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Bryant Bennett papers, 1767-1902, bulk 1840-1875

2 Linear Feet
Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

2 results in this collection

Alonzo G. Beardsley papers, 1787-1897

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,597 items (including 1 vol.)
This collection, largely the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley (founded c. 1868), also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded them, including John Porter, judge and state senator. During the 1850s the collection also includes the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. From 1840 to 1860 the papers concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States. The Civil War period papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy, U.S. Representative from Cayuga County, N.Y. include mention of appointments and promotions; aid to wounded soldiers; defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863, civilian morale, and the activities of Southern sympathizers. Post Civil War materials include the papers of the Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. Letters after 1870 include information about gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872, and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. There is also genealogical material for the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

This collection contains mostly the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley, also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded this firm. The early papers, beginning about 1800, center on John Porter, judge, state senator, and law partner of New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop. In about 1840 the Porter letters merge into those of William Allen, and for the next fifteen years the correspondence reflects Allen's legal practice and depicts life in Auburn, New York. The letters of Alonzo Beardsley begin about 1842, but it is not until 1855 that he and Allen become partners. During the 1850s the papers also include the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. For the most part, papers during 1840-1860 concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States.

For the Civil War period there are the 1860s papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy from Cayuga County, New York, a U.S. representative. Topics include appointments and promotions, aid to wounded soldiers, defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of the 5th, 111th, and 138th New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863 and its enforcement, and civilian morale and the activities of Southern sympathizers, especially in 1863. Pomeroy's correspondence also concerns patronage, party organization and rivalry, and service to constituents. From 1865 to 1870 there is much family correspondence, particularly letters to Nellie Bisby of Attica, New York. Between 1865 and 1868 many papers appear from Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. After 1870 letters of Alonzo Beardsley relate to miscellaneous subjects, such as gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872; the Oswego Starch Company; and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. Numerous legal papers and documents reflect all phases of the Osborne firm's work. There is a large amount of related printed matter. The collection also included genealogical material on the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

2 results in this collection

Armistead Burt papers, 1759-1933

3.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 5,675 items
Armistead Burt (1802-1883) was a planter, lawyer, and U.S. Representative from Abbeville, S.C. Collection contains political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress. The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection includes the political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress.

The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

3 results in this collection

John J. Crittenden papers, 1786-1932

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,055 items, 3 vols.
This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrapbooks, a letter book, and speeches related to John J. Crittenden's service as a Kentucky legislator and governor, as a member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky and the nation during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861. Other papers pertain to the private life of the family, and to the publication of "The Life of John J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). The collection also includes unpublished papers from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrap books, a letter book, and speeches relating to John J. Crittenden's service as Kentucky legislator and Governor, as member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861.

In addition to the political related materials are papers pertaining to the private life of the family and the publication of "The Life of John. J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). Also included are unpublished letters from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

2 results in this collection

Harden family papers, 1772-1940

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 2,531 items including 27 volumes.
Collection includes correspondence, diaries, account books, daybooks, and legal and other papers, of Edward Harden, planter, lawyer, and politician, of Athens, Ga.; of his son, Edward Randolph Harden, lawyer and politician; and of other members of their family. The material concerns U.S. and Georgia politics, Cherokee Indian affairs (1840s), military recruitment in the Civil War, the 44th Georgia Infantry, military operations in the Confederacy, Reconstruction and economic conditions, the Republican Party in the south, social life and customs, genealogy, and other matters. Also includes a diary kept by Evelyn Harden Jackson during the last months of the war referring to the general alarm preceding Sherman's activities in Georgia.

This collection contains political, family, and business papers of Edward Harden (1784-1849), planter and politician; of his second wife, Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden (1794-1874); of their son, Edward Randolph Harden (1815-1884), telegraph operator and lawyer; of their daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden (1811-1887); and of Edward Randolph Harden's children.

