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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Folder

The Archaeology series contains pamphlets, offprints, extracts, and many illustrated pieces. It is a small group of 233 pamphlets.

Of importance are the pamphlets concerning numismatics, particular excavations during the nineteenth century, papyrus studies, ancient art, and Italian ceramics. There is even an unusual and probably rare guide to the pornographic artifacts in the Museum of Archeology in Naples.

Authors of interest include Medea Norsa, a well-known papyrologist of the nineteenth century, Luigi Pernier, Corrado Ricci, Giuseppe Gerola, Guido Ferrari, Santi Muratori, Astorre Pellegrini, E. Teza, Luigi Milani, Luigi Rizzoli, Settimio Severo, and Luigi Chiappelli.

Related subjects and areas of overlap are found in the Italian Art series and perhaps in the history-related subject areas.

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Assorted portraits and images of women, approximately 1600s-1930s 3 Files — 2 folders in Box 1, and 1 item in Oversize Folder 1

Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name.

File
Box 1

Decorative trade cards (ranging in size from 5x8cm to 11x19 cm) advertising businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. These trade cards all appear to originate from Great Britain or the United States.

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The papers begin in 1736, when John Hall (ca. 1717-1790) and his brothers Henry and William become actively engaged in tobacco planting. The letters open with a land indenture of 1745 and continue as business correspondence with London, Annapolis, Baltimore, and local merchants and factories. Comment is made on salt as a necessity for plantation life in 1778 and 1782. An overseer's contract in 1764 gives details of plantation management and enslavement.

A letter is signed by John Hall of "Vineyard" on June 11, 1778. As a member of the Maryland Assembly, he discusses the check and balance theory as it was working out in the "young government" of Maryland, he mentions violent contests, the quit rents and state revenue, militia service, and the role of the governor. In 1787 "Publicanus" addresses the people of Anne Arundel Co. on the topic of paper money.

The will of John Hall (made in 1787) gives his estate as "Bachelor's Choice," on West River, and names his children and their families. Enslaved people are listed as part of the estate. Many of the later letters are from the families of Hall sibilings to William Henry Hall, son of John Hall. A series of law suits occurs in the 1790s as William Henry Hall settles his father's estate.

A letter dated Oct. 3, 1796, to William Henry Hall describes the life of an American seaman impressed into the British navy. Samuel Hopkins, a young Maryland plantation overseer, and John Wilson of Cheraw, S. C., comment in letters to Hall from 1810-1813 on cotton planting in S. C. Hopkins describes on July 1, 1810, a plot by enslaved people to rise against enslavers in the Marlboro District of S. C. In 1813 he writes of hiring a substitute for himself if drafted in the War of 1812. Among W. H. Hall's correspondents were William, John, David, and John G. Weems of Anne Arundel Co., relatives of Mason Locke ("Parson") Weems.

File
Box 1

Business correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, including commercial problems during the War of 1812, and particularly in Charleston, South Carolina. Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. Also includes some personal correspondence, primarily with the individuals John Dawson, Ladson, H. Cunningham, and B. W. Martin, and an anonymous individual identitified only as I.H.L.

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The family's correspondence includes letters across several generations of Slades and their business associates, friends, and relatives, centering around the family's plantations, farming, and fisheries in and around Williamston, Martin County, N.C.; Tennessee; and Georgia. Early letters document on the activities of Jeremiah Slade, a general during the War of 1812. His letters tend to relate to the fisheries, legal cases, and business issues. Slade served as a North Carolina State Senator from 1809 to 1815, so some correspondence relates to court cases and other activities of the senate. All materials relating to his role as Commissioner for the Tuscarora Indians has been removed to the Tuscarora Nation Series.

The Correspondence Series contains many letters between Jeremiah and Janet Slade and their children, with the majority being from Alfred, Thomas, Mary Ann, James Bog (J.B.), Elizabeth, and William. After the death of Jeremiah Slade in 1824, the family's correspondence tends to center around the activities of his sons, Thomas and William Slade, and their families (they had 12 and 11 children, respectively). Their letters include descriptions of college life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, Greensboro Female College/State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG), and several secondary boarding schools. A few letters early in 1861 are from Henry Slade, a student at Trinity College, Randolph County, North Carolina, until he joined the army in the same year. Henry Slade mentions Braxton Craven, in whose home he boarded.

