Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

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David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

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William S. Carter papers, 1830-1922

3 Linear Feet
Col. William Sylvester Carter (approximately 1833-1902) was a white Confederate plantation owner, businessman, and state representative from Fairfield in Hyde County, N.C. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents, including enslaved and later emancipated African Americans, throughout the mid-ninteenth century. Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents throughout the mid-ninteenth century. A small amount of materials in the ledgers relate to Black people and are indicated with the headings "negro" - this material is sporadic and dates both pre- and post-emancipation.

Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War, including correspondence informing the family of the death of Captain James Carter in 1862. Other materials relate to the enslavement of different men, women, and children, including bills of sale, rental and lease information, and medical expenses accrued by the slaveholders for the different slaves treated on various plantations in the 1850s and 1860s. One document records the names of slaves who self-emancipated themselves following the Union Army victory at the Battle of New Bern. Following the war, most correspondence and legal documents relate to estates and other routine business transactions. There are two election certificates for William Carter in the 1860s, and a draft of a letter to the editor from David S. Carter promoting Democratic candidate Edward J. Warren. The collection also contains several dozen forms returned to the Richmond Boarding House Bureau of Information (1907) reflecting prices of room and board.

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Alonzo G. Beardsley papers, 1787-1897

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,597 items (including 1 vol.)
This collection, largely the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley (founded c. 1868), also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded them, including John Porter, judge and state senator. During the 1850s the collection also includes the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. From 1840 to 1860 the papers concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States. The Civil War period papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy, U.S. Representative from Cayuga County, N.Y. include mention of appointments and promotions; aid to wounded soldiers; defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863, civilian morale, and the activities of Southern sympathizers. Post Civil War materials include the papers of the Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. Letters after 1870 include information about gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872, and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. There is also genealogical material for the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

This collection contains mostly the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley, also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded this firm. The early papers, beginning about 1800, center on John Porter, judge, state senator, and law partner of New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop. In about 1840 the Porter letters merge into those of William Allen, and for the next fifteen years the correspondence reflects Allen's legal practice and depicts life in Auburn, New York. The letters of Alonzo Beardsley begin about 1842, but it is not until 1855 that he and Allen become partners. During the 1850s the papers also include the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. For the most part, papers during 1840-1860 concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States.

For the Civil War period there are the 1860s papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy from Cayuga County, New York, a U.S. representative. Topics include appointments and promotions, aid to wounded soldiers, defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of the 5th, 111th, and 138th New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863 and its enforcement, and civilian morale and the activities of Southern sympathizers, especially in 1863. Pomeroy's correspondence also concerns patronage, party organization and rivalry, and service to constituents. From 1865 to 1870 there is much family correspondence, particularly letters to Nellie Bisby of Attica, New York. Between 1865 and 1868 many papers appear from Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. After 1870 letters of Alonzo Beardsley relate to miscellaneous subjects, such as gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872; the Oswego Starch Company; and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. Numerous legal papers and documents reflect all phases of the Osborne firm's work. There is a large amount of related printed matter. The collection also included genealogical material on the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

2 results in this collection

Guido Mazzoni pamphlet collection, 1572-1946, bulk 1750-1940

Online
860 Linear Feet — 1626 boxes — 49,648 items
This collection of print materials, many of them rare and ephemeral, was assembled over many decades by Guido Mazzoni, an Italian Senator, Dante scholar, professor, and bibliophile. The approximately 49,648 pieces span the years 1572 through 1946, with the bulk dating from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries. Topics range widely and include Italian politics, particularly the rise of Socialism and Fascism; Italian humanities, especially poetry, theater, and opera; Dante studies; patriotic writings, including some by Mussolini and others in his regime; and the history and context of both World Wars. Popular literary and cultural serials abound, many with writings by noted authors, including women writers. Given Mazzoni's background in academics, his friendships with publishers, and his residence in Padova and Firenze, many of the authors are Jewish. Many of the pieces were sent to Mazzoni from former students or colleagues and are inscribed to him. Mazzoni collected many rare pieces from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; broadsides from Napoleonic, Medicean, and Borbonic Italian regions are numerous. Formats represented in the collection include: pamphlets, offprints, clippings, full-issue newspapers (many from the Piedmont), libretti, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, political broadsides, epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one handmade photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with map inserts. About 80 percent of the material is in the Italian language: other common languages include Latin, French, English, German. There are also some publications in Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages. The largest and most developed subject areas, with thousands of pamphlets in each series, relate to Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the early 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from its earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscans to the rise of Fascism in the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections relate to Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially opera and popular music; art history; and religious history. The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented by the collection are too numerous to mention in this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed in this guide. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials on Dante Alighieri and his works number in the thousands.

The Guido Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection spans the years 1572 through 1946, with approximately 46,825 pieces in the collection. The bulk of the material, chiefly in the Italian language, dates from the mid-eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Formats represented include: pamphlets, libretti, clippings, newspapers, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, broadsides (some very large), epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with maps enclosed.

About 80 percent of the materials is in the Italian language, though other languages are represented, most notably Latin, French, English, German, Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages.

This guide offers access to brief descriptive records for each item. Hundreds of pamphlets, particularly the epithalamia, were described more fully in the library's online catalog and can be found by using the subject keywords "provenance" and "mazzoni guido." A full set of more than 30 volumes held by the library offers photocopied images of Mazzoni's handwritten catalog slips for subject and name access to the pamphlets.

Guido Mazzoni assembled his library in several ways. He purchased many items from rare book dealers and other book sellers in Italy, particularly in Padua, Florence, and Bologna. His colleagues and former students sent him thousands of offprints, extracts, and small volumes of their work, most of them inscribed to Mazzoni. He accumulated materials from his work in the Italian Senate, most notably in areas of education, politics, and the humanities. He also acquired either by purchase or by inheritance entire libraries of academic colleagues, some of whom became his relatives by marriage. Some of these names include Giuseppe Chiarini, his father-in-law, and Raffaello Fornaciari.