Papers of Edward Harden include a diary with information concerning the operation of 'Silk Hope,' a rice plantation near Savannah, with inventory of equipment and work done during 1827; lists of slaves; courtship letters to Mary Ann Elizabeth Randolph; letters to his wife about farm work to be done in his absence; letters of Peter Randolph, father-in-law of Harden; letters to his wife while in the Georgia legislature in 1825; and letters and papers pertaining to his duties as counsel for the Cherokee Indians, U.S. marshal in Georgia, 1843, and collector of the port of Savannah, 1844. Letters in 1846-1847, from Washington, D.C., while Harden served as Indian Commissioner, concern Washington social life and customs, office seekers, bureaucracy, James K. Polk and Sarah (Childress) Polk, and Dolly (Payne) Todd Madison. Also included are letters from Howell Cobb, concerning his efforts to obtain political offices for Harden; legal papers consisting chiefly of depositions, letters, and notes pertaining to Harden's law practice; letters relative to the course of study and tuition fees of Harden's daughter, Mary, while at the Latouche School in Savannah; letters connected with the activities of the Georgia Historical Society; and information regarding Thomas Spalding of Sapelo Island. Other papers consist of an account by Harden of his appointment to and removal from the collectorship of the port of Savannah; receipts; a few account books and diaries; deeds, letters of dismissal, and other papers pertaining to the Mars Hill Baptist Church; and references to various residents of Athens, Georgia, where Harden conducted a law school after 1830.

Letters of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden are to her husband; to her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden, while the latter attended school in Savannah; and to her son, Edward Randolph Harden, while he attended the University of Georgia, Athens, 1829-1830. Papers, 1849-1860, chiefly concern her efforts to get land warrants for her husband's services in the War of 1812, and papers, 1865-1874, deal with her attempts to obtain a pension on the same grounds.

Letters of Edward Randolph Harden from 1854 to 1856 describe his duties as judge of the first court in the territory of Nebraska and conditions there. Letters, 1859-ca. 1870, of Edward Randolph Harden, of his daughter Anna, and of other children of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden, reflect the poverty of the family and conditions of the time. Civil War letters of Edward Randolph Harden describe the activities of the army while he served as an officer of the Georgia state troops, civilian life, and commodity prices. Postwar letters concern his removal from Rome to Cuthbert and later to Quitman, all in Georgia; and his desultory practice of law supplemented by storekeeping and, in 1870, by work as a census enumerator.

There are also letters of the related Jackson family, including correspondence between Asbury Hull Jackson and his family describing his service in the 44th Georgia Regiment, the fighting around Richmond in 1862, and the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania. Clippings concern the formation of the 3rd, 4th, 6th, 10th, and 16th Georgia Regiments in the early days of the war.

Among the letters to Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden is a proposal of marriage from John Howard Payne, author of "Home Sweet Home!" whom she met when he visited Georgia in the interest of the Cherokee Indians. According to tradition her father refused to allow the match. The collection also contains other proposals, all of which she refused; and her diary, 1853-1883.

Throughout the collection are frequent letters from Henrietta Jane (Harden) -Wayne, daughter of Edward Harden by his first marriage and wife of James Moore Wayne's nephew. Her letters give detailed accounts of life in Savannah and the people there, including mention of James Moore Wayne (1790-1867).

Among the correspondents are John Macpherson Berrien, Sr., Benjamin Harris Brewster, Joseph Emerson Brown, Howell Cobb, William Crosby Dawson, Hugh Anderson Haralson, Benjamin Harvey Hill, Amos Kendall, John Henry Lumpkin, John Howard Payne, Richard Rush, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, Thomas Spalding, Wil]iam Henry Stiles, Israel Keech Tefft, George Michael Troup, James Moore Wayne, and Lewis Williams.

2 results in this collection

Graham family papers, 1773-1885

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1113 items including 11 vols.
Collection contains correspondence, account books, records, sermons, and other papers (chiefly, 1800-1880) of the Graham family of Virginia. Includes letters of the Rev. William Graham, Presbyterian minister and one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University); material relating to the patent on Dr. William A. Graham's fire extinguisher; records (1774-1803) of tuition charges and books bought by Washington College students; and correspondence between Edward Graham and Edmund Ruffin discussing scientific experiments.

This collection holds records of three generations of a family of Scots-Irish Presbyterians. Correspondence of Reverend William Graham (1746-1799), who moved from Pennsylvania to Lexington, Virginia, about 1776 and was one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University) refers largely to his investment in land on the Ohio River near Marietta after 1796, and his lawsuit claiming he had been cheated.

The bulk of the collection comprises the correspondence of William's brother, Edward Graham, a lawyer and professor at Washington College. There are many letters between Edward's wife, Margaret (Alexander) Graham, and her children. Represented also are William A., Archibald A., Nancy, Elizabeth, and Edward, Jr. Included is correspondence of Edward Graham with Edmund Ruffin concerning scientific experimentation and many letters concerning the patent application of William A. Graham, an inventor, for his fire extinguisher.