There is a significant amount of letters documenting the Civil War period, particularly comments on the organization of military companies; campaigns around Yorktown, Virginia, during 1861; fighting, refugees, and the Union occupation in eastern North Carolina; living conditions and high prices; Longstreet's Corps in Caroline County, Virginia, in 1863; and the military situation around Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1863. There are also war letters between Eli Peal and his wife in eastern North Carolina, containing advice on farming operations; payment of taxes; accounts of skirmishes at Camp Burgwyn near Wilmington, North Carolina; slaves running away; difficulty of obtaining clothes; and references to guard duty.

There is a significant amount of correspondence to and from the Slade women (including Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, and Helen) during the Civil War. Letters of "Bog" or J. B. Slade early in 1861 from Harris County, Georgia, reflect enthusiasm for the newly formed Confederacy.

Post-war letters include general family correspondence, with frequent letters between the Slade women, including Janet, Mary, Emma, Martha, and Helen (on the Thomas Bog Slade side) and Annie, Mary, Elizabeth, Helen, and Frances (on the William Slade side). Correspondence also relates to the family's business ventures, including land rentals and other engagements with freedmen, news from the fishery, and reports from various horse breeding ventures. One notable letter is from Fanny, a former slave, writing from Texas in 1867 asking for any information on the whereabouts of her children. She was apparently sold away from them by the Slades. Another notable letter from Mount Airy in 1874 tells of the death of the Siamese twins, Eng and Chang.

The latest letters in the Correspondence series document the activities of James Bog Slade, Thomas B. Slade, and their descendents in Columbus, Georgia, and Martin County, North Carolina. Topics include the Clinton Female Seminary (Clinton, Georgia), the State Normal and Industrial School (Greensboro, N.C.), women's suffrage, Trinity Baptist Church (Caswell Co., N.C.), tobacco farming, hog butchering, and other business interests of the family.

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Correspondence, 1817-1895 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Correspondence consists chiefly of business letters by John Knight and his partners and friends. However, there are also many letters by Knight family members and their relatives and friends. The correspondence begins in 1817 with letters from Mary (McCleery) Knight in Indiana to her sister Frances (McCleery) Beall, William M. Beall's wife. There is also correspondence between Fanny Knight, John and Frances Knight's daughter, and Thomas McDannold during their courtship. Correspondence also includes letters from friends and relatives while the Knights were traveling abroad. Many letters also mention John Knight's attempts at various cures for ill health, including water cures, hot springs, and baths.

Between 1830 and 1864, Knight's business correspondence with Enoch Pratt, a Baltimore banker in charge of Knight's finances, William Beall, and others, predominates. Topics include: the U.S. political and economic climate: the conflict between Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson; the cotton market; banking and bank failures; investment in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; the purchase and sale of slaves, with some bought by William Beall and sent to Knight in Mississippi; the treatment and medical care of slaves; the operation of Knight's plantations; piracy on the Mississippi River, 1841; cholera and yellow fever epidemics in New York and New Orleans in 1832, 1833, 1837, and 1841; the economic panic of 1857; education at the Frederick Female Academy, Frederick, Maryland; financial conditions in the United States during the Civil War; the relations between the United States and England during the war; and the course of the Civil War, especially the Union invasion of Maryland. One early letter from Roger Brooke Taney to William Murdock Beall explains his refusal of the vice-presidency and discussing his interest in the U.S. presidency.

Other smaller groups of correspondence were written by Frances "Fanny" Knight McDannold, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, her children Knight and Alexandra, and husband Thomas McDannold, and that family's acquaintances.

The correspondence ends with a much smaller series of letters, which include items to Frances S.Z. Knight from her grandchildren, and other correspondence reflecting her financial and legal activities as she managed her husband's large estate and the guardianship of her grandchildren even as she approached old age.

Some additional correspondence can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers series.

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Series contains letters to and from Amy Morris Bradley, related ephemera, notes and receipts, third-party correspondence about Bradley, and one folder of newspaper clippings. The majority of material relates to Bradley's time in Costa Rica, her work as a field nurse and for the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, and her time as an educator in Wilmington, N.C.

