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Augustin Grisolle note, undated [probably between 1830 and 1869].

1 item
ANS. Arranges a meeting.
1 result in this collection

Ange Marie Francois Guepin letter, undated [probably between 1825 and 1873].

1 item
ALS. Writes of family matters.
1 result in this collection

Richard Bright papers, [London], undated, probably between 1817 and 1858

4 items
2 letters (ANS) and 2 holograph notes, unsigned, relating to various social engagements.
1 result in this collection

Charles Francois S. Giraudy letter, undated [probably between 1800 and 1848].

1 item
ALS relating medical notes and observations.
1 result in this collection

John Mackie letter, to Tristam Burges, undated [probably between 1790 and 1853]

1 item
ALS. Writes regarding the settlement of an estate.
1 result in this collection

Charles Lasegue note, undated [between 1835 and 1883?].

1 item
ANS. Informs addressee that a Dr. Morel, physician in chief at the Rouen Asylum, wishes to visit their patient, Leon Guibout.
1 result in this collection

Jean Jacques Joseph Leroy d'Etiolles note, [Paris], undated [between 1820 and 1860?]

1 item
ANS. Asks a colleague to assist him the next day.
1 result in this collection

M. Lisfranc note, undated [between 1810 and 1847?].

1 item
ANS.
1 result in this collection

Francois Magendie letter, [Sannois, now suburb of Paris], to Dr. Boulard, undated, [between 1800 and 1855?]

1 item
ALS. Asks him to kindly give three or four baths free of charge to a servant girl of his wife who does not have the means to pay for them. Adds that next time he will recommend better patients.
1 result in this collection

Johann Ferdinand Koreff letter, undated [between 1800 and 1851?].

1 item
ALS. Sends information on cases of artificial anus.
1 result in this collection

Ernst von Bergmann letter, Berlin, undated [before 1907]

1 item
Letter (ALS) concerning corrections to a report.
1 result in this collection

O. Terrillon note, undated [before 1895].

1 item
ANS. Sets a time to meet the next day.
1 result in this collection

J. N. (Jean Nicolas) Demarquay letter, [Paris], undated [before 1875]

1 item
ANS regarding a competition.
1 result in this collection

Jean-Louis-Marie Alibert letter, Paris, undated

2 items
Letter (ALS) describes a treatment for a skin condition. Includes translation. Includes translation.
1 result in this collection

Georges Apostoli letter, Paris, undated

1 item
Letter (ALS) informs recipient that Apostoli will send a recent published thesis on his electrical treatment of fibromata.
1 result in this collection

Esprit Sylvestre Blanche note, undated.

1 item
Dinner invitation (ANS).
1 result in this collection

Joannes de Carro note, Carlsbad, Germany, undated

1 item
Note (ANS). Expects a good season in Carlsbad.
1 result in this collection

Joseph Montagu Cotterill note, London, to Mr. Mayhew, undated

1 item
ANS. Returning thanks for congratulations upon investiture as baron.
1 result in this collection

Robert Jameson letter, to Dr. Anderson, Leith, Scotland, undated

1 item
ALS. Regrets that his present state of health prevents him from visiting Anderson.
1 result in this collection

Westel Woodbury Willoughby letter, [Fairfield, New York], undated

1 item
ALS. Letter of recommendation for Doctor Forester Dexter.
1 result in this collection

W. R. Wilde note, [Dublin], to Mrs. Simpkinson, undated

1 item
ANS. Accepts invitation.
1 result in this collection

A. Trousseau letter, to M. Hipp. Rayer Collard, Paris, undated

1 item
ALS. Asks Collard to befriend a St. Marc, who seeks reinstatement to his former position as principal of a college.
1 result in this collection

Jacques Arsene d'Arsonval letter, Paris, to "Cher Confrere et Ami.", undated

1 item
Letter (ALS) to "Cher Confrere et Ami"
1 result in this collection

Benjamin Guy Babington note, undated

1 item
Note (ANS). Accepts an invitation to dinner.
1 result in this collection

Jean Louis Arnal note, undated

1 item
Note (ANS).
1 result in this collection

Auguste Berard note, to "Mon cher confrere.", undated

1 item
Note (ANS) to "Mon cher confrere" Requests meeting.
1 result in this collection

A. Vulpian letter, undated.

1 item
ALS. Writes regarding the editing of a publication on Parkinson's disease.
1 result in this collection

Sir Charles Clarke note, [London], to Sir Charles Wetherell, undated

1 item
ANS. A note of sympathy.
1 result in this collection

Edward Cowles note, undated.

1 item
ANS. Sends compliments.
1 result in this collection

[Ad?] Richard papers, undated.

2 items
2 autographed notes from unidentified French physician.
1 result in this collection

H. C. Wood, Jr. letter, Philadelphia, undated

1 item
ALS. Refers the addressee to Alfred Stille's and John Shaw Billings' writings on cholera.
1 result in this collection

Alexander Braun note, Berlin, to Herr Gilman, [no year], Feb. 20

1 item
Note (ANS) inviting Gilman to an evening with the "Gesellschaft naturforscher Freunde."
1 result in this collection

Elisha North manuscript, [not before 1811].

1 item
Manuscript pages from a proposed, but never published second and revised edition of North's book, "A treatise on a malignant epidemic, commonly called spotted fever". Available are photographs of the title page of North's own copy of the book, which bears marginal notes in his hand. Reader is referred to the article by Pleadwell, "A new view of Elisha North ... ", in Annals of medical history, 6 (1924). The manuscript and North's copy form the basis of this essay.
1 result in this collection

Dujardin-Beaumetz letter, [Paris], circa 1833-1895

1 item
ALS. Asks that recipient examine bearer of letter. Typed transcription available.
1 result in this collection

Marion T. Plyler papers, circa 1832-1950

1 Linear Foot — 750 Items
Marion Timothy Plyler was born in Iredell County, N.C., near Statesville in 1867. He graduated from Trinity College in 1892 with a B. A. degree and played on the school's first football team. He earned his M. A. degree at Trinity in 1897 and received his Doctor of Divinity degree from Duke University in 1937. Additionally, Dr. Plyler received the M. A. degree and the D. D. degree from the University of North Carolina in 1905 and 1931, respectively. Dr. Plyler was ordained as a minister in the Methodist Church in 1892. Contains typescripts, correspondence, and printed matter, with the bulk of the material consisting of the manuscript of Dr. Plyler's unpublished biography of William Preston Few, written in 1948-1949, as well as copies of Few's writings and addresses. The collection ranges in date from 1832-1950.

Contains typescripts, correspondence, and printed matter, with the bulk of the material consisting of the manuscript of Dr. Plyler's unpublished biography of William Preston Few, written in 1948-1949, as well as copies of Few's writings and addresses. There are several folders of related printed matter, research notes, and articles, including typescripts annotated by Dr. Few and Dean Alice Baldwin. Correspondence concerns the North Carolina Pastors' School, Methodist Conference matters, and the Few biography. The collection also includes some genealogical notes and other typescripts by Dr. Plyler. The collection ranges in date from 1832-1950.

1 result in this collection

American Song Sheets collection, circa 1830s-1920s bulk 1850s-1880s, bulk 1850-1889

Online
3 Linear Feet — 1982 Items
In the mid nineteenth century, publishers printed the lyrics to popular songs, without their tunes, on small sheets called song sheets, handbills, or broadsides. These sheets were often illustrated with a woodcut scene or portrait and sold at gathering places where people sang together. Duke's collection of American song sheets includes 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from "The Star Spangled Banner" to "Pop Goes the Weasel," forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Duke's collection of American song sheets includes around 1,982 of these ephemeral productions, from The Star Spangled Banner to Pop Goes the Weasel, forming a rich source for research on American society and culture. The American South and the Civil War era are especially well documented, including well over one hundred Confederate broadsides. The collection also includes carrier's addresses, non-musical poetry, and other ephemeral verse. Publishers represented in the collection include: J. Andrews, A. W. Auner, Bell and Company, James D. Gray, Johnson and Company, Charles Magnus, H. de Marsan, T. M. Scroggy, St. Clair Smith, John T. Thorne, H. J. Wehman, J. Wrigley, and others.

