Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Collection
Document, signed. John Mitchell petitions the Hospital for admittance. The Hospital receives the promise of John Haighton, physician, to supply the patient with clean body linen weekly and to remove the body at his expense, if the patient should die within the Hospital's care.
Collection
ANS. Requests that bearer be given a copy of his work on mineral waters, as well as his book on the liver. Note is attached to short biographical sketch.
Collection
Letter (ALS) informs recipient that Apostoli will send a recent published thesis on his electrical treatment of fibromata.
File
Volume M:3924

North Carolina and Tennessee. Alternative title: "Register of persons who wish reservations under the Treaty of July 8, 1817." Includes names and places of residence and occasionally other remarks such as "enrolled for Arkansas."

Collection
ALS. Writes regarding the editing of a publication on Parkinson's disease.
Collection
Manuscript pages from a proposed, but never published second and revised edition of North's book, "A treatise on a malignant epidemic, commonly called spotted fever". Available are photographs of the title page of North's own copy of the book, which bears marginal notes in his hand. Reader is referred to the article by Pleadwell, "A new view of Elisha North ... ", in Annals of medical history, 6 (1924). The manuscript and North's copy form the basis of this essay.
Collection

John Foot Scrapbook, circa 1810s-1870s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

John Foot, Esq., presumably of Westminster, England. Victorian scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Victorian era scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Harold Jantz Graphic Art collection, circa 1400s-1800s 5 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items

Professor of German literature at Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, and Duke Universities. Collector of German baroque literature and German Americana. A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

This material remains unprocessed and undescribed. Prints have been loosely sorted by American, European, or Asian origin and are foldered accordingly.

Collection
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

Collection
Online
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

Collection
Printed burial announcement, Amsterdam, 1775, of the death and remarkable old age of Hermanus van Kleef; silhouette portrait of cut-out colored papers and a lock of human hair, with holograph caption; and autograph translation of both announcement and caption. Collage portrait supposedly of and by van Kleef a few years before his death at the age of 101. English translation by a Dr. Luckhardt, sometime around 1950.
File
Box 3

Empty wooden box decorated to look like Ladies' Cabinet book, intended to be stored on a bookshelf. Book's cover is a lid for the box, which opens to reveal a hidden storage compartment. Interior of the box lid has a small landscape with lace trim adhered to the surface, but no name or date information regarding the former owner.

File

Assorted portraits and images of women, approximately 1600s-1930s 3 Files — 2 folders in Box 1, and 1 item in Oversize Folder 1

Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name.

Collection
3 letters (ALS), including a letter of reference, dated May 27, 1839, Edinburgh, for Dr. William Pirrie.
Collection
Letter (ALS) dated Oct. 20, 1830 tendering his resignation as Professor of Physiology at the University of London; a pencil sketch and engravings of drawings by Bell; a copy of a portrait of Bell by J. Stevens and two clippings.
Collection
Document, signed. Certificate of the Massachusetts Medical Society, that Josiah Lamson is qualified to practice medicine. Signed by, among others, Josiah Bartlett and Aaron Dexter.
File
Box 1

Item is a bound manuscript journal of about 69 pages with Hayne's diary along with some abstracts of ship logs and notes from the Embassy's return voyage following the Embassy's visit to China. Their ship, H.M.S. Alceste, was shipwrecked near Pulo Leat (also called Pongok Island in modern-day Malaysia) on 1817 Feb. 17. The journal has Hayne's diary from February 19-23, recording his trip with the Embassy in open boats from the wreck to Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Hayne records the difficult conditions for Lord Amherst, his suite, and the marines who rowed the boat with no shade, limited rations, and very little fresh water.

The journal contains an abstract of the Alceste's logbook, tracking its voyage from the "mouth of Pie-ho" to the "Napa-Kian Roads in the Islands of Loo-choo," waiting for the return of the Embassy. The log then records the day of the shipwreck and the ferrying of the crew to Batavia, and their journey onwards on the H.M.S. Cesar. The Cesar sailed around Capt St. Marys, to False Bay, and then "anchored at Noon off James' Valley and Town St. Helena" on 27 June 1817. The logbook ends on 15 August.

Another portion of the journal includes "copious extracts from and few additions to a journal kept by one of the Officers of the Alceste during his stay on the Desert Island of Pulo Leat near which the said ship was wrecked" (page 29 on). This excerpt records efforts to rescue men and supplies, the departure of the ambassador's suite (including Hayne), digging for water, the arrival of Malaysian pirates and fishermen, and the eventual rescue of the survivors and their ferrying to Batavia where they were reunited with the Embassy and continued onward to England.

Also in the journal are abstracts of the HMS Blanche's logbook from Plymouth to Lisbon, Madeira, and Rio de Janiero (1824).

