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Collection
Letter (ALS) informs recipient that Apostoli will send a recent published thesis on his electrical treatment of fibromata.
Collection
ALS. Writes regarding the editing of a publication on Parkinson's disease.
Collection
Manuscript pages from a proposed, but never published second and revised edition of North's book, "A treatise on a malignant epidemic, commonly called spotted fever". Available are photographs of the title page of North's own copy of the book, which bears marginal notes in his hand. Reader is referred to the article by Pleadwell, "A new view of Elisha North ... ", in Annals of medical history, 6 (1924). The manuscript and North's copy form the basis of this essay.
Collection

Marion T. Plyler papers, circa 1832-1950 1 Linear Foot — 750 Items

Marion Timothy Plyler was born in Iredell County, N.C., near Statesville in 1867. He graduated from Trinity College in 1892 with a B. A. degree and played on the school's first football team. He earned his M. A. degree at Trinity in 1897 and received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Duke University in 1937. Additionally, Dr. Plyler received the M. A. degree and the D. D. degree from the University of North Carolina in 1905 and 1931, respectively. Dr. Plyler was ordained as a minister in the Methodist Church in 1892. Contains typescripts, correspondence, and printed matter, with the bulk of the material consisting of the manuscript of Dr. Plyler's unpublished biography of William Preston Few, written in 1948-1949, as well as copies of Few's writings and addresses. The collection ranges in date from 1832-1950.

Contains typescripts, correspondence, and printed matter, with the bulk of the material consisting of the manuscript of Dr. Plyler's unpublished biography of William Preston Few, written in 1948-1949, as well as copies of Few's writings and addresses. There are several folders of related printed matter, research notes, and articles, including typescripts annotated by Dr. Few and Dean Alice Baldwin. Correspondence concerns the North Carolina Pastors' School, Methodist Conference matters, and the Few biography. The collection also includes some genealogical notes and other typescripts by Dr. Plyler. The collection ranges in date from 1832-1950.

Collection
Online
In the mid nineteenth century, publishers printed the lyrics to popular songs, without their tunes, on small sheets called song sheets, handbills, or broadsides. These sheets were often illustrated with a woodcut scene or portrait and sold at gathering places where people sang together. Duke's collection of American song sheets includes 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from "The Star Spangled Banner" to "Pop Goes the Weasel," forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Duke's collection of American song sheets includes around 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from The Star Spangled Banner to Pop Goes the Weasel, forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Note that some song sheets are housed in the Confederate Pamphlet collection and the Broadsides collection.

Collection

John Foot Scrapbook, circa 1810s-1870s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

John Foot, Esq., presumably of Westminster, England. Victorian scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Victorian era scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Collection

Manuscript Sheet Music collection, circa 1800s-1900s 0.3 Linear Feet — 1 oversize folder; 20 piece

Collection includes 20 pieces of collected manuscript sheet music, circa 1830s-1900s. The scores, which cover multiple genres, were most likely copied by hand from other sources.
Collection
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection
Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

Collection

Harold Jantz Graphic Art collection, circa 1400s-1800s 5 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items

Professor of German literature at Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, and Duke Universities. Collector of German baroque literature and German Americana. A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

This material remains unprocessed and undescribed. Prints have been loosely sorted by American, European, or Asian origin and are foldered accordingly.

Collection
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

Collection
Online
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

Collection
Printed burial announcement, Amsterdam, 1775, of the death and remarkable old age of Hermanus van Kleef; silhouette portrait of cut-out colored papers and a lock of human hair, with holograph caption; and autograph translation of both announcement and caption. Collage portrait supposedly of and by van Kleef a few years before his death at the age of 101. English translation by a Dr. Luckhardt, sometime around 1950.
Collection
3 letters (ALS), including a letter of reference, dated May 27, 1839, Edinburgh, for Dr. William Pirrie.
Collection

Matthew Thomson Letter, 1835 August 24 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Mathew Thompson, a farmer in Fleming County, Kentucky with relatives in Greenville, Virginia. Letter from Matthew Thomson in Fleming County, Kentucky, dated August 24, 1835, to a relative John S. Thomson in Greenville, Virginia. Thomson relays news of his Aunt Rebecca's death and the health of other family members, comments on his crops and prices, and advises young men to marry at age 21 and have male children immediately to assist with farm work.

Letter from Matthew Thomson in Fleming County, Kentucky, dated August 24, 1835, to a relative John S. Thomson in Greenville, Virginia. Thomson relays news of his Aunt Rebecca's death and the health of other family members, comments on his wheat crop and prices, and advises young men to marry at age 21 and have male children immediately to assist with farm work.

Collection

Nora Campbell Chaffin papers, 1835-1981 0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Nora Chaffin was on the history faculty at Duke University from 1935-1944. Her collection contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Collection
Richard Harvey Wright (1894-1980) was a businessman of Durham, N.C., and founder of Wright Machinery Company. Wright Machinery merged with Sperry Rand Corporation on 29 March 1957. Collection dates from 1870-1980 and comprises correspondence, 1870-1941; legal papers; printed matter; business papers; financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and letterpress books for business correspondence. Later additions comprise business correspondence; financial ledgers and statements; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Collection (232,267 items; dated 1870-1980) comprises extensive files of correspondence dating from 1873-1941; legal papers; printed matter; many business and financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and many letterpress books for business correspondence.

Additions (4-27-79) (2002-086) comprise business correspondence; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents (2101 items, dated 1941-1967) of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Addition (2005-108) (65 items, 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1877-1905) comprises one letter book; one financial ledger; a judgment appeal; general contractor reports and statements; rental statements; and checks.

Two accessions (97-087 and 97-105) containing chiefly print materials from Wright Machinery Company, including company newsletters, were separated from the Wright Papers and placed in the Wright Machinery Company Records collection.

Addition (2021-0025. 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1835-1878) contains account and day books from Tally Ho and Durham, North Carolina. There is also a volume of "The Methodist Protestant" newspaper and "Gram's unrivaled family atlas of the world".

Collection

Spanish Vice-Consulate records, 1835-1935 4 Linear Feet — 979 Items

Vice-Consulate of Spain based in Savannah, Ga. Largely communications directed to the Spanish Vice-Consulate in Savannah, Ga., by the Madrid government, by Spanish ministers, consuls, and vice-consuls in the U.S., and by governing officials in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The central theme is Spain's constant preoccupation that American or Cuban expeditions, operating from the U.S., would wrest the island from the Spanish crown. Includes references to political developments within Spain, Spain's commercial relations with her West Indian possessions and with the U.S., and Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru (1865-1866); and routine records relating to shipping, customs service, and commerce.

Largely communications directed to the Spanish Vice-Consulate in Savannah, Ga., by the Madrid government, by Spanish ministers, consuls, and vice-consuls in the U.S., and by governing officials in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The central theme is Spain's constant preoccupation that American or Cuban expeditions, operating from the U.S., would wrest the island from the Spanish crown. Includes references to political developments within Spain, Spain's commercial relations with her West Indian possessions and with the U.S., and Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru (1865-1866); and routine records relating to shipping, customs service, and commerce.

Collection
Mary Calvert Stribling (1870-1951) was a civic leader, of Martinsburg, West Virginia. Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area. Includes scattered business and family papers.

Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area.