The importance of the Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection primarily lies in its contribution to the fields of European and Italian studies. It is a broad but selective bibliography - put into material form, as it were - of nineteenth-century European culture and its transition into the twentieth century. The intellectual arrangement assigned to the pamphlets by library staff places them into thirty-one subject areas.

The largest and most developed subject areas, each represented by thousands of pamphlets, are: Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from their earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscan period to the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections include Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially popular music and opera; art history; and religious history. Many individual items, particularly literary publications, are ephemeral, rare, and difficult to locate in the United States and even in Italy.

The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented in the collection are too numerous for this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed below. Suffice it to say that virtually every important poet, dramatist, writer, historian, and political figure of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is represented, and, perhaps more importantly, many minor authors and political figures of those eras whose works are now difficult to find. In addition, prominent scientific individuals of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries are represented in the collection. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials relating to every topic in Dante studies number in the thousands.

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Folder

The Archaeology series contains pamphlets, offprints, extracts, and many illustrated pieces. It is a small group of 233 pamphlets.

Of importance are the pamphlets concerning numismatics, particular excavations during the nineteenth century, papyrus studies, ancient art, and Italian ceramics. There is even an unusual and probably rare guide to the pornographic artifacts in the Museum of Archeology in Naples.

Authors of interest include Medea Norsa, a well-known papyrologist of the nineteenth century, Luigi Pernier, Corrado Ricci, Giuseppe Gerola, Guido Ferrari, Santi Muratori, Astorre Pellegrini, E. Teza, Luigi Milani, Luigi Rizzoli, Settimio Severo, and Luigi Chiappelli.

Related subjects and areas of overlap are found in the Italian Art series and perhaps in the history-related subject areas.

Folder

This is a small group of 147 pamphlets, many of them illustrated, having to do with the design and construction of particular monuments or buildings.

The dates range from 1795 to 1942.

Of primary importance are pamphlets on Renaissance palaces and on the architecture of churches. One group of items has to do with the construction of the new Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence during the 1930s; there are several architects' proposals in this group.

Individuals represented are: Giuseppe Giusti, Adolfo Venturi, Giuseppe Boffito, Luca Beltrami, Raffaello (S), Alvise Cornari (S), Fra Giovanni Giocondo (S), Giuseppe Poggi (S), Battista Covo (S), Jacobo Sansovino (S), Giovanni di Lapo (S), Giuseppe Segusini (S), and Antonio Averlino, "Il Filarete" (S).

There are numerous areas of overlap in connection with this group. Only items strictly having to do with architectural subjects are included in it; for example, for descriptions of buildings that focus more on the history or on the art inside, one should look under "Art, Italian," or "Italy -- History." One can also try "Italy -- Description and Travel" for tourist-oriented publications such as guides to towns or palaces. Some related pamphlets may also be found in the "Italy -- Politics and Government" series if the focus is on a government project, particularly if it is propagandistic. For monuments erected in honor of particular individuals, look under "Biography" and use that person's name. Pamphlets related to monuments erected in honor of historical events will be found under "Italy -- History," or "World War, 1914-1918", and so on.

Folder

This series includes 797 items including pamphlets, clippings, and periodicals, with many illustrated materials.

The areas of Italian art most represented are painting and sculpture; there are also numerous pamphlets on religious art and manuscript illuminations.

Individuals represented are: Luca Beltrami, Adolfo Venturi, Mario Salmi, Leonardo Da Vinci (S), Michelangelo (S), Giotto (S), Lorenzo di Credi (S), Botticelli (S), Sem Benelli (S), Andrea del Verrocchio (S), Giorgio Vasari (S), and many others.

Only items having to do with visual arts or art criticism are found here. One should turn to "Biography" for items related to a specific individual's life and works. For related topics, look under "Archaeology" or "Architecture." Again, some propagandistic works related to Fascism, for example, might be found under "Italy -- Politics and government," as this subject heading would reflect a more relevant and more specific area of interest to researchers rather than the general heading "Art, Italian."

For works concerning non-Italian art, one may search the "History" subject area.

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of portraits and images of women, 1600s-1940s

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. A small portion of the ephemera collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women.

Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. Examples of women depicted include: Mother Damnable, Moll Cutpurse, Catherine de Medici, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Martha Hatfield, and Madame de Genlis. One item is a relief sculpture of the bust of Martha Washington. A small portion of the collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a copy of a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers. Many of the items in this collection are loose pages which have been copied or removed from bound volumes.

3 results in this collection
File

Assorted portraits and images of women, approximately 1600s-1930s 3 Files — 2 folders in Box 1, and 1 item in Oversize Folder 1

Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name.

File
Box 1

Assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers.

Augustin Louis Taveau papers, 1741-1931

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,862 items
This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1830-1886) of Taveau, of his father, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and of their family. The collection centers around Augustin Louis Taveau and relates to his education, activities as a poet, European travels (1852-1854), career in the Confederate Army, postwar condemnation of Confederate leaders, removal to Maryland (1866), and agricultural efforts. Other subjects include family and legal matters, social life and customs in South Carolina, the education of Southern girls, rice planting before the Civil War, planting in Mississippi and Louisiana (1850s), agriculture and scientific farming in Maryland, Charleston during the Civil War, postwar politics, and other matters. Correspondents and persons mentioned in this collection include William Aiken, Josias Allston, Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, Ralph Elliott, Nathan George Evans, J. A. Gadsden, Horace Greeley, William Gregg, Thomas S. Grimké, Robert Y. Hayne, O. W. Holmes, W. H. Huger, Robert Hume, T. J. Hyland-MacGrath, Andrew Johnson, Carolina Olivia Ball Laurens, Eliza G. Maybank, James L. Petigru, J. J. Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Clifford Simons, Keating L. Simons, Admiral Joseph Smith, Horatio Sprague, John R. Thompson, and members of the Girardeau, Swinton, and Taveau families.