Collection

MacRae family papers, 1817-1943 10 Linear Feet — 4270 items

Correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida. Alexander MacRae's papers concern Florida plantations and their management, the Seminole Indian War (1842), and settlements in southern Florida. Papers of his son, Archibald MacRae, deal with his life aboard ship as a U.S. naval officer, and with his trips to the Azores, Italy, Sicily, Hawaii, South America, and California during the Mexican War. Other papers pertain to railroad construction and management, North Carolina militia (1832, 1839), a general commission business, life in the Confederacy and Confederate Army during the Civil War, postwar business and industrial development in the Wilmington, N.C., area, and a variety of business enterprises with which the MacRae family was connected. Includes writings and papers of Hugh MacRae.

Collection contains primarily correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of Hugh MacRae and the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida.

From the ante-bellum period there are papers of Hugh MacRae's grandfather, Alexander MacRae, concerning the management of plantations in Florida and the second Seminole War; of Archibald MacRae, pertaining to his career in the United States Navy, including a voyage to the Azores and the Mediterranean Sea, 1838, observation of the British attack on Egyptian forces, 1840, participation in the Mexican War in California, voyage to Hawaii, 1847, and descriptions of political and social events in Chile while part of the United States Naval Expedition to the Southern Hemisphere, 1849-1852; of John Colin MacRae and Henry MacRae, relating to the construction and management of railroads in North Carolina and general construction and transportation development in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia, including correspondence concerning quarrels between the Wilmington and Manchester Rail road, headed by Alexander MacRae, and other North Carolina lines; and of John MacRae and Donald MacRae, concerning their general commission business in Wilmington, North Carolina, founded in 1849, the Endor Iron Works (McIver, North Carolina), begun in 1857, and the political activities of John MacRae in Wilmington.

Civil War papers reflecting army life are those of William MacRae, Robert Bruce MacRae, Henry MacRae, and Walter G. MacRae, all of whom served in the Confederate Army, for the most part in North Carolina and Virginia. Their letters describe numerous battles and skirmishes and depict camp life in the 1st, 5th, and 87th North Carolina Regiments and the 2nd North Carolina Regiment, Cavalry. Letters of Donald MacRae, John Colin MacRae, Roderick MacRae, and Alexander MacRae, Jr., concern conditions at home during the war and family business interests, including the sale of cotton, blockade running, operations of an iron works, manufacture of salt, an epidemic of yellow fever in Wilmington, speculation and economic dislocation at the end of the war, and the occupation of Wilmington by Union troops.

Papers for the years after the Civil War are primarily those of Donald MacRae and his son, Hugh MacRae. Papers of Donald MacRae concern the handling of family real estate; settlement of claims on property in Florida; the guano business, particularly the Navassa Guano Company; general business interests, including the development of Linville, North Carolina, as a resort by the Linville Improvement Company and the Western North Carolina Stage Coach Company; and power development, especially the Great Falls Water Power Mining and Iron Company. The papers after 1890 are increasingly those of Hugh MacRae and concern his business interests, including the Wilmington Street Railroad Company, the Consolidated Railways, Light and Power Company, the Central Carolina Power Company in South Carolina, the Tidewater Power Company, and the Investment Trust Company of Wilmington (North Carolina), and his interest in land development and land reclamation, including the formation of farm communities near Wilmington, the promotion of legislation designed to help tenant farmers acquire their own land and to encourage immigration, the creation of the Carolina Trucking Development Company and the Carolina Real Estate Trust Company, and MacRae's work with the National Economy League and the Southern Economic Council in the 1930s.

The collection contains bills and receipts from many of the businesses in which the MacRae family was interested and a number of volumes dealing with personal and business matters, including works on rural rehabilitation; a diary of Robert Bruce MacRae, 1865-1866; a volume of Hugh MacRae's experiment records, 1909; "Roll of the Wilmington Hibernian Society," 1866-1879; account books of Alexander MacRae; record book of Donald MacRae, Company K, 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the Spanish-American War; letter book of Hugh MacRae, 1899-1900; and mercantile and shipping records for J. & D. MacRae of Wilmington, 1858-1860.

Collection

Chambers Baird papers, 1817-1933 4 Linear Feet — 2,255 Items

Lawyer and businessman, of Ripley, Ohio. Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

Correspondence and legal and financial papers, relating to Baird's law practice, his activities as paymaster of the U. S. Army (1863-1866) and as claim agent for soldiers' bounties and pensions (1863-1881); together with the papers of his son, Chambers Baird (b. 1860). Includes references to Ohio politics and business conditions during the antebellum period.

Collection

John R. Pendell papers, 1817-1906 2 Linear Feet — 1527 Items

John R. Pendell was a teacher, Baptist minister, and book salesman of Worcester, Mass. and New York. Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.

Collection consists of personal correspondence of several generations of the family of John R. Pendell, teacher, salesman, and Baptist minister, and of the related F. D. Ingersoll and Jeduthan Stevens families, discussing family finances, social life and customs in Massachusetts and New York, the need for education for various members of the family, religion, temperance and prohibition, and the presidential elections of 1884 and 1888.