Other papers include: A diploma of Mary Brown Riddle from Woodburn Female Seminary in Morgantown, W. Va. (March 28, 1860); agreement of 1874 between John S. McClellan and M. Nascimento of Philadelphia and C. Strlbling of Baltimore for forming a partnership under the firm name of J.S. McClellan and Co. to manufacture silk and cassimere hats; letters from McClellan to Strlbling about their business; Indenture of 1875 severing Strlbling's relationship with the firm; letters, and will of C. K., Strlbling, who between 1845 and 1847 commanded the U. S. Receiving ship Pennsylvania; catalogue of Prince Edward Academy, Worsham, Va., for 1879; business papers of Mrs. Ann E. Strlbling, wife of Cornelius Strlbling, deceased; reports by Ann E. Strlbling, guardian of her children Chas. R., James M., Mary C, and Sue Brown Strlbling, to the orphans' court in Baltimore and in Martinsburg on the expenditures which she had made for her children and In keeping of their property; letters of Chas. R. While at Hampden Sidney College: business papers of Joseph A. Wishard, proprietor of a hotel in Smithsburg. Md.; programs of a music and a travel club in Martinsburg; sermon notes; broadside by Carrie Chapman Catt entitled "Mrs. Catt on League of Nations and the Presidential Election"; pamphlet published by the Pro-League Independents; papers relating to the dismissal of Gutzon Borglum as the sculptor of the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial and to attempts to raise funds for the continuation of the work on that monument by Augustus Lukeman.; materials relating to Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pa., and to Mary Baldwin College, of which Mary C. Strlbling was an alumna. Bulletin of the Swarthmore Chautauqua, Swarthmore, Pa.; and programs of services at the Presbyterian Church in Martinsburg; map of Winchester Presbytery.

Collection

Abel Beach Nichols papers, 1835-1850 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 Items

Abel Beach Nichols (1796/7-1868) was a merchant, farmer, slave owner and dealer from Bedford County, Virginia. The collection includes a small account book A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836, followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as A list of bonds bought in Alabama ... and Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the writer's intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

The collection includes a small account book that A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, "A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836," followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as "A list of bonds bought in Alabama ..." and "Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold" are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the "writer's" intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

Collection
Rev. William Young, was an itinerant Methodist preacher. Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848.

Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848. Each sermon is identified by a date and place and is signed by Young. They approximately follow the chronology of Young's circuit appointments. The text is followed by an index in which there is a brief thematic description of each sermon, along with the Bible verse upon which it is based.

Collection
Documents, signed, relating to Thomas Hughes, his maternal grandmother, Joyce Morgan, his mother, Anne Hughes Samuel, her second husband, William Samuel, and the disposal of family property and goods. There is also a page of printed material, Miscellaneous articles sold by Thomas Hughes, dispensing chemist.
Collection
Holograph receipts, signed. Payments received by Crosby from Mr. Soley for medical services and from Oliver P. Hubbard for graduation fees.
Collection

Paris Cleveland Gardner papers, 1834-1976 5.4 Linear Feet — 3,156 Items

The papers of Paris Cleveland Gardner span the years 1834 to 1976, though they fall chiefly in the period 1920 to 1951. They consist of correspondence, legal papers, case files, printed matter, and clippings.

Included are some papers relating to Gardner's personal life and affairs in Cleveland County, N.C., and in Oklahoma. Of particular interest is correspondence relating to local, state, and national Democratic Party politics and elections in North Carolina in the 1920s and 1930s. Correspondents of note in this group include Richard Fountain, O. Max Gardner, and Robert R. Reynolds. Also present are some case files relating to Gardner's private legal practice, including the 1917 case of Leroy Cowthen, a member of the International Workers of the World (I.W.W.) who was being harassed; the investigation of the Humphreys family claims to the title of a profitable oil field near Beaumont, Tex.; and a file on the Shelby (N.C.) Building and Loan Association. Also included in a file of miscellaneous material is some genealogical material on the Harman family.

By far the bulk of the papers are represented by the Federal Trade Commission files. As an attorney-examiner with the F.T.C. between 1941 and 1962, Gardner worked with cases involving alleged deceptive advertising practices in the print media and radio. The individual files contain factual summaries of evidence in each case as well as occasional recommendations for action.

While the files here probably do not represent a complete record of Gardner's work with the F.T.C., they do provide ample illustration of the methods and practices of the government as it attempted to regulate false and misleading advertising.

Most of the cases represented in these files went through the office of Gardner's superior, D. B. Gatling, who was Chief of the Division of Radio and Periodical Advertising. The F.T.C. files in the so-called "Packets" and Alphabetical Files contain documentation regarding routine complaints about mostly small proprietary companies, though there are exceptions - most notably, the series of files on the American Tobacco Company, relating principally to misuse and distortions of testimonials from tobacco buyers and smokers in advertising. For the most part, the cases in these files rarely went beyond the preliminary stages of investigation. The "Secondary Review Files" are generally more substantive, representing cases on which some sort of action was taken. Also included are some of Gardner's personnel files from the F.T.C. While the reason for their inclusion with the case files is not altogether clear, the original order and contents of these files has been maintained nevertheless.

Collection

Emma Simpson Glover Family papers, 1834-1953 2 Linear Feet — circa 410 Items

The papers consist of correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, account books, a memoir book, and miscellaneous papers and span the time period from 1834 to 1953. The bulk of the papers consists of correspondence between 1862 and 1914. This correspondence falls roughly into three major periods, each one consisting of two or three dozen letters.

The first period lasts until the 1890s and focuses on G. F. Simpson's involvement with the construction of a silver ore-crushing mill in Helena, Montana Territory, a venture shared with his brother, Charles H. Simpson; land investments in Kansas; and, after the 1860s, iron ore mining operations in Virginia. The letters from Montana and Kansas also document the harsh life on the American frontier. Included with this mostly business correspondence are a few letters from Thomas B. Sykes describing his experiences at Camp Chase, a Union prisoner-of-war camp near Columbus, Ohio, and as a resident of Aberdeen, Miss. during Reconstruction.

The second period, from the 1890s to 1910, consists chiefly of letters to Emma or her sisters Mary and Mabel, which discuss news of family and friends.

The last period, 1910-1914, consists mostly of correspondence between Emma and her husband Dr. Samuel R. Glover during their courtship and early marriage. Dr. Glover's letters include a limited discussion of his medical practice.

The legal papers include a will, mortgages, and land deeds. The financial papers include receipts and notes, some belonging to the firm of Simpson, Bass and Co. of Richmond, Va., operated by Charles H. Simpson and L. L. Bass, who were commission merchants in flour, grain, hay, and other provisions. The miscellaneous papers include clippings and printed material. There are photographs of Emma Simpson Glover, J. W. Simpson, and Mrs. Margaret Simpson.

The bound volumes consist of two ledgers and accounts, 1914-1921, of Dr. Glover's medical practice; ledger and accounts, 1877-1882, of a general store in Nelson Co., Va., which includes entries for farm and farm labor; and a memoir or scrap book of Mary Simpson, consisting of printed material, clippings, ribbons, and other memorabilia. The memoir book originally served as the cash book of an unknown Virginia firm for 1834-1836.

Collection

Collection consists largely of correspondence between family members, friends, and business associates spanning three generations, as well as some Civil War and early Reconstruction letters relating to Hopkins' activities in New Orleans. Correspondents include Hopkins' daughter, Elizabeth; her husband Alfred Lawrence Aiken, a prominent banker in Boston; the Gadsden family of Charleston, S.C.; and the Peck family, relatives of Hopkins' wife, Lizzie. An information folder chronologically lists a portion of the collection. Also included in this collection are a few legal papers, financial papers, addresses and writings, pictures, and a miscellaneous folder that includes some genealogy. Subjects mentioned in the letters include travel in the U.S. and Europe, marriage and family life, illness, Williams College, Yale College, politics, law,"bloodletting with leeches," Civil War activities, and The Worcester Continentals.