There is also correspondence of Dr. John Graham and Beverly Tucker Lacy, grandsons of Edward Graham. Account books of Archibald Graham of Lexington, 1840-1880, 7 vols., include one volume (6 pp.) on the administration of Edward Graham's estate and the guardianship of Martha and Elizabeth Lyle. Account books, 2 vols., of Edward, Sr., contain judgments and court actions, 1801-1811, and accounts of Washington College, Lexington, 1831-1836. A commonplace book, 1820, may relate to Edward Graham. There is a genealogy of the Alexander and Graham families by John A. Graham.

2 results in this collection

Fowler family papers, 1779-1870

4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume
Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

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Italian public health documents declaring ships and goods to be disease-free, 1630-1818

14 items — 2 boxes
Fourteen single-sheet printed documents issued by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargoes, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning bubonic plague. Cities include Venice, Brindisi, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, and Trieste. Almost all bear small woodcuts chiefly of patron saints and coats of arms, and official seals and stamps. Handwritten annotations include dates, itineraries, and, in the case of maritime shipping, the names of ships and owners. Some note the type of cargo and a few list the names of crew members, with age, stature, and other details. Most are in Italian but several also include some Latin. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Fourteen single-sheet printed documents, issued from 1630 to 1818 by officials in northern Italian ports or inland trade centers, declaring that ships, cargo, and crews have been inspected and are free of contagion, chiefly meaning plague. Most are in Italian, but several also include some Latin.

Nine of these bills of health originated in Venice, with others from Brindisi, Guastalla, Milano, Piacenza, Ravenna, Reggio, San Giovanni in Persiceto, Segna, San Martino, and Trieste. They range in size from 6 x 8 1/4 to 12 x 16 1/2 inches. Almost all bear one or more small woodcuts such as patron saints and coats of arms; blindstamps and seals are also often present.

Typical handwritten content on the front and sometimes back of the sheet gives the name of the ship's owner and his ship, the ship's itinerary, number of containers ("Colli"), and type of cargo. A few of the documents also include lists of crew members, with names, ages, and stature. A few terms of interest that appear include "lazzeretto," indicating a place of quarantine, and "epizootico," a medical term for a non-human epidemic or agent. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

1 result in this collection

Japanese medical manuscript notebooks, 1810-1849 and undated

3.5 Linear Feet — 63 Items
The sixty-three manuscript volumes in this collection range from 10 to 154 pages, and were created in Japan from about 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students. The notebooks usually take one of two forms: transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations, and bodies of knowledge written up as manuals by well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū and Takenaka Bunpō. Topics covered include herbal medicines and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eyes and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly for cancers, tumors, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; treatment of wounds; suturing; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. Some notebooks contain black-and-white and color hand-drawn illustrations - many full-page - of surgeries, close-ups of suturing, bandages and wrappings, osteopathic manipulations, and medicinal plants. In most cases, the author or copyist recorded details such the place and time of the lecture and the name of the medical school. There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians, and to earlier dates for the work being copied - these range from 1677 to 1796. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The sixty-three Japanese manuscript volumes in this collection were created from 1810 to 1849, chiefly by medical students, and document Japanese medical training and practice during the time also known as the Edo period, and the conjoining of Chinese-inspired materia medica with current Western medical practices introduced primarily by the Dutch. The notebooks range in length from 10 to 154 pages, and typically take the form of transcriptions of lectures and demonstrations; in many cases the writer recorded the place and time of the demonstration and the name of the medical school. There are also volumes which represent the collected knowledge of well-known Japanese physicians of the time, especially Hanaoka Seishū but also Takenaka Bunsuke (Nanpō). There are references in the notes to at least a dozen other contemporary or earlier physicians.

The copyists and note-takers signed their names at the end of the volumes; the name Yamanaka Shūsai Hideyuki appears most frequently; also appearing frequently are the names of editors and proofreaders, and corrections and later annotations in red ink are found in a number of the manuscripts. In addition to the contemporary dates, there are many references to the earlier manuscript versions being copied: these dates range from 1677 to 1796.

The topics covered by the volumes range widely, and include: herbal medicine and other prescriptions; treatments for diseases of the eye and other parts of the head; surgery, particularly on cancers, swellings, and fistulas; breast cancer; smallpox; scurvy; osteopathy; the treatment of wounds; hematology; gynecology and obstetrics; and pediatric medicine. There are several volumes containing illustrative drawings, some hand-colored and others are black-and-white; they include detailed images of surgical procedures and close-ups of suturing; examples of bandages and wrappings; osteopathic manipulations; and medicinal plants.