This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence of Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau (1790-ca. 1857), planter; of his wife, Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau (d. 1847); of their son, Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), planter and author; of the latter's wife, Delphine (Sprague) Taveau (1832-ca. 1909); and of relatives and friends.

Papers prior to 1829 consist of a copy of the will of William Swinton made in 1741 and letters between the Swinton and Girardeau families recording Charleston events, the marriage settlement of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball and Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and a copy of the will of Caroline Olivia (Ball) Laurens, daughter of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau by her first marriage. Beginning in June 1829, and continuing for more than a year, the collection contains letters to Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau from her husband, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, while he was in France endeavoring to settle his father's estate.

In 1838 the papers begin to center around Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), while in school at Mt. Zion Academy, Winnsboro, South Carolina and while later studying law and dabbling in poetry while living in or near Charleston, South Carolina and touring Europe from 1852 to 1854. From 1855 until 1860, the papers contain correspondence with the publisher of Taveau's book of poems, The Magic Word and Other Poems (Boston, 1855), published under the pseudonym of 'Alton,' correspondence with the Sprague family in an effort to obtain the remainder of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau's patrimony, papers relative to a mortgage on Oaks Plantation held by Robert Hume, letters relative to the failure of Simons Brothers in Charleston in 1857 and the consequent loss of Oaks Plantation, letters of Taveau describing a trip to New Orleans (Louisiana), with his slaves and their sale, letters of Taveau to his wife describing various plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana, and a series of letters in 1860 to and from Taveau, Ralph Elliott, and Clifford Simons regarding a supposedly slighting remark involving Taveau's credit.

Late in 1861 Taveau settled on a farm near Abbeville, South Carolina, but soon afterwards joined the Confederate Army. His career in the army continued until 1865. Letters to his wife during the war period, include Taveau's accounts of his efforts as a soldier, descriptions of Charleston during the war, copy of a letter evidently intended for a newspaper, protesting that gentlemen of birth and education could get no commissions in the army while sons of tinkers could; accounts of his duties as guard at the "SubTreasury" in Charleston; papers relating to an effort to permit Delphine (Sprague) Taveau and her three children to sail for Europe in December, 1864; and oaths of allegiance and passports issued to Taveau and his wife and children, March 3, 1865, for going to Boston, Massachusetts.

Immediately after the war, the papers contain letters and copies of letters published in the New York Tribune by Taveau under the title of A Voice from South Carolina, stating that former Southern leaders could not be trusted and condemning them for having allowed conscription. Included also are drafts of letters from Taveau to Horace Greeley and William Aiken; letters relative to Taveau's efforts to get the position of collector of the customs at Charleston; accounts of an interview of Taveau with Greeley and with President Andrew Johnson; letter of June 25, 1865, describing conditions in Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina; a copy of a petition signed by Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, William Gregg, and Taveau begging President Johnson to appoint a provisional governor for South Carolina; several letters to and from William Aiken; and letters written by Taveau to his wife in the autumn of 1865 from various points in Virginia including areas near Richmond, Alexandria, and Warrenton, where he had gone in search of a farm.

Taveau and his family finally settled in 1866 on a farm near Chaptico in St. Mary's County, Maryland. From 1866 until 1881, the correspondence is concerned with efforts to obtain patents and money for developing a revolving harrow and a steam plow invented by Taveau; efforts to obtain money for meeting the annual interest on the sum owed for the farm near Chaptico; and accounts of Taveau's literary activities. There are letters and papers bearing on Taveau's efforts to interest the Ames Plow Company, as well as manufacturers of farm machinery in Dayton, Ohio, in his inventions and drawings and circulars relative to the inventions. From 1878 until Taveau's death, his papers contain manuscripts of his poems and correspondence with many leading publishing houses regarding the publication of Montezuma (published in New York in 1883 and again in 1931). Thereafter much of his correspondence consists of letters of thanks from various relatives, friends, and well-known literary figures for copies of Montezuma sent them by Taveau; and letters to newspapers and magazines submitting his poems and usually followed by letters of rejection.

Throughout the collection there are many letters from the mother and sisters of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau, usually in French. Letters of her brothers, however, were generally in English. Among the correspondents are William Aiken, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Johnston Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Smith, and John R. Thompson. Also included are some Unpublished Letters of John R. Thompson and Augustin Louis Taveau, William and Mary College Quarterly, XVI (April 1936), 206-221; Letters of Georgia Editors and a Correspondent, Georgia Historical Quarterly, XXIII (June, 1939), [170-176.]

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Bradley T. Johnson papers, 1851-1909

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes (922 items)
Bradley T. Johnson was a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Maryland who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection includes correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in several states, a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. Included also are a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge along with an anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, law student in Richmond, Va. and son of prosperous Charlotte County family.

Correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania of Bradley T. Johnson, a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Md. who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection also includes a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. It includes a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge.

Collection also Includes anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, a law student in Richmond, Va. and son of a prosperous Charlotte County family.

1 result in this collection

Bryant Bennett papers, 1767-1902, bulk 1840-1875

2 Linear Feet
Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

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Caleb Budlong physician's account books, 1817-1843, 1915 and undated

4 Linear Feet — 86 items
Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

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Cornelius Baldwin Hite papers, 1711-1918

4.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,344 items (includes 2 vols.)
Collection contains personal, business, and legal papers of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Jr. and of his family. The material pertains largely to life in Virginia during Reconstruction, with information about social life and customs, and on prominent Virginia families, especially the Marshall family, who were related to Hite by marriage. Includes copies (1709-1711) of passages from the diary of Mrs. Alexander Spotswood, and early legal documents relating to Hardy Co., Va.