In addition to family letters, there are several letters with soldiers and their relatives thanking her for her service. Included is a petition from 1865 signed by 320 soldiers recommended to the Secretary of War that Bradley be commissioned to major in the U.S. Army for her service. Clippings relate primarily to the Tileston Normal School, although some are also about Mary Hemenway, a benefactress of Tileston. Later correspondence comes from parents of students in Wilmington and from former students, many of whom maintained a close friendship with Bradley over many years. Ephemera includes programs of events at Tileston.

File
Box 1

Assorted handwritten copies of earlier texts and extracts of letters. Includes a fragment of meeting minutes for a Friends meeting in 1673; a copy of "A Description of Christ Jesus" from 1685; a copied letter from James Ireland to Matthew Wright offering a history of French Quakers, dated 1787; a letter to Susana Hatton from Samula Fothergill with religious advice relating to Quakerism, dated 1760; an undated extract of a letter from William Forster recounting a vision; a will for Stephen Fell, dating 1771-1773; a letter from S. Fell to "my friend and next door neighbor" regarding money owed, 1820.

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Thomas's assorted correspondence along with extensive notes, loose account pages, and other miscellaneous items are sorted chronologically by year into General Papers. There are also volumes with travel diaries for various business ventures and letterbooks with copies of his incoming and outgoing correspondence. This series documents his various businesses and investments, his Confederate service during the Civil War, his work as an Indian agent, and his family life and friendships. Additional material on his work with the Eastern Band of Cherokee can be found in the Cherokee Papers Series; additional contracts, reports, and petitions relating to railroads and turnpikes can be found in the Infrastructure Series.

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Most of the earliest items pertain to Mrs. Walton's family, the Bakers, who had settled in Hingham, Massachusetts at least by the eighteenth-century. Letters to Mrs. Walton comprise a major segment of this series, including those to her from her father, James Baker, 1880-1882. Included are courtship letters from George Walton, a physician who attended Eleanore Walton while she was convalescing near Deland, Florida. Most were written from 1891-1892, after she returned to her home in Chicago. Letters from George Walton after the marriage suggest financial hardship and indicate that the couple was frequently separated from the beginning of their marriage and during the early childhood of their son Loring. After 1895, there is a gap in the correspondence.

Also included is George Walton's 1896 diary of a trip via wagon from Indiana to Florida. Later material and correspondence in the series pertains to Eleanore Walton's work as a clubwoman and motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri from the 1920s to 1948, when she retired and moved to Durham, N.C. to live with her son Loring Baker Walton, who was on the faculty at Duke University.

The papers of Loring Baker Walton, make up a separate and larger series in this collection. An extensive series of correspondence between Eleanor and her son is located there.

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Online

The majority of the 136 letters in the series were composed by Benjamin Rush, and letters he wrote to Julia during the 1793 yellow fever epidemic in Philadelphia form a substantial part of the series. Main topics in the letters include Rush family matters, medical treatments for a wide variety of medical issues, American politics, and the country's relations with European nations. Other topics include mental illness and its treatment, the medical department in the Continental Army, the impact of epidemics upon commerce internationally, reading habits, parenting, and capital punishment.

Among the prominent correspondents who wrote one or more personal or professional letters to Rush or his wife are Abigail Adams, John Quincy Adams, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, Thomas Paine, and George Washington. Letters from others to Julia Rush seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family, and offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Included are several manuscript copies Benjamin Rush made of individual letters he penned.

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Collection includes family correspondence consisting of letters from Kell to his mother, Marjory Spalding (Baillie) Kell; his wife , Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell; and his sisters. Beginning in 1841, Kell's letters cover the period of his service in the U.S. Navy. Topics include accounts of cruises; social activities aboard ship and on land; Commodore Matthew C. Perry; the funeral of Commodore Alexander James Dallas; the countryside in the vicinity of Cape Town, South Africa; descriptions of Montevideo and Uraguay; and references to President Carlos Antonio Lopez of Paraguay. After 1860, Kell's letters concern his duties with the Confederate Navy, including running the blockade on the C.S.S. SUMTER and the subsequent abandonment of the ship.