Note that some song sheets are housed in the Confederate Pamphlet collection and the Broadsides collection.

1 result in this collection

Sanders Family papers, 1806-1930

Online
1 Linear Foot — 214 items
Primarily the papers of Derrill Sanders, Burrell Sanders, and Benjamin Sanders, and of the Sanders family, concerning the management of small plantations, including Lifeland Plantation, in St. Bartholomew's Parish, Colleton County, South Carolina. Correspondence contains family letters and letters from various cotton factors in Charleston, S.C. Financial papers include household and plantation accounts, receipts for the sale of slaves, and tax receipts. The collection also contains wills, deeds, records of lawsuits, and three volumes, including a book listing slaves and their prices and a record of days missed and wages lost by black workers in 1866.
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Edward Alston Thorne papers, 1820-1909

1.5 Linear Feet
Edward Alston Thorne was a white Confederate Army ordnance officer from Littleton, N.C. Collection comprises business and personal correspondence, legal documents, and other papers relating to Thorne's service in the Confederate Army (mainly in Virginia and North Carolina), his farming operations, and his activity as tax assessor of Halifax County.

Collection comprises business and personal correspondence, legal documents, and other papers (chiefly 1862-1873) relating to Thorne's service in the Confederate Army (mainly in Virginia and North Carolina), his farming operations, and his activity as tax assessor of Halifax County. Unprocessed material includes legal and business papers, including receipts and invoices; account book (1862); correspondence, much of it to his wife Alice Maria Harriss Thorne during the Civil War; biographical sketch of Thorne (ca. 1895); a land survey (1821); and an undated drawing of a building.

3 results in this collection

John Foot Scrapbook, circa 1810s-1870s

0.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item
John Foot, Esq., presumably of Westminster, England. Victorian scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

Victorian era scrapbook, roughly 100 pages, compiled by one John Foot, containing engravings, practice calligraphy, trade cards, announcements, tickets, early examples of color printing, and numerous other engraved or lithographed items originating in or around London, England from the 1810s to 1870s. Items of interest include a ticket to the coronation of Queen Victoria, lithographed advertisements for books, letterhead, book plates, sketches, and other ephemera.

1 result in this collection

Manuscript Sheet Music collection, circa 1800s-1900s

0.3 Linear Feet — 1 oversize folder; 20 piece
Collection includes 20 pieces of collected manuscript sheet music, circa 1830s-1900s. The scores, which cover multiple genres, were most likely copied by hand from other sources.
1 result in this collection

P. C. A. Louis note, to M. le President de l'Academie, circa 1800-1872

1 item
ANS. Asks the President to recommend a doctor from the French garrison in Rome.
1 result in this collection

Emily G. Wightman testimony on spousal abuse and neglect, circa 1800-1850

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 leaf — 16 x 20 cm.
Single page testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman describing her husband's physical abuse and his neglect of his children.

Single-page handwritten manuscript testimony signed by Emily G. Wightman on the topic of her husband's physical abuse of her and his neglect of their children. Text reads: "Cruel and inhuman treatment by my husband such as frequently and greatly impair my health and endanger my life rendering it unsafe for me to cohabit with him - Refusing & neglecting to provide sufficient provisions and clothing for his family and when otherwise provided he deprives the family of their use by hiding & secreting them and locking them up in places where they cannot be found or recovered by the family when needed." Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

1 result in this collection

Richard A. Preston papers, circa 1745-1987 (bulk 1956-1987)

36 Linear Feet — 36000 Items
Richard Arthur Preston (b. 1910), a leading British Commonwealth scholar, was appointed the William K. Boyd Professor of History at Duke University in 1965. Major subjects of the collection include Canadian history, especially military history; the Department of History; and the Canadian Studies program at Duke. Materials include correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, manuscripts, clippings, photographs, and other papers. English.

Collection includes correspondence, reports, course syllabi, printed matter, drafts, research notes, manuscripts, lectures, photographs, clippings, maps, and other papers.

The arrangement of the collection is by accession dates. These additions follow the order given in the collection file and are not presented in chronological order.

The 1981 Additions (A81-60) include extensive correspondence, numerous drafts and published articles and reviews, photocopies of primary sources, some research notes, and administrative papers dealing with the Duke University History Dept. The chief subjects include Canadian military affairs, general military history, military education, and Canadian Studies as a historical subdiscipline. There is a folder list for this addition that is part of the collection file.

The 1980 Additions includes printed material, correspondence, studies, reports, articles, drafts, proofs, outlines, lectures, syllabi, clippings, photos, maps, and other papers. Major subjects include Canadian history, especially military history and current military and defense concerns. The first major portion of this Addition is made up of correspondence about Preston's own research and writings of other scholars. Other materials include Preston's research notes; photocopies and typed copies of historical documents; and guides to historical collections. There are also administrative files about the History Dept. at Duke, and the Canadian Studies Program. There is a small amount of material about the alumni of the Royal Military College in Canada, where Preston taught for a number of years. The second major portion of this Addition focuses on various aspects of modern Canadian defense and external security, Canada and NATO, relations with the British Commonwealth, and Canadian domestic affairs.

1 result in this collection

Harold Jantz Graphic Art collection, circa 1400s-1800s

5 Linear Feet — Approximately 1000 Items
Professor of German literature at Northwestern, Johns Hopkins, and Duke Universities. Collector of German baroque literature and German Americana. A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

A collection of etchings and engravings and other prints. Includes European, American and Asian works. Some old master prints.

This material remains unprocessed and undescribed. Prints have been loosely sorted by American, European, or Asian origin and are foldered accordingly.

1 result in this collection

Dismal Swamp Land Company records, bulk circa 1660s-1860s, 1810-1879

4 Linear Feet
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

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Slade family papers, 1751-1929 and undated

4.5 Linear Feet
The Slade family were white plantation owners and businessmen in Martin County, North Carolina. This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and family affairs of a plantation owning family in the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances. Also contains materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade.

This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, Thomas Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and the family affairs of a plantation-owning family of the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds, including correspondence and receipts with other N.C. politicians, judges, and officials such as Asa Biggs; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances.

There is extensive correspondence between the women of the Slade family, reporting on local and family news as well as offering opinions and accounts of their various studies and activities. There is also a fair amount of business correspondence and account logs from the various Slade ventures, including fisheries, logging, hog farming, tobacco crops, cotton, and horse breeding.

Of note are the materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade. There are also assorted accounts and receipts documenting guardianship, personal expenses, invoices, and other financial papers relating to the operation of plantations and large farms in North Carolina both before and after the Civil War.

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Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers, bulk 1766-1845 and undated

Online
0.8 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 2 volumes
The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record. Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army. There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book. The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death. Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

The Benjamin and Julia Stockton Rush papers include letters, writings, financial records, a few legal documents and one educational record.

Benjamin Rush's personal and professional outgoing letters, with some incoming letters, cover a wide variety of topics, but focus primarily on medical concerns, particularly the 1793 and other yellow fever epidemics in Philadelphia, as well as mental illness and its treatment, and the medical department of the Continental Army.

There are a few letters from others to Julia Stockton Rush that seek to continue ties with her and the Rush family or offer condolences following Benjamin's death. Collection also contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]; other writings include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book.

The financial records include a few statements and receipts, but primarily contain two account books, one maintained by Benjamin Rush, the other by Rush with his wife. These account books provide a complete picture of the family finances from the period before the couple married, almost to Julia's death.

Legal documents include a sworn statement and a land patent, and there is an educational record for one of Rush's students.

3 results in this collection
Container
Box 3, Folder 3
Online

Rush not only detailed her religious thoughts and practiced devotional exercises but also outlined her feelings regarding family matters, especially in regard to her bereavement following her husband's death. She requested intersession for family members, such as when her daughters emigrated to England and Canada and their later return, when they suffered serious illnesses, and blessings for the christenings of her grandchildren. She also noted her general physical and mental health as she aged. Entries are irregular, but often annually mark the New Year and her birthday on March 2nd.