Collection
Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

Collection
William Woods Holden was a journalist and Republican governor of North Carolina during Reconstruction. He was the owner and editor of the North Carolina Standard newspaper from 1843 to 1860, during which time he and the paper were affiliated with the Democratic Party. He was elected governor as a Republican in 1868, but was impeached by the Democratic state legislature in 1870 for his efforts to combat the Ku Klux Klan. Collection consists of correspondence, memoirs, business papers, legal documents, poems, and other papers. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870. Also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters.

The collection documents Holden's career as a journalist and politician, including his shift in party allegiance from Democrat to Republican during the Civil War. He served as the 28th and 30th governor of North Carolina.

Pre-Civil War letters deal mainly with personal and legal matters and with the Democratic convention in Charleston, S.C., 1860, and presidential election of 1860. Post-war materials concern the history of journalism in North Carolina; Holden's appointment by Andrew Johnson as provisional governor of North Carolina in 1865; his election as governor in 1868; Reconstruction policies; Ku Klux Klan activity in the state; the Kirk-Holden War; the "Ferrell Matter," a debt case in which Holden was the guarantor; Holden's impeachment as governor in 1870; his conviction by the N.C. Senate in 1871; his appointment as postmaster by Ulysses S. Grant in 1873; and life and politics in Washington during the period of Radical control. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870.

The collection also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters; Holden's memoirs, recorded by his daughter Mary Holden Sherwood and edited by W.K. Boyd as part of the Trinity College Historical Society; some family photographs and materials related to the Holden homestead in Raleigh, N.C.; writings and poetry by Holden and his son, Joseph Holden; obituaries and clippings about Holden and his legacy; and other assorted personal and financial papers. Though removed from public life, Holden continued to write about public policy and government, sometimes critical of both parties, until his death in 1892.

Collection

James Andrew Riddick papers, 1834-1903 1.3 Linear Feet — 620 Items

James Andrew Riddick, born September 13, 1810, near Sunsbury, N.C., died 1899, Petersburg, Va. As a youth, moved to Suffolk, Va., to become a clerk in his brother-in-law's mercantile establishment. Became a Methodist minister in the 1830s and served in this capacity in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

Sermons are organized in folders grouped alphabetically by bible book and arranged within each folder numerically by chapter and verse. Sermons that do not refer to any book are grouped in a miscellaneous sermons and writings folder. Correspondence from John Early has been foldered separately from all other general correspondence and arranged by date. Newspapers have been arranged in folders by title and within each folder by date. Box 3 is oversize.

Collection
William Morehead was a merchant from Cumberland, Maryland. This collection contains correspondence, account books, bills, receipts, and advertisements, dealing with Morehead's household goods store. Collection also contains letters from firms in Maryland, Virginia, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, pertaining to the sale, purchase, and shipment of goods, borrowing of money, payment of notes, and other matters.

This collection contains correspondence to William Morehead from various business establishments in Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. The letters pertain to all phases of Morehead’s business transactions including sale and purchase of goods, particularly stoves and water pumps, shipment of goods, borrowing of money, payment of promissory notes, and other matters. The collection also contains numerous advertisements, bills and receipts, and eighteen account books recording the sales and expenses of Morehead's store during the 1860's and 1870's.

Collection
ALS. Writes to Commodore Jacob Jones regarding the naval asylum property and to W.P.C. Barton, from the Navy Department, regarding travel expenses.
Collection

Tomlinson Store Ledger B, 1834-1848 1.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Tomlinson Store was a steam tanning works, shoemaking establishment and general store run by Allen U. Tomlinson in Randolph County, NC. Ledger B contains accounts of the Methodist and Quaker families that formed Union Institute as well as Brantley York and school faculty.

Ledger B contains accounts of the Methodist and Quaker families that formed Union Institute and later supported Normal College and Trinity College. There are accounts for Brantley York, for all of the signers of the constitution of the Union Institute Society, and for the faculty of the school. The bulk of the entries date from the 1830s.

Collection

Ezekiel Skinner papers, 1834-1836 1 Linear Foot — 40 Items

Ezekiel Skinner (1777-1855) was a missionary and physician who worked in Monrovia, Liberia for the American Colonization Society during the 1830s. Although almost 60 years old, Skinner believed it was his duty to continue the work of his son, Benjamin Rush Skinner, who had died in Liberia a few years before. He returned to the United States in 1837. This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

Collection
ALS to Thomas Aspinwall and to William Jenkins Worth relating to accounts and expenses to be paid by the Surgeon General's Office.
Collection

Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976 3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Josiah William Bailey papers, 1833-1967, bulk 1900-1946 270 Linear Feet — 539 boxes — Approximately 422,400 itemss

The collection houses the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. Chiefly consists of correspondence and print material, as well as smaller amounts of financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items dating from 1900 through 1946. The collection documents Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the U.S. Senate in 1931 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. After 1931, material chiefly pertains to national affairs. Significant topics include: state and national elections and campaigns in the 1920s and 1930s; national defense and the military; veterans; the effects of the Depression on southern states and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; Prohibition; the court system; taxation; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parks; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration. Legal papers offer a sample of case files from Bailey's law office, including a 1920s case involving W.V. Guerard of the Klu Klux Klan. Outgoing personal correspondence contains many references to national and regional issues as well as personal exchanges.

Collection comprises the personal and professional papers of Josiah William Bailey (1873-1946), noted Baptist layman, Raleigh attorney, and United States Senator. The material covers many aspects of Bailey's life and career and provides rich information on North Carolina and the United States in the first half of the twentieth century, particularly for the Depression years and World War II.

The papers are comprised chiefly of correspondence and supporting printed material, although there are also financial records, clippings, volumes, broadsides, photographs, and memorabilia, dating from 1833 through 1967, with most items falling in the period from 1900 through 1946.

The collection documents Josiah W. Bailey's family, personal, religious, and professional life and indicates the wide range of his intellectual interests throughout his adult years. Generally, papers prior to Bailey's election to the United States Senate in 1930 reflect North Carolina's legal, political, religious, agricultural, social, and economic issues. During the senatorial years, material pertaining to national affairs predominates. Topics chiefly relate to national defense, the effects of the Depression on Southern States and the U.S. economy and society in general; labor issues; prohibition; the development of the Blue Ridge Parkway and other parklands; the state and Supreme Court systems; agriculture in the Southern States; and the New Deal of the Roosevelt Administration.

The chronological division between the Pre-Senatorial Series and the Senatorial Series was established at December 31, 1930. There is occasional overlap among topical files within a series (such as that among Agriculture, Taxation, and Taxation: Revaluation in the Pre-Senatorial Series) or between series in some cases. When possible, cross references and other notes have been provided in the inventory. The researcher, however, should be aware of these relationships as they apply to specific research topics.

Much of Bailey's outgoing correspondence consists of form letters and perfunctory acknowledgments, but there are also many lengthy and articulate letters. It should be noted that the correspondence in the Personal Series is comprised mainly of family letters, many of which are informative about political issues of the day. Letters from Bailey to his wife, Edith Pou Bailey, and to his father-in-law, James Hinton Pou, are particularly informative.