One volume in particular stands out above the rest, consisting of over ninety carefully drawn, full-page, hand-coloured illustrations, nine of which are double-page, displaying patients with dislocated limbs, skin cancer, or requiring sophisticated bandages, as well as illustrations of internal organs and one page with surgical instruments. One of the illustrations is a realistic portrait of Hanaoka Seishū, with a beard and spectacles (probably imported from Holland), showing him excising a cyst from a patient. At the end of the volume, two different explanatory texts in Kanbun (classical Chinese read in the Japanese manner) provide comments in the volume about the diseases and their treatment.

Each codex in the collection is composed of leaves of rice paper, with hand-sewn bindings and soft covers, and calligraphy in black and red ink. Some of the texts are written in Shino Japanese (Chinese reading style) using all Kanji characters, while other texts are in Shino Japanese written in 19th-century characters - the language of the educated class in Japan. At least one volume (Vol. 21) contains Dutch words for medicinal compounds. The script reads back to front; the script is laid out in vertical columns that are read from right to left across the page. In some cases, pages or sections and covers are missing, and some volumes bear traces of insect damage, but for the most part, the volumes are remarkably well-preserved.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. In the case of missing titles, a title was supplied from content by library staff. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters, and some older calendar dates are also given in modern Western dates. Illegible or untranslatable text is indicated by blank lines.

Volumes are arranged in this collection guide in two series: sets of notebooks, and single volumes. The items in the sets are linked by common themes or bodies of knowledge, and range from two to eleven volumes. They include collections of works by one physician, as well as sets of manuals and lecture notes on topics such as obstetrics and gynecology, metallurgy, opthalmology, pox and skin diseases, and others. Single volumes are housed after the sets.

All titles are taken when possible from the covers or from section headings; approximate translations in English provided by library staff and are in brackets. Titles and significant names are also given in Japanese characters.

Each volume has been assigned a unique institutional identifier.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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James Iredell, Sr. and James Iredell, Jr. papers, 1724-1890 and undated

9.5 Linear Feet
James Iredell Sr. was a statesman and one of the first justices of the Supreme Court of the United States serving from 1790 to 1799. James Iredell Jr. was the governor of North Carolina (1827-1828) as well as a U.S. Senator from North Carolina (1828-1831). Topics in this collection include revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina, North Carolina's ratification of the U.S. constitution, national politics, the legal and political careers of both James Iredell Jr. and Sr., correspondence from family and friends in England and Ireland, and other family affairs.

The papers of the elder Iredell concern colonial life and Revolutionary sentiment in North Carolina; the Revolution and North Carolina's ratification of the Constitution; and North Carolina and national politics (1780s and 1790s); and include early letters from friends and relatives in England and Ireland, including the Macartney family. Most of the correspondence between 1799 and the War of 1812 concerns family and business matters. Papers of James Iredell, Jr., pertain mostly to his legal career. Other topics include his student activities at Yale, national and North Carolina politics, naval appointments, patronage matters, the nullification crisis, and family affairs. Correspondents in the collection include John Branch, John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay, Samuel Chase, William R. Davie, Oliver Ellsworth, Robert Y. Hayne, Joseph Hewes, William Hooper, John Jay, Charles Lee, Henry Lee, H. E. McCulloh, John Marshall, A. Nielson, William Paterson, Timothy Pickering, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., Zachary Taylor, and John Tyler.

2 results in this collection

Abbot Family papers, 1733-1999 and undated, bulk 1860-1910

19 Linear Feet — 10 boxes
The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

2 results in this collection
Folder

Insurance policies, deeds of trust, and land plats pertaining to Bellevue property and W.R. Abbot's property elsewhere in Virginia and in Kansas City; legal papers of Ellen Abbot's pre-Civil War residence in Georgetown; records of W.R. Abbot's partnership with J.P. Holcombe and his assumption of Bellevue subsequent to Holcombe's death; affidavits of family members recording receipt of inheritance; and original deeds of trust recording land grants made in Virginia to John B. Minor from Sir Thomas Carr of Topping Castle.