Folder

Correspondence, 1817-1895 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Correspondence consists chiefly of business letters by John Knight and his partners and friends. However, there are also many letters by Knight family members and their relatives and friends. The correspondence begins in 1817 with letters from Mary (McCleery) Knight in Indiana to her sister Frances (McCleery) Beall, William M. Beall's wife. There is also correspondence between Fanny Knight, John and Frances Knight's daughter, and Thomas McDannold during their courtship. Correspondence also includes letters from friends and relatives while the Knights were traveling abroad. Many letters also mention John Knight's attempts at various cures for ill health, including water cures, hot springs, and baths.

Between 1830 and 1864, Knight's business correspondence with Enoch Pratt, a Baltimore banker in charge of Knight's finances, William Beall, and others, predominates. Topics include: the U.S. political and economic climate: the conflict between Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson; the cotton market; banking and bank failures; investment in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; the purchase and sale of slaves, with some bought by William Beall and sent to Knight in Mississippi; the treatment and medical care of slaves; the operation of Knight's plantations; piracy on the Mississippi River, 1841; cholera and yellow fever epidemics in New York and New Orleans in 1832, 1833, 1837, and 1841; the economic panic of 1857; education at the Frederick Female Academy, Frederick, Maryland; financial conditions in the United States during the Civil War; the relations between the United States and England during the war; and the course of the Civil War, especially the Union invasion of Maryland. One early letter from Roger Brooke Taney to William Murdock Beall explains his refusal of the vice-presidency and discussing his interest in the U.S. presidency.

Other smaller groups of correspondence were written by Frances "Fanny" Knight McDannold, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, her children Knight and Alexandra, and husband Thomas McDannold, and that family's acquaintances.

The correspondence ends with a much smaller series of letters, which include items to Frances S.Z. Knight from her grandchildren, and other correspondence reflecting her financial and legal activities as she managed her husband's large estate and the guardianship of her grandchildren even as she approached old age.

Some additional correspondence can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers series.

Collection

Iveson L. Brookes papers, 1817-1888 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 720 items (inc. 11 volumes)

Online
Collection includes correspondence of a Baptist preacher, landholder, and enslaver in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations, tariff and the nullification controversy, missionary work among enslaved people, student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of antebellum politics. Also discussed are diseases, health, and remedies, Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems along with Brookes' family genealogy and his sermon notes.

Collection contains correspondence of Iveson L. Brookes, a Baptist preacher and landholder in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations; tariff and the nullification controversy; transportation conditions; banking; missionary work among enslaved people; student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of ante-bellum politics; diseases, health, and remedies.

His later correspondence also discusses Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, religious revivals, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, the destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems. Correspondence by descendants includes mining near Potosi, Missouri, race relations in marriage and religion, politics in South Carolina in 1877, Columban College in Washington, D.C.; Brookes' family genealogy, and his sermon notes.

File
Box 3

Bound volume, 173 pages, approximately 20x32cm, consisting of chronological entries by William Massie recording the various agricultural activities of the Pharsalia, Tyro, and Level Green plantation lands, with additional notes regarding weather or other events. Entries tend to be brief, for example: "Finished cutting the wheat" (1828 June 26). Some entries indicate which area of the plantation was being farmed, such as Newground, Old Ground, or various fields. Crops include wheat, oats, tobacco, apples, barley, clover, hemp, sweet potatoes; others entries record the killing of hogs, shearing sheep, and birth of foals. This book does not seem to include entries with names or groups of enslaved people, although their labor is indirectly implied. Later in the book, Massie began arranging entries by "Crop Memorandum," "Weather Memorandum," and "Orchard Memorandum."

Collection
Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

Collection
4 letters (ALS). Correspondence from Caspar Wistar, Robert Hare and Nathaniel Chapman. Wistar writes regarding quarantine regulations, that, on the one hand, they should prevent the introduction of contagious diseases and, on the other, should not be "burdensome to commerce". Includes transcription of Wistar letter.
Collection
In an ALS to Thomas Poole, Davy inquires after an estate in Nether Stowey he would like to purchase and remarks sadly upon the death of Princess Charlotte. In a holograph note, signed, in French, to the Monsignor de Medici Spada, Davy remarks upon his poor health.
Container
Box 28

Letterbook of A. S. Bullock, collector of the port of Savannah at least from 1817 to 1822, containing copies of routine letters relative to the port of Savannah. The routine letters, however, contain considerable information. Among them are accounts of pirate ships, smuggling of slaves, escape of slaves in ships, burning of the customs house at Savannah, Tybee Light House and its equipment, and other related matters. Frequently Bullock's letters request information on legal matters from the district attorney. A few letters at the end of the volume were written by N.A. Olmstead, Deputy collector.