The Cornelius Baldwin Hite papers contains report sheets for Cornelius B. Hite, Jr., from several schools in Virginia, 1855-1860; letters from the period of the Civil War, for the most part dealing with the impact of the war on civilians in western Virginia; a large amount of material showing the effect of Reconstruction on Cornelius B. Hite, Jr., and his relatives, including descriptions of economic distress, politics, and the migration of many Virginians to the western United States. There are letters describing social life and community health in Winchester, Virginia, in the 1870s; conditions at Shenandoah Valley Academy, 1868; and a long trip to Texas, 1875-1876. Letters, 1890-1895, are to Elizabeth Augusta (Smith) Hite, mother of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Jr., from her sisters and grandchildren.

The collection also contains legal papers of the Christman, Fravel, and Branson families from 1797; a 19th century copy of excerpts from a journal kept by Ann Butler (Brayne) Spotswood, 1709-1711; and legal papers and letters of the Gales family, 1824-1865. Miscellaneous items include six volumes of songs, poetry, and scrapbooks; bills and receipts; clippings; printed matter; and an account book, 1838-1841, and a ledger, 1839-1841, of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Sr.

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William Henry Hall papers, 1736-1862

1020 items
The Hall family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, were enslavers and owners of tobacco plantations. Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

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The papers begin in 1736, when John Hall (ca. 1717-1790) and his brothers Henry and William become actively engaged in tobacco planting. The letters open with a land indenture of 1745 and continue as business correspondence with London, Annapolis, Baltimore, and local merchants and factories. Comment is made on salt as a necessity for plantation life in 1778 and 1782. An overseer's contract in 1764 gives details of plantation management and enslavement.

A letter is signed by John Hall of "Vineyard" on June 11, 1778. As a member of the Maryland Assembly, he discusses the check and balance theory as it was working out in the "young government" of Maryland, he mentions violent contests, the quit rents and state revenue, militia service, and the role of the governor. In 1787 "Publicanus" addresses the people of Anne Arundel Co. on the topic of paper money.

The will of John Hall (made in 1787) gives his estate as "Bachelor's Choice," on West River, and names his children and their families. Enslaved people are listed as part of the estate. Many of the later letters are from the families of Hall sibilings to William Henry Hall, son of John Hall. A series of law suits occurs in the 1790s as William Henry Hall settles his father's estate.

A letter dated Oct. 3, 1796, to William Henry Hall describes the life of an American seaman impressed into the British navy. Samuel Hopkins, a young Maryland plantation overseer, and John Wilson of Cheraw, S. C., comment in letters to Hall from 1810-1813 on cotton planting in S. C. Hopkins describes on July 1, 1810, a plot by enslaved people to rise against enslavers in the Marlboro District of S. C. In 1813 he writes of hiring a substitute for himself if drafted in the War of 1812. Among W. H. Hall's correspondents were William, John, David, and John G. Weems of Anne Arundel Co., relatives of Mason Locke ("Parson") Weems.

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The bills and receipts contain many an "acct. sale" of tobacco, listing custom duties, charges, etc., in tobacco shipping. Estate inventories for Major Henry Hall, 1758, Thos. Lane, 1790-98, John Hall, 1795, and Mrs. Ruth Hall, 1803, include enslaved people and list possessions. Many mercantile and household accounts are included.

There are 7 volumes dated 1765-1902. Six are account books, two that belonged to John Hall and 4 to William Henry Hall. There is one volume that belonged to Harriet Hall.

Frederick Fraser papers, 1700-1911 and undated

2 Linear Feet
The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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Box 1

Business correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, including commercial problems during the War of 1812, and particularly in Charleston, South Carolina. Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. Also includes some personal correspondence, primarily with the individuals John Dawson, Ladson, H. Cunningham, and B. W. Martin, and an anonymous individual identitified only as I.H.L.

Fowler family papers, 1779-1870

4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume
Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

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Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; approximately 3,516 items
Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) was a lawyer, sheriff, and plantation owner from Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Hicks and of his son, David S. Hicks, planter, lawyer, land agent, and judge in the same locality. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, economic conditions in Virginia, and the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co. Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation on the Red River, Arkansas, after 1837. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons at New Orleans during 1852. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D.J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, John W. Paup, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (died 1858), lawyer and planter of Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons in New Orleans during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks, the papers dated after 1858 are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns African American congressmen in the South and his hatred for them amidst fears of a "Negro supremacy." Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad Company.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, seem to have into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff in Virginia. These are chiefly in the form of account and ledger books.

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Box 1

One letter from November 13, 1840, recently added to the original collection, was written from John Paup, Spring Hill Plantation, Hempstead county, Arkansas, to Edward Brodnax Hicks, his partner in the plantation and resident of Brunswick County, Virginia. His thee-page letter refers to the economics of enslaved labor and buying enslaved persons; illness and the deaths of enslaved persons on the plantation; the cotton crop, insurance, and prices; and the survey of the border between Arkansas and the Republic of Texas.

Slade family papers, 1751-1929 and undated

4.5 Linear Feet
The Slade family were white plantation owners and businessmen in Martin County, North Carolina. This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and family affairs of a plantation owning family in the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances. Also contains materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade.

This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, Thomas Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and the family affairs of a plantation-owning family of the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds, including correspondence and receipts with other N.C. politicians, judges, and officials such as Asa Biggs; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances.

There is extensive correspondence between the women of the Slade family, reporting on local and family news as well as offering opinions and accounts of their various studies and activities. There is also a fair amount of business correspondence and account logs from the various Slade ventures, including fisheries, logging, hog farming, tobacco crops, cotton, and horse breeding.

Of note are the materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade. There are also assorted accounts and receipts documenting guardianship, personal expenses, invoices, and other financial papers relating to the operation of plantations and large farms in North Carolina both before and after the Civil War.