Charles L. Abernethy Sr. papers, 1713-1972, bulk 1907-1959

85 Linear Feet — 160 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 60,855 items
Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. (1872-1955) was a Democratic Congressman representing eastern North Carolina from 1922-1935. His professional papers consist chiefly of correspondence and records from his law practice and legal cases, with smaller amounts of writings and speeches, financial papers, printed materials, diaries, and some personal papers, including early deeds. There is also a large group of photographs, photo albums, and clippings scrapbooks chiefly documenting Abernethy's political career. One album from 1907 contains postcards of Beaufort, N.C.; another contains photographs of a three-month Congressional trip to Alaska, 1923, and includes images of President and Mrs. Harding and a diary transcript of the trip. Other items include some papers of his son, Charles Laban Abernethy, Jr., also a lawyer, and a volume of his poetry.

The collection principally comprises a large series of correspondence and legal records accumulated by North Carolina lawyer and politician Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. during his tenure as U.S. Congressman. There are papers relating to the senior Abernethy's law practice and business dealings in Beaufort and New Bern, N.C. (including legal papers concerning land development in Carteret County, Cape Lookout, and Horse Island maintained by both father and son).

Other materials include deeds and other early papers, political speeches, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks of Abernethy's political career, a diary, and the Abernethy coat-of-arms. There are also papers assembled by Abernethy's son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., a lawyer in his father's firm, and a volume of his poetry.

A lare group of photographs and albums includes a photograph album containing snapshots the elder Abernethy took during a congressional trip to Alaska for three months of 1923 (including photographs of President and Mrs. Harding), as well as a typescript of his diary from the trip; and an album containing postcards of Beaufort, N.C, in 1907, featuring a celebration of either the 200th anniversary of the town's founding or the opening of passenger and rail service to the town (or both).

2 results in this collection

John Bonsack papers, 1786-1929

2 Linear Feet — 4 Boxes, 2,034 items.
Collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are letters from family members in schools in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York. Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Va., 1862, and at Bonsack, Va., during the 1880s. There are also references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and politician in and around Roanoke, Va.; accounts of Jacob Bonsack, a merchant in Good Intent, Va., and accounts of Harry E. Plaine, a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Neb., during the 1880s. About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to the two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859).

This collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are school and college letters from Emory and Henry College, Virginia, 1851, Calvert College, New Windsor, Maryland, 1851-1852, State Normal School, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1881, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia, 1882, and Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1883.

Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Virginia, 1862, and at Bonsack, Virginia, during the 1880s, references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and a politician in and around Roanoke, Virginia, accounts of Jacob Bonsack (1819-1889), as a merchant in Good Intent, Virginia; and accounts of Harry E. Plaine as a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Nebraska, during the 1880s.

About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859). Included in these are several religious tracts, memorandum books, study notes, and short diaries. The diaries contain accounts of a trip in 1856 from Randolph County, Virginia, to Madison, Wisconsin, travels in the vicinity of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and a record kept by D. H. Plaine in 1857.

2 results in this collection

Amy Morris Bradley papers, 1806-1921, bulk 1841-1921

3 Linear Feet
Amy Morris Bradley was a nurse and agent of the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War as well as an educator in Maine, 1840s-1850s, and Wilmington, N.C., 1865-1890s. Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

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Folder

Series contains letters to and from Amy Morris Bradley, related ephemera, notes and receipts, third-party correspondence about Bradley, and one folder of newspaper clippings. The majority of material relates to Bradley's time in Costa Rica, her work as a field nurse and for the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, and her time as an educator in Wilmington, N.C.

In addition to family letters, there are several letters with soldiers and their relatives thanking her for her service. Included is a petition from 1865 signed by 320 soldiers recommended to the Secretary of War that Bradley be commissioned to major in the U.S. Army for her service. Clippings relate primarily to the Tileston Normal School, although some are also about Mary Hemenway, a benefactress of Tileston. Later correspondence comes from parents of students in Wilmington and from former students, many of whom maintained a close friendship with Bradley over many years. Ephemera includes programs of events at Tileston.

Caleb Budlong physician's account books, 1817-1843, 1915 and undated

4 Linear Feet — 86 items
Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

2 results in this collection

Frederick Fraser papers, 1700-1911 and undated

2 Linear Feet
The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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File
Box 1

Business correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, including commercial problems during the War of 1812, and particularly in Charleston, South Carolina. Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. Also includes some personal correspondence, primarily with the individuals John Dawson, Ladson, H. Cunningham, and B. W. Martin, and an anonymous individual identitified only as I.H.L.

