Va.), Randolph, Rowan, Yadkin, and Wake. There are also bound volumes of N.C. Conference, MECS, district conference minutes (1866-1939); financial, administrative, and legal records for the Board of Missions and Church Extension of the Western N.C. Conference, MECS (1909-1952); bound journals of annual conference meetings of the N.C. Conference, MECS (1838-1913); as well as some district, conference, and national records for non-N.C. conferences and for the MECS and the Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC). The national records include correspondence--especially to and from J. H. Colpais Purdon--and financial records from the American Mission in North Africa, MEC (1909-1952); and correspondence, minutes, reports, and printed material documenting the planning for the reunification of the MEC and the MECS (1906-1916, 1932-1939), especially hymnal revision.

In addition to the quarterly conference and district conference minutes, the N.C. Conference and Non-N.C. Conference Series include membership, Sunday School, abstinence society, and susbscription and class lists (Buckhorn, Currituck, Forsyth, and Haw River Circuits); plans and maps of circuits (Currituck, Forsyth, and Holly Springs Circuits); notes, drawings, and inventories of church buildings and furniture (Iredell and Roanoke Circuits); and handwritten "responses" of the Eastern Shore of Virginia to the MEC split, some written by William Gwynn Coe. The Historical Sketches Series includes land deeds for churches and correspondence written by or pertaining to Francis Asbury and Thomas Coke; and some information about churches with mixed-race congregations. Although the entire collection dates from 1784-1984, the bulk of the material dates from 1800-1940.

This collection does not include complete runs of any set of bound minutes, correspondence, or other documentation for any N.C. county or district. Thus, it does not provide a full view of the activities of the Methodist Church in N.C. However, for both the N.C. and Western N.C. Conferences, some districts, circuits, and counties are well-represented. These include, in the N.C. Conference, MECS, the Durham District (1885-1927), Elizabeth City District (1911-1922), Raleigh District (1914-1915 and 1935-1939), and Wilmington District (1866-1898); and Bath Circuit (Beaufort Co., 1849-1894), Dare Circuit (Dare Co., 1859-1903), Fifth Street Charge/Church/Station (New Hanover Co., 1844-1905), Gates Circuit (Gates Co., 1784-1911), Iredell Circuit (Iredell Co., 1823-1873), Leasburg Circuit (Caswell Co., 1883-1930), North Gates Circuit (Gates Co., 1884-1937), Pasquotank Circuit (Pasquotank Co., 1852-1906), Pittsboro Circuit (Chatham Co., 1854-1943), and Yanceyville Circuit (Caswell Co., 1844-1902). In the Western N.C. Conference the Asheville District (1912-1916) and Winston-Salem District (1924-1935) are well-documented, along with Alamance Circuit (Alamance Co., 1893-1908), First Methodist Church/Station (Lincoln Co., 1902-1962), Jefferson Circuit (Ashe Co., 1893-1932), Morganton Circuit (Burke Co., 1889-1932), Polkville Circuit (Cleveland Co., 1911-1927), and Randolph Circuit/Charge (Randolph Co., 1893-1930).

Arranged in five series: National Records Series; Non-N.C. Conference Records Series; N.C. Conference Records Series; Western N.C. Conference Records Series; Historical Sketches Series.

The National Records Series comprises national-level records from the MEC (1820-1952) and the MECS (1857-1939), including correspondence and financial records from the American Mission in North Africa of the MEC (1909-1952), especially correspondence to and from Joseph Cooksey, Edwin Frease, and Joseph Purdon (1909-1925). The MECS national records comprise primarily correspondence, minutes, reports, and printed material documenting the planning for the reunification of the MEC and the MECS (1906-1916, 1932-1939), especially hymnal revision.

The Non-N.C. Conference Records Seriesconsists primarily of bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes for circuits, charges, and churches in the Baltimore, North Georgia, South Carolina, Virginia and other Conferences, especially those in Lumpkin Co., Ga.; Marion Co., S.C.; and Gates and Loudoun Cos., Va. Circuit, charge, and church-level records include a classbook of the Pleasant Hill Society (1851-1879, Dallas Co., Ala.); a hand-drawn map from the 1800s of the Holly Springs Circuit (unknown Co., Miss.); and a history of the formation of the Methodist Protestant Church in Maryland, 1833. There are conference-level records only for the Virginia and Wisconsin Conferences and these include an 1815 list of ministers serving Virginia Conference districts and circuits, as well as a group of hand-written "responses" of the Eastern Shore of Virginia to the Methodist Episcopal Church split (1864-1866).

The N.C. Conference Records Seriescomprises primarily bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes that document the administrative life of circuits, charges, churches, missions, and stations of the N.C. Conference, MECS, in the eastern and central counties of North Carolina, particularly Bladen, Caswell, Chatham, Dare, Durham, Gates, New Hanover, Perquimans, and Wake, but also including other counties (1784-1974). In addition, the series includes bound journals of annual conference meetings for the N.C. Conference of the MECS (1838-1913), as well as bound volumes of district conference minutes and quarterly conference minutes for, among other districts, the Durham, Elizabeth City, Raleigh, and Wilmington Districts of the N.C. Conference of the MECS (1866-1939).

The Western N.C. Conference consists primarily of bound volumes of quarterly conference minutes and church registers that document the administrative life of MECS and Methodist Church (MC) circuits, charges, churches, missions, and stations in the western and west central counties of North Carolina (1893-1932). Counties include Alamance, Ashe, Burke, Catawba, Cleveland, Davidson, Forsyth, Iredell, Lincoln, Randolph, Rowan, and Yadkin, among others. The series also includes financial, administrative, and legal records for the Board of Missions and Church Extension of the Western N.C. Conference of the MECS (1909-1952), as well as quarterly conference and district conference minutes and trustees minutes for districts within the Western N.C. Conference including, among others, the Asheville and Winston-Salem districts (1912-1935).

The Historical Sketches Series comprises primarily historical and biographical information solicited from N.C. ministers about themselves, their churches, circuits, and counties in 1879 by H. T. Hudson and in 1895 by an unknown person. Also includes earlier and later sketches, especially typescript or handwritten articles, essays, or sermons on Methodism in N.C.

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Fox and Backhouse family papers, 1673-1930s

1 Linear Foot
Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse were members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in England in the mid-1800s. Their son, Edmund Backhouse, married Juliet Fox in 1848. This collection contains personal correspondence between members of the different connected Quaker families based in England, as well as some diaries, genealogical notes, and other printed ephemera from the family. Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and other ephemeral materials relating to the Fox and Backhouse families, along with materials relating to nineteenth century Quaker communities and families in England. The bulk of the collection is correspondence between different members of the Backhouse family, including Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, their son Edmund Backhouse and his wife Juliet Fox, and their grandson Jonathan Edmund (Jed) Backhouse. Caroline Fox is also a routine correspondant. The letters discuss family news, personal activities and travel, religious sentiments.

There are two excerpts of diaries which appear to be by different authors and may relate to Hannah Chapman Backhouse's travels to the United States in the 1830s, or to another family member's travels in Europe or the Middle East. The handwriting of these pages is challenging and the excerpts are unattributed and appear to be undated, so more research would be helpful.

Also present in the collection are some writings, including essays and poetry, typically spiritual or relating to prayer, as well as some honorifics for Edmund Backhouse and a copy of his obituary. There are some manuscript riddles, some watercolors, and some sketches of scenes and still lifes. The collection also includes some ceremonial documents, including a letter from the Society of Friends declaring support for Hannah and Jonathan Backhouse's travels to the United States.

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Tyre Glen papers, 1806-1882 and undated

4 Linear Feet
Tyre Glen was a slave trader, planter, postmaster, and merchant in North Carolina. This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

Volumes include accounts of slaves, mercantile interests, and general expenses. Also included in the collection are two volumes concerning a firm known as Poindexter and Palmer operating a general store in North Carolina. These records contain numerous accounts of individuals from the region included H.P. Poindexter, various members of the Clingman family and Richard C. Puryear.

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Turner family papers, 1778-1929 and undated

3.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 1316 Items
The Turner family was based in Van Buren, Crawford County, Arkansas. Correspondence, papers, diaries, and scrapbooks of Jesse Turner, Sr. (1805-1894), lawyer, jurist, and Whig politician of Van Buren, Ark.; his wife, Rebecca (Allen) Turner (1823-1917); their son, Jesse Turner, Jr. (1856-1919); and other members of the Turner and Allen families, relating to law practice, family history and personal matters, political activities in Arkansas and the U.S. (1840-1900), secession in Arkansas, the Arkansas Constitution of 1836, social life and customs in Arkansas, life during Reconstruction, and U.S. presidential elections of 1848 and 1860. Correspondents include prominent Arkansas attorneys Albert Pike and Absalom Fowler. There are also a number of letters between Rebecca Allen and Jesse Turner before their marriage, and letters from Rebecca to her son Jesse Jr., as well as diaries written by his mother (1857-1859) chronicling his early childhood.