Collection
Aristide Caviallé-Coll was a French organ builder and musician. The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe, and the Americas, as well as his incorporation of technological innovations into his instruments. This material was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe and the Americas, as well as his incorporations of technological innovations into his instruments. The material in this collection was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and the collection includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

Collection
Papers consist of three types of material: correspondence, loose manuscript leaves, and ms. notebooks. Correspondence consists of letters written by Sayer, his wife, Sarah A. Sayer, and the Superintendent at the Asylum, John Gray, during Sayer's stay at the Asylum. Loose manuscripts consist of miscellaneous notes, a poem, Sayer's teacher certification, and the school lists of both Sayer and his wife, then Sarah Ann Bennet. Notebooks: "Sketches of life" (a journal, tp., 23 pp., 1842-1859); "A book intended for writings" (notebook of essays and poems, tp., 23 pp., 1837); and an algebra notebook (tp., 85 pp., 1833) with notes on town bonds at the end (3 pp., 1872).
Collection

Andrew J. Fleming papers, 1833-1840 1.2 Linear Feet — 4 Items

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Collection contains a ledger, a daybook, a cashbook, and an account book relating to a firm involved in the importation and sale of sugar, molasses, coffee, tea, corn, and other products. The books record shipment of goods from various ports in the West Indies and the South. Craven Ashford may have been a business partner. Several items are laid in.

Collection
Online
Resident of Laurens (Otsego Co.), N.Y. Collection comprises a manuscript booklet (stitched into contemporary wrappers, approx. 7-1/4 x 4-1/2 inches, 8 pgs.) likely begun and maintained by Bradley in 1833 in order to practice his handwriting. In addition, he maintained a record of itinerant preachers serving at New Lisbon Church (New Lisbon, N.Y.?), including the Bible text that served as the basis for the 18 sermons recorded, as well as the preacher's denomination. Preachers listed include "Christians" John H. Currier, Sarah Hedges, and Reuben Bergis; Methodist elders Brownell and Brown; and Baptist elder Amner. There are no dates provided for each sermon. There is also a small ink diagram on the inside wrapper explaining a solar eclipse.

Collection comprises a manuscript booklet (stitched into contemporary wrappers, approx. 7-1/4 x 4-1/2 inches, 8 pgs.) likely begun and maintained by Bradley in 1833 in order to practice his handwriting. In addition, he maintained a record of itinerant preachers serving at New Lisbon Church (New Lisbon, N.Y.?), including the Bible text that served as the basis for the 18 sermons recorded, as well as the preacher's denomination. Preachers listed include "Christians" John H. Currier, Sarah Hedges, and Reuben Bergis; Methodist elders Brownell and Brown; and Baptist elder Amner. There are no dates provided for each sermon. There is also a small ink diagram on the inside wrapper explaining a solar eclipse.

Collection

Erwin Cotton Mills records, 1832-1976 and undated, bulk 1892-1967 156 Linear Feet — 357 volumes; 66 boxes; 6 oversize folders.

Account books, nearly complete, and office files, very incomplete, of the Erwin Mills textile mill, chiefly 1892-1967, and some personal papers of William Allen Erwin. The business files include letters, volumes, legal and financial papers, memoranda, printed material, reports, blueprints, and other records of the company.

The records of the Erwin Cotton Mills, a textile manufacturing company, date primarily from 1982-1967 but include items as early as 1832 and as late as 1976. There are ten series: Information; Account Books; Alphabetical; Labor Relations; William Allen Erwin; Pearl Cotton Mills; Cooleemee Cotton Mills; Erwin Yarn company; and J. N. Ledford Company. The collection relates mostly to the company's textile operations and related matters, but there is also some material concerning William A. Erwin's personal and family interests. The account books are largely intact. Most of the correspondence and topical records have not survived and are represented here only by scattered files. Records from the subsidiaries and acquired companies vary but have survived in similar fashion. the Account Books Series and Alphabetical Series comprise the bulk of the collection.

Collection

Gennett Lumber Company records, 1832-1954, bulk 1920-1945 19 Linear Feet — Approximately 16,000 Items

Lumber company founded in 1902 by Andrew and Nat Gennett, headquartered in Georgia and South Carolina, later in Asheville, N.C. Correspondence, contracts, legal documents, and other records of the Gennett Lumber Co., mostly for the years 1920 to 1945. The two Gennett brothers Nat and Andrew, founders of the company, were part of the effort to establish the South's national forest system. Subjects covered by materials in the collection include Civil War reminiscences, life at Nashville and at Tulane and Vanderbilt universities shortly after the war, the lumber business after 1890, economic conditions in the U.S. after 1900, forest conservation, U.S. politics and foreign relations during World War I, and travel in Europe after the war.

Correspondence, contracts, legal documents, and other records of the Gennett Lumber Co., mostly for the years 1920 to 1945. The two Gennett brothers Nat and Andrew, founders of the company, were part of the effort to establish the South's national forest system. Subjects covered by materials in the collection include Civil War reminiscences, life at Nashville and at Tulane and Vanderbilt universities shortly after the war, the lumber business after 1890, economic conditions in the U.S. after 1900, forest conservation, U.S. politics and foreign relations during World War I, and travel in Europe after the war.

Collection

Lassiter Family papers, 1832-1928 29 Linear Feet — 21,752 Items

Daniel William Lassiter was a physician of Petersburg, Va. Collection comprises correspondence and other papers of Daniel William Lassiter, and of his sons, Francis Rives Lassiter, lawyer and U.S. Representative from Virginia, and Charles Trotter Lassiter, politician. Much of the correspondence concerns the political career of Francis R. Lassiter. Includes information on Confederate recruitment, politicians after the Civil War, Presidential elections, the Virginia militia, and economic conditions in the U.S. Correspondents include Henry Mills Alden, Thomas Baily Aldrich, John Hollis Bankhead, Harry Flood Byrd, Champ Clark, John Warwick Daniel, Henry De La War Flood, Carter Glass, Epps Hunton, Jr., Fitzhugh Lee, Arthur Lefevre, William Gordon McCabe, Thomas Staples Martin, John Garland Pollard, Furnifold McLendel Simmons, Charles Augustus Swanson, Henry St. George Tucker, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, and Edward Carrington Venable.

Collection comprises correspondence and other papers of Daniel William Lassiter, and of his sons, Francis Rives Lassiter, lawyer and U.S. Representative from Virginia, and Charles Trotter Lassiter, politician. Much of the correspondence concerns the political career of Francis R. Lassiter. Includes information on Confederate recruitment, politicians after the Civil War, Presidential elections, the Virginia militia, and economic conditions in the U.S. Correspondents include Henry Mills Alden, Thomas Baily Aldrich, John Hollis Bankhead, Harry Flood Byrd, Champ Clark, John Warwick Daniel, Henry De La War Flood, Carter Glass, Epps Hunton, Jr., Fitzhugh Lee, Arthur Lefevre, William Gordon McCabe, Thomas Staples Martin, John Garland Pollard, Furnifold McLendel Simmons, Charles Augustus Swanson, Henry St. George Tucker, Lyon Gardiner Tyler, and Edward Carrington Venable.

Collection

John Hobart Davis papers, 1832-1920 1 Linear Foot — 400 Items

The papers of John Hobart Davis span the years 1832-1920, but the bulk of the collection is the Civil War correspondence, 1862-1865. Davis chiefly wrote the letters to his sister, Elisa E. Davis, with a few letters to other family members, such as his brother Frank. Private Davis was stationed at Camp Beaufort, Me. (1861, Dec. - 1862, Feb.); Ship Island, Miss. (1862, Mar. - 1863, Feb.); Fort Jackson, La. (1863, Feb. - Aug.); Pass Manchoc, La. (1863, Aug. -Sept.); Fort Stephens, La. (1863, Oct. - 1864, July); and Washington, D.C. (1864, Aug. - 1865, Apr.).