The collection also includes family papers of Nathan Campbell Munroe of Macon, Ga., his wife Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe, their daughter Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell, and other members of the Munroe, McIntosh, and Napier families. Topics include Georgia and national politics, Henry Clay and the Bank of the United States; railroad construction in Ga.; Christ Church Episcopal Parish in Macon; Montpelier Institute, Salem Female Academy, and other educational institutions; temperance; the duel between Thomas Butler King, U.S. Rep. from Georgia, and Charles Spalding; town-gown relations at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; riverboat transportation in Alabama; and the fight between the MONITOR and VIRGINIA as described by a Confederate naval officer.

File
Box 1

Assorted examples of artwork, advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a manipulated postcard with a bird removing a woman's wig, mocking her empty head. Includes a manipulated item which shows a chaste woman after and a party woman before marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers.

File
Box 1

One letter from November 13, 1840, recently added to the original collection, was written from John Paup, Spring Hill Plantation, Hempstead county, Arkansas, to Edward Brodnax Hicks, his partner in the plantation and resident of Brunswick County, Virginia. His thee-page letter refers to the economics of enslaved labor and buying enslaved persons; illness and the deaths of enslaved persons on the plantation; the cotton crop, insurance, and prices; and the survey of the border between Arkansas and the Republic of Texas.

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Box 1

Includes eleven bills of sale for enslaved people: • George, 22 or 23, and Sam, about 7: From Harrison and Francis Hicks of Giles County, TN, to Clement Comer Clay of Huntsville, AL, for "one negro man, slave, of black complexion, twenty two or three years old, named George, and also one negro boy, slave, of dark complexion, about seven years old named Sam." For $1250. 1818 March 12. • Isaac, about 12: From Edmund Hardy and Fortundaus (?) S. Cook to Comer Clay, for one enslaved boy, "of black complexion, about twelve years old, named Isaac." For $700. 1818 June 08 • Dick, about 26: From Arthur F. Hopkins to Clement Comer Clay, for "a certain negro man, named Dick, about twenty six years old". For $900. 1819 June 01 • Hampton, about 13: From J. Willis Pope (?) of Hunstville, AL, to Clement C. Clay, for "a certain negro boy, about thirteen years old, of a yellowish complexion, named Hampton" for $500. 1820 March 03 • Dedun, about 15: From Colin Bishop of Madison County, AL, to Clement C. Clay for "a negro boy, named Dedun, of dark complexion, about fifteen years old." For $500. 1821 November 25 • Davy: Letter from C. Bishop in Huntsville, AL, to his father Wyatt Bishop, agreeing to sell "his man Davy" to "Judge Clay" for $500; says to tell Davy he won't be far from his wife. 1822 January 01. Wyatt Bishop added note on reverse affirming receipt of payment from a C.C. Clay • Treasy/Crecy, 30 or 31, and her children Jacob, 13, Aimy, 7, and Joe, 7 or 8 months: From William F. Withers to Clement C. Clay for "Treasy alias Crecy" "a negro woman of black complexion" age 30-31; Jacob "yellow" 13; Aimy, 7; Joe, 7-8 months old. For $1200. 1822 August 07. • Jacob, about 22: From William Clay, Jr to Clement C. Clay, for one enslaved man "Jacob, about twenty two years of age, and of a dark complexion." 1823 July 15 • Minerva, 30, and her son Stephen, about 1 year, and Celia, 32, and her son Abraham, 1 year: From John Grayson, Madison County, AL, to Clement C. Clay. For $794. 1825 January 24. • Garland, 19: From John Taylor and Jesse Mundy of Amherst County, VA, to Clement C. Clay, for a 19 year old man Garland, "black complexion." For $600. 1825 October 08. • Nanny, 38, and her children Nancy, 7, Jackson, 4, and Sampson, 2: From William F. Withers of Lauderdale County, AL, to Clement C. Clay, for Nanny about 38; and her three children, Nancy age 7, Jackson age 4 and Sampson age 2. For $1000. 1826 September 02.