Correspondence and papers of Jesse Turner, Sr., lawyer, jurist, and Whig politician of Van Buren, Arkansas; his wife, Rebecca (Allen) Turner; their son, Jesse Turner, Jr.; and other members of the Turner family, relating to law practice, family affairs, political activities in Arkansas and the U.S. (1840-1900), the Arkansas Constitution of 1836, secession in Arkansas, social life and customs in Arkansas, and life during Reconstruction. Jesse Turner Sr.'s letters on secession are especially invaluable, as are his letters and those from prominent lawyers and jurists commenting on state and national politics. Correspondents include prominent Arkansas lawyers Albert Pike and Absalom Fowler. There are also a number of letters between Rebecca Allen and Jesse Turner before their marriage, and letters from Rebecca to her son Jesse Jr.

The collection also includes legal records; school records, college letters from the University of Virginia, and other papers of Jesse Jr.; a diary belonging to Rebecca Allen Turner (1857-1859) that comments on her young son's activities; a journal of work on steamboats in the West (1840-1850); and scrapbooks relating to the presidential elections of 1848 and 1860.

For a more detailed description of the context and contents of this collection, please consult with a reference archivist for access to the Rubenstein's digitized cardfile.

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Timothy Lindall Jennison papers, Cambridge, Mass., 1803-1832

2 items
ALS and holograph document, signed. Document is a receipt for a rent payment by William Jenks to Jennison. ALS to Jenks relates to a pamphlet to be given to the Massachusetts Historial Society.
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Tillinghast family papers, 1763-1971

15 Linear Feet — 4,910 items
Family from North Carolina, Virginia, and Massachusetts. Family and business letters, personal journals, deeds, legal items, and papers (chiefly 1830-1911) of William Norwood Tillinghast (b. 1831), merchant of Fayetteville, N.C.; William A. Norwood (d. ca. 1866), judge of Hillsboro, N.C.; and of the Tillinghast and Norwood families of Massachusetts, Virginia, and North Carolina. Contains information about the mercantile activities of the Tillinghast family; social life and customs in North Carolina before 1900; business and economic conditions in the South before, during, and after the Civil War; agriculture in the South Atlantic States before 1860; the secession of North Carolina; living conditions during the Civil War and Reconstruction; events of the war in North Carolina; the South during the late 19th century; and camp life during the Spanish American War. Correspondents include Kemp P. Battle and Henry Clay Robinson.

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Tillinghast family of Fayette ville, North Carolina, relating to family and business interests in New England, New York, North Carolina, and Georgia. Early corre spondence is chiefly with relatives in New England discussing cotton and tobacco prices and markets, relations with France and England, the effects of the embargo on mer chants in Taunton, Massachusetts, and social life and customs in North Carolina. There are also a copy of a letter, 1765, from Sir Francis Bernard, royal governor of Massachu setts, describing the turmoil in Boston and the activities of the Sons of Liberty; and a letter, 1781, from James Hogg requesting payment for supplies-taken from him by the army. Papers prior to 1850 focus principally on Samuel Willard Tillinghast (d. 1860), commission merchant, and his wife, Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, daughter of Judge William A. Norwood (1774-1842) and Robina (Hogg) Norwood, (d. 1860) whom he married in 1830, dealing with mercantile accounts and business relations with firms in New York, New York, and Providence, Rhode Island; family matters; life in Chapel Hill, Hills borough, and Fayetteville, North Carolina; trips to New York to purchase goods for the store; the Protestant Episcopal Church; fires in 1831 and 1845 which destroyed Fayetteville; rumors in Fayetteville of slave insurrections in other parts of North Carolina; the settlement of the estate of William A. Norwood; education at the Virginia Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, Staunton, Virginia, attended by Thomas Hooper Tilling hast (b. 1833), son of Samuel Tillinghast and Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, and at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb, New York, attended by Thomas Hooper Tillinghast and his brother, David Ray Tillinghast; social life, politics, financial affairs, and cotton planting in Georgia; yellow fever in Georgia; railroad construction in North Carolina and Georgia; the building of plank roads; private schools in Hillsborough and Fayetteville; the gingham School, Hillsborough, and later, in Mebane, North Carolina; the temperance movement, 1842; the Whigs and the Loco-Focos in North Carolina, 1840; the speeches of Louis D. Henry (1788-1846); and the growth of Fayetteville, its prospects, and need for expanded banking facilities.

Papers, 1850-1900, relate chiefly to the children of Samuel Willard Tillinghast and Jane (Norwood) Tillinghast, especially William Norwood Tillinghast, who first worked with his father, and then established Tillinghast's Crockery Store. The papers concern the Democratic and Whig conventions in 1852; the presidential election of 1852; Franklin Pierce and slavery; business, health and social life in Savannah, Georgia; studies, literary societies, and student life at Normal College (later Trinity College), Randolph County, North Carolina, 1853-1854; college life at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, during the 1850s, and the commencements of 1852 and 1856; the Nicholas Hotel in New York, New York, 1853; life in Liberia at Monrovia as described by a former slave; commencement at the Greensboro Female College (now Greensboro College), Greensboro, North Carolina, in 1856; efforts to send Episcopal missionaries to China; the Belmont Theological Seminary, Kentucky, and the Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia; secession sentiment; the Constitution; the election of 1860; confusion in Washington, D.C., April, 1861; secessionists versus unionists in North Carolina; civilian life during the Civil War; the Emancipation Proclamation; life of a Confederate soldier, including food, casualties, blockade running, conscription, the progress of the war, preaching to troops, the battle of Gettysburg, use of observation balloons by the Union Army, and Sherman's march through Fayetteville and depredations by his troops; economic conditions after the war; conditions, conduct, and wages of freedmen; the Home Institute, Sumter, South Carolina, a school for freedmen; politics in North Carolina in 1868; Governor William W. Holden and the Radicals; Chapel Hill in 1868 after the suspension of the University; education of the deaf by Thomas Hooper Tillinghast, David Ray Tillinghast, and Sarah Ann Tillinghast; business trips to New York, New York; the movement of Davenport College, Lenoir, North Carolina, to Hickory, North Carolina, where it became Claremont College; the Spanish-American War, including mobilization, camp life, artillery school on Sullivan's Island (South Carolina), yellow fever, and camp on Tybee Island (Georgia); life in Washington, D. C., ca. 1900, including Marine Band concerts and government employment; and the visit of Queen Victoria to Dublin, Ireland.

Papers after 1900 are primarily those of Anne Troy (Wetmore) Tillinghast (d. ca. 1948), wife of John Baker Tillinghast (d. 1914), and of her daughter, Anne Wetmore Tillinghast, pertaining to public schools and education in North Carolina; various educational organizations such as the North Carolina Teachers' Assembly and the North Carolina State Primary Teachers' Association; nursing with the American Expeditionary Forces in Europe during World War I; United War Work Campaign; the Fourth Liberty Loan Drive; the Armistice celebration, the Protestant Episcopal Church, especially the 1920s through the 1940s; the Commission of Young People's Work in the Diocese of East Carolina; Young People's Conference, 1926; the Young People's Service League; St. Mary's School and Junior College, Raleigh, North Carolina; the Richmond (Virginia) Division of the College of William and Mary (now Virginia Commonwealth University); St. Paul's Girls' School, Baltimore, Maryland, where Anne Wetmore Tillinghast was recreational director; financial difficulties during the Depression; the Tar Heel Society of Maryland; the North Carolina Society of Baltimore; Anne (Wetmore) Tillinghast's membership on the Cumberland Board of Public Welfare, the board of trustees of the Fayetteville City Schools, and the Thompson Orphanage Jubilee Committee (Charlotte, North Carolina); labor and financial difficulties at the Erwin Cotton Mills, Erwin, North Carolina, and the 1934 strike; restoration of Bath, North Carolina; employment on the Works Project Administra-tion's recreational program; the recreation department of Fayetteville; the death of Anne (Wetmore) Tillinghast; life in the U. S. Foreign Service, 1962-1966, in Saudi Arabia, the Middle East, Egypt, India, and Sweden; and other personal and family matters.