Topics discussed in the collection include Davis' attitude toward Blacks, especially his prejudice toward Black officers, foraging raids behind enemy lines and the Battle of Blair's Landing, (also known as Pleasant Hill Landing) as well as aspects of camp life, such as guard duty, artillery practice, drills, and practice skirmishes, pay furloughs, sutlers, camp recreation, and breaking up camp. Some letters are illustrated with maps or drawings. Included also are diaries, photographs, and miscellaneous writings.

Collection

Charles Gilpin papers, 1832-1875 0.5 Linear Feet — about 336 items

The collection consists of letters written to Gilpin by numerous persons - a glittering array of mid-nineteenth century reformers. Quakers are prominent, but the Society of Friends was not discussed. The content is varied and represents his social and political interests. The publishing business rarely appears in the correspondence.

Two indexes to the collection have been compiled. The first is a listing of known correspondents. Their letters are itemized in the Autograph File. Several signatures could not be identified. The second is a selective index of references to persons, places, and topics that are mentioned in the collection, with references to the dates of the letters in which those references may be found.

Collection
Online
Collection contains largely correspondence received by Samuel Wilberforce relating primarily to missionary activities of the Church of England in East Africa and various British colonies and describing also scenery, local politics, and efforts to thwart the slave trade. Correspondents include John William Colenso, bishop of Natal; Christopher Palmer Rigby, British Army officer in Zanzibar; Charles Frederick Mackenzie, bishop of Central Africa; David Livingstone; Lord John Russell, British foreign secretary; Henry Labouchere, colonial secretary; Walter Chambers, missionary in Sarawak; Thomas Clarkson; Sir James Brooke, rajah of Sarawak; and Sir Samuel White Baker. Also includes some of Wiberforce's routine correspondence regarding appointments, meetings, and casual matters.

The majority of this collection consists of letters received by Samuel Wilberforce while he served as Bishop of Oxford, and tend to relate to missionary activities of the Church of England in East Africa and various British colonies in the mid-nineteenth century. Letters from the 1830s document Wilberforce’s role in coordinating the Society for Propagation of the Gospel with the Church Missionary Society. Additional correspondence from 1857 through 1864 describes other Anglican Church missions and clergy in Sarawak (Malaysia), Tasmania, New Zealand, and the West Indies. Notable correspondents include Sir James Brooke, Rajah of Sarawak (whose memorandum dates from Apr. 2, 1860) and Sir Samuel White, whose letter from 1869 describes his expedition on the White Nile in Egypt and Sudan.

East Africa is the subject of several letters to Wilberforce between 1853 and 1863. Two letters from John William Colenso, Bishop of Natal, discuss the status of the Anglican Church in Natal, his attempts to acquire financial aid, the refusal of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel to provide aid for white residents, difficulties between Natal’s governor and his council, and injustices to the Kaffirs. A letter (dated Aug. 23, 1860) from Christopher Palmer Rigby, British veteran officer, describes economic and social conditions of Zanzibar, including the extent of the slave trade there and French activities on the island. Rigby also writes about the depopulation of the African coast due to slave expeditions, British naval actions against slavers, and recent ventures into the African interior. A batch of ten letters from Charles Frederick Mackenzie, Bishop of Central Africa, date between 1859 and 1861. Mackenzie’s letters describe the preparations for his trip to the Shire River region, his consecration of the mission in Cape Town, South Africa, and his work and discussions with Daniel Livingstone, who assisted in founding the mission in Nyasaland (Malawi). He describes their journey to the mission site, including Livingstone’s freeing of slaves they encountered being transported to markets, and also writes about relations between the local Manganja and Ajawa tribes.

The collection also includes contemporary copies of letters describing David Livingstone’s activities in the Zambezi River area, including a letter from Mar. 15, 1862, which describes Mackenzie’s destruction of a hostile village and his death from fever and dysentery. A related letter (unsigned) from Apr. 27, 1862, describes Mackenzie’s activities in the Shire region, as well as the political landscape between various tribes and the role of slave traders in fermenting war between various groups. A letter from Feb. 2, 1863, from British Foreign Secretary Lord John Russell informs Wilberforce that Livingstone’s expedition has been withdrawn from the mission.

Collection

The Jody Jones Hunter Collection of Works by William Styron includes first editions, limited editions, translations, and other editions, many of them autographed or inscribed, of the works of William Styron, along with published articles, correspondence, manuscripts, and related materials. The correspondence is chiefly letters written by Styron to Stuart Wright, the owner of Palaemon Press in Winston-Salem, N.C. and publisher of several limited editions of Styron's work. Also included with the collection is a carbon typescript of Confessions of Nat Turner, with holograph notes, and the original typescript of Styron's recipe for southern fried chicken from The Artist's and Writer's Cookbook (1961).

The addition (Accession 2001-0056) consists largely of books (mostly first editions, some signed or inscribed) and printed material written by or about Styron, or containing his contributions (1951-2001). Also includes editions of All the Finest Girls (2001), by Alexandra Styron (his youngest daughter); an original manuscript review of Sophie's Choice (1979) by Julian Symons; an original publisher's advertisement for The Confessions of Nat Turner (1967); an uncorrected proof of Admiral Robert Penn Warren and the Snows of Winter: A Tribute (1978?); and an original holograph manuscript of Styron's 1977 review of Philip Caputo's A Rumor of War (1977).

Addition (08-081)(5 items, .1 lin. ft.; undated) comprises a signed black-and-white photograph, and four pages of Styron's writing (two sheets are signed).

Addition (08-325)(4 items, .3 lin. ft.; dated 1982-1995 and undated) comprises two items of correspondence, a signed photograph, and an undated screenplay, SET THIS HOUSE ON FIRE.

Collection

Hans Horst Meyer papers, 1831-1943, 2004 and undated 8 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — approx. 201 items — Approximately 201 items

Hans Horst Meyer was a pharmacologist and scientist on the faculty of the University of Vienna in the early 20th century. The papers are mostly in German, and consist of Meyer's professional correspondence; diplomas and awards; a few professional writings; an autograph book with signatures and correspondence of notable scientists and others; genealogical papers relating to his attempts in the late 1930s to document his family's ancestry; several volumes, including a family Bible and a diary of his son Arthur's first six years of life; and professional and personal photographs. There are two photographs of neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (Boston), inscribed to Meyer (1914 and 1929), and a sketch by Cushing. There are a few letters from family members, one of which describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany. An addition to the collection consists of a few letters, photographs, negatives, and other memorabilia relating to Meyer's son, Arthur W. Meyer, personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, and Arthur's son Horst, who became a physicist at Duke University. The Hans Horst Meyer papers form part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers, mostly in German, document pharmacologist and scientist Hans Horst Meyer's career and personal life, and consist of personal and professional correspondence; written pieces; genealogical documents; diplomas, medals, and awards; a Bible and other assorted volumes; professional and personal photographs; and an autograph album.

The certificates and medals were received by Meyer between 1901 and 1937, and come from a variety of international scientific organizations, such as the New York Academy of Medicine, the Royal Society of Physicians in Budapest, and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. Meyer also received the German Order of the Red Eagle and honorary citizenship of the city of Vienna. Also included is a small group of letters and printed materials relating to honors received by Meyer, as well as a reprint of Meyer's chapter in the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie.

Of note are two portrait photographs of pioneer neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1914 and 1929), both inscribed to Hans Horst Meyer, and a warm letter from Cushing to Meyer's son Arthur, a physician. A sketch of a spongioblast, attributed to Cushing, rounds out this group.

The personal papers include a group of official documents, identity and voting cards, and correspondence with parishes and German officials, attesting to Meyer's efforts from about 1938 to 1939 to document his family's religious heritage and obtain a new German identity card, possibly in order to leave the country. Meyer died in Vienna in 1939 while his application was still under review. Also among the personal papers are a few letters from family members, one of which, dated October 6, 1939, describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany.