Folder
Online

Contains a medical case book and a fragment of an essay or lecture written by Benjamin Rush, along with his travel diary for a trip to meet with the Board of Trustees for Dickinson College in 178[4]. Other materials include Julia Rush's devotional journal and exercise book, as well as an undated presentation note written by Richard Rush.

Friedrich Tiedemann note, London, [between 1816 and 1848]

1 item
ANS. Requests a meeting with recipient.
1 result in this collection

Theodric Romeyn Beck letter, [Fairfield, New York], between 1815 and 1840

1 item
Letter (ALS). Requests of Mr. Little, a bookdealer, the account against the Western College of Physicians and Surgeons for various medical journals.
1 result in this collection

Hermanus van Kleef collage portrait and burial announcement,, between 1771-1950

3 items
Printed burial announcement, Amsterdam, 1775, of the death and remarkable old age of Hermanus van Kleef; silhouette portrait of cut-out colored papers and a lock of human hair, with holograph caption; and autograph translation of both announcement and caption. Collage portrait supposedly of and by van Kleef a few years before his death at the age of 101. English translation by a Dr. Luckhardt, sometime around 1950.
1 result in this collection

William Holland Thomas papers, 1814-1900s and undated

30 Linear Feet
White agent and representative for the Cherokee, merchant, lawyer, and trader, of Haywood Co., N.C. Collection includes correspondence, account books, day books, ledgers, and other papers, relating to Thomas's life in western North Carolina; the removal of the Cherokee and the status of those who remained; the development of intrastructure including turnpikes and railroads in North Carolina; Civil War fighting in east Tennessee; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and his private business operations as a white trader among the Cherokees. Includes records of Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties, and business correspondence and accounts of Thomas's son, also William Holland Thomas, a merchant and farmer of Jackson County, N.C.

Collection contains letters and papers of William H. Thomas (1805-1893) concerning his life and businesses in western North Carolina; his role as a white agent representing the Indians in negotiations and communications with the U.S. government; the removal of the Eastern Band of Cherokee on the Trail of Tears; the legal and financial conditions of Cherokee who remained behind in North Carolina; the building of roads and railroads through Western North Carolina; fighting during the Civil War in East Tennessee, including Thomas's leadership of Thomas's Legion in the Confederate Army; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and private business of Thomas, including some documentation of his declining health and his institutionalization for mental instability. There are also account books, day books, and ledgers showing a record of goods bought and sold in Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties. Included also are business correspondence and miscellaneous accounts, 1875-1890, of his son, William Holland Thomas, Jr., merchant and farmer of Jackson County, North Carolina.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of women's work and domestic arts ephemera, 1700s-1940s

1 Linear Foot
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

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File
Box 3

Empty wooden box decorated to look like Ladies' Cabinet book, intended to be stored on a bookshelf. Book's cover is a lid for the box, which opens to reveal a hidden storage compartment. Interior of the box lid has a small landscape with lace trim adhered to the surface, but no name or date information regarding the former owner.

Fox and Backhouse family papers, 1673-1930s

1 Linear Foot
Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse were members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in England in the mid-1800s. Their son, Edmund Backhouse, married Juliet Fox in 1848. This collection contains personal correspondence between members of the different connected Quaker families based in England, as well as some diaries, genealogical notes, and other printed ephemera from the family. Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and other ephemeral materials relating to the Fox and Backhouse families, along with materials relating to nineteenth century Quaker communities and families in England. The bulk of the collection is correspondence between different members of the Backhouse family, including Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, their son Edmund Backhouse and his wife Juliet Fox, and their grandson Jonathan Edmund (Jed) Backhouse. Caroline Fox is also a routine correspondant. The letters discuss family news, personal activities and travel, religious sentiments.

There are two excerpts of diaries which appear to be by different authors and may relate to Hannah Chapman Backhouse's travels to the United States in the 1830s, or to another family member's travels in Europe or the Middle East. The handwriting of these pages is challenging and the excerpts are unattributed and appear to be undated, so more research would be helpful.

Also present in the collection are some writings, including essays and poetry, typically spiritual or relating to prayer, as well as some honorifics for Edmund Backhouse and a copy of his obituary. There are some manuscript riddles, some watercolors, and some sketches of scenes and still lifes. The collection also includes some ceremonial documents, including a letter from the Society of Friends declaring support for Hannah and Jonathan Backhouse's travels to the United States.

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William S. Carter papers, 1830-1922

3 Linear Feet
Col. William Sylvester Carter (approximately 1833-1902) was a white Confederate plantation owner, businessman, and state representative from Fairfield in Hyde County, N.C. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents, including enslaved and later emancipated African Americans, throughout the mid-ninteenth century. Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents throughout the mid-ninteenth century. A small amount of materials in the ledgers relate to Black people and are indicated with the headings "negro" - this material is sporadic and dates both pre- and post-emancipation.

Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War, including correspondence informing the family of the death of Captain James Carter in 1862. Other materials relate to the enslavement of different men, women, and children, including bills of sale, rental and lease information, and medical expenses accrued by the slaveholders for the different slaves treated on various plantations in the 1850s and 1860s. One document records the names of slaves who self-emancipated themselves following the Union Army victory at the Battle of New Bern. Following the war, most correspondence and legal documents relate to estates and other routine business transactions. There are two election certificates for William Carter in the 1860s, and a draft of a letter to the editor from David S. Carter promoting Democratic candidate Edward J. Warren. The collection also contains several dozen forms returned to the Richmond Boarding House Bureau of Information (1907) reflecting prices of room and board.

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Lisa Unger Baskin collection of portraits and images of women, 1600s-1940s

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. A small portion of the ephemera collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women.

Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. Examples of women depicted include: Mother Damnable, Moll Cutpurse, Catherine de Medici, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Martha Hatfield, and Madame de Genlis. One item is a relief sculpture of the bust of Martha Washington. A small portion of the collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a copy of a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers. Many of the items in this collection are loose pages which have been copied or removed from bound volumes.

3 results in this collection
File

Assorted portraits and images of women, approximately 1600s-1930s 3 Files — 2 folders in Box 1, and 1 item in Oversize Folder 1

Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name.

File
Box 1

Assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers.

Robert Brown manuscript, [London], [after 1826]

1 item
Holograph, unsigned. A memorial to Dr. Clarke Abel.
1 result in this collection

Robert A. Hill Collection, 1890-2014

Online
755 Linear Feet
The Robert A. Hill Collection covers the period of 1800 to 2014 and documents Hill's research, writing, and publications about Marcus Garvey's life and work and the founding of the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), as well as Hill's many other projects. Items in the collection include research material assembled by Hill, writings by and about Garvey, manuscripts, correspondence, printed material, clippings, microfilm, photographs, video and sound recordings, and objects. Series 1-4 contain the production papers of the Marcus Garvey Papers Project: American Volumes (AM), African Volumes (AF), Caribbean Volumes (CA), and Project Administration (PA). Hill's other projects and writings are included in Series 5-6 as Other Works by Robert A. Hill (OW) and Hill Personal (HP). The remaining Series 7-10 consists of Microfilm (MF), Primary Sources (PS), Research (RE), and the unprocessed Jamaica (J). The collection was acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center in 2015.

The major emphasis of the Hill Collection is The Marcus Garvey and Universal Negro Improvement Association Papers, a series of publications that Hill edited for over thirty years that compile more than 30,000 documents highlighting the influence and accomplishments of Garvey and the UNIA. The process of compiling the twelve volumes is reflected in Hill's collection of research materials from manuscripts, photocopies of microfilm and original sources, newspaper clippings, annotated printed materials, photographs, scholar's correspondence, FBI records, and annotated drafts from U.S. and international archives, universities, and libraries. The bulk of the research materials are reproductions. Original materials can be found in the Primary Sources (PS) series.

The Other Works series contains Hill's personal papers, university-related materials and correspondence, general research, presentations, and other writings. These documents include Hill's historical editions such as Marcus Garvey's The Black Man: A Monthly Magazine of Negro Thought and Opinion; Cyril V. Briggs' The Crusader; George S. Schuyler's Black Empire and Ethiopian Stories; and The FBI's RACON: Racial Conditions in the United States during World War II.