Other papers and volumes include school exercises; essays by Samuel Willard Tillinghast on education in Fayetteville, the Female High School in Fayetteville, the militia, and John C. Calhoun; bills and receipts relating to the mercantile business of Samuel Willard Tillinghast; an account book, 1783, of an "Adventuring Company" with references to voyages to Jamaica, Hamburg, and Lisbon; an account book of the Ray family; Sunday school records of St. John's Episcopal Church, Fayetteville; journal, 1804 and 1816, of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., father of Samuel Willard Tillinghast, concerning life in early Fayetteville, tobacco, river traffic and warehouses, Scottish immigration, opposition to slavery, and his shipping interests; logbook, 1804, of Daniel Jencks Tillinghast (d. 1804), son of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., regarding a voyage to the Far East for coffee and sugar; journal, 1812-1813, of William Holroyd Tillinghast (d. 1813), son of Paris Jencks Tillinghast, Sr., concerning prices, embargoes, the scarcity of goods, orations at Fayetteville Academy in 1813, and military and naval actions; letter books, 1824-1831 and 1852-1861, of Samuel Willard Tillinghast regarding his mercantile business with northern companies, including the sale of cotton, tobacco, and beeswax and his partner ships with Cyrus P. Tillinghast and, later, with D. A. Ray; a sales book, 1832-1845, from the auctioneering firms of Thomas Sanford and Co. and Samuel Willard Tillinghast at Fayetteville, containing accounts for sales of a great variety of goods, the personal effects of Henry L. Jones and of Mrs. David Smith in 1833, and of slaves in 1832, a task book, 1849-1851, for turpentine operations relating to the use of slaves and purchases of clothing for them; invoice books, 1853-1861 and 1877-1880, of Tillinghast's Crockery Store operated by William Norwood Tillinghast; the journal,1861, of Emily Tillinghast, daughter of Samuel Willard Tillinghast, describing home life during the early months of the Confederacy; the funeral service of Edward Peet, teacher at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; the February, 1865, issue of The Fanwood Chronicle edited by David Ray Tillinghast at the New York Institution for the Deaf and Dumb; invoice books, 1866-1883, of the Fayetteville Gas Light Company of which William Norwood f Tillinghast was secretary and treasurer; photocopy of a letter (56 pp.) of Sarah Ann Tillinghast describing making clothing for the Fayetteville company of the 1st North Carolina Infantry during the Civil War, and detailing the activities of the Union soldiers when Sherman captured Fayetteville; an account by Robina Tillinghast of Sherman's march through Fayetteville; statement, 1892, of the Reverend Job Turner, a missionary among the deaf; account, 1926, of the founding and history of the North Carolina Historical Commission in which Susan (Tillinghast) West took part; two family Bibles; legal papers including wills, land deeds and indentures, and marriage bonds; financial papers, including receipts, profit and loss statements, and material regarding the life insurance policy of John Baker Tillinghast; papers relating to the estate of John H. Culbreth, 1930s; genealogical material; invitations; programs; funeral booklet; autograph album; records of St. John's Episcopal Church, 1930s and 1940s, of the St. John's Young People's Service League, and of the St. John's Woman's Auxiliary; writings and addresses; poetry; words to songs; religious writings, especially relating to St. John's Episcopal Church; clippings; annual celebrations of the battle of Moore's Creek; scrapbooks; notebooks; and pictures.

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Thomas Thweatt Jones papers, 1757-1979 and undated

6.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 8100 Items
Physician and resident of Durham, North Carolina. Collection consists of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families of North Carolina and Virginia (Dinwiddie County and other places). Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.); records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital in England during World War II (affiliated with the Duke School of Medicine); Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook and her journals of 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and a photograph album and other scrapbooks.

The Thomas Thweatt Jones papers consist of correspondence (chiefly 1947-1974), writings, memoranda, reports, printed material, clippings, and other papers, relating to Jones's interest as a physician in alcoholism, mental health, and agathanasia (the care of the dying), and his activities with the Durham Council on Alcoholism and Medical Society of the state of North Carolina. There are also letters, photographs, writings, legal and financial papers, and other items relating to the Jones, Scanlun, Blackwell, and Graver families history and genealogy.

Collection highlights include a memoir of Rev. George White discussing slave-owner relations prior to and during the Civil War; photographs of Shenandoah Normal College (Reliance, Va.) students and faculty; personal correspondence; clippings and printed publications dealing with alcoholism and agathanasia, a term Dr. Jones adopted referring to a patient's right to die; records of Jones's service on the staff of the 65th General Hospital during World War II; Mrs. Jones's high school scrapbook; a photograph album; journals of her 1923 and 1926 trips abroad; and genealogical materials, including a sketch by Dr. Jones of his brother, Dr. Robert R. Jones, Jr., one of the original staff members of Duke Hospital. Robert Jones was killed in 1941 by a patient.

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Thomas Nelson Page papers, 1739-1927 and undated, bulk 1885-1920

12.4 Linear Feet — 9329 Items
Virginia lawyer and writer; ambassador to Italy from 1913-1919. The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927. Personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items (chiefly 1885-1920) relate to Page's legal and literary career; his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; and his interest in civic affairs, plantation life, social reform and race relations in the United States, particularly during and after Reconstruction; American politics and diplomacy, especially during World War I; and European travel. Many of his papers directly relate to his term as ambassador to Italy during World War I, from 1913 to 1919.

The Thomas Nelson Page Papers span the years 1739-1927, with the majority of the materials dating from the 1880s to 1920. The papers include personal and professional correspondence, legal and business papers, writings, diplomatic dispatches, clippings and other items, all relating to Page's legal and literary career. Topics include his activities as a lyceum lecturer; his marriages and family relations; his role in and perspective on American politics and foreign relations, particularly during World War II; travels in Europe; and his interest in civic affairs, social reform and race relationsin the United States, particularly during and following Reconstruction. Collection is arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal and Financial Papers, Writings and Speeches, Diplomacy, Visual Materials, Personal Papers, and Clippings Two oversize newspapers are described in a series at the end of the finding aid.

In the Correspondence Series, the largest in the collection, letters prior to 1880 include personal correspondence from various members of the Page family, especially between Thomas Nelson Page, his mother, Elizabeth Burwell (Nelson) Page, and brother, Rosewell Page, who lived at the ancestral estate, "Oakland," in Hanover County, Virginia. Page describes his political activities in letters concerning the presidential campaigns of 1912 and 1916. Correspondence from this period also includes personal letters to members of the family describing new experiences in diplomatic life, and routine business correspondence. Significant correspondents in the series include C. F. Adams, Grover Cleveland, Josephus Daniels, J. C. Harris, William D. Howells, Robert Lansing, Robert T. Lincoln, Henry C. Lodge, Theodore Roosevelt, E. Root, J. M. Stoddart, and William H. Taft. For some of these individuals only one or two pieces of correspondence exist. Another set of correspondence, dated 1883-1912 and interfiled at the end of the correspondence series, comprises photocopies of letters (and a few other items, including a telegram, Christmas greeting, and obituary clipping on Henry Hobson) chiefly from Page to close friend Henry Wise Hobson (1858-1898), originally of Virginia, and to his wife Katherine. Notes: Originals for photocopies are in the donor's possession. The collection also includes two scrapbooks, found in the Personal Papers Series, containing cards and envelopes from distinguished persons. This series also houses documents related to Page's ties with the University of Virginia, personal reminiscences, various fragmentary notes, and a journal from 1863. Four folders of carbon copies of diplomatic dispatches from Page to the U.S. State Department and to President Woodrow Wilson, along with other papers related to his diplomatic activities, can be found in the Diplomacy Series. Another small group, the Legal and Financial Series, houses documents relating to Page's properties and other business affairs. The Writings and Speeches Series contains many manuscripts and drafts of political and literary speeches, memoirs, essays, and articles, but none of Page's major literary works. Several folders of materials in this series contain Page's detailed journalistic notes describing his trips in 1916 to the war fronts in Italy and France. Extensive folders of cuttings in the Clippings Series were taken from both American and Italian newspapers, and comprise a significant portion of the collection. The clippings refer to events in Page's career such as lyceum appearances, political appointments, and political speeches, both in the United States and in Italy. In addition, Page clipped articles referring to race relations in the United States, particularly in the South. The clippings also document national and global events during Page's years as an ambassador to Italy from 1913 to 1919, and provide rich background material for a study of United States foreign relations with Italy and other countries during World War I. There are also a few photographs in the Visual Materials Series, some of which depict scenes from wartime Italy.

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Thomas Lenoir papers, 1771-1912

5 Linear Feet — 2,007 Items
Army officer, of Caldwell Co., N.C. Correspondence, diary, legal documents, account books, mercantile records, surveying records, and other papers (chiefly 1838-1880) of Lenoir, of his father, William Lenoir, and of his children. The early papers concern horse breeding, legal matters, deism in North Carolina (1790s), and the international situation (1790s). Thomas Lenoir's papers make up the majority of the collection and relate to the settlement of his father's estate, activities of his brother in Tennessee and his sons at the University of North Carolina, and antebellum agriculture in North Carolina. Postwar letters pertain mainly to politics, agriculture, cattle diseases, family matters, student life at the University of North Carolina and at Davis Military School, Winston (now Winston-Salem), N.C., North Carolina militia, and Civil War reminiscences. Correspondents include W. J. Bingham, Calvin J. Cowles, Charles F. Deems, S. F. Patterson, Lewis Williams.