Meyer's personal papers are accompanied by a German bible, a volume of poetry and quotations, and a journal in which Meyer recorded his son Arthur's first six years of life. There are also photographs of Hans Horst Meyer with various family members: his wife Doris, shortly after marriage, his sons Arthur and Kurt, his daughter-in-law Lotte, and grandchildren.

The autograph album contains 147 autographs and letters of well-known and lesser-known Germans, most of whom lived in the 19th century. Included are a letter each from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller, and Clara Schumann, a postcard from Johannes Brahms, and the autographs of many individuals, including Henrik Ibsen and Charles Dickens.

An addition to the collection consists of personal memorabilia, including photographs, glass slides, and a few letters, relating to Hans Horst Meyer's son Arthur, and his close relationship as personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, until Arthur's suicide in 1933. The letters are addressed to (Johannes) Horst Meyer, Arthur's small son, who eventually became a physicist, emigrated to the U.S., and joined the faculty of Duke University.

With the exception of the autograph album, originally in the holdings of the Rubenstein Library general collections, the Meyer papers were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection

William Thomas Leavell papers, 1831-1932 5.6 Linear Feet — 17 boxes; 5,136 items

Collection contains the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; along with family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister. The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.

Collection comprises the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; and family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister.

The papers also contain material pertaining to the economic and agricultural conditions in Leavell's parishes in Virginia and West Virginia and genealogical material on many of his parishioners; letters while a student at Bristol College, Bristol, Pa., 1833-1836, and at Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, 1836-37; letters from brothers and sisters in Spotsylvania and Culpeper counties, Va., discussing agriculture; correspondence between daughter Anne Leavell and John M. Daniel in the 1870s, both before and after their respective marriages; and over 200 sermons. Leavell was a teacher at Fairfax Institute, 1837-39. Box 9 contains a diary in which Leavell included much autobiographical information.

The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.

Collection
Artifacts, memorabilia, pins, awards, textiles, and other materials, either related to or produced by Trinity College and Duke University or collected by Trinity College Historical Society or other offices and individuals as historical curiosities.

Artifacts, memorabilia, pins, awards, textiles, and other materials, either related to or produced by Trinity College and Duke University or collected by Trinity College Historical Society or other offices and individuals as historical curiosities. Includes academic apparel from university leaders, athletic memorabilia, commemorative plates, and shoulder patches from the Armed Forces units that Duke alumni served in.

Collection

Stirewalt Family papers, 1830s-1993 6 Linear Feet — 2750 Items

The Stirewalt Family Papers, 1828-1993 (bulk 1850-1947), are comprised of the personal papers of individuals from four successive generations of the Stirewalt family. The correspondence, writings, diaries, legal/financial documents, photographs, and other miscellaneous papers found in this collection document the Stirewalt Family's personal lives and involvement in the Lutheran Church as ministers, educators and missionaries. The collection is divided into four primary series which reflect the individuals whose papers make up this collection: Jacob Stirewalt, Jerome Paul Stirewalt, Martin Luther Stirewalt, and Catherine A. Stirewalt. The arrangement of the collection is primarily chronological, following the lineage of the Stirewalt family. Subsections within each major series are determined by the type of materials found within the collection and are arranged either chronologically, as in the case of the Diaries and Correspondence Subseries, or alphabetically and thereunder chronologically, as in the case of the Writings Subseries.

The Stirewalt family is descended from Jacob Stirewalt, a minister and member of the Tennessee Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. Jacob Stirewalt was primarily active in and around New Market, Va. and Rowan and Shenandoah counties in Virginia. The Subseries related to Jacob Stirewalt includes Correspondence from 1828-1858, Writings (primarily sermons and sermon outlines in German and English) from the 1830s to the 1860s, and Diaries, which includes a Memorandum book where he recorded financial transactions and other records of his career as a minister from 1834 to his death in 1869.

Jerome Paul Stirewalt, the son of Jacob Stirewalt, was also a minister and a leader of the Tennessee Synod of the Evangelical Lutheran Church. He served as a minister in several pastorates in Virginia and North Carolina and several terms as president, secretary, and treasurer of the Tennessee Synod in the late 1800s and early 1900s. His papers are primarily composed of Correspondence, 1870-1933, with other ministers, relating to the business of the Tennessee Synod, and with family members. The collection also includes Jerome Paul Stirewalt's Writings, primarily sermons and sermon outlines, and other miscellaneous financial and legal papers. The Diaries Subseries is primarily memorandum books which list the date and location of religious services performed and the topic or title of sermons delivered by J.P. Stirewalt. These books serve to provide a record of Stirewalt's work as a Lutheran minister.

Martin Luther Stirewalt, the son of Jerome Paul Stirewalt, was also a Lutheran minister and educator at Lutheran schools and colleges in Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Chicago, Ill. This series includes correspondence, diaries, writings and clippings which provide a picture of Stirewalt's theological education, activities as a minister and educator, and insights into his personal life and familial relationships.

The papers of Catherine A Stirewalt, Martin Luther Stirewalt's daughter, are primarily correspondence written while she was a Lutheran Missionary in China from 1939-1949. This correspondence provides documentation of the Lutheran Church's activities in China prior to and after World War II. Catherine Stirewalt's letters provide a great deal of detail about the daily lives of missionaries in China and some information about the lives of the Chinese people working as instructors or attending the mission school. There is no correspondence from the period of the first two years of World War II when she was interned in the Weihsien concentration camp near Tsingtao, China. Other miscellaneous clippings, photographs, and writings in this series provide further documentation of her experiences in China.

Collection
Sarah Wallis Bowdich Lee was an English naturalist, author, and illustrator. This collection consists of an untitled, apparently unpublished, 1830s manuscript (439 pages) surveying the African continent and discussing African exploration, history, geography, and culture from a white British colonialist perspective.

Collection consists of one untitled holograph manuscript (439 pages) written by Sarah Bowdich Lee discussing African history, exploration, geography, and culture. It appears to date from the 1830s, and was apparently never published. The pages are grouped into loosely bound signatures, with no title page or binding for the text.

Lee's manuscript is an untitled work on Africa that is a survey of European knowledge of the continent as of approximately 1830. It does not appear that Lee saw many of the nations she describes. She writes that she selected many of the "details from the narratives of those whose names alone inspire confidence." The manuscript's watermarks date between 1814 and 1828. Much of Lee's description reflects British white colonialist attitudes and racist or patronizing views of African and Arab people.

The first portion of the manuscript (about pages 1-100) recount African history, exploration, and colonization. The second portion of the text discusses African regions and kingdoms, including Egypt (114, including a description of the ancient pyramids and tombs, and contemporary Muslim inhabitants); Nubia and Sudan (141; includes a description of local wildlife, population, and the trafficking of enslaved people); Abyssinia (165); the Red Sea (180); Darfur and Kordo-far (188; unicorns are mentioned on 194); Cyrenaica (207); Tripoli (216); Fezzan (225); Bornou (240); Tunis, Algiers, and Morocco (283); Senegal (297, includes descriptions of French colonization, the gum trade, Baobob trees, and wildlife); Gambia (306, including descriptions of the British settlement Bathurst); Sierra Leone (322); Ashantee (340); Dahomey (355, including a description of the king and his court); Gabon (381); Congo (388); Portuguese Angola; Cape of Good Hope (399, including a description of Cape Town); and the African islands of Mauritius, Madagascar, Madeira, the Canaries, and others.