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Jules Gabriel Francois Baillarger letters, Paris, 1840 and undated

2 items
2 letters (ALS). One is a certificate to commit a female patient.
1 result in this collection

John Abercrombie letters, 1839 and undated

3 items
3 letters (ALS), including a letter of reference, dated May 27, 1839, Edinburgh, for Dr. William Pirrie.
1 result in this collection

American slavery documents collection, 1757-1924 and undated

Online
2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Collection of manuscript items relating to American slavery assembled over a number of decades by the staff of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Collection contains items documenting the sales, escapes, and emancipations of enslaved people from colonial times through the Civil War, and to a lesser extent, materials relating to slavery in the United States dating from the post-emancipation period.

The collection brings to light details of the lives and deaths of enslaved and free Africans and African Americans in the southern United States, primarily in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, but also in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. There are also six albumen studio portrait photographs, mounted on card stock, dating from the second half of the 19th century, along with a copper token from the American Colonization Society, dated 1833.

Items have been foldered individually, with the inventory reflecting their titles, geographic origin, and date (if known).

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Justinus Andreas Christian Kerner manuscript, 1835, Mar. 20

1 item
Autograph prescription, signed.
1 result in this collection

Savannah Port papers, 1754-1920

Online
20 Linear Feet — 5,594 items
This collection contains the official papers of the Port of Savannah, Georgia, in the Governmental Coastal District of Savannah. They are papers of ship clearance, cargo lists, Treasury Department letters and similar papers which deal with the customs operations at the port from 1820 to 1920. Although the papers mainly consist of cargo manifests, there are also letters, legal documents, literary pieces, and other miscellaneous items. Several of the items deal with slavery in Savannah and there are occasional mentions of piracy, smuggling, and general misdeeds among the seamen.

The official papers of the port of Savannah cover a myriad of topics, but are primarily comprised of documents pertaining to customs, import and export trade, and shipping. The general papers include ship clearance papers, cargo lists, crew lists, crew bonds, customs papers, salary receipts for port officials, and warehouse papers. The general correspondence includes letters from everyday port transactions and affairs, United States Treasury Department letters, and letters from the British consulate. There are papers concerning construction and maintenance of lighthouses, particularly the Tybee Island Lighthouse. These papers also include a number of legal documents, mostly bills of sale and deeds for land, livestock, sea vessels, and slaves. Other items include lists of seamen admitted to the Savannah poor house and hospital in the 1820s and 1830s, miscellaneous literary documents, and papers of the Savannah Port Society, a charitable organization to aid indigent seamen. Included also is a letter book, 1817-1826, of A. S. Bullock, collector of the port of Savannah, giving many references to economic conditions; a volume listing the persons who entered the port of Savannah, 1817-1818; and volumes containing lists of returns of goods on a number of ships, and inspectors' returns, 1830-1840. Items are arranged chronologically whenever possible.

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John Ware letter, Hingham, Mass., to Doctor Fiske, 1835, June 9

1 item
ALS. Reports no great change in the condition of a Miss Andrews and prescribes various medicines.
1 result in this collection

Thaddeus William Harris letter, Cambridge, Mass., to Jas. Brown, Boston, 1835, Dec. 9

1 item
ALS. Asks Brown, a bookseller, to send volumes of the Boston Journal of Natural History to Mr. A. Halsey of Hartford, and to see that the journal is on sale and advertised in the principal cities and towns.
1 result in this collection

Matthew Thomson Letter, 1835 August 24

0.1 Linear Feet — 1 Item
Mathew Thompson, a farmer in Fleming County, Kentucky with relatives in Greenville, Virginia. Letter from Matthew Thomson in Fleming County, Kentucky, dated August 24, 1835, to a relative John S. Thomson in Greenville, Virginia. Thomson relays news of his Aunt Rebecca's death and the health of other family members, comments on his crops and prices, and advises young men to marry at age 21 and have male children immediately to assist with farm work.

Letter from Matthew Thomson in Fleming County, Kentucky, dated August 24, 1835, to a relative John S. Thomson in Greenville, Virginia. Thomson relays news of his Aunt Rebecca's death and the health of other family members, comments on his wheat crop and prices, and advises young men to marry at age 21 and have male children immediately to assist with farm work.

1 result in this collection

Granville Sharp Pattison letter, Philadelphia, to Robert Gilmor, Baltimore, 1835, Apr. 21

1 item
ALS. Asks for the renewal of a note for $750.00.
1 result in this collection

Nora Campbell Chaffin papers, 1835-1981

0.5 Linear Feet — 250 Items
Nora Chaffin was on the history faculty at Duke University from 1935-1944. Her collection contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

Contains correspondence, clippings, typescripts, reviews, records, and other materials. Among the papers are review of her book Trinity College and a record book of an unidentified YMCA. The collection ranges in date from 1835-1981.

1 result in this collection

Richard Harvey Wright papers, 1835-1980 and undated

151.5 Linear Feet
Richard Harvey Wright (1894-1980) was a businessman of Durham, N.C., and founder of Wright Machinery Company. Wright Machinery merged with Sperry Rand Corporation on 29 March 1957. Collection dates from 1870-1980 and comprises correspondence, 1870-1941; legal papers; printed matter; business papers; financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and letterpress books for business correspondence. Later additions comprise business correspondence; financial ledgers and statements; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Collection (232,267 items; dated 1870-1980) comprises extensive files of correspondence dating from 1873-1941; legal papers; printed matter; many business and financial papers; and clippings relating to Wright's business interests, particularly the Wright Machinery Company of Durham, N.C., manufacturer of packaging for tobacco products and various other kinds of commodities. There is much information on the economic history of Durham and the development of the tobacco industry. Volumes in the collection include financial records and many letterpress books for business correspondence.

Additions (4-27-79) (2002-086) comprise business correspondence; machinery licensing, leasing, and loan agreements; and legal documents (2101 items, dated 1941-1967) of the Wright Machinery Company. Also includes one framed oil portrait of Wright, signed "Freeman. 1922."

Addition (2005-108) (65 items, 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1877-1905) comprises one letter book; one financial ledger; a judgment appeal; general contractor reports and statements; rental statements; and checks.

Two accessions (97-087 and 97-105) containing chiefly print materials from Wright Machinery Company, including company newsletters, were separated from the Wright Papers and placed in the Wright Machinery Company Records collection.

Addition (2021-0025. 1.1 lin. ft.; dated 1835-1878) contains account and day books from Tally Ho and Durham, North Carolina. There is also a volume of "The Methodist Protestant" newspaper and "Gram's unrivaled family atlas of the world".

2 results in this collection

Spanish Vice-Consulate records, 1835-1935

4 Linear Feet — 979 Items
Vice-Consulate of Spain based in Savannah, Ga. Largely communications directed to the Spanish Vice-Consulate in Savannah, Ga., by the Madrid government, by Spanish ministers, consuls, and vice-consuls in the U.S., and by governing officials in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The central theme is Spain's constant preoccupation that American or Cuban expeditions, operating from the U.S., would wrest the island from the Spanish crown. Includes references to political developments within Spain, Spain's commercial relations with her West Indian possessions and with the U.S., and Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru (1865-1866); and routine records relating to shipping, customs service, and commerce.

Largely communications directed to the Spanish Vice-Consulate in Savannah, Ga., by the Madrid government, by Spanish ministers, consuls, and vice-consuls in the U.S., and by governing officials in Puerto Rico and Cuba. The central theme is Spain's constant preoccupation that American or Cuban expeditions, operating from the U.S., would wrest the island from the Spanish crown. Includes references to political developments within Spain, Spain's commercial relations with her West Indian possessions and with the U.S., and Spain's naval war with Chile and Peru (1865-1866); and routine records relating to shipping, customs service, and commerce.