The collection includes 1,977 items and 30 volumes of business and family letters of Colonel Thomas Lenoir (1780-1861), of his father, General William Lenoir (1751-1839), and especially of Colonel Thomas Lenoir's eight children. The earlier papers include legal documents, a stud book, and family letters. Those of John Norwood (1727-1802) contain comments during the late 1790s on the spread and reception of deism in North Carolina and on the political situation in France and England; and one letter of Lewis Williams is concerned with Joseph Seawell Jones's Defense of the Revolutionary History of the State of North Carolina...(Boston and Raleigh, 1834). Other topics include Cherokee Indian murders of whites in Buncombe County, 1794; North Carolina cession of sites for coastal forts, 1794; North Carolina militia; commodity prices; land; overseers; the attitude of Tennessee electors toward Thomas Jefferson, 1804; plans to extinguish the claims of Indians to lands in Tennessee; the coming War of 1812; the attitude of North Carolina electors toward Madison, 1812; criticism of Jackson's stand on the Worcester v. Georgia decision; nullification in South Carolina; emigration to Missouri; David L. Swain; and the conduct of Sam Houston in 1840 on his way to woo Margaret M. Lea of Alabama.

The majority of the collection, connected directly with Colonel Thomas Lenoir, consists of family papers concerning chiefly the settlement of the William Lenoir estate; the activities of the former's brother, William Ballard Lenoir (1781-1855) in Lenoir, Roane County, Tennessee; and the former's sons, Rufus Theodore and Walter Waightstill Lenoir, who were students at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. The most valuable letters are those concerning the livestock farming operations of Thomas Isaac Lenoir in Haywood County, North Carolina, before the Civil War.

There are but few Civil War letters. During the postwar period there are letters of Walter Waightstill Lenoir from Crab Orchard probably in Haywood County, and Shulls Mills, Watauga County, North Carolina, containing references to North Carolina politics, including the role of W. W. Holden and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in North Carolina politics in 1866. There are also occasional treatises on diseases of cattle. Included in this collection are letters of the Gwynn family and of the Pickens family of South Carolina, both related to the Lenoirs by marriage; of Rufus Theodore Lenoir and his sons at the University of North Carolina, of Julia A. Oertel, wife of a Protestant Episcopal minister and artist who came from Bavaria, Germany, and settled in Caldwell County, North Carolina, of Rufus T. Lenoir, Jr., as a student at Davis Military School, Winston, North Carolina, in 1893; and of Sarah Joyce Lenoir; and memoranda of farming operations, 1878-1901. There is a genealogical table of the Lenoir family and a slave list.

The volumes contain mercantile records; personal diary of Walter Waightstill Lenoir (1823-1890), started while a student at the University of North Carolina, and concerned also with the death of his wife and his career as an attorney; lists of notes payable; survey records of William Lenoir; account books; and a diary of William Avery Lenoir, 1837-1852 (with gaps), which contains biographical information on Waightstill Avery and his family, a description of Henry Clay's plantation, the construction of turnpikes in North Carolina, and a planned railroad to Tennessee. There are unbound pages from account books, receipts for dues paid the Protestant Episcopal Church, surveyor's field notes and plats made in 1885, legal papers of various types, French notes, deeds, warrants, and records of hearings before justices of the peace. Among the correspondents are W. J. Gingham, Calvin J. Cowles, Charles R. Deems, S. F. Patterson, and Lewis Williams.

1 result in this collection

Thomas Lee Settle papers, 1795-1949

10 Linear Feet — 5,641 Items
Physician and Confederate surgeon, of Paris (Fauquier Co.), Va. Alleged to have pronounced the death of abolitionist John Brown. Correspondence, travel journal, bills, presecriptions, deeds, receipts, records of land sales, and other papers (chiefly 1820-1900), concerning Settle's medical career, his interests in stock raising and farming, Civil War, events in Virginia (1861-1862), the Confederate medical service, activities of military units, and other matters. Includes letters from Robert H. Simpson, an offcer of the 17th Virginia Infantry.

Papers of Thomas Lee Settle (1836-1920), physician, and surgeon of the 11th Virginia Cavalry, C.S.A., include orders for the Virginia militia, 1797 and 1800; family letters to Texas, Missouri, and Tennessee; and correspondence concerning the education of the Settle children and friends at various schools and academies in Virginia, and at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia. Civil War correspondence, including letters of Captain Robert H. Simpson and other Confederate soldiers, describes the battles of first Manassas, Chickahominy Swamp, and Fredericksburg, the Peninsular Campaign, crops and conditions in northern Virginia during the war, and directions for making salt. There are also records of land sales, deeds, and rent receipts; medical correspondence, prescriptions, and bills; bills and receipts for land transactions, household expenses, and apple brandy making; horse-dealing records during the Civil War; two Confederate Loan Bonds; business papers of A. H. Settle & Co., merchants of Paris, Virginia, medical diary, 1855-1858, 1861, and 1865-1866, of Thomas Lee Settle; and a diary, 1863-1864, of Thomas Lee Settle describing his activities as surgeon to the 11th Virginia Cavalry. A journal, 1863, of John S. Timberlake entitled "Trip to Florida and Salt Works, Oct. 20, 1863. With descriptions of the country and other particulars intervening on the way," contains detailed descriptions of various salt works in Georgia; "Descriptions of Florida and Health and Other Particulars (useful) as they Happen" discussing health and agricultural conditions, sugar making, and the economic conditions of Florida and Georgia plantations; and a synopsis of Adiel Sherwood's 1860 Gazetteer of Georgia. Postwar materials include Sunday school record book, 1884; letters from soldiers in the Spanish-American War discussing camp life in Florida, the Rough Riders, courts-martial, and desertion; letter, 1909, from T. C. Evans, dean of the Medical Department, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky discussing his department; letters from Edgar Ackley Moore (d. 1924), physician, to his wife Pauline (Settled Moore, daughter of Thomas Lee Settle, while serving in the U.S. Army Medical Reserve Corps during World War I, describing camp life and his experiences in America and France, the work of the Young Men's Christian Association and the American National Red Cross in France, casualties, prisoners, hospitals, and physicians; papers relating to Moore's Masonic affiliation; ledger, 1905-1907, and accounts, 1906-1912, of Edgar Ackley Moore; literary reviews; medical pamphlets; and scrapbooks and exercise books. Volumes consist of medical visiting and account books, 1855-1914, commonplace books, 1852-1867, daybook, 1901-1905, expense book, 1870-1880, ledgers, 1867-1913, and record book, 1856-1857, of Thomas Lee Settle; account book for the John Horn estate; pamphlets, including one on the San Francisco earthquake of 1906 and another on a silver mining scheme in Canada, entitled Julian Hawthorne and Company (1909); a stallion service book; and photographs. Other papers include genealogical information, original poetry, and legal documents and wills.

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Thomas Ellison Keitt papers, 1758-1945 and undated

2 Linear Feet — 769 items
Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.

2 results in this collection

Thomas Cadell letters, 1783-1817, and undated.

9 items
Letters (ALS) to Thomas Cadell, Sr. (1742-1802), Thomas, Jr., and William Davies (d. 1820), publishers and booksellers, from James Makittrick Adair, regarding his essay on regimen; from John Aikin; from George Armstrong, regarding his Essay on the diseases most fatal to infants; from Alexander Peter Buchan, regarding a book on sea-bathing; from Thomas Cogan, regarding his Theological disquisitions; from Quintin Craufurd; from James Currie; from William Hey, regarding his Practical observations in surgery, and from Benjamin Rumford, regarding the second edition of his Seventh essay. A letter written by William Buchan was removed from this collection and placed with the William Buchan collection.
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Theodric Romeyn Beck letter, [Fairfield, New York], between 1815 and 1840

1 item
Letter (ALS). Requests of Mr. Little, a bookdealer, the account against the Western College of Physicians and Surgeons for various medical journals.
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The Duke University Currency collection, 1746-1982

4 Linear Feet — 4,896 Items

The Currency Collection contains 4896 pieces, 1746-1982, of which all except a small number of coins and tokens are paper currency. Most of this money is domestic, but there are a limited number of foreign items, some of them quite old and interesting. Approximately two-thirds of the collection dates from the Civil War and one-fourth from the antebellum period.