Letters between family members also reference individual enslaved persons, particularly multiple letters from William Clay to his son Clement Comer Clay in 1823-1824 regarding someone named Cynthia requesting C.C. Clay send Crecy to her, and how this travel might take place. Also includes a letter to C.C. Clay from a George Mas(son?), 1818 July 05, regarding the likelihood of purchasing enslaved people and where it can best be accomplished.

Also includes other letters from and to C.C. Clay, Sr., regarding court business; letters from William Clay regarding court business, running of plantations, and hiring of and other matters related to enslaved people; and other family and professional letters.

Folder
Online

This series consists of the official papers of the Port of Savannah, Georgia. It mainly contains ship clearance papers, cargo lists, and other documents that were a part of customs operations at the time. The documents date from 1754 to 1918, but the bulk of the items are from the early to mid-1800s.The manifests detail cargo entering and leaving the port. The Returns of Seamen papers list the crews shipping on the vessels. There are also import customs papers, which detail the customs due on each item. The Warehouse Withdrawal papers are permits to withdraw stored items from warhouses. Importers were allowed to place liquors and otherarticles in bonded warehouses until sold and then pay the duty as they withdrew them from the houses. Also included are lists of ship stores. The crew bonds are bonds binding vessel masters to return to port with the same crews with which they ship out, unless some be discharged in foreign ports with permission of the U.S. Consul in that port. There are also salary receipts of the various United States officials necessary to administer the work of the District of Savannah, and receipts and disbursement accounts of various sorts for the Port of Savannah, District of Savannah.

Of these papers, by far the largest part are manifests, either of a part of the cargo or of the whole cargo. The next largest groups include Returns of Seamen and Import Custom papers, and the other items are in much smaller proportions.

Several interesting observations arise from a study of this collection. One of these concerns the chief items of export from Savannah during the years of this set. The one item which composed the largest part of the export trade was up-land, or short-staple colton. Most of this went to Liverpool, and the return cargoes consisted largely of iron, steel, and manufactured goods.There was some Sea Island Cotton to export, but not nearly so much of it as of the upland. Two or three manifests, one in 1851, show that often ships came down from Boston and New England with cargoes of ice. The 1851 manifest shows a cargo of 124 tons of ice from Boston to Savannah. Most of the other cargoes from New England consisted mainly of food.Two other items occur often in the export manifests from Savannah. One is rice. This commodity formed a part of many cargoes, and quite a few times was the whole cargo. The other item was lumber, notably pine, in the form of boards and shingles. Much of this went to Liverpool, and much of it to Barbados, Havana, and other island ports, but, interestingly enough, a considerable quantity was sent North to New England ports. Much wine was imported from Madeira and then exported again to European ports, notably Liverpool. The main European ports receiving Savannah exports were Liverpool and Havre.

Items are arranged chronologically. There are several boxes of oversized documents also arranged chronologically.

Folder

The letters sub-series contains letters from Eleanor Butler, Sarah Ponsonby, and Sarah Ponsonby's family. The early letters are from the Fownes, Sir William and Lady Betty, who took in Sarah Ponsonby after her father died. After Sarah eloped with Eleanor Butler to Llangollen, she wrote to her cousin, Sarah Tighe. The majority of the letters are from Sarah Ponsonby to Mrs. Tighe, recounting daily life in Llangollen Vale.

File
Box 1

Assorted manuscript documents from the Massie family, arranged chronologically. Items include land surveys and hand drawn plot maps; correspondence from acquaintances and business contacts regarding crops and prices for tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, hemp, and other agriculture; planning and maps for planting fields, raising pigs, or other farming activities; some family correspondence about travel plans and different health of various family members. Includes some exchanges between Thomas Massie and his sons, William and Thomas Massie, as well as between the two brothers themselves; also includes small amount of correspondence to Sarah Massie. Includes a deed with a seal granting land to Thomas Massie from Governor Wilson Cary Nicholas in 1814. There are at least two references to sales of enslaved people. One is a note from William Garland to Massie, offering to send a courier with a "boy with him - if you think proper to take him at the six hundred dollars, Mr. Ware will deliver to you a Bill of Sale." A later bill of sale, issued in Lynchburg on 1815 August 5, notes that William Massie purchased "negro woman by the name of Lady and her son Bob" for six hundred seventy five dollars, from Davidson Bradford.