1 result in this collection

Mary Calvert Stribling papers, 1835-1930; bulk 1920-1929

6.5 Linear Feet
Mary Calvert Stribling (1870-1951) was a civic leader, of Martinsburg, West Virginia. Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area. Includes scattered business and family papers.

Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area.

Other papers include: A diploma of Mary Brown Riddle from Woodburn Female Seminary in Morgantown, W. Va. (March 28, 1860); agreement of 1874 between John S. McClellan and M. Nascimento of Philadelphia and C. Strlbling of Baltimore for forming a partnership under the firm name of J.S. McClellan and Co. to manufacture silk and cassimere hats; letters from McClellan to Strlbling about their business; Indenture of 1875 severing Strlbling's relationship with the firm; letters, and will of C. K., Strlbling, who between 1845 and 1847 commanded the U. S. Receiving ship Pennsylvania; catalogue of Prince Edward Academy, Worsham, Va., for 1879; business papers of Mrs. Ann E. Strlbling, wife of Cornelius Strlbling, deceased; reports by Ann E. Strlbling, guardian of her children Chas. R., James M., Mary C, and Sue Brown Strlbling, to the orphans' court in Baltimore and in Martinsburg on the expenditures which she had made for her children and In keeping of their property; letters of Chas. R. While at Hampden Sidney College: business papers of Joseph A. Wishard, proprietor of a hotel in Smithsburg. Md.; programs of a music and a travel club in Martinsburg; sermon notes; broadside by Carrie Chapman Catt entitled "Mrs. Catt on League of Nations and the Presidential Election"; pamphlet published by the Pro-League Independents; papers relating to the dismissal of Gutzon Borglum as the sculptor of the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial and to attempts to raise funds for the continuation of the work on that monument by Augustus Lukeman.; materials relating to Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pa., and to Mary Baldwin College, of which Mary C. Strlbling was an alumna. Bulletin of the Swarthmore Chautauqua, Swarthmore, Pa.; and programs of services at the Presbyterian Church in Martinsburg; map of Winchester Presbytery.

2 results in this collection

William Alexander Smith papers, 1765-1949

20 Linear Feet — 51 boxes; 9 separately bound volumes
William Alexander Smith was a textile manufacturer and businessman of Ansonville, North Carolina. Collection includes correspondence, account books, business records, and other papers, relating to Smith's career as a merchant, cotton textile manufacturer, farmer, and investor. Includes material relating to the family's agricultural, mercantile, and milling enterprises during the antebellum period, with references to Smith's interests in education, the Protestant Episcopal Church, the Civil War, and the United Confederate Veterans, and to automobile manufacture, banking, commercial finance, cosmetics, furniture, insurance, lumbering, patent medicine, personal loans, self-propelled railway passenger cars, real estate development, tobacco processing, and the mining of gold in Alaska and Montana, copper in Arizona, and mica in North Carolina. Correspondents include Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire, Francis Johnstone Murdoch, and George Stephens.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, volumes, printed material and other items relating to the various activities and interests of William Alexander Smith (1843-1934), businessman and investor.

Records of Smith's general mercantile business, 1866-1886, include store accounts, 1875-1886, and a purchase journal, 1875-1877, listing various expenses.

Records of the operation of a store with Charles A. Smith include a ledger, an invoice book, and inventories and financial reports pertaining to the store and its failure.

The management of Smith's farm on the Pee Dee River is documented by records on the cotton trade, prices, the condition of crops, and marketting, and includes agreements with tenant farmers. Records of the Yadkin Falls Manufacturing Company, Milledgeville, North Carolina, 1883-1896, of which William Smith was president, include a letter book, 1887-1888, and an account book, 1876-1887, listing the expenses for the construction of this cotton mill and an inventory of mercantile goods purchased by the company.

For the Eldorado Cotton Mills, Milledgeville, 1897-1906, of which Smith also was president, there are a letter book, 1899-1902; a time book, 1898-1903, a general store ledger, 1900-1903; bank check, dividend check, and deposit books, 1898-1902; correspondence with Tucker & Carter Rope Company which Eldorado supplied with goods, 1898-1902; and records of a legal and financial controversy, 1914-1919.

Other textile mills in North Carolina and South Carolina are the subject of correspondence with Francis Johnstone Murdoch, Episcopal clergyman and textile executive; with Lee Slater Overman, textile executive and U.S. senator; and with James William Cannon, operator of Cannon Mills.

Correspondence with George Stephens, president of the Stephens Company, developers, and officer of the American Trust Company of Charlotte, North Carolina, concerns real estate ventures, such as the development of Myers Park residential area in Charlotte.

Other records relate to investment in the Southern States Finance Company, 1922-1925.

Mining of gold, copper, and mica is the subject of material on the Eagle River Mining Company in Alaska, 1905-1916, the Montana Consolidated Gold Mining Company, 1905-1918, the Monarch Mining and Smelting Company, Wickenburg, Arizona, 1906-1918, and the Spruce Pine Mica Company, Inc., Spruce Pine, North Carolina, 1924-1933.

Papers concerning the insurance business comprise those of the North State Fire Insurance Company and the Dixie Fire Insurance Company, both of Greensboro, North Carolina.

Relating to the railroad and the automobile industries are papers of the Edwards Railway Motor Car Company of Sanford, North Carolina, 1923-1927; the David Buick Carburetor Corporation, 1922-1932; the Fox Motor Car Company, 1922-1923; and the Winston-Salem Railway through Ansonville, 1910-1911.

Other business records concern lumbering in North Carolina, 1916-1925; the Carolina Remedies Company of Union, South Carolina, 1922-1925; the W. L. Hand Medicine Company of Charlotte, North Carolina, 1923-1925; the John E. Hughes Company, Inc., tobacco processor of Danville, Virginia, 1922-1924; and the Forsyth Furniture Lines, Inc., 1922-1923.

Records of William A. Smith's activities as purchasing agent, banker, and broker include ledgers, 1873-1933; daybook, 1885-1893; letter and letterpress books, 1867-1895 and 1909-1910; and other account books.

Papers relating to Smith's writings include material on the publication of his Anson Guards: Company Fourteenth Regiment, North Carolina Volunteers, 1861-1865 (Charlotte: 1914), including correspondence with the Stone Publishing Company, and reminiscences of several members of the Guards; papers on the causes and historiography of the Civil War, especially correspondence with Samuel A'Court Ashe, 1920s and 1930s, correspondence with Benjamin Franklin Johnson, 1915-1916, concerning a biographical sketch of Smith in Johnson's Makers of America; correspondence about Smith's pamphlet on the designing of the Confederate flag and the raising of the first flag of secession in North Carolina; and correspondence and genealogical notes used in the writing of Smith's Family Tree Book, Genealogical and Biographical (Los Angeles: 1922).

There are papers concerning the United Confederate Veterans, especially while Smith was commander of the North Carolina Division during the 1920s.

Correspondence, bills and receipts, ledgers, and writings concerning educational institutions relate to Carolina Female College, Ansonville, of which Smith's father, William Gaston Smith, was chairman of the board of trustees; sponsorship of the Nona Institute at Ansonville, 1906-1910, oriented toward the Episcopal Church; the University of the South, Sewanee, Tennessee, of which Smith was a trustee; Davidson College, Davidson, North Carolina, which Smith had attended before the Civil War; the education of Smith's adopted son, Bennett Dunlap Nelme, at textile schools and mills, including comment about New Bedford and Lowell textile schools in Massachusetts, 1902-1907, and about North Carolina State College, Raleigh, 1900-1903; controversy over the content of history textbooks used in the state public schools, 1921; and membership on the board of managers of the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, North Carolina.

Correspondence with Bishop Joseph Blount Cheshire and Archdeacon Edwin A. Osborne concerns affairs of the Episcopal Church, its missions, local churches, and the diocese.

Relating to the Freemasons are a history of Carolina Lodge No. 141 of Ansonville and the minutes of the lodge, 1906-1925.