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Terrasson Brothers records, 1773-1869, bulk 1780-1860

2.5 Linear Feet — 1245 items
Collection contains the records of the firm of Terrasson Brothers, established in Philadelphia by Antoine and Barthelemy Terrasson as a branch of their father's firm, John Terrasson and Company, headquartered in Paris and Lyons, France. Early business letters reflect the trade of the firm in grain, the furnishings of supplies to the French and American armies, and the purchase of tobacco at various places throughout the South. The letters contain information on the American Revolution, especially on naval operations, and on post-Revolutionary business conditions. Papers after 1800 concern the family of Mark Prager, members of which apparently married into the Terrasson family. Prager was owner of a trading firm in Holland. These papers contain information on Prager's trading activities until 1820, and on the family of Harriet Prager of Philadelphia. The later letters contain references to family affairs, slavery, politics and sectionalism. Approximately 100 Civil War letters describe conditions in the North.
2 results in this collection

Picture File, 1700s-1980s, bulk 1814-1950

Online
50 Linear Feet — Approximately 6050 items
The Picture File was created and maintained beginning in the 1950s by the Duke University Manuscript Department staff and its institutional successors as a vertical file of pictorial works separated from manuscript collections as well as acquired individually. The collection is large and diverse, with images dating from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Engravings feature prominently, with photographs a close second. The predominant genre is portraits of political and military leaders, authors, artists, physicians, scientists, and others. Members of the Duke family and others from Durham, N.C. are also present. In the Socialist Party Series there are numerous images of leader Eugene Debs. Topics range widely, with a focus on American history, including the Revolutionary and Civil Wars; history and culture of the southern U.S.; and U.S. and European politics. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. The dominant formats are engravings and photographs. Specific formats include: cartes de visite, cabinet cards, and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes (cased and uncased); engravings, lithographs, and other mechanical prints; caricatures and cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; small souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. There are a few cyanotypes and negatives.

The images offer views from most of the southern United States, especially North and South Carolina and Virginia. Many images are from Europe, with a smaller number from Japan and China; a large variety of other countries and locations are represented by a few images. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C. Many political and military leaders and notable personages, primarily from the U.S. and Europe are present in portraits and caricatures; there are numerous images of Eugene Debs, U.S. Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Subjects Series is eclectic, including advertising, cartoons, tobacco, ships, and images from conflicts: Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and devastation both rural and urban. There are also scenes from the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and both World Wars. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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Folder

Originally part of the Socialist Party Records, this series was added to the Picture File in the 1980s and remains intellectually distinct from the other series in the collection. It has two subseries: General and People. The General Subseries consists of images depicting a variety of subjects, ranging from Civil Rights protests in the U.S. to news photographs of the Nazi military buildup in the early 1930s. This subseries also contains images of Socialist Party headquarters, parades, and strikes. The People Subseries contains portraits of various socialist leaders throughout the party's history (both national and regional), with a large amount of material focusing on the life of five-time U.S. presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs. Also included in this subseries are groups of socialist legislators as well as assembled socialist conventions and delegations. The vast majority of the images in this series portray various events and individuals in Socialist Party history; however, there are also a few items which depict places of socialist interest, such as the city of Vienna or the party headquarters in Chicago. Images in this series are chiefly photographic; other formats include handbills, clippings, sketches, black-and-white illustrations, a viewbook, and postcards.

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of Women's Education Ephemera, 1806-1948

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains assorted examples of ephemeral manuscripts and printed materials collected by Lisa Unger Baskin relating to women's education, largely dating from the 19th and early 20th century. Formats include: school catalogs and prospectuses (for both New England and Parisian institutes for young women); school certificates and merit awards; tuition receipts and other financial ephemera; some images of school buildings; student workbooks, penmanship books, and other classroom exercises; examples of correspondence between female students and their family or friends; and other assorted items including a journal kept by student Sophia Jane Griffith and a student list maintained by penmanship instructor J. P. Webster.
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File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Bound booklets, certificates, and a fragment, used by students or teachers to practice penmanship or other topics. Items include: Ladies' Angular Hand blue booklet, undated; Geographical Exercises workbook for Ribston Hall (student Annie Jones), Sept. 1867; stitched booklet with penmanship and artwork by Ruth Satterly, 1800s; Penmanship and writing book, 1879; Penmanship book (student Elizabeth Louisa Christopher), 1830; Betsey Rich's Book, including penmanship and awards for spelling, Charleston, 1813; Lucy Towne copybook with sonnets and poems, Bedford, Mass., 1810s; fragment on School Penmanship by Margaret T. Lewis, 1820 June 12; an Epitaph on Mrs Mason by Naomi S Crooker, Bridgewater Academy, approximately 1800s.

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Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Examples of printed and manuscript materials relating to school finances, including teacher payment receipt, student tuition receipts, lists, and circulars for subscribers and support for different schools. Items include: Mrs. Jarley's Wax Works, for the Benefit of the Fund for the Liberal Education of Southern Girls programme, with annotations noting the names of the performers, 1872; Blue-School for Girls list of contributors, Chester, England, 1806; Auburn Female Seminary receipt for Eliza Wright, 1843 Jan. 28; Unknown school tuition receipt for Lucretia Chapman, 1821 Oct.; British and Foreign School Society, subscribers' book for a new training school for female teachers, 1842 Aug.; Gower's Walk School solicitation for Adult Instruction for Friendless and Unprovided Orphan Daughters of Clergymen, Military, and Naval Officers, 1820 Oct.; Philadelphia School of Design for Women tuition receipt for Ms. McAllister, 1865 Sept; Pay stub for Louise Shoept(?), Ellisburgh, 1870; Account book, including tuition payments, from Pioneer Valley, 1818-1829; Academy of Dancing receipt for Susan Ward from C. Labasse, 1826; Receipt for Massachusetts Teacher subscription, 1834; Receipt for tuition to Boston Cooking School, Simmons College, for 12 practice lessons, 1903; an oversize broadside "Catalogue of the Trustees and Students of Westfield Academy," Hartford, listing names and hometowns, 1829.

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Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Assorted examples and samples of student awards, passes, and other ephemera distributed by schools and relating to children's or women's education. Items include: Troy Female Seminary certificate to Abbie E. Bond, signed by principal Emma Willard, 1866 June 27; Miss Phebe Harcy, head of class, 1809 Aug. 20; Bradford Academy Female Department report card for Larissa Kimball, 1830s; Angeline W. Tottingham reward of merit for spelling, Pittsford, 1815; Mary Lucas teaching certificate, Middlesborough, 1849 June 12; Cincinnati Female Institute attendance ticket, 1840; Young Ladies Hall reward of merit to Mary P. Gramble, 1820 May 8; Miss Cranston's School reward of merit for Abby R. Manchester, 1816 Oct. 23; Attendance certificate for Merrimack County Institute for Martha H. Morse, Concord, 1852; Cheshire County Teachers' Institute, Keene, certificate for Mary Towne, 1848 Nov. 1; School Souvenir (Winterterm student list), District 18, Chesterfield Factory Village, N.H., 1869; Reward of merit for Peleg Walker, 1820s?; Reward of Merit certificate for Peleg Walker, 1820s?; Souvenir for New Rye School (includes photograph portrait of woman and student list), Epsom, N.H., 1910; Reward of merit for Lydia M. Watson, 1800s?; Rewards of merit (adhered to a board) for Mary Patrick and Sarah A. Lincoln, 1858; Wesleyan Female College library shelf location tickets (2); Miss Peck illuminated manuscript of appreciation, on vellum, Montreal, 1882; Reward of merit for Joseph Battles, by Phebe Battles, 1800s; Rewards of merit (2) for Sophronia Sturtevant, 1800s; Rewards of merit (9) for Mary Eastman for Henry Tappan School, 1846-1847; Miss Balch's Boarding School token of appreciation, 1822 Mar. 20; an oversize Reward of Merit for Miss Sally Boynton, East Windsor, 1829.

St. Thomas's Hospital document, London, undated [probably between 1775 and 1823]

1 item
Document, signed. John Mitchell petitions the Hospital for admittance. The Hospital receives the promise of John Haighton, physician, to supply the patient with clean body linen weekly and to remove the body at his expense, if the patient should die within the Hospital's care.
1 result in this collection

Stanislas Tanchou note, [Paris], [1817], Apr. 26

1 item
ANS.
1 result in this collection

Spanish Consulate records, 1794-1898 and undated

10.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains correspondence, logbooks, shipping and passport registers, crew lists, and an inventory of consular property. Communications in the collection are chiefly directed to the Spanish Consulate in Charleston, S.C., by the Madrid government, by Spanish diplomats and consular representatives in the U.S., and by governing officials in Florida, Cuba, and Puerto Rico. The papers of the 1790s and early 1800s are largely concerned with Spanish interests in Florida. The papers of the 1830s, except those dealing with routine commercial matters, are largely concerned with political affairs in Spain. Later papers relate to Spain's concern that the U.S. will aid Cuban insurgents; reports of American filibustering for Spanish possessions before and after the Civil War; revolutionary movements in Cuba; Spain's diplomatic approach to the U.S. during the Civil War; Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru (1865-1866); Charleston's trade with Spanish West Indian possessions during most of the 19th century; and occasionally to Spanish diplomatic relations with nations other than the U.S. Bound volumes in the collection include letter books, shipping and passport registers, logbooks, crew lists, and an inventory of consular property.