Folder

The bills and receipts contain many an "acct. sale" of tobacco, listing custom duties, charges, etc., in tobacco shipping. Estate inventories for Major Henry Hall, 1758, Thos. Lane, 1790-98, John Hall, 1795, and Mrs. Ruth Hall, 1803, include enslaved people and list possessions. Many mercantile and household accounts are included.

There are 7 volumes dated 1765-1902. Six are account books, two that belonged to John Hall and 4 to William Henry Hall. There is one volume that belonged to Harriet Hall.

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Box 1

Item is a bound manuscript journal with Hanye's diary from his travels with the Second British Embassy through China in late 1816. The journal begins when Hayne is with the embassy in Nanjing and ends with the embassy's arrival at the outskirts of Guangzhou. Many topics overlap with Volume 2. Hayne describes diplomatic matters, holidays and celebrations, the terrain and agricultural practices he witnesses, the physical appearances of different Chinese people (including women, soldiers, and other groups), and visiting different towns and cities along the Yangtze and other rivers between Peking (Beijing) and Canton (Guangzhou).

Hayne notes that some of his later entries (Dec. 31 1816-Jan. 1 1817) in this volume were lifted from Henry Ellis's journal. Ellis served as Third Member of the Embassy.

File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1, Oversize-folder 2

Assorted examples and samples of student awards, passes, and other ephemera distributed by schools and relating to children's or women's education. Items include: Troy Female Seminary certificates, signed by principal Emma Willard, 1823 and 1866; Troy Female Seminary diploma (oversize) for Louisa L. Brown, 1843; Miss Phebe Harcy, head of class, 1809 Aug. 20; Bradford Academy Female Department report card for Larissa Kimball, 1830s; Angeline W. Tottingham reward of merit for spelling, Pittsford, 1815; Mary Lucas teaching certificate, Middlesborough, 1849 June 12; Cincinnati Female Institute attendance ticket, 1840; Young Ladies Hall reward of merit to Mary P. Gramble, 1820 May 8; Miss Cranston's School reward of merit for Abby R. Manchester, 1816 Oct. 23; Attendance certificate for Merrimack County Institute for Martha H. Morse, Concord, 1852; Cheshire County Teachers' Institute, Keene, certificate for Mary Towne, 1848 Nov. 1; School Souvenir (Winterterm student list), District 18, Chesterfield Factory Village, N.H., 1869; Reward of merit for Peleg Walker, 1820s?; Reward of Merit certificate for Peleg Walker, 1820s?; Souvenir for New Rye School (includes photograph portrait of woman and student list), Epsom, N.H., 1910; Reward of merit for Lydia M. Watson, 1800s?; Rewards of merit (adhered to a board) for Mary Patrick and Sarah A. Lincoln, 1858; Wesleyan Female College library shelf location tickets (2); Miss Peck illuminated manuscript of appreciation, on vellum, Montreal, 1882; Reward of merit for Joseph Battles, by Phebe Battles, 1800s; Rewards of merit (2) for Sophronia Sturtevant, 1800s; Rewards of merit (9) for Mary Eastman for Henry Tappan School, 1846-1847; Miss Balch's Boarding School token of appreciation, 1822 Mar. 20; an oversize Reward of Merit for Miss Sally Boynton, East Windsor, 1829.

Folder

Although most of the Writings and Speeches Series consists of sermons, class assignments, or debates, there is some printed material included if the items contained handwritten notes. The Brotherhood folder contains sermons and other items relating to race relations, mostly within the context of the Methodist church and its relationship with African Americans. The Sermons and Notes folder include several eulogies and many prayers by Mr. Stott and other ministers, which cover a wide range of topics from the scriptures. Some of these sermons have been transliterated into Japanese.

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Box 1

Includes letters primarily written to Cornelius Bowman Campbell's parents, Rebecca (Whitcomb) and Hezekiah, although a few other individuals are addressees. Topics include visits and visitors; news of friends and family members; announcements of births, deaths, and weddings; and descriptions of balls held. There are also several letters discussing genealogical information for the Campbell and Whitcomb families. Includes an indenture for Hezekiah to learn the shoemaking trade, a small account book with unidentified owner (1843-1844), and part of a dressmaker's pattern. Two letters contain fabric samples for a dress and a bonnet.