Collection
Letter (ALS) dated Oct. 20, 1830 tendering his resignation as Professor of Physiology at the University of London; a pencil sketch and engravings of drawings by Bell; a copy of a portrait of Bell by J. Stevens and two clippings.
Collection

The papers of the lawyer and educator William Righter Fisher and the journalist Mary Wager Fisher consist primarily of correspondence, but also include photographs (several of them tintypes and cartes-de-visite), financial papers, diaries, clippings, printed material, and writings and speeches. Among correspondents are many journalists, physicians, educators, and other notable figures of the late nineteenth century including Lucy Abbott, Mercy Baker, Jennie Chapin, Mary L. Booth, W.S. Burke, James Gowdy Clark, M.E. Dodge, Weston Flint, P. Girard, S. D. Harris, Albert Leffingwell, Henry C. Olney, W. Trickett, George Boyer Vashon, and Frank J. Webb. The collection also includes letters from James B. Hazelton of the First Regiment, New York Artillery. Hazelton's letters describe battles and political events of the Civil War, including Lincoln's re-election campaign and the anti-draft riots. The papers are particularly rich in documentation of women in medicine and women's medical education in the second half of the nineteenth century; the Freedmen's schools in the Reconstruction South; the movement for women's rights; and friendship among American women in the late Victorian era.

The Correspondence Series includes letters from three prominent women physicians of the period (Jennie Chapin, Mercy N. Baker, and Lucy M. Abbott) to Mary Wager before her marriage to Fisher. In their letters they described their medical education, their obstetrical experience, and the high cost of tuition and living expenses at the Women's Medical College of Philadelphia. Letters prior to her marriage in 1876 also attest to Wager's numerous romantic involvements. Among her admirers was lawyer and educator Weston Flint, and the Correspondence Series includes over 100 letters from him describing his political, social, and literary interests as well as his deep affection for Mary Wager. He also wrote about his wartime travels and his interest in helping the contrabands medically and educationally. Flint detailed political events of the Civil War, including Lincoln's re-election campaign and the anti-draft riots, and mentions the Copperheads. He expressed particular interest in the moral state of soldiers, decrying their drinking of alcohol and consorting with prostitutes. Flint sometimes included poetry in his letters.

Also in the Correspondence Series are two letters (1870) from Frank J. Webb, the author of The Garies and Their Friends (1857), a daring novel about an interracial couple. In one of these letters dated May 5, he referred to a 500-page manuscript sent to Harper's for an unpublished novel, Paul Sumner, which he considered to be superior to The Garies. In a four-page letter to Wager (April 9, 1870), African American writer, attorney, and educator George Boyer Vashon provided an autobiography. The events of his life were penned on the letterhead of The New Era: A National Journal, Edited by Colored Men.

The collection offers insight into emotionally intense friendships between women of the nineteenth century. Wager's female friends sent good wishes, but expressed great jealousy at the time of her marriage to Fisher. Young women wrote of both romantic and sisterly love for Mary, and sometimes discussed such issues as women's education, women's dress, women's suffrage, and temperance.

The bulk of William Righter Fisher's letters in the collection were written between him and his parents. A small cache of letters from author and dean of Dickenson College Law School William Trickett, who lived in Germany in 1872, provide a vivid illustration of the political climate and structure of the Germany of Bismarck. Also to be found among letters to Fisher are several written in the late 1860's by agents of the Freedmen's Bureau and the Freedmen's school in Wytheville, Virginia.

While the bulk of the collection consists of correspondence, some speeches and writings by Mary Wager Fisher and Weston Flint are included. Of particular interest is a photocopy of Mary Wager's article entitled " Women as Physicians." Also, the Pictures Series includes both cartes-de-visite and tintypes.

The William Righter and Mary Wager Fisher Papers provide numerous windows through which researchers can view aspects of late Victorian America. The collection provides an unusual entree into the private and public lives of nineteenth-century men and women, and particularly provides information about the professionalization of American women, relationships between women in nineteenth-century America, and race relations in the Reconstruction South.

Collection

John Grammar Brodnax papers, 1830-1929 2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,389 items.

Collection contains personal, professional and family correspondence of three generations of the Brodnax family, centering around John G. Brodnax. Pre-Civil War letters refer to the sale of slaves; wartime correspondence reflects the fear of the advancing Union forces. Postwar papers include Brodnax's appointment as assistant surgeon general of a North Carolina hospital at Petersburg, Va., overseeing the discharge of disabled Confederate soldiers, and his oath of allegiance to the United States. Also includes letters to his wife during her summer visits with relatives. Many papers concern Mrs. Brodnax's activities in the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy; others relate to attendance of family members at various North Carolina and Virginia schools and colleges. There are also letters from Germany and Europe in the 1870s and 1880s and Mexico in 1910.

This collection contains family correspondence of three generations of the Brodnax family centering chiefly around John G. Brodnax (1829-1907), a Confederate surgeon and practicing physician.

Letters from 1857 to 1867, generally from Lynchburg, Virginia, refer to the sale of slaves and, during the war years, are concerned with the question of fleeing or remaining to face the advancing Federals. Included also are Brodnax's appointment as assistant surgeon general of the North Carolina Hospital at Petersburg, Virginia, and his oath of allegiance to the United States. Other items pertaining to Dr. Brodnax are letters to his wife, beginning in 1881, while she visited her relatives in summer, a speech against railroad taxation in 1879, a group of petitions in 1877 requesting that Brodnax be made superintendent of the North Carolina State Insane Asylum, and an undated article on optical surgery. Included also is genealogical material as well as other materials connected with the activities of Brodnax's wife in the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

A number of letters were written from schools and colleges attended by members of the family, including Salem Female Academy, Salem, North Carolina, and St. Mary's College, Raleigh, North Carolina, during 1912; N. I. Smith's School in Leaksville during 1879 and 1880; Bingham School in Orange County during 1883; Bingham School in Asheville, and Old Point Comfort College, Virginia, after 1909.

Also included in the collectoon are letters from Mrs. Barr, an aunt of Mrs. Brodnax, and her children from 1877 to 1884 while traveling in Europe and studying music in Germany. There are letters from Mary (Brodnax) Glenn and her family while in Mexico, where her husband worked for a railroad company, a mining firm, and as secretary to the American consul general; letters of this period are filled with references to conditions in Mexico, especially concerning political upheavals around 1910. Included also are papers relative to the settlement of the estate of John Brodnax, Jr., after 1909, and a group of sermons delivered by James Kerr Burch, a Presbyterian minister and father-in-law of Dr. John G. Brodnax.

Collection
Col. William Sylvester Carter (approximately 1833-1902) was a white Confederate plantation owner, businessman, and state representative from Fairfield in Hyde County, N.C. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents, including enslaved and later emancipated African Americans, throughout the mid-ninteenth century. Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents throughout the mid-ninteenth century. A small amount of materials in the ledgers relate to Black people and are indicated with the headings "negro" - this material is sporadic and dates both pre- and post-emancipation.

Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War, including correspondence informing the family of the death of Captain James Carter in 1862. Other materials relate to the enslavement of different men, women, and children, including bills of sale, rental and lease information, and medical expenses accrued by the slaveholders for the different slaves treated on various plantations in the 1850s and 1860s. One document records the names of slaves who self-emancipated themselves following the Union Army victory at the Battle of New Bern. Following the war, most correspondence and legal documents relate to estates and other routine business transactions. There are two election certificates for William Carter in the 1860s, and a draft of a letter to the editor from David S. Carter promoting Democratic candidate Edward J. Warren. The collection also contains several dozen forms returned to the Richmond Boarding House Bureau of Information (1907) reflecting prices of room and board.