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The family's correspondence includes letters across several generations of Slades and their business associates, friends, and relatives, centering around the family's plantations, farming, and fisheries in and around Williamston, Martin County, N.C.; Tennessee; and Georgia. Early letters document on the activities of Jeremiah Slade, a general during the War of 1812. His letters tend to relate to the fisheries, legal cases, and business issues. Slade served as a North Carolina State Senator from 1809 to 1815, so some correspondence relates to court cases and other activities of the senate. All materials relating to his role as Commissioner for the Tuscarora Indians has been removed to the Tuscarora Nation Series.

The Correspondence Series contains many letters between Jeremiah and Janet Slade and their children, with the majority being from Alfred, Thomas, Mary Ann, James Bog (J.B.), Elizabeth, and William. After the death of Jeremiah Slade in 1824, the family's correspondence tends to center around the activities of his sons, Thomas and William Slade, and their families (they had 12 and 11 children, respectively). Their letters include descriptions of college life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, Greensboro Female College/State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG), and several secondary boarding schools. A few letters early in 1861 are from Henry Slade, a student at Trinity College, Randolph County, North Carolina, until he joined the army in the same year. Henry Slade mentions Braxton Craven, in whose home he boarded.

There is a significant amount of letters documenting the Civil War period, particularly comments on the organization of military companies; campaigns around Yorktown, Virginia, during 1861; fighting, refugees, and the Union occupation in eastern North Carolina; living conditions and high prices; Longstreet's Corps in Caroline County, Virginia, in 1863; and the military situation around Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1863. There are also war letters between Eli Peal and his wife in eastern North Carolina, containing advice on farming operations; payment of taxes; accounts of skirmishes at Camp Burgwyn near Wilmington, North Carolina; slaves running away; difficulty of obtaining clothes; and references to guard duty.

There is a significant amount of correspondence to and from the Slade women (including Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, and Helen) during the Civil War. Letters of "Bog" or J. B. Slade early in 1861 from Harris County, Georgia, reflect enthusiasm for the newly formed Confederacy.

Post-war letters include general family correspondence, with frequent letters between the Slade women, including Janet, Mary, Emma, Martha, and Helen (on the Thomas Bog Slade side) and Annie, Mary, Elizabeth, Helen, and Frances (on the William Slade side). Correspondence also relates to the family's business ventures, including land rentals and other engagements with freedmen, news from the fishery, and reports from various horse breeding ventures. One notable letter is from Fanny, a former slave, writing from Texas in 1867 asking for any information on the whereabouts of her children. She was apparently sold away from them by the Slades. Another notable letter from Mount Airy in 1874 tells of the death of the Siamese twins, Eng and Chang.

The latest letters in the Correspondence series document the activities of James Bog Slade, Thomas B. Slade, and their descendents in Columbus, Georgia, and Martin County, North Carolina. Topics include the Clinton Female Seminary (Clinton, Georgia), the State Normal and Industrial School (Greensboro, N.C.), women's suffrage, Trinity Baptist Church (Caswell Co., N.C.), tobacco farming, hog butchering, and other business interests of the family.

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The Financial Papers series includes financial ledgers, account books, estate inventories, invoices, receipts, orders, lists, censuses and hiring account of enslaved persons, guardianship accounts, and other financial materials documenting the personal and business expenses of the Slades throughout the nineteenth century. Jeremiah Slade's accounts and financial papers have been separated into their own folders; the rest of the family's expenses and income is documented in the General Papers portion of the series. Specific accounts relating to the Conicho Fishery, Lenox Castle, and La Vega horse stud operation are also present in this series. All materials relating the the Tuscarora Nation's accounts with Jeremiah Slade are housed in the Tuscarora Series.

The financial papers of various Slade members also include their tax assessments, sales and evaluations of enslaved persons, estate sales, and personal expenses. Lists of enslaved persons tend to include names, ages, and valuations; other materials include occasional receipts for the sale of enslaved persons; bills for medical care; and account books or lists recording the hiring out of enslaved persons to other farms or plantations in Martin County.

Jarratt-Puryear family papers, 1807-1918, bulk 1843-1879, bulk 1843-1879

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3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 2,349 items (including 4 vols.)
Collection contains chiefly correspondence relating to the Clingman, Jarratt, Poindexter, and Puryear families, early settlers of Surry County, N.C., together with a genealogical table. Subjects include the slave trade between North Carolina and Alabama, 1830-1835; North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction, conditions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill prior to the war, plantation accounts, the distillation and sale of whiskey, and business affairs. Correspondents include William James Bingham, John Adams Gilmer, and Zebulon Vance.

This collection contains papers of the related Jarratt, Puryear, Clingman, Poindexter and Cash families, and especially of Isaac A. Jarratt, soldier in the War of 1812, landholder, merchant, and distiller.

The collection concerns family matters and local affairs; the education of Mary Jarratt at St. Mary's College, Raleigh, North Carolina; the education of Augustus Jarratt at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and conditions at the university preceding the Civil War; Isaac Jarratt's partnership with Tyre Glen in the slave trade between Alabama and North Carolina, 1830-1835; the Creek War of 1836; United States relations with Mexico, 1842; a survey of Wilson, North Carolina, 1851; frontier conditions in Texas; the Civil War, including troop movements in North Carolina and Virginia, conditions in the Confederate Army, conscription, lists of absentees, official orders for enrolling new age groups, conscription lists, casualty lists, payments to widows, and home conditions; freedmen, including letters from former enslaved persons inquiring about relatives; Jarratt's efforts to get whiskey during the war; North Carolina politics after the war; whiskey taxes; conditions in California; a Texas counterfeit affair in which A. B. Clingman was unjustly suspected; the business affairs of the Jarratt family; the administration of the estates of Samuel L. Davis, William Doss, Sally Doss, and Polly Sapp by Isaac Jarratt and of the estate of Richard Clauselle Puryear (d. 1867) by Jarratt and by his son, Richard Clingman Puryear (b. 1848); and the law practice of Richard Clingman Puryear, including the collection of many claims, 1870-1900.