The collection contains dispatches from the Madrid government, Spanish diplomatic and consular representatives in the United States, and officials in Florida, Cuba, and Puerto Rico, addressed to the Spanish consulate in Charleston, South Carolina. Prior to 1803 there are similar dispatches addressed to the Spanish vice consul at Savannah. Topics include Spanish fear of American filibustering in Florida in the 1790s, especially the activities of Samuel Hammond in 1794; the fear of English invasion of Florida, 1796, or invasion by Americans sympathetic to England; and privateering and the actions of William Augustus Bowles in seizing the fort at St. Marks (Appalachee) in 1800. Papers of the 1830s and after concern political affairs in Spain, the Carlist War, and Spanish expectations of a favorable ruling from the U. S. Supreme Court in the Amistad case, 1841. Material concerning the fear of American filibustering activity in Cuba extends from the 1840s to the 1890s, and includes comment on American neutrality policy and on Northern support for and Southern opposition to filibustering after the Civil War. During the Civil War period papers relate to neutrality of the consulate; the capture of Spanish property in American vessels by Confederate privateers; the seizure of the Nuestra Señora de Reqla by Union forces; Beauregard's claim to have lifted-the Charleston blockade, 1863; and the bombardment of Charleston. There are lists of ships entering and leaving Charleston harbor in violation of the blockade. Papers of 1865-1866 concern Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru and activity in the United States of Chilean privateers. Most of the papers in the collection are of a routine nature and concern shipping, health conditions, passports, changes of government in Spain, and legal problems encountered by Spaniards in South Carolina. Numerous papers relate to commerce between Charleston, Cuba, and Puerto Rico; and after the Civil War there are letters of the vice consul in Wilmington, North Carolina, relating to shipping at that port.

Bound volumes in the collection include letter books, shipping and passport registers, logbooks, crew lists, and an inventory of consular property. The shipping registers, 1850-1860, 1871-1896, contain information on the nature and value of cargoes entering and leaving Charleston, and on the nationality, type, origin, and destination of vessels calling at the port. Letter books relate almost entirely to such commercial affairs as the arrival and departure of Spanish ships, prices of goods, tariffs, legal problems of merchants and shippers, costs of ship repairs, and the discipline of Spanish seamen. For the Civil War period, reports of consul Francisco Muñoz Ramón de Moncada describe conditions in Charleston and news of political and military events within the Confederacy; French intrigues in Texas; the attack on Fort Sumter; Confederate policy on privateering; the capture of Fort Hatteras and other points along the coast, the ineffectiveness of the blockade; conditions in Charleston and the flight of residents; and Confederate conscription policies, especially as they concerned citizens of foreign countries. Post-Civil War letter books relate almost exclusively to routine commercial matters.

1 result in this collection

Southgate-Jones Family papers, 1760-2008

22.4 Linear Feet — circa 13,456

The Southgate-Jones family papers, 1794-1990s (bulk 1912-1933), are largely comprised of both business and personal correspondence, but also include printed material; photographs; genealogical information; business records in the form of volumes, reports, and minutes of meetings; clippings; and legal and financial papers. Several generations of Southgate and Jones family members are represented, including James Southgate, James H. Southgate, Mattie Logan Southgate Jones and James Southgate ("South") Jones. These individuals were involved in business, educational, political, civic, social and cultural activities in Durham and North Carolina during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Areas include insurance, real estate and tobacco businesses, banking, the administration of Trinity College, the women's suffrage movement, the Durham Civic Association, and Durham Masonic Lodge No. 352. The collection is useful for studying the history of Durham and North Carolina, the regional application of national policy toward farmers during the 1920s and 1930s, and the family history of prominent citizens.

A significant portion of the collection was generated by James Southgate Jones as President of the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham. This organization was one of twelve created by the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916, to encourage farmers to purchase land with low interest, long term loans financed by the sale of stocks and bonds to investors. The bank was liquidated in 1942. The majority of correspondence dating before 1930 in the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham Series contains documents relating to the sale of farm land in North Carolina and, to a much lesser extent, Virginia; the financing of loans; and, after 1930, the increasingly harsh economic situation farmers faced as banks foreclosed on their loans. There is also discussion of foreclosure policies, relief programs, and the Hull-Wolcott Bill of 1933 in later correspondence. Included are communications with investment brokers in New York and Boston, property owners, real estate agents in North Carolina and elsewhere, prospective clients, banks in North Carolina and other states, and to a lesser extent the United States Treasury Department. There is also correspondence between James Southgate Jones, other officers of the bank and members of its Board of Directors. The series contains some financial reports from other land banks in Nebraska, Chicago, California, and Washington, D.C. Also included in the financial papers subseries are: lists of property owned, money loaned, farms for sale, farms purchased, and foreclosures; receipts for the sale of land and stock; balance sheets; and bank expenditures.

Other family business endeavors are documented in the Correspondence and Business Records Series. Both series contain information about the business endeavors of tobacco merchant T.D. Jones, including letters and notes from tobacco merchants throughout the Southeast who sold his products. Volumes in the Business Records Series record the financial affairs of J. Southgate and Son, an insurance agency begun by James Southgate and later headed by James H. Southgate; agencies affiliated with J. Southgate and Son; and Southgate Jones and Company Real Estate, headed by James Southgate Jones. Scattered Correspondence, 1890s- early 1910s, and a letterbook of James H. Southgate (1901-1906), relating to J. Southgate and Son, concern these businesses. As President of Southgate Jones and Company Real Estate, James Southgate Jones handled property in North Carolina, such as farmland and Durham homes and businesses as well as property in Virginia and New York. The bulk of the Correspondence between 1912 and 1914 deals with the promotion of North Carolina land to prospective buyers, especially in the North and West; and efforts of businessmen to make deals with Jones. These letters may be useful for examining the development of Durham between 1910 and 1920. There is limited correspondence regarding early land stock business unaffiliated with the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham.

Information on the civic and political activities of family members is located in the Correspondence, Printed Material, Writings and Speeches and Miscellaneous Series. Correspondence, particularly after 1916, was generated almost exclusively by Mattie Southgate Jones's involvement in the Durham Civic Association and a variety of women's clubs. The Miscellaneous Series contains materials relating to her involvement with the North Carolina State Fair, suffrage, and a Durham campaign for a waste disposal program. Correspondence about the suffrage campaign, 1918-1922, discusses soliciting names for petition drives, lobbying state senators, and political strategy and organization. Mrs. Jones was responsible for petition drives on the Trinity College campus. Other suffragist leaders with whom she frequently corresponded include Gertrude Weil, who served as Vice President and President of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association. A letterbook (1897-1902) kept by James Southgate concerns his involvement with the Masons, Elks and Templars. In addition to a small number of letters pertaining to his insurance business, the bulk are to other Lodge members and pertain to the Grand Chapter, the national organization and other business of Durham Masonic Lodge No. 352, including the sponsorship of an Orphan Asylum in Oxford, North Carolina. James H. Southgate's letterbook (1901-1906) contains a small amount of correspondence, 1903-1904, concerning his position as a Trustee of Trinity College, and includes discussion of the Bassett affair and the formation of Greensboro Women's College.

The extensive genealogical research of Mattie Southgate Jones is located in the Correspondence, Genealogy, Pictures and Miscellaneous Series. Additional information on family members can be found in the Clippings, Legal Papers and Financial Papers Series. The majority of letters written in the Correspondence Series between 1922 and 1934 consist of contacts made by relatives in North Carolina and elsewhere, in response to Mrs. Jones's queries. The largest amount of material relates to the Jeffreys, Jones, Southgate, and Wynne families. Photographs in the Pictures Series correspond to written information, and often unidentified loose photographs can be matched to labeled ones in albums.

The Correspondence Series contains a small amount of commentary, 1861-1863, on the Civil War, including letters from family members serving with the 1st North Carolina Cavalry Regiment. One letter includes an account by a civilian of the Union cavalry expedition from New Bern to Tarboro and Rocky Mount, North Carolina in July, 1863. The series also contains correspondence between family and friends. Included are a number of letters, 1906-1930, between James Southgate Jones ("South") and his uncle James H. Southgate, mother Mattie Southgate Jones, and brother Lyell Jones, written while he was away at school or traveling. Letters, 1909-1910, that South and Lyell wrote during a trip out West describe new surroundings, particularly New Mexico. There are also letters from South, Mattie, and other family members to Lyell from 1912-1913, during his extended illness and stay at the Winyah Sanatorium in Asheville, N.C. Other correspondents include James Southgate and Celestia Muse Southgate Simmons.