Collection

Washington M. Smith papers, 1830-1916 and undated 11.4 Linear Feet — 8,578 Items

Planter, banker, and lawyer, of Selma, Alabama Business and personal correspondence and other papers of Washington M. Smith and the Smith family, containing information on Smith's interests in banking, law, and agriculture, on economic conditions in Alabama after 1840, public schools and their establishment in Alabama, tax collection in the Confederate States, social life and customs in Selma, economic conditions during Reconstruction, Smith's successful efforts to reestablish in New York and England his former affluency, and family affairs. Includes a series of letters of Smith's daughter, Ella, and her husband, Hilary A. Herbert. Most of the items before 1850 and after 1869 are family letters and papers.

Personal, legal and financial papers of Washington M. Smith, lawyer, planter, and president of the Bank of Selma, relating to his law practice; his appointment as legal advisor for the Bank of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; his presidency of the Bank of Selma; the development of his plantation in Dallas County; exports of cotton and naval stores through brokers in Mobile; his real estate ventures in Selma and in Minnesota, and the inheritance by his wife, Susan (Parker) Smith, of property in Texas; the movement in the 1850s for public schools; his service on the school board of Selma, 1865-1868; his service as state representative in 1844 and in 1861-1863; his struggle after the Civil War to rebuild his estate; his efforts to establish a private banking house in Selma his partnership with John McGinnis in a general banking and stock and gold brokerage business in New York; attempts to restore the prosperity of his plantation, including contracts with many of his former slaves; his journey to England to establish cotton markets; his despondency over economic conditions in Alabama; and his consideration of migration to California. Arranged in the following series: Correspondence, Legal Papers, Financial Papers, Printed Material, and Volumes.

Included are personal correspondence between Smith and his wife while on his travels; records of slave purchases and sales; correspondence, bills, and receipts relating to the running of the plantation; scattered price current bulletins for Mobile, Alabama, 1848-1866, and for Liverpool, England, 1865-1869; Smith's petition for pardon to Andrew Johnson explaining his feelings about secession and his activities during the war, and other miscellaneous items pertaining to Smith's activities. After Smith's death in 1869, the papers chiefly relate to the education of their seven children at various schools and academies, including Virginia Military Institute (Lexington, Virginia), Moore's Business College (Atlanta, Georgia), the University of Alabama (Tuscaloosa), and Shorter College (Rome, Georgia); to the settlement and administration of the Smith estate; to a family quarrel between Susan (Parker) Smith and her children over disposal of the property in Minnesota; and to the children's efforts at various occupations. Also included are letters of Colonel Hilary A. Herbert (1834-1919), U.S. congressman from Alabama, 1877-1893, and secretary of the navy, 1893-1897, and husband of Smith's daughter, Ella, chiefly concerning family matters; letters from Leila Herbert, daughter of Hilary A. Herbert and Ella (Smith) Herbert, Washington hostess, and author of The First American, His Homes and Households (1900), discussing family matters and Washington social activities; numerous account books of Susan (Parker) Smith containing records of household expenses; course of study of the Selma Study Club, 1907-1908; catalog of the San Souci girls' school near Greenville, South Carolina, 1902-1903; the annual report of Beta Theta Pi for 1896; and other miscellaneous items.

Collection

Dawson family papers, 1830-1910 0.4 Linear Feet — 2 folders

Collection consists primarily of personal and business correspondence (bulk 1870s-1910s) and speeches of John Henry Dawson, his family and friends in and around Lenoir County, North Carolina. Also included are wills of John Dawson, Sr. (1830s-1840s) outlining the disposition of his property including several slaves and a plantation along the Neuse River.
Collection

Townsend Family papers, 1829-1972 2.4 Linear Feet — 1699 items

Consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the large Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont.

The collection consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont. The bulk of the correspondence between a large group of family members falls between 1830 and 1939; topics include family matters and spiritualism. One group of letters and a diary were written by a Union soldier, Francis Torrey Townsend, and relate to his experiences in Mississippi and Tennessee as a soldier with Company K, 13th Iowa Infantry. Other materials concern Bessie Meachum's teaching experiences with African-American children at the Beach Institute, Savannah, Ga., at the Lincoln Normal School, Marion, Ala., and at the Rio Grande Industrial School in Albuquerque, N.M.; some of this work was done through the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Church. Some photographs also depict Tougaloo College in Miss., and Le Moyne College in Tenn. Other volumes include the early 20th century diaries of Torrey Townsend and his autobiography; an 1870 diary of Elisa Townsend; a 1892 diary of Mary Meachum; and several diaries and notebooks of Bessie Meachum.

Collection

George Wesley Johnson papers, 1829-1939 10 Linear Feet — 7 boxes, 2,620 items and 77 vols.

Correspondence, daybooks, in the early 1840s, ledgers, notebooks, accounts, bills, receipts, orders, promissory notes, postal records, and other papers (chiefly 1831-1888) of George Wesley Johnson and of his family. The material pertains to Tennessee agriculture, purchases of goods in Philadelphia and other northern cities before and after the Civil War, Wake Forest College, the University of North Carolina, Greensboro Female College, economic conditions after the Civil War, and the mercantile activities of the Johnsons.

This collection contains business and family papers of George W. Johnson, postmaster, justice of the peace, general merchant, and farmer; of his brother and business partner, James M. Johnson; of George W. Johnson's son, Francis Marion Johnson; and of other members of the family.

The collection contains letters to George W. Johnson from friends in Tennessee relative to agricultural and economic conditions there, 1838-1844; letters between George W. and James M. Johnson while one or the other bought goods in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before the Civil War; bills, accounts, receipts, orders, promissory notes, and letters of a business nature, including occasional reference to another brother of George W. Johnson, Hiram, who had a financial interest in the mercantile establishment; numerous letters from George W. Johnson, his wife, Martha Johnson, and friends, including one at Wake Forest College, North Carolina, to Francis Marion Johnson while the latter was a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1855-1858; letters, 1858-1861, from another brother of George W. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, who-was operating a store at East Bend in Yadkin County, North Carolina, as well as references to the debt of Olin High School, North Carolina, notices of meetings of Mocksville Lodge No. 134, letters to Martha Johnson from her daughter, Jennie, while a student at Greensboro Female College, North Carolina, 1857-1859, prices of foods and general commodities, letters from Eagle Mills, Buffalo Paper Mills, and W. Turner's cotton mill at Turnersburg, North Carolina, and bills of lading for various commodities.

Material during the Civil War period is limited to a few letters in 1863 from W. G. Johnson (younger brother of George W. Johnson) near Kinston, North Carolina; tax in kind returns and a petition from Francis Marion Johnson asking for military exemption on the basis of operating a grist mill. Postwar material consists largely of mercantile records of the Farmington store showing that goods were purchased from wholesale firms in New York City; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Richmond and Lynchburg, Virginia; Baltimore, Maryland; and Winston-Salem, Charlotte, Wilmington, and Salisbury, North Carolina.

Volumes consist of small notebooks, recording goods bought by George W. Johnson; daybooks; ledgers; postal records of the Farmington, North Carolina, post office, 1838-1856, including postage books, newspaper postage books, and receipt books for registered letters; blacksmith accounts; itinerary of a journey made by George W. Johnson, S. Taylor, and D. N. Reynolds through North Carolina and Tennessee in 1836; minutes of the Farmington Lodge No. 46 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and the Davie County Division of the Sons of Temperance. Included also are a few business letters from Nathaniel Boyden and Son, and a letter to Francis M. Johnson from a friend in Norfolk, Virginia, describing a typhoid epidemic in 1855.