Volumes include a plantation account book, 1834-1881, containing lists and prices of enslaved persons bought and sold in 1834 and 1835; a plantation account book, 1866-1871, recording supplies and cash advanced to tenants; an administration book, 1845-1848, concerning the estate of Matthew A. Doss; and a ledger, 1869-1870, of Isaac A. Jarratt & Sanderford, a general mercantile firm, containing the records of the sale of whiskey.

Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Correspondence, 1817-1895 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Correspondence consists chiefly of business letters by John Knight and his partners and friends. However, there are also many letters by Knight family members and their relatives and friends. The correspondence begins in 1817 with letters from Mary (McCleery) Knight in Indiana to her sister Frances (McCleery) Beall, William M. Beall's wife. There is also correspondence between Fanny Knight, John and Frances Knight's daughter, and Thomas McDannold during their courtship. Correspondence also includes letters from friends and relatives while the Knights were traveling abroad. Many letters also mention John Knight's attempts at various cures for ill health, including water cures, hot springs, and baths.

Between 1830 and 1864, Knight's business correspondence with Enoch Pratt, a Baltimore banker in charge of Knight's finances, William Beall, and others, predominates. Topics include: the U.S. political and economic climate: the conflict between Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson; the cotton market; banking and bank failures; investment in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; the purchase and sale of slaves, with some bought by William Beall and sent to Knight in Mississippi; the treatment and medical care of slaves; the operation of Knight's plantations; piracy on the Mississippi River, 1841; cholera and yellow fever epidemics in New York and New Orleans in 1832, 1833, 1837, and 1841; the economic panic of 1857; education at the Frederick Female Academy, Frederick, Maryland; financial conditions in the United States during the Civil War; the relations between the United States and England during the war; and the course of the Civil War, especially the Union invasion of Maryland. One early letter from Roger Brooke Taney to William Murdock Beall explains his refusal of the vice-presidency and discussing his interest in the U.S. presidency.

Other smaller groups of correspondence were written by Frances "Fanny" Knight McDannold, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, her children Knight and Alexandra, and husband Thomas McDannold, and that family's acquaintances.

The correspondence ends with a much smaller series of letters, which include items to Frances S.Z. Knight from her grandchildren, and other correspondence reflecting her financial and legal activities as she managed her husband's large estate and the guardianship of her grandchildren even as she approached old age.

Some additional correspondence can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers series.

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Notebooks, 1831-1884 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

A variety of small volumes kept by family members make up this series. Frances Beall Knight's 1831-1879 notebooks include a scrapbook with a few entries from her husband and friends, pasted-in clippings with obituaries for Elisha Beall, William M. Beall, and Zeruiah Bell, pasted-in engravings, copied poems, and other writings. There is also a notebook with medical and financial content; a notebook with mostly religious content; and a notebook on various subjects.

There is one notebook from 1858 identified as John Knight's, in which he describes the family's trip to Russia. Also in the series are Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight's booklets of schoolwork dated from the 1840s to 1854.

This series also includes four anonymous notebooks. The smallest item, from after 1862, is actually a small folded sheaf of notes on world history, perhaps from a lecture or a book. Another small volume, circa 1864, contains needlework patterns, recipes, and housekeeping notes, and may be Fanny Knight's; a notebook from 1884 listing traveling trunk and bank vault contents, and medical receipts, which may be Frances B. Knight's while she acted as guardian of her two grandchildren; and another is a baby journal recording in detail the first years of Knight McDannold's life, 1875-1882.

Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated

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1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items
Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including lists with names of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including some lists of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 names of enslaved persons from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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Correspondence, 1820-1920 and undated 11 folders — Approximately 600 items

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About one third of the correspondence dates from the 1820s to 1865, and two-thirds dates from after the Civil War to the early 20th century. Included are 46 letters from the Civil War period to and from members of John and Susan Bullock's family, chiefly concerning their son Walter Bullock's service in the Confederate Army.

Topics in the correspondence typically include family matters such as schooling, illnesses, courtship and marriage, deaths in the family and in the community, farming, sales of agricultural crops, religious life, visitors and local events, and some business matters. There is also some mention of the Spanish-American War in later letters.

There are many letters from the daughters and sons of John and Susan Cobb, especially from William, James, Richard, Walter, Alfred, George, Sally, Lucy, and Beck. Grandchildren's letters and many letters from Beck to her mother Sally (Tarry) Hamilton make up the bulk of the late 19th and early 20th century letters.

Family names also appearing in the papers include: Boyd, Goode, Eaton, Farrar, Hamilton, Harrison, Tarry, Taylor, and Watkins. There are also frequent mention of Andersons, Grahams and Hendersons.

Place names associated with the Bullocks and their relatives are: Williamsborough (or -boro), Granville County, NC (now Vance County), the principal home place for the Bullocks; Wheatland, Tarboro, Warrenton and Rocky Mount, NC; Petersburg, Soudan, Boydton, and Skipwith, VA. There are some letters from Tennessee and Mississippi, where the Bullocks owned land. Other place names appearing include Grassy Creek and Oak Hill, Granville County.

The Civil War letters mostly were sent to and from Walter Bullock and his parents, but there are a few from his brothers, several of whom apparently also served for a time, and other people. They give details about camp life, food and diet, health issues, weather, furloughs, troop movements, and rumors about events. There are frequent requests for supplies from home. One letter bears a long description of the battle of Kinston, NC, 1862; another from an encampment "near Norfolk" dated March 1862 mentions a major naval engagement at the mouth of the James River. A letter from June 1862 brings the news that a Bullock son was taken prisoner. Another letter from John Bullock to a friend announces that Walter was taken prisoner in June 1864, probably when Captain George W. Kirk and Union cavalry overran Camp Vance (Burke Cty.). There is one letter from Walter writing from Johnson's Island, Ohio, September 1864; he then writes several letters from Kenansville, NC in early 1865, and describes the last months of the war. Camp Vance (Burke County), figures most prominently in Walter's letters, who seems to have been by then in the 68th Regiment, and Camp Holmes, near Raleigh. Other place names include Camp Mangum, NC; Camp Arrington, VA, 1862; "in the trenches," Petersburg, VA, November 29, 1864; and Kenansville, NC, December 1864. There are a few letters relating to Captain William Wallace White, who also appears at the head of a militia roll in the Other Papers series.