File
Box 1

Item is a bound manuscript journal of about 69 pages with Hayne's diary along with some abstracts of ship logs and notes from the Embassy's return voyage following the Embassy's visit to China. Their ship, H.M.S. Alceste, was shipwrecked near Pulo Leat (also called Pongok Island in modern-day Malaysia) on 1817 Feb. 17. The journal has Hayne's diary from February 19-23, recording his trip with the Embassy in open boats from the wreck to Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Hayne records the difficult conditions for Lord Amherst, his suite, and the marines who rowed the boat with no shade, limited rations, and very little fresh water.

The journal contains an abstract of the Alceste's logbook, tracking its voyage from the "mouth of Pie-ho" to the "Napa-Kian Roads in the Islands of Loo-choo," waiting for the return of the Embassy. The log then records the day of the shipwreck and the ferrying of the crew to Batavia, and their journey onwards on the H.M.S. Cesar. The Cesar sailed around Capt St. Marys, to False Bay, and then "anchored at Noon off James' Valley and Town St. Helena" on 27 June 1817. The logbook ends on 15 August.

Another portion of the journal includes "copious extracts from and few additions to a journal kept by one of the Officers of the Alceste during his stay on the Desert Island of Pulo Leat near which the said ship was wrecked" (page 29 on). This excerpt records efforts to rescue men and supplies, the departure of the ambassador's suite (including Hayne), digging for water, the arrival of Malaysian pirates and fishermen, and the eventual rescue of the survivors and their ferrying to Batavia where they were reunited with the Embassy and continued onward to England.

Also in the journal are abstracts of the HMS Blanche's logbook from Plymouth to Lisbon, Madeira, and Rio de Janiero (1824).

File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Assorted printed examples of items related to women-owned business ventures, pay, and income, including: life insurance for women brochures; advertisements and catalogs issued by women for boarding houses, ladies' classes, or gardening or grocery supplies; help wanted advertisements from various businesses, seeking women to hire for work as inspectors and door-to-door sales agents; a pay bill for Champfleurie Garderners' and Labourers' including Thomas and Mrs. McIntyre (1865); tickets, handouts, and circulars for services offered by women; lace specimen samples from Mme. Gurney and Co; a pensioner card for a firefighter's widow. There are some oversize materials in this section, including: a 1922 diploma (43x56 cm) for Nina E. Wilcox, earning a Philosopher of Chiropractic from the National College of Chiropractirs; a broadside advertising a 1914 recital by Louise Thornton, reader and impersonator in Boston; a broadside for Mrs. E. C. Cowdrey, Milliner, in Falls Village, Conn.; a Daly's Theatre playbill from 1884 , printed on fabric, with advertisements for E. A. Morrison's Elegant Bonnets; and a broadside (34 x 42cm) advertising the 1839 sale of two adjoining tenements in Godalming, "Late the Property and Residence of the Widow Crouch, deceased; who for many years carrier on the Trade of a Cooper, and for which the Premises are well adapted."

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Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Examples of printed and manuscript materials relating to school finances, including teacher payment receipt, student tuition receipts, lists, and circulars for subscribers and support for different schools. Items include: Mrs. Jarley's Wax Works, for the Benefit of the Fund for the Liberal Education of Southern Girls programme, with annotations noting the names of the performers, 1872; Blue-School for Girls list of contributors, Chester, England, 1806; Auburn Female Seminary receipt for Eliza Wright, 1843 Jan. 28; Unknown school tuition receipt for Lucretia Chapman, 1821 Oct.; British and Foreign School Society, subscribers' book for a new training school for female teachers, 1842 Aug.; Gower's Walk School solicitation for Adult Instruction for Friendless and Unprovided Orphan Daughters of Clergymen, Military, and Naval Officers, 1820 Oct.; Philadelphia School of Design for Women tuition receipt for Ms. McAllister, 1865 Sept; Pay stub for Louise Shoept(?), Ellisburgh, 1870; Account book, including tuition payments, from Pioneer Valley, 1818-1829; Academy of Dancing receipt for Susan Ward from C. Labasse, 1826; Receipt for Massachusetts Teacher subscription, 1834; Receipt for tuition to Boston Cooking School, Simmons College, for 12 practice lessons, 1903; an oversize broadside "Catalogue of the Trustees and Students of Westfield Academy," Hartford, listing names and hometowns, 1829.