Scattered correspondence and other papers pertain to North Carolina elections, especially the Democratic primary of 1912; the courts; the Democratic Party; county government; the good roads movement, especially in 1916; the family life and political career of Edward Hull Crump of Memphis, Tennessee, who was the son of Smith's first cousin; and politics in Mississippi and Tennessee. Other papers include the steam mill account books, 1851-1861, of Smith & Ingram who operated a sawmill in Anson County and correspondence, 1850-1851, concerning the acquisition of the steam machinery to run the mill; diary and notebook, 1765-1789, of James Auld, farmer, clerk of the court, and operator of a store for Joseph Montfort; North Carolina Argus subscription book, i852-1853; account books, 1840-1857, of blacksmiths; account books, 1835-1858 and 1860-1864, of grist mill operators; ledger, 1835-1845, of William Gaston Smith's mercantile business; account books, 1840s and 1850s, of Joseph Pearson Smith, brother of William Gaston Smith, and operator of a mercantile business; ledger, 1858, of Joseph Pearson Smith, and ledger, 1855-1858, of Eli Freeman, carriage repairman, containing records of the sale and repair of carriages and buggies; deeds and plats; papers relating to the administration of the estates of William Gaston Smith (1802-1879), of John Smith (1772-1854), father of William Gaston Smith, and of Mary (Bellew) Smith (1775-1872), wife of John Smith; cashbook, 1875-1902, of William Alexander Smith; an inventory of notes and accounts receivable; stock dividend ledger, 1931-1934; and the financial reports of Mary (Bennett) Smith, William Alexander Smith's wife, and Bennett Dunlap Nelme, who, after 1926, were the legal guardians of William Alexander Smith.

Description taken from: Davis and Miller, Guide to the Cataloged Collections in the Manuscript Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980).

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Abel Beach Nichols papers, 1835-1850

0.1 Linear Feet — 3 Items
Abel Beach Nichols (1796/7-1868) was a merchant, farmer, slave owner and dealer from Bedford County, Virginia. The collection includes a small account book A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836, followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as A list of bonds bought in Alabama ... and Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the writer's intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

The collection includes a small account book that A. B. (Abel Beach) Nichols used to record financial transactions that occurred in Alabama from 1835 to 1836. Nine pages contain handwriting and several pages near the front and back of the book have been removed. Of particular interest are two pages with the heading, "A list of the sales of negroes in the State of Alabama in 1835 & 1836," followed by a tabular listing of the number of slaves, their names, from whom purchased, cost, date, to whom sold, time, and amount. In all, Nichols bought and sold 42 slaves for a profit of $21,430.58. Headings such as "A list of bonds bought in Alabama ..." and "Bond on ... in Alabama for articles sold" are found on subsequent pages. Also included in the collection are two letters addressed to A. B. Nichols. The 1846 letter, from Pollard Hopkins & Co., describes efforts regarding the sell or hire of Nichols' slave, Henry, and the "writer's" intention to buy Henry a horse and dray, thereby giving him the means to eventually buy his freedom. The 1850 letter, from Henry, respectfully explains arrangements for acquiring the title to himself.

1 result in this collection

William Young notebook of seventy-seven sermons, 1835-1848

0.4 Linear Feet — 1 item
Rev. William Young, was an itinerant Methodist preacher. Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848.

Collection of 77 manuscript sermons (246 pages) that were written and used by the Reverend William Young, delivered at irregular intervals between December 1835 and January 1848. Each sermon is identified by a date and place and is signed by Young. They approximately follow the chronology of Young's circuit appointments. The text is followed by an index in which there is a brief thematic description of each sermon, along with the Bible verse upon which it is based.

1 result in this collection

Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated

Online
1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items
Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including lists with names of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including some lists of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 names of enslaved persons from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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Folder

Includes a folder of medical receipts and treatments by local doctors, 1834-1837, chiefly for family members but also mentions enslaved people and servants. Other papers of note in the series include a list of enslaved persons initialed by John Bullock, 1857; 19th century commodities price sheets from Virginia; and school grades and comportment reports, with a few antebellum from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for the sons of John Bullock.

Thomas Hughes papers, Llandilo, [Wales?], 1835-1846 and undated

4 items
Documents, signed, relating to Thomas Hughes, his maternal grandmother, Joyce Morgan, his mother, Anne Hughes Samuel, her second husband, William Samuel, and the disposal of family property and goods. There is also a page of printed material, Miscellaneous articles sold by Thomas Hughes, dispensing chemist.
1 result in this collection

Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; approximately 3,516 items
Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) was a lawyer, sheriff, and plantation owner from Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Hicks and of his son, David S. Hicks, planter, lawyer, land agent, and judge in the same locality. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, economic conditions in Virginia, and the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co. Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation on the Red River, Arkansas, after 1837. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons at New Orleans during 1852. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D.J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, John W. Paup, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (died 1858), lawyer and planter of Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons in New Orleans during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks, the papers dated after 1858 are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns African American congressmen in the South and his hatred for them amidst fears of a "Negro supremacy." Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad Company.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, seem to have into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff in Virginia. These are chiefly in the form of account and ledger books.

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Dixi Crosby documents, 1835-1840

2 items
Holograph receipts, signed. Payments received by Crosby from Mr. Soley for medical services and from Oliver P. Hubbard for graduation fees.
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Abbot Family papers, 1733-1999 and undated, bulk 1860-1910

19 Linear Feet — 10 boxes
The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Folder

Transcription of entries from Charles Minor's personal diary from a trip from Charlottesville to New Orleans, mentioning General Jackson. The second half of the document is Minor's account of his early education in the classics, also detailing the circumstances surrounding Minor's first teaching position in Albemarle County and eventual move to Ridgway.

Personal diary of Anne Minor, youngest child of Charles Minor. The diary describes early childhood experiences during the Civil War, after the family moved from Brookhill to Lands End upon the death of Charles Minor. The ten-page record is unusual for its dramatic reconstruction of a child's perspective on events witnessed during the Civil War, as well as for its disturbing reflections on the particular insecurities suffered by young children in war-time (c. 1929).

Folder

Insurance policies, deeds of trust, and land plats pertaining to Bellevue property and W.R. Abbot's property elsewhere in Virginia and in Kansas City; legal papers of Ellen Abbot's pre-Civil War residence in Georgetown; records of W.R. Abbot's partnership with J.P. Holcombe and his assumption of Bellevue subsequent to Holcombe's death; affidavits of family members recording receipt of inheritance; and original deeds of trust recording land grants made in Virginia to John B. Minor from Sir Thomas Carr of Topping Castle.

Guido Mazzoni pamphlet collection, 1572-1946, bulk 1750-1940

Online
860 Linear Feet — 1626 boxes — 49,648 items
This collection of print materials, many of them rare and ephemeral, was assembled over many decades by Guido Mazzoni, an Italian Senator, Dante scholar, professor, and bibliophile. The approximately 49,648 pieces span the years 1572 through 1946, with the bulk dating from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries. Topics range widely and include Italian politics, particularly the rise of Socialism and Fascism; Italian humanities, especially poetry, theater, and opera; Dante studies; patriotic writings, including some by Mussolini and others in his regime; and the history and context of both World Wars. Popular literary and cultural serials abound, many with writings by noted authors, including women writers. Given Mazzoni's background in academics, his friendships with publishers, and his residence in Padova and Firenze, many of the authors are Jewish. Many of the pieces were sent to Mazzoni from former students or colleagues and are inscribed to him. Mazzoni collected many rare pieces from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; broadsides from Napoleonic, Medicean, and Borbonic Italian regions are numerous. Formats represented in the collection include: pamphlets, offprints, clippings, full-issue newspapers (many from the Piedmont), libretti, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, political broadsides, epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one handmade photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with map inserts. About 80 percent of the material is in the Italian language: other common languages include Latin, French, English, German. There are also some publications in Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages. The largest and most developed subject areas, with thousands of pamphlets in each series, relate to Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the early 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from its earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscans to the rise of Fascism in the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections relate to Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially opera and popular music; art history; and religious history. The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented by the collection are too numerous to mention in this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed in this guide. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials on Dante Alighieri and his works number in the thousands.