Folder

Financial Papers, 1808-1876 and undated 6 folders — Approximately 500 items and two volumes.

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Two account books, and loose receipts, bills, promissory notes, estate papers, and other financial records concerning the Bullock family, particularly John Bullock's general store in Granville County (now Vance), and the 19th century farms and small plantations of the Bullocks and other relations. Of particular note are two 1836 documents concerning the purchase by John Bullock from the Torrey or Toney family of an African American woman, Kitty, and her three children, Martha Ann, Mordecai, and Sally.

Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1823-1954 (bulk 1823-1883)

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8 Linear Feet — approx. 3,000 Items
Alexander H. Stephens (1812-1883) was a Georgia lawyer, politician and Vice President of the Confederate States of America. The collection includes a large amount of correspondence as well as bills/receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material. It ranges in date from 1823 to 1954, with the bulk covering 1823-1883.

The collection includes correspondence, bills and receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material and ranges in date from 1823-1954, with the bulk dated 1823-1883. Due to preservation concerns, some items were copied onto acid-free paper and stamped as preservation copies. The originals were placed in mylar and are located in Box 7. Patrons should consult with Rubenstein Library staff before handling these materials.

The vast majority of the collection is comprised of correspondence, covering the years 1823-1883. Many of the letters in the collection were written to Stephens, although there are letters written in his own hand. Throughout the correspondence are letters written to Stephens by various family members, most notably his brothers John and Linton. The bulk of the correspondence pertains to Stephens' law work, regarding issues such as the settling of estates and the collection of debts. The most prominent topics include family matters, business and legal matters and Stephens' health. Given the expansive amount of correspondence, below is a breakdown by decade of other topics which appear, in an effort to assist the researcher in locating materials of interest:

Correspondence 1823-1839: Topics include States' Rights, slavery, and an Indian war in Florida [possibly the Creek War]. There is a letter from Herschel V. Johnson who sought advice from Stephens in 1839 regarding negotiations with a railroad company.

Correspondence 1840-1849: Topics include local and national politics/views, opinions about President Martin Van Buren, "agricultural politics," Thomas Dorr and the People's Party, the purchasing of slaves, the 1843 Boston visit of President John Tyler and Vice President Daniel Webster, Stephens' nomination to serve in the U. S. Congress, Whigs and Democrats (Stephens was invited to attend several Whig-sponsored barbeques), and the death of Stephens' brother Aaron. There is a letter from United States Representative Marshall Johnson Wellborn which discusses the Judiciary Act (1841). There are also a substantial number of letters written by and to John Bird and letters written to him and Stephens (they were likely law partners). Of note are two letters written in 1844 by [Sarvis] Pearson (presumably a client of Stephens or his firm) to his estranged wife Mary S. Pearson which offer insight into the subject of divorce and marital discord of the time period.

Correspondence 1850-1859: Letters written by Stephens start to appear more frequently. Topics include largely family and legal matters.

Correspondence 1860-1869: Topics include employment inquiries both pre- and post-Civil War, autograph requests, Stephens' book about the Civil War, and the social history of a post-Civil War Georgia. Items of note: There are petitions (1860) by Stephens' district constituents asking him to address them about the presidential election. There are letters asking him for permission to travel into the Union. There are a couple of letters written by Stephens to Jefferson Davis. There is a letter from March 1860 to Pearce Stevons [Stephens] by Rody Jordan, both of whom were not only brothers but slaves as well. The letter is likely written by someone other than Jordan. A letter to Stephens in October 1866 states that his former slave Pearce was charged with murder and asks for Stephens' legal counsel at Pearce's request (he apparently complied based on a letter from 1869).

Correspondence 1870-1879: Topics include requests for employment and financial help, requests for letters of recommendation, Linton Stephens' death, Stephens' paper the Daily and Weekly Sun, the federal government, autograph requests, and Stephens' work with the Committee on Standard Weights and Measures. Item of note: There are documents from 1873 concerning an illegal distilling and corruption case in Georgia.

Correspondence 1880-1883: Topics includes Stephens' opinion of President James A. Garfield, his bid for Governor, requests for financial help and letters of recommendation for men interested in state posts appointed by the Governor, such as Physician of the Georgia Penitentiary. Items of note: There is a letter dated 1883 signed by Secretary of War, Robert Todd Lincoln. There are two letters from 1882 which offer some insight into African-American involvement in Georgia politics.

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Henry W. Jones papers, 1813-1877

4 Linear Feet
Henry W. Jones was a farmer, lawyer, magistrate, and distiller from Granville County, North Carolina.

Correspondence and Assorted Family Material is primarily personal correspondence sorted by year. One folder contains handwritten genealogical information about Jones and his lineage. Almost all of the correspondence is addressed to Henry W. Jones, though most of the correspondence came after his death in late 1871 or early 1872, and is addressed to a son, Edward H. Jones of Oxford, N.C. Nearly all of the correspondents, both before and after 1871/1872, were children and children-in-law of Henry W. Jones, most of whom resided in Hopkins Co., Ky. The notable exceptions to this are John and Alice Beasley, a son-in-law and daughter who lived in Tex., and P. H. Gooch, a nephew who lived in Farmington, Mo. Agriculture and family matters are the dominant subjects covered by the correspondence. One family matter of particular interest was an effort by some of Henry W. Jones's children, particularly Soloman W. Jones, a local Methodist preacher, to convert their father to Christianity. These same letters also document the revivals that swept Kentucky in the 1850s. There are also several letters that comment on life in the C.S.A. Army, including ones by E. H. Jones (55th Regiment, N.C. Troops) and B. F. Jones (17th Regiment, N.C. Troops).