File
Box 1

Letterbook (15 pages) with copies of letters to Hayne's father from Lord Amherst, Reverend Edward Drew, J.W. Addington, and Reverend Guy Bryan discussing Hayne's appointment to the Second Embassy. Also contains copies of two copies of poems by William Burges Hayne, written following the death of his sister, Anne, and on the occasion of Christmas.

Folder

This portion of the collection relates to the work of General Jeremiah Slade, who was appointed Commissioner of Indian Affairs by the N.C. State Legislature in 1802. He was charged with the task of settling accounts with the Tuscarora, whose lands in Bertie County were to be leased to white farmers after the nation was removed to New York in the early nineteenth century. Slade's correspondence with Tuscarora chiefs in New York, particularly Chiefs Longboard and Saracusa, as well as his accounts of land leases, debts owed the Tuscarora, and various legal documents, including correspondence with the War Department, are all present in this series. Notable documents include a power of attorney from 1817 signed with seals by dozens of Tuscarora chiefs and warriors, as well as a few letters from the Tuscarora to Slade, acknowledging receipt of funds or other financial updates. Correspondence and contracts with the chiefs are signed with X and usually accompanied by a seal.

File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Bound booklets, certificates, and a fragment, used by students or teachers to practice penmanship or other topics. Items include: Ladies' Angular Hand blue booklet, undated; Geographical Exercises workbook for Ribston Hall (student Annie Jones), Sept. 1867; stitched booklet with penmanship and artwork by Ruth Satterly, 1800s; Penmanship and writing book, 1879; Penmanship book (student Elizabeth Louisa Christopher), 1830; Betsey Rich's Book, including penmanship and awards for spelling, Charleston, 1813; Lucy Towne copybook with sonnets and poems, Bedford, Mass., 1810s; fragment on School Penmanship by Margaret T. Lewis, 1820 June 12; an Epitaph on Mrs Mason by Naomi S Crooker, Bridgewater Academy, approximately 1800s.

File
Box 1

Examples of letters to and from students collected by Lisa Unger Baskin and relating to women's or girls' educational endeavors. Items include: Elizabeth H. Haight postcard of Vassar College, 1948 Aug. 26; Josslyn Flagg (Harrison, Maine) to Helen Rankin (East Denmark, Maine), 1913 Jan. 20; Maggie to Emma (Lima), regarding Milton School, 1864 Apr. 17; Mariah (Norridgwork) to friend, regarding Female Academy, 1849 Jun. 25; Lydia (Wellesley College) to Bertha, 1896 Apr. 18; Rebecah Tufts to James Cutler (her uncle, West Cambridge, Mass.), regarding Mrs. Gills Academy, 1811 May 22; Charles Gaylord(?) to C.C. Palmer, on Connecticut Literary Institution letterhead, 1865.

Folder

The Financial Papers series includes financial ledgers, account books, estate inventories, invoices, receipts, orders, lists, censuses and hiring account of enslaved persons, guardianship accounts, and other financial materials documenting the personal and business expenses of the Slades throughout the nineteenth century. Jeremiah Slade's accounts and financial papers have been separated into their own folders; the rest of the family's expenses and income is documented in the General Papers portion of the series. Specific accounts relating to the Conicho Fishery, Lenox Castle, and La Vega horse stud operation are also present in this series. All materials relating the the Tuscarora Nation's accounts with Jeremiah Slade are housed in the Tuscarora Series.

The financial papers of various Slade members also include their tax assessments, sales and evaluations of enslaved persons, estate sales, and personal expenses. Lists of enslaved persons tend to include names, ages, and valuations; other materials include occasional receipts for the sale of enslaved persons; bills for medical care; and account books or lists recording the hiring out of enslaved persons to other farms or plantations in Martin County.