Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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Bryant Bennett papers, 1767-1902, bulk 1840-1875

2 Linear Feet
Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

2 results in this collection

Alonzo G. Beardsley papers, 1787-1897

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,597 items (including 1 vol.)
This collection, largely the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley (founded c. 1868), also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded them, including John Porter, judge and state senator. During the 1850s the collection also includes the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. From 1840 to 1860 the papers concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States. The Civil War period papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy, U.S. Representative from Cayuga County, N.Y. include mention of appointments and promotions; aid to wounded soldiers; defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863, civilian morale, and the activities of Southern sympathizers. Post Civil War materials include the papers of the Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. Letters after 1870 include information about gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872, and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. There is also genealogical material for the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

This collection contains mostly the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley, also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded this firm. The early papers, beginning about 1800, center on John Porter, judge, state senator, and law partner of New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop. In about 1840 the Porter letters merge into those of William Allen, and for the next fifteen years the correspondence reflects Allen's legal practice and depicts life in Auburn, New York. The letters of Alonzo Beardsley begin about 1842, but it is not until 1855 that he and Allen become partners. During the 1850s the papers also include the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. For the most part, papers during 1840-1860 concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States.

For the Civil War period there are the 1860s papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy from Cayuga County, New York, a U.S. representative. Topics include appointments and promotions, aid to wounded soldiers, defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of the 5th, 111th, and 138th New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863 and its enforcement, and civilian morale and the activities of Southern sympathizers, especially in 1863. Pomeroy's correspondence also concerns patronage, party organization and rivalry, and service to constituents. From 1865 to 1870 there is much family correspondence, particularly letters to Nellie Bisby of Attica, New York. Between 1865 and 1868 many papers appear from Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. After 1870 letters of Alonzo Beardsley relate to miscellaneous subjects, such as gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872; the Oswego Starch Company; and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. Numerous legal papers and documents reflect all phases of the Osborne firm's work. There is a large amount of related printed matter. The collection also included genealogical material on the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

2 results in this collection

Armistead Burt papers, 1759-1933

3.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 5,675 items
Armistead Burt (1802-1883) was a planter, lawyer, and U.S. Representative from Abbeville, S.C. Collection contains political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress. The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection includes the political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress.

The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

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Folder

Series includes political and legal correspondence mostly related to John C. Calhoun and the secession question. Later correspondence deals with Burt's law practice. Correspondents include: Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legaré, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, james L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Aristide Caviallé-Coll papers, 1833-1885, 1970s

9 Linear Feet
Aristide Caviallé-Coll was a French organ builder and musician. The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe, and the Americas, as well as his incorporation of technological innovations into his instruments. This material was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe and the Americas, as well as his incorporations of technological innovations into his instruments. The material in this collection was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and the collection includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

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G. Hope Summerell Chamberlain papers, 1821-1946

10 Linear Feet
G. Hope Summerell Chamberlain was an author, artist, and civic worker, of Raleigh (Wake Co.) and Chapel Hill (Orange Co.), N.C. Letters from 1821 to 1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

Letters from 1821-1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

2 results in this collection

John J. Crittenden papers, 1786-1932

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,055 items, 3 vols.
This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrapbooks, a letter book, and speeches related to John J. Crittenden's service as a Kentucky legislator and governor, as a member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky and the nation during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861. Other papers pertain to the private life of the family, and to the publication of "The Life of John J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). The collection also includes unpublished papers from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrap books, a letter book, and speeches relating to John J. Crittenden's service as Kentucky legislator and Governor, as member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861.

In addition to the political related materials are papers pertaining to the private life of the family and the publication of "The Life of John. J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). Also included are unpublished letters from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

2 results in this collection

Harden family papers, 1772-1940

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 2,531 items including 27 volumes.
Collection includes correspondence, diaries, account books, daybooks, and legal and other papers, of Edward Harden, planter, lawyer, and politician, of Athens, Ga.; of his son, Edward Randolph Harden, lawyer and politician; and of other members of their family. The material concerns U.S. and Georgia politics, Cherokee Indian affairs (1840s), military recruitment in the Civil War, the 44th Georgia Infantry, military operations in the Confederacy, Reconstruction and economic conditions, the Republican Party in the south, social life and customs, genealogy, and other matters. Also includes a diary kept by Evelyn Harden Jackson during the last months of the war referring to the general alarm preceding Sherman's activities in Georgia.

This collection contains political, family, and business papers of Edward Harden (1784-1849), planter and politician; of his second wife, Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden (1794-1874); of their son, Edward Randolph Harden (1815-1884), telegraph operator and lawyer; of their daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden (1811-1887); and of Edward Randolph Harden's children.