The collection also includes lantern slides, tintypes, daguerrotypes, and cartes-de-visites in the Picture Series. Subjects include family members and Durham businesses, streets and homes in the late nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

Additions to the collection have not been interfiled, and include business records, photographs, scrapbooks, a cookbook, and autobiographies of some family members. Please consult the detailed list below for more information.

The papers of James Southgate (1832-1914) form a separate collection in the Duke University Special Collections Department. Collections in the Duke University Archives related to the career of James Haywood Southgate include the William Preston Few Papers, the Trinity College Board of Trustee Papers, and the John Carlisle Kilgo Papers.

1 result in this collection

American slavery documents collection, 1757-1924 and undated

Online
2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Collection of manuscript items relating to American slavery assembled over a number of decades by the staff of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Collection contains items documenting the sales, escapes, and emancipations of enslaved people from colonial times through the Civil War, and to a lesser extent, materials relating to slavery in the United States dating from the post-emancipation period.

The collection brings to light details of the lives and deaths of enslaved and free Africans and African Americans in the southern United States, primarily in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, but also in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. There are also six albumen studio portrait photographs, mounted on card stock, dating from the second half of the 19th century, along with a copper token from the American Colonization Society, dated 1833.

Items have been foldered individually, with the inventory reflecting their titles, geographic origin, and date (if known).

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Slade family papers, 1751-1929 and undated

4.5 Linear Feet
The Slade family were white plantation owners and businessmen in Martin County, North Carolina. This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and family affairs of a plantation owning family in the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances. Also contains materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade.

This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, Thomas Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and the family affairs of a plantation-owning family of the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds, including correspondence and receipts with other N.C. politicians, judges, and officials such as Asa Biggs; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances.

There is extensive correspondence between the women of the Slade family, reporting on local and family news as well as offering opinions and accounts of their various studies and activities. There is also a fair amount of business correspondence and account logs from the various Slade ventures, including fisheries, logging, hog farming, tobacco crops, cotton, and horse breeding.

Of note are the materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade. There are also assorted accounts and receipts documenting guardianship, personal expenses, invoices, and other financial papers relating to the operation of plantations and large farms in North Carolina both before and after the Civil War.

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Folder

This portion of the collection relates to the work of General Jeremiah Slade, who was appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs by the N.C. State Legislature in 1802. He was charged with the task of settling accounts with the Tuscarora, whose lands in Bertie County were to be leased to white farmers after the nation was removed to New York in the early nineteenth century. Slade's correspondence with Tuscarora chiefs in New York, particularly Chiefs Longboard and Saracusa, as well as his accounts of land leases, debts owed the Tuscarora, and various legal documents, including correspondence with the War Department, are all present in this series. Notable documents include a power of attorney from 1817 signed with seals by dozens of Tuscarora chiefs and warriors, as well as a few letters from the Tuscarora to Slade, acknowledging receipt of funds or other financial updates. Correspondence and contracts with the chiefs are signed with X and usually accompanied by a seal.

Folder

The Legal Papers series contains an assortment of legal and court-related documents, including wills, executor's appointments, powers of attorney, contracts, indentures, guardianship appointments, land deeds, and other materials documenting the Slades' participation land ownership, business ventures, lawsuits, and official role in Martin County and North Carolina more broadly.

Sir Lucas Pepys note, to James Window, Esq., undated, [between 1784-1830]

1 item
ANS. Autograph sample.
1 result in this collection

Sir Humphry Davy papers, 1817-1829

2 items
In an ALS to Thomas Poole, Davy inquires after an estate in Nether Stowey he would like to purchase and remarks sadly upon the death of Princess Charlotte. In a holograph note, signed, in French, to the Monsignor de Medici Spada, Davy remarks upon his poor health.
1 result in this collection

Sir Charles Clarke note, [London], to Sir Charles Wetherell, undated

1 item
ANS. A note of sympathy.
1 result in this collection

Sir Astley Cooper correspondence, 1813-1853 and undated.

38 items
ALS to and from Cooper. Includes two notes from Catherine Cooper, Cooper's daughter, to Mr. and Mrs. Balderson and an anonymous recipient, and a note from W. Smith to Ann Cooper, Cooper's wife. Among Cooper's correspondents are well-known English physicians, scientists, and his patients. They include: A. Marcet, H. Halford, C.M. Clarke, J. Ingles, R. Leston, Sir C. Locock, Sir J. McGregor, A. Monro, Dr. Browne of Glasgow, Sir W. Lawrence, Sir C. Aldis, B. Travers, Dr. J.C.W. Lever, W.F. Montgomery, Dr. J. Kidd, Dr. Balderson, Dr. W. Prowl, H.S. Seton, J. Soogood, and B. Whittaker. Letters relate to personal and professional matters. The letters are in English. However, an ALS from Charles de Greti and an ANS from Pierre Moquet are in French. In his letters to Marcet, Cooper expresses strong opinions regarding the political situation in England and on the Continent during the Napoleonic wars. In his letters to Cooper, Kidd discusses the subject of medical reform. Seton's gossipy, personal letters relate to the royal family.
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Sir Anthony Musgrave papers, 1739-1966

8.0 Linear Feet — 16 boxes
Collection contains professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave, of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda Field Musgrave; and of her father, David Dudley Field, lawyer and law reformer. Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life and education, the Unitarian Church, his career in New York and the compilation of that state's civil, penal, and criminal codes, law reform, and his wife, Jane Lucinda Hopkins Field. Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings, pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica, 1877-1883, but also St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, British Columbia, 1869-1872, Natal, 1872, South Australia, 1873, and Queensland, 1883-1888. Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence, letters with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australian politics, and autobiographical and genealogical information.

Collection includes the professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave (1828-1888), British colonial official; of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda (Field) Musgrave (1833-1920); and of her father, David Dudley Field (1805-1894), lawyer and law reformer.

The Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life; his education at Stockbridge Academy and at Williams College, including bills and receipts, and correspondence about student life and professors; religion, especially the rise of the Unitarian Church; his early career in New York; law reform; the compilation of civil, penal, and criminal codes for New York, and as a model for other states; international law, including maritime law and admiralty courts; the reform of municipal government; the Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations, 1870s; the Institut de Droit International; the laying of the Atlantic Cable, 1866; and the Hague Peace Conference, 1899. Personal correspondence includes letters, 1830s, with the Hopkins family, Mark, Harry, and his future wife, Jane Lucinda; and letters, 1870-1894, with the Muegrave family. Also in the collection are clippings pertaining to the Field and Hopkins families; some legal papers; diaries, 1875-1894, of David Dudley Field; Recollections of My Early Life, Written in the Spring of 1832, by Field; his commonplace book, 1824-1827; his Autobiography, 1805-1836; a journal, 1831-1835, containing comments on his studies and reading; a journal, 1836, principally concerning the fatal illness of his wife; journals, 1836-1837 and 1851, describing his travels in Europe, volume of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field containing recollections of her youth, written in 1832, and a journal, 1833-1835, Poetical Extracts of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field; Personal Recollections of David Dudley Field written in 1892; and correspondence, 1898, relating to a biography of Field written by his brother, Henry Martyn Field.

Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica. Jamaican materials, 1877-1883, concern the case of Pulido v. Musgrave, colonial rule, the immigration of laborers to Jamaica, the membership of the Legislative Council, the reorganization of the judicial system, colonial defense, customs, commercial relations with the United States and Canada, and Cuban revolutionaries in Jamaica. Other papers pertain to the administration of St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, especially concerning the Newfoundland fisheries. British Columbia, 1869-1872; Natal, 1872, including information on native policy, education and marriage, the constitution, and relations between Natal, the Transvaal, and the Zulus; South Australia, 1873; and Queensland, 1883-1888. There are letters concerning Sir Anthony's writings on political economy, 1870s, as well as pamphlets of his works; correspondence, 1887, concerning the formation of the Westminster Review Company and the publication of the Westminster Review; a Private Letter Book, 1868-1878, containing confidential letters to other officials and personal correspondence; a scrapbook, 1874-1881, with reviews of his writings, and information on the social, economic, and political affairs of Jamaica and South Australia; and a Memorial Scrapbook, 1868-1908, comprised of pictures, clippings, telegrams and letters concerning the death of Sir Anthony.

Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence; letters, 1890-1901, with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australia, including information on the federation of Australia, the Australian constitution, labor unrest, the separation movement, and his work as chief justice of Queensland and of Australia; letters, 1910-1911, dealing with Anglican mission work among miners and loggers in British Columbia; "Notes for My Sons," containing biographical information about herself and her relatives; and a scrapbook, 1810-1913, of letters from prominent persons. Other materials include correspondence, 1918-1920, of Mark Hopkins III concerning the work of the Red Cross in France. letters, 1886-1891, from Dudley Field Musgrave (1873-1895), son of Sir Anthony, describing life as a naval cadet and his service in the Mediterranean; correspondence and printed material pertaining to railroads, especially the Berkshire Street Railway Company of Stockbridge; pictures of the Field and Musgrave family members; and genealogical material on the Field, Musgrave, Hopkins, Byam, Sergeant, Dyett, and Abbott families.

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Silas Weir Mitchell papers, 1809-1915 and undated

1.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder — 747 Items
U.S. physician, neurologist, and author. Papers date from 1809-1915 and include correspondence and documents sent to Mitchell relating to matters personal and professional. Transcripts are often present. Principal correspondents include his relative Mitchell Henry, his publisher Frank H. Scott, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jeffries Wyman, Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard, Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, Anna Eliot Ticknor, Sir W. T. Gairdner, Louis Lee Lawrence, Charles Leonard Moore, Julian Stafford Corbett, Harrison S. Morris, T. Lauder Brunton, Sir William Osler, and Hideyo Noguchi, among others. A complete list of correspondents is available in the collection. Papers are arranged chronologically. The principal language is English, although there are some letters in French and German. Also includes a set of Mitchell's diplomas. The papers form part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers of physician and neurologist Silas Weir Mitchell date from 1809-1915 and comprise over 700 documents and correspondence sent to Dr. Mitchell relating to matters both personal and professional. Transcripts are often included. Principal correspondents include his relative Mitchell Henry, his publisher Frank H. Scott, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jeffries Wyman, Charles-Éduoard Brown-Séquard, Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz, Anna Eliot Ticknor, Sir W. T. Gairdner, Louis Lee Lawrence, Charles Leonard Moore, Julian Stafford Corbett, Harrison S. Morris, T. Lauder Brunton, Sir William Osler, and Hideyo Noguchi, among others. A complete list of correspondents is available in the first box of the collection. A set of Mitchell's diplomas is also included.

The Silas Weir Mitchell papers form part of the Trent Manuscripts Collection and were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Sheek family papers, 1767-1939, bulk 1850-1869, bulk 1850-1869

3.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains mainly letters (mostly between 1850-1869) to members of the Sheek family of North Carolina, from relatives who had migrated to Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Texas. The letters concern religion in the West, economic conditions, farming on the frontier, Texas during the 1840s-1860s, sectional strife, Civil War experiences, and conditions in the Confederacy and after the war.

The collection contains letters to the Sheek, Smith, and Clouse families of North Carolina from relatives who migrated to Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, and Texas, concerning land and commodity prices; religion; the Mexican War; Trinity College, North Carolina; farming on the frontier; conditions in Texas, 1840-1870; secession in North Carolina; the experiences of several Confederate soldiers; and Reconstruction. The collection also contains advertisements for books and patent medicines North Carolina ballots; circulars for giris' schools and boys' schools in Lockville and Jonesville, North Carolina; bills; receipts; and summonses from a justice of the peace.

Former collection name: Jacob Sheek and Jonathan Smith Papers.

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Seamen's Friend Society of Wilmington records, 1810-1963

0.5 Linear Feet — 405 Items

Correspondence, legal and financial papers, ledger (1853-1923), and memoranda, of a society organized for the improvement of the social, moral, and religious condition of seamen who visited the port of Wilmington, N.C. The society also operated a hospital.

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Alexander Robinson Boteler papers, 1707-1924, bulk 1836-1889

Online
3 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1,686 items (incl. 4 vols.)
Correspondence of Alexander's father, Dr. Henry Boteler, for 1776-1837; and family letters of Alexander with information on his career at Princeton College and his courtship of his future wife, Helen Macomb Stockton. Political correspondence, relating to the election of 1860, the Constitutional Union party, and Alexander's travels around the country in 1882-1884 while a member of the U.S. tariff commission. Volumes include Boteler's diary for 1845, relative to his farming activities; various scrapbooks and some genealogical materials on the Pendleton, Digges, and Pope families. Among the correspondents are Lewis Cass, Samuel Cooper, John B. Floyd, S. B. French, Wade Hampton, T. J. Jackson, Andrew Johnson, R. E. Lee, John Letcher, W. P. Miles, John Page, Thomas N. Page, Rembrandt Peale, W. N. Pendleton, W. C. Rives, Alexander Robinson, W. H. Seward, J.E.B. Stuart, Jacob Thompson, J. F. Thompson, and Dabney C. Wirt.

This collection consists of family letters of Alexander R. Boteler (1815-1892), Virginia political leader, congressman, and Civil War soldier, with sidelights on his career at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, his courtship of Helen Macomb Stockton, whom he later married, his altercations with Charles J. Faulkner, and "Yankee" depredations at his home, "Fountain Rock," during the Civil War; political correspondence, 1855-1870, relating to the election of 1860 and the Constitutional Union Party; letters concerning Boteler's travels about the country in 1882-1884 while a member of the U.S. Tariff Commission; correspondence concerning claims of James Rumsey as inventor of the first steamboat; and legal and personal papers of Helen (Stockton) Boteler's father, Ebenezer S. Stockton, and grandfather, Robert Stockton. Volumes include Boteler's diary, 1845, relative to his farming activities; a scrapbook on the election of 1848; a scrapbook containing clippings, letters, and pictures devoted principally to the activities and interests of Boteler; and a scrapbook containing clippings, letters, and pictures concerning the Pendleton, Digges, and Pope families, especially the life of Dudley Digges Pendleton who married Helen Stockton Boteler.

The collection also contains the correspondence of Alexander R. Boteler's father, Dr. Henry Boteler, for 1776-1837. Among other correspondents are A. R. Boteler, Lewis Cass, Samuel Cooper, John B. Floyd, S. B. French, Wade Hampton, T. J. Jackson, Andrew Johnson, R. E. Lee, John Letcher, W. P. Miles, John Page, Thomas N. Page, Rembrandt Peale, W. N. Pendleton, W. C. Rives, Alexander Robinson, W. H. Seward, J. E. B. Stuart, Jacob Thompson, J. R. Thompson, Dabney C. Wirt.

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Georgette A. Chamberlin papers, 1785-1917

10 Linear Feet — 12 Items
Georgette A. Chamberlin (1831-1920) was daughter of Mehitable Varnum and Franklin Tenney, who was proprietor of the National Hotel in Washington, D.C, where she resided. Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin.

Four travel diaries, a genealogical album, four photograph albums, two scrapbooks, and a postcard album; all except one photograph album maintained by Georgette A. Chamberlin. The diaries document her trips to New England (1877), the Southern States (1881 and 1886) and to Europe (1880, 1882, and 1897). The genealogical album includes material about the Varnum and Tenney families, Franklin Tenney (her father) and the National Hotel. During her travels to Germany (1897) she stayed and traveled with Princess Salm-Salm (Agnes Elizabeth Winona Leclercq) an American adventures, and widow of Prussian nobleman, Prince Felix Salm-Salm. The photograph albums and the scrapbooks document her family history, and the history of and visitors to the National Hotel. The postcard album contains postcards of her travel in Europe, with a few from the United States.

2 results in this collection
Container
Box 10

Scrapbook (150 pages) maintained by Chamberlin that documents her family history, and contains information on the various hotels run by Franklin Tenney. There are early legal documents for the Varnum family, as well as other documents for the Tenney and Chamberlin families. In addition, there are newspaper clippings, letters, broadsides, advertisements, photographs, and invitations. Many items have been laid or tipped in.

Frederick Fraser papers, 1700-1911 and undated

2 Linear Feet
The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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File
Box 1

Business correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, including commercial problems during the War of 1812, and particularly in Charleston, South Carolina. Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. Also includes some personal correspondence, primarily with the individuals John Dawson, Ladson, H. Cunningham, and B. W. Martin, and an anonymous individual identitified only as I.H.L.

Scovill-Beecher Letters, 1816-1864 bulk 1817-1820

0.2 Linear Feet — 29 Items
William H. Scovill (1796-1854) of Waterbury, Connecticut, businessman and founder of the Scovill Manufacturing Company; and Rebecca Beecher (1800-1876), of Kent, Connecticut. The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill and Rebecca Beecher during a long period of geographic separation and secret engagement from 1817 to 1820. Materials in the collection range in date from 1816 to 1864.

The collection includes twenty-nine letters, chiefly the courting letters of William H. Scovill a