Funkhouser family papers, 1786-1941, bulk 1836-1908

6 Linear Feet
The Funkhouser family lived in Virginia with members moving West with the expansion of the Unites States. Other Funkhouser descendants moved into Ohio, Maryland and New Jersey. The collection contains correspondence, diary and other papers, chiefly 1836-1908, of the Funkhouser family of Mount Jackson, Va. including Andrew Funkhouser. Topics discussed include conditions in the West, opposition to slavery, and economic conditions in the U.S. after 1837; Civil War letters discuss camp life of Union and Confederate soldiers and the state of the South. Post-war letters are mainly personal. Includes a diary (1863) kept by G. H. Snapp, a minister of the United Brethren in Christ Church, telling of religious life among soldiers and civilians.

The collection contains family letters and business papers of the Funkhouser family, and, after 1910, of the Miller family. Most of the papers prior to 1830 are deeds for land in Philadelphia and Virginia. There are two land patents, one signed by Edmund Randolph, governor of Virginia, to Peter Hoshaur, 1788, and one signed by Joseph Johnson, governor of Virginia, to Andrew Funkhouser, 1851.

From the 1830s there are numerous letters from relatives in Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Indiana, and Wisconsin describing the move westward, religion, railroads, economic conditions, land speculation, opposition to slavery, commerce, Indians, army forts, legal affairs, stock raising, farming, sickness and health, and the Mormon problem in Missouri. Many of these letters are from Funkhouser's son-in-law, John Kerr, a lawyer and speculator. There are also several wills and estate papers.

Civil War letters include items from R. H. Simpson with directions for his home farm and statements about Walker's and Archer's brigades on Funkhouser's land and the amount of wood they used. There is an account book mentioning Confederate Army purchases; papers relating to a claim against the United States for farm buildings, equipment and products burned or seized by order of General Sheridan; and tax in kind estimates and receipts. A diary of Rev. G. H. Snapp of the United Brethren in Christ Church, a brother-in-law of Andrew's son, Casper, discusses his circuit, revivals, conferences, and chaplains in the army; there are also many letters to Snapp down to 1900.

Other letters are from commission merchants in Winchester, Baltimore, Alexandria, and Washington both before and after the Civil War; price current bulletins from Washington, 1890s; and other business letters. Most of the letters after 1880 are from the children of Casper Funkhouser. There is a related genealogical and biographical sketch. These letters describe Shenandoah Seminary, Dayton, Virginia, 1880-1882; Bonebrake Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio; teaching at various places in Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey in the 1880s and 1890s; and family affairs. Papers concerning the family of Edward J. Miller include tax receipts, wheat allotment applications, and condolences on Miller's death.

Printed materials with the collection relate to teaching, insurance, an 1899 civil service examination, and standing orders for a mental hospital. Other business papers include tax receipts for Andrew Funkhouser, 1830-1886; tax receipts on Missouri land, 1850-1880; notes, receipts, and bills. Numerous letters refer to the temperance movement in the United Brethren Church and to Andrew Funkhouser's work as a trustee. In the 1880s there are business papers of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly.

Bound volumes include the roll of shareholders and minutes of the meetings of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly, daybooks, 1847-1861, and a ledger, 1836-1843, of Andrew Funkhouser, a list of the personal property of Jacob R. Funkhouser, 1856, and daybooks of John Bauserman, a merchant of Hawkinstown, Shenandoah County, Virginia.

2 results in this collection

American slavery documents collection, 1757-1924 and undated

Online
2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Collection of manuscript items relating to American slavery assembled over a number of decades by the staff of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Collection contains items documenting the sales, escapes, and emancipations of enslaved people from colonial times through the Civil War, and to a lesser extent, materials relating to slavery in the United States dating from the post-emancipation period.

The collection brings to light details of the lives and deaths of enslaved and free Africans and African Americans in the southern United States, primarily in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, but also in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. There are also six albumen studio portrait photographs, mounted on card stock, dating from the second half of the 19th century, along with a copper token from the American Colonization Society, dated 1833.

Items have been foldered individually, with the inventory reflecting their titles, geographic origin, and date (if known).

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Dilmus J. Appleberry papers, 1810-1927, bulk 1850-1896

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1,750 items
Business, family, and legal correspondence, accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, land surveys, and other papers. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House, Va., Altantic and Virginia Fertilizing Co. of Richmond, Va., and Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

This collection contains business, family, and legal correspondence of plantation owner Dilmus Appleberry. It is largely composed of accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, and land surveys. Letters, some of a business nature, comprise about five percent of the collection. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House; Atlantic and Virginia Fertilizing Company of Richmond, Virginia; and Dilmus Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

1 result in this collection

Dismal Swamp Land Company records, bulk circa 1660s-1860s, 1810-1879

4 Linear Feet
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

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