Papers of Edward Harden include a diary with information concerning the operation of 'Silk Hope,' a rice plantation near Savannah, with inventory of equipment and work done during 1827; lists of slaves; courtship letters to Mary Ann Elizabeth Randolph; letters to his wife about farm work to be done in his absence; letters of Peter Randolph, father-in-law of Harden; letters to his wife while in the Georgia legislature in 1825; and letters and papers pertaining to his duties as counsel for the Cherokee Indians, U.S. marshal in Georgia, 1843, and collector of the port of Savannah, 1844. Letters in 1846-1847, from Washington, D.C., while Harden served as Indian Commissioner, concern Washington social life and customs, office seekers, bureaucracy, James K. Polk and Sarah (Childress) Polk, and Dolly (Payne) Todd Madison. Also included are letters from Howell Cobb, concerning his efforts to obtain political offices for Harden; legal papers consisting chiefly of depositions, letters, and notes pertaining to Harden's law practice; letters relative to the course of study and tuition fees of Harden's daughter, Mary, while at the Latouche School in Savannah; letters connected with the activities of the Georgia Historical Society; and information regarding Thomas Spalding of Sapelo Island. Other papers consist of an account by Harden of his appointment to and removal from the collectorship of the port of Savannah; receipts; a few account books and diaries; deeds, letters of dismissal, and other papers pertaining to the Mars Hill Baptist Church; and references to various residents of Athens, Georgia, where Harden conducted a law school after 1830.

Letters of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden are to her husband; to her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden, while the latter attended school in Savannah; and to her son, Edward Randolph Harden, while he attended the University of Georgia, Athens, 1829-1830. Papers, 1849-1860, chiefly concern her efforts to get land warrants for her husband's services in the War of 1812, and papers, 1865-1874, deal with her attempts to obtain a pension on the same grounds.

Letters of Edward Randolph Harden from 1854 to 1856 describe his duties as judge of the first court in the territory of Nebraska and conditions there. Letters, 1859-ca. 1870, of Edward Randolph Harden, of his daughter Anna, and of other children of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden, reflect the poverty of the family and conditions of the time. Civil War letters of Edward Randolph Harden describe the activities of the army while he served as an officer of the Georgia state troops, civilian life, and commodity prices. Postwar letters concern his removal from Rome to Cuthbert and later to Quitman, all in Georgia; and his desultory practice of law supplemented by storekeeping and, in 1870, by work as a census enumerator.

There are also letters of the related Jackson family, including correspondence between Asbury Hull Jackson and his family describing his service in the 44th Georgia Regiment, the fighting around Richmond in 1862, and the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania. Clippings concern the formation of the 3rd, 4th, 6th, 10th, and 16th Georgia Regiments in the early days of the war.

Among the letters to Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden is a proposal of marriage from John Howard Payne, author of "Home Sweet Home!" whom she met when he visited Georgia in the interest of the Cherokee Indians. According to tradition her father refused to allow the match. The collection also contains other proposals, all of which she refused; and her diary, 1853-1883.

Throughout the collection are frequent letters from Henrietta Jane (Harden) -Wayne, daughter of Edward Harden by his first marriage and wife of James Moore Wayne's nephew. Her letters give detailed accounts of life in Savannah and the people there, including mention of James Moore Wayne (1790-1867).

Among the correspondents are John Macpherson Berrien, Sr., Benjamin Harris Brewster, Joseph Emerson Brown, Howell Cobb, William Crosby Dawson, Hugh Anderson Haralson, Benjamin Harvey Hill, Amos Kendall, John Henry Lumpkin, John Howard Payne, Richard Rush, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, Thomas Spalding, Wil]iam Henry Stiles, Israel Keech Tefft, George Michael Troup, James Moore Wayne, and Lewis Williams.

2 results in this collection

Tyre Glen papers, 1806-1882 and undated

4 Linear Feet
Tyre Glen was a slave trader, planter, postmaster, and merchant in North Carolina. This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

Volumes include accounts of slaves, mercantile interests, and general expenses. Also included in the collection are two volumes concerning a firm known as Poindexter and Palmer operating a general store in North Carolina. These records contain numerous accounts of individuals from the region included H.P. Poindexter, various members of the Clingman family and Richard C. Puryear.

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Graham family papers, 1773-1885

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1113 items including 11 vols.
Collection contains correspondence, account books, records, sermons, and other papers (chiefly, 1800-1880) of the Graham family of Virginia. Includes letters of the Rev. William Graham, Presbyterian minister and one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University); material relating to the patent on Dr. William A. Graham's fire extinguisher; records (1774-1803) of tuition charges and books bought by Washington College students; and correspondence between Edward Graham and Edmund Ruffin discussing scientific experiments.

This collection holds records of three generations of a family of Scots-Irish Presbyterians. Correspondence of Reverend William Graham (1746-1799), who moved from Pennsylvania to Lexington, Virginia, about 1776 and was one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University) refers largely to his investment in land on the Ohio River near Marietta after 1796, and his lawsuit claiming he had been cheated.

The bulk of the collection comprises the correspondence of William's brother, Edward Graham, a lawyer and professor at Washington College. There are many letters between Edward's wife, Margaret (Alexander) Graham, and her children. Represented also are William A., Archibald A., Nancy, Elizabeth, and Edward, Jr. Included is correspondence of Edward Graham with Edmund Ruffin concerning scientific experimentation and many letters concerning the patent application of William A. Graham, an inventor, for his fire extinguisher.

There is also correspondence of Dr. John Graham and Beverly Tucker Lacy, grandsons of Edward Graham. Account books of Archibald Graham of Lexington, 1840-1880, 7 vols., include one volume (6 pp.) on the administration of Edward Graham's estate and the guardianship of Martha and Elizabeth Lyle. Account books, 2 vols., of Edward, Sr., contain judgments and court actions, 1801-1811, and accounts of Washington College, Lexington, 1831-1836. A commonplace book, 1820, may relate to Edward Graham. There is a genealogy of the Alexander and Graham families by John A. Graham.

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Fowler family papers, 1779-1870

4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume
Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

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