The Guido Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection spans the years 1572 through 1946, with approximately 46,825 pieces in the collection. The bulk of the material, chiefly in the Italian language, dates from the mid-eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Formats represented include: pamphlets, libretti, clippings, newspapers, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, broadsides (some very large), epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with maps enclosed.

About 80 percent of the materials is in the Italian language, though other languages are represented, most notably Latin, French, English, German, Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages.

This guide offers access to brief descriptive records for each item. Hundreds of pamphlets, particularly the epithalamia, were described more fully in the library's online catalog and can be found by using the subject keywords "provenance" and "mazzoni guido." A full set of more than 30 volumes held by the library offers photocopied images of Mazzoni's handwritten catalog slips for subject and name access to the pamphlets.

Guido Mazzoni assembled his library in several ways. He purchased many items from rare book dealers and other book sellers in Italy, particularly in Padua, Florence, and Bologna. His colleagues and former students sent him thousands of offprints, extracts, and small volumes of their work, most of them inscribed to Mazzoni. He accumulated materials from his work in the Italian Senate, most notably in areas of education, politics, and the humanities. He also acquired either by purchase or by inheritance entire libraries of academic colleagues, some of whom became his relatives by marriage. Some of these names include Giuseppe Chiarini, his father-in-law, and Raffaello Fornaciari.

The importance of the Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection primarily lies in its contribution to the fields of European and Italian studies. It is a broad but selective bibliography - put into material form, as it were - of nineteenth-century European culture and its transition into the twentieth century. The intellectual arrangement assigned to the pamphlets by library staff places them into thirty-one subject areas.

The largest and most developed subject areas, each represented by thousands of pamphlets, are: Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from their earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscan period to the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections include Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially popular music and opera; art history; and religious history. Many individual items, particularly literary publications, are ephemeral, rare, and difficult to locate in the United States and even in Italy.

The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented in the collection are too numerous for this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed below. Suffice it to say that virtually every important poet, dramatist, writer, historian, and political figure of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is represented, and, perhaps more importantly, many minor authors and political figures of those eras whose works are now difficult to find. In addition, prominent scientific individuals of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries are represented in the collection. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials relating to every topic in Dante studies number in the thousands.

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Paris Cleveland Gardner papers, 1834-1976

5.4 Linear Feet — 3,156 Items

The papers of Paris Cleveland Gardner span the years 1834 to 1976, though they fall chiefly in the period 1920 to 1951. They consist of correspondence, legal papers, case files, printed matter, and clippings.

Included are some papers relating to Gardner's personal life and affairs in Cleveland County, N.C., and in Oklahoma. Of particular interest is correspondence relating to local, state, and national Democratic Party politics and elections in North Carolina in the 1920s and 1930s. Correspondents of note in this group include Richard Fountain, O. Max Gardner, and Robert R. Reynolds. Also present are some case files relating to Gardner's private legal practice, including the 1917 case of Leroy Cowthen, a member of the International Workers of the World (I.W.W.) who was being harassed; the investigation of the Humphreys family claims to the title of a profitable oil field near Beaumont, Tex.; and a file on the Shelby (N.C.) Building and Loan Association. Also included in a file of miscellaneous material is some genealogical material on the Harman family.

By far the bulk of the papers are represented by the Federal Trade Commission files. As an attorney-examiner with the F.T.C. between 1941 and 1962, Gardner worked with cases involving alleged deceptive advertising practices in the print media and radio. The individual files contain factual summaries of evidence in each case as well as occasional recommendations for action.

While the files here probably do not represent a complete record of Gardner's work with the F.T.C., they do provide ample illustration of the methods and practices of the government as it attempted to regulate false and misleading advertising.

Most of the cases represented in these files went through the office of Gardner's superior, D. B. Gatling, who was Chief of the Division of Radio and Periodical Advertising. The F.T.C. files in the so-called "Packets" and Alphabetical Files contain documentation regarding routine complaints about mostly small proprietary companies, though there are exceptions - most notably, the series of files on the American Tobacco Company, relating principally to misuse and distortions of testimonials from tobacco buyers and smokers in advertising. For the most part, the cases in these files rarely went beyond the preliminary stages of investigation. The "Secondary Review Files" are generally more substantive, representing cases on which some sort of action was taken. Also included are some of Gardner's personnel files from the F.T.C. While the reason for their inclusion with the case files is not altogether clear, the original order and contents of these files has been maintained nevertheless.

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Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Folder

Notebooks, 1831-1884 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

A variety of small volumes kept by family members make up this series. Frances Beall Knight's 1831-1879 notebooks include a scrapbook with a few entries from her husband and friends, pasted-in clippings with obituaries for Elisha Beall, William M. Beall, and Zeruiah Bell, pasted-in engravings, copied poems, and other writings. There is also a notebook with medical and financial content; a notebook with mostly religious content; and a notebook on various subjects.

There is one notebook from 1858 identified as John Knight's, in which he describes the family's trip to Russia. Also in the series are Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight's booklets of schoolwork dated from the 1840s to 1854.

This series also includes four anonymous notebooks. The smallest item, from after 1862, is actually a small folded sheaf of notes on world history, perhaps from a lecture or a book. Another small volume, circa 1864, contains needlework patterns, recipes, and housekeeping notes, and may be Fanny Knight's; a notebook from 1884 listing traveling trunk and bank vault contents, and medical receipts, which may be Frances B. Knight's while she acted as guardian of her two grandchildren; and another is a baby journal recording in detail the first years of Knight McDannold's life, 1875-1882.

Emma Simpson Glover Family papers, 1834-1953

2 Linear Feet — circa 410 Items

The papers consist of correspondence, legal and financial papers, photographs, account books, a memoir book, and miscellaneous papers and span the time period from 1834 to 1953. The bulk of the papers consists of correspondence between 1862 and 1914. This correspondence falls roughly into three major periods, each one consisting of two or three dozen letters.

The first period lasts until the 1890s and focuses on G. F. Simpson's involvement with the construction of a silver ore-crushing mill in Helena, Montana Territory, a venture shared with his brother, Charles H. Simpson; land investments in Kansas; and, after the 1860s, iron ore mining operations in Virginia. The letters from Montana and Kansas also document the harsh life on the American frontier. Included with this mostly business correspondence are a few letters from Thomas B. Sykes describing his experiences at Camp Chase, a Union prisoner-of-war camp near Columbus, Ohio, and as a resident of Aberdeen, Miss. during Reconstruction.

The second period, from the 1890s to 1910, consists chiefly of letters to Emma or her sisters Mary and Mabel, which discuss news of family and friends.

The last period, 1910-1914, consists mostly of correspondence between Emma and her husband Dr. Samuel R. Glover during their courtship and early marriage. Dr. Glover's letters include a limited discussion of his medical practice.

The legal papers include a will, mortgages, and land deeds. The financial papers include receipts and notes, some belonging to the firm of Simpson, Bass and Co. of Richmond, Va., operated by Charles H. Simpson and L. L. Bass, who were commission merchants in flour, grain, hay, and other provisions. The miscellaneous papers include clippings and printed material. There are photographs of Emma Simpson Glover, J. W. Simpson, and Mrs. Margaret Simpson.

The bound volumes consist of two ledgers and accounts, 1914-1921, of Dr. Glover's medical practice; ledger and accounts, 1877-1882, of a general store in Nelson Co., Va., which includes entries for farm and farm labor; and a memoir or scrap book of Mary Simpson, consisting of printed material, clippings, ribbons, and other memorabilia. The memoir book originally served as the cash book of an unknown Virginia firm for 1834-1836.

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William Swinton Bennett Hopkins papers, 1834-1946, bulk 1852-1898

3.5 Linear Feet — 1657 Items

Collection consists largely of correspondence between family members, friends, and business associates spanning three generations, as well as some Civil War and early Reconstruction letters relating to Hopkins' activities in New Orleans. Correspondents include Hopkins' daughter, Elizabeth; her husband Alfred Lawrence Aiken, a prominent banker in Boston; the Gadsden family of Charleston, S.C.; and the Peck family, relatives of Hopkins' wife, Lizzie. An information folder chronologically lists a portion of the collection. Also included in this collection are a few legal papers, financial papers, addresses and writings, pictures, and a miscellaneous folder that includes some genealogy. Subjects mentioned in the letters include travel in the U.S. and Europe, marriage and family life, illness, Williams College, Yale College, politics, law,"bloodletting with leeches," Civil War activities, and The Worcester Continentals.