The first portion of Legal and Financial Papers contains individual folders with records relating to Jones's career as a magistrate (tax records, election rolls, and warrants) as well personal financial information (distillery taxes and personal tax receipts). The remainder of the series is general financial and legal correspondence sorted by year. This series also contains several account books for business partnerships between Jones and his father-in-law, David Parker.

The final series--Printed materials, clippings, and printed work--contains newspaper clippings, political pamphlets, and other printed material related to farming, legal issues, as well as North Carolina and national politics.

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Alexander Sprunt and Son records, 1779-1960

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6082 items
Cotton firm from Wilmington, N.C., that for a short period was probably the largest cotton exporting house in the United States. Collection includes account books, ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase and sales journals, inventories, other subsidiary books, and some office files and correspondence. Goods were purchased from the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas, and other states and processed in the firm's compress facilities and sold to Great Britain, France, Germany, and elsewhere in Europe.

The collection consists of an extensive, but incomplete, set of account books, remnants of the office file and James Sprunt's correspondence (personal as well as business letters and papers), and pictures. Among the account books there are long series of ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase books, and stock inventories that document the company's operations between the 1870s and 1950s. The ledgers date between 1889 and 1952, and there are private ledgers for 1907 through 1931. The volume of minutes covers 1919-1930, but there are a few others among the offices files along with financial statements, 1885-1915, important legal documents of the partnership and corporation, and assorted other papers.

Correspondence and other papers of James Sprunt and the company date between 1884 and 1952, but they are numerous only for 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921. The letters date mostly to 1904-1910, and 1919-1921, and are largely files of James Sprunt, reflecting his activities in business and interests in secular and theological education, the Presbyterian church in the U.S., and North Carolina history. Notable correspondents and subjects are Alexander Sprunt (1815-1884), Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), Alexander Sprunt (b. 1898), James Sprunt (1847-1924), Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, Francis Herman Packer, John Miller Wells, John Campbell White, Edward Jenner Wood, The Laymen's Missionary Movement, and the Presbyterian mission at Kiangyin, China. Account books, minutes, and correspondence are available also for a number of domestic and foreign subsidaries and branch offices, but these are often quite fragmentary. More than thirty pictures, mostly photographs, illustrate the firm's staff, workers, physical plant, and employees as well as other scenes.

Also included are some papers representing various domestic and foreign subsidiaries and branch offices, especially Champion Compress and Warehouse Company, the Wilmington Compress and Warehouse Company, Alexander Sprunt & Son (of Delaware, a holding company), and the company's offices in New York City and Le Havre, France.

Information about the company's history can be found in: James Sprunt's letters of Nov. 6, 1908; Apr. 9, 1909; Jun. 7 and Oct. 22, 1919; an article in Wilmington's Morning Star from Feb. 11, 1921; and Dictionary of American Biography.

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Folder
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James Sprunt had very extensive correspondence files, of which only a small portion has survived. A year's letters were subdivided alphabetically and included both the incoming originals and the outgoing copies. The years represented by a sizeable body of papers are 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921, but they are probably quite incomplete. All of the papers have been arranged chronologically. The series also contains "other papers," which cannot be identified with their original files. Most of the material came from James Sprunt's files.

The series represents a variety of Sprunt's personal and professional interests. Business operations, the cotton market, and domestic and foreign economic conditions are constant concerns. There was frequent communication between Sprunt and his relatives and business associates in Liverpool. His work as vice consul for Great Britain and Germany appears occasionally. Prominent among his activities and charities is the Presbyterian Church in the U.S., the southern body of the Presbyterians. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church and assisted other congregations in Wilmington and Chapel Hill, where he financed the remodeling of the church as designed by architect Hobart Upjohn. He made substantial contributions to the mission in Kiangyin, China. The interdenominational Laymen's Missionary Movement and its general secretary, John Campbell White, are also prominent in the papers, along with the southern Presbyterian part of of that organization. Sprunt was a principle mover in the arrangements for a statue of George Davis, Confederate attorney general and native son of Wilmington, and there is much correspondence about it, including that with Francis Herman Packer, the sculptor. Sprunt was a trustee of the University of North Carolina and a benefactor of Davidson College, and there are communications between him and the schools' students and officials. Other educational institutions represented include Columbia Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, the antecedents of North Carolina Central University, and other colleges and academies in the South, including several historically black colleges. River and harbor improvements at Wilmington are noted. Scattered political correspondence includes references to state elections, the N.C. Supreme Ct., and the U.S. District Court for Eastern N.C., and the Wilmington riots of 1898. There are several letters about the N.C. Literary and Historical Association and the N.C. Folklore Society, and about other episodes of state history, such as blockade running during the Civil War, President Taft's visit to Wilmington in 1909, Governor Benjamin Smith, and the monument for the Revolutionary battle at Moore's Creek. Correspondence with and about Woodrow Wilson mainly concerned a Carnegie pension for Henry Elliot Shepherd, an educator, but there are a few minor items of a political nature. Sprunt communicated with Senators Lee Slater Overman and Furnifold Simmons about various matters.

Several close relatives of James Sprunt had distinguished careers and are also represented by letters and references: his brother Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), a Presbyterian clergyman at Charleston, S.C.; Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, an architect in New York who was a brother-in-law; Edward Jenner Wood, a nephew and physician who was a pioneer in the campaign against pellagra; and Joseph Austin Holmes, another brother-in-law who was a geologist, chief of the technological branch of the U.S. Geological Survey in charge of the investigation of mine accidents, 1904-1907, and the first director of the Bureau of Mines established in 1910.