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Benjamin Newton Duke papers, 1834-1941, 1969 and undated, bulk 1890-1929

102 Linear Feet
Benjamin Newton Duke (1855-1929) was a tobacco manufacturer, industrialist, and philanthropist of Durham, NC and New York, NY and a trustee and major benefactor of Trinity College (later Duke University). He was the son of Washington Duke, older brother of James B. Duke, husband of Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, and father of Angier Buchanan Duke and Mary Duke Biddle. The materials in this collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries in North Carolina and New York and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr., series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

The papers of Benjamin Newton Duke have been collected from various sources over time and span the years 1834 to 1969, although the bulk of the material dates from 1890 to 1929. The materials in the collection document the business, financial, philanthropic, and personal interests of Benjamin N. Duke and his family in Durham, NC and New York, NY, especially Duke's involvement in the tobacco, textile, banking, and hydroelectric industries and the Duke family's financial support of a variety of institutions, including educational institutions for African Americans and women, the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and individual churches, orphanages, hospitals, and community organizations. Types of material in the collection include correspondence, financial statements and ledgers, bills and receipts, architectural blueprints and drawings, land plats, deeds, photographs, photograph albums, scrapbooks, and a diary.

Family members represented include Sarah P. Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Mary Duke Biddle, Washington Duke, James B. Duke, Brodie L. Duke, Lida Duke Angier, and Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Jr. Other individuals represented include Julian S. Carr, William A. Erwin, John C. Kilgo, William P. Few, Daniel Lindsay Russell, James E. Shepard, and George W. Watts.

The Richard B. Arrington series and Alexander H. Sands, Jr. series document the personal and financial interests of Benjamin N. Duke's private secretaries in New York, NY.

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Folder

A majority of the documents in the Legal series pertain to property transactions of Benjamin Newton Duke and other individuals in Orange County, NC and Durham, NC. Property deeds dating from 1838 show changes in ownership of land that Duke eventually purchased. Other papers include architectural contracts, plans and specifications, trust indentures, a legal brief, copies of the wills of Benjamin N. Duke and Washington Duke, and materials related to the execution of the estates of Angier B. Duke and Benjamin N. Duke.

William Woods Holden papers, 1834-1929 and undated

4.0 Linear Feet
William Woods Holden was a journalist and Republican governor of North Carolina during Reconstruction. He was the owner and editor of the North Carolina Standard newspaper from 1843 to 1860, during which time he and the paper were affiliated with the Democratic Party. He was elected governor as a Republican in 1868, but was impeached by the Democratic state legislature in 1870 for his efforts to combat the Ku Klux Klan. Collection consists of correspondence, memoirs, business papers, legal documents, poems, and other papers. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870. Also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters.

The collection documents Holden's career as a journalist and politician, including his shift in party allegiance from Democrat to Republican during the Civil War. He served as the 28th and 30th governor of North Carolina.

Pre-Civil War letters deal mainly with personal and legal matters and with the Democratic convention in Charleston, S.C., 1860, and presidential election of 1860. Post-war materials concern the history of journalism in North Carolina; Holden's appointment by Andrew Johnson as provisional governor of North Carolina in 1865; his election as governor in 1868; Reconstruction policies; Ku Klux Klan activity in the state; the Kirk-Holden War; the "Ferrell Matter," a debt case in which Holden was the guarantor; Holden's impeachment as governor in 1870; his conviction by the N.C. Senate in 1871; his appointment as postmaster by Ulysses S. Grant in 1873; and life and politics in Washington during the period of Radical control. Of note are depositions and other evidence gathered by Holden and his supporters of various members of the Ku Klux Klan, documenting their membership and activities during 1869-1870.

The collection also includes Holden family papers, including scrapbooks and account books kept by Holden's wife and daughters; Holden's memoirs, recorded by his daughter Mary Holden Sherwood and edited by W.K. Boyd as part of the Trinity College Historical Society; some family photographs and materials related to the Holden homestead in Raleigh, N.C.; writings and poetry by Holden and his son, Joseph Holden; obituaries and clippings about Holden and his legacy; and other assorted personal and financial papers. Though removed from public life, Holden continued to write about public policy and government, sometimes critical of both parties, until his death in 1892.

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James Andrew Riddick papers, 1834-1903

1.3 Linear Feet — 620 Items
James Andrew Riddick, born September 13, 1810, near Sunsbury, N.C., died 1899, Petersburg, Va. As a youth, moved to Suffolk, Va., to become a clerk in his brother-in-law's mercantile establishment. Became a Methodist minister in the 1830s and served in this capacity in North Carolina, Virginia, and Tennessee. The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

The James Andrew Riddick papers includes mostly sermons and other writings by Methodist Reverend James Andrew Riddick. The majority of the sermons are undated and titled with only a book, chapter, and verse. However, some sermons are dated (1834-1844) and include title information with the location the sermon was given. These locations include Charlotte, Edenton, and Elizabeth City, North Carolina and Charlottesville, Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College, Ashland, Virginia. Other miscellaneous writings and notebooks date 1835-1886. There are also newspapers dated 1863-1903 with articles or letters to the editor written by or about Riddick, or collected by Riddick. Additionally, there is correspondence received by Riddick dated 1854-1899. The bulk of the correspondence is from John Early who Riddick worked with early in his career. There are photographs of Riddick as well as photographs of his daughters Judith, Lucie, and Bettie. Also included in this collection are papers with biographical information about Riddick and his letters of reference dated 1835-1899, a few miscellaneous financial papers dated 1830-1899, and a few miscellaneous printed materials collected by Riddick.

Sermons are organized in folders grouped alphabetically by bible book and arranged within each folder numerically by chapter and verse. Sermons that do not refer to any book are grouped in a miscellaneous sermons and writings folder. Correspondence from John Early has been foldered separately from all other general correspondence and arranged by date. Newspapers have been arranged in folders by title and within each folder by date. Box 3 is oversize.

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William Morehead papers, 1834-1898 and undated

3 Linear Feet
William Morehead was a merchant from Cumberland, Maryland. This collection contains correspondence, account books, bills, receipts, and advertisements, dealing with Morehead's household goods store. Collection also contains letters from firms in Maryland, Virginia, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia, pertaining to the sale, purchase, and shipment of goods, borrowing of money, payment of notes, and other matters.

This collection contains correspondence to William Morehead from various business establishments in Maryland, New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and West Virginia. The letters pertain to all phases of Morehead’s business transactions including sale and purchase of goods, particularly stoves and water pumps, shipment of goods, borrowing of money, payment of promissory notes, and other matters. The collection also contains numerous advertisements, bills and receipts, and eighteen account books recording the sales and expenses of Morehead's store during the 1860's and 1870's.

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Tyre Glen papers, 1806-1882 and undated

4 Linear Feet
Tyre Glen was a slave trader, planter, postmaster, and merchant in North Carolina. This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

This collection consists largely of business papers, particularly of financial and legal documents concerning the slave trade in North Carolina, Virginia and Alabama as well as possibly other locations. In addition to copious information on slave trading in the 1830s and 1840s, the collection includes references to Glen's Union sympathies and claims for horses confiscated by the U.S. Army; farming; exemptions from the Confederate Army and other topics.

Volumes include accounts of slaves, mercantile interests, and general expenses. Also included in the collection are two volumes concerning a firm known as Poindexter and Palmer operating a general store in North Carolina. These records contain numerous accounts of individuals from the region included H.P. Poindexter, various members of the Clingman family and Richard C. Puryear.

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Thomas Harris papers, 1834-1848 and undated.

3 items
ALS. Writes to Commodore Jacob Jones regarding the naval asylum property and to W.P.C. Barton, from the Navy Department, regarding travel expenses.
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Henry Watson papers, 1765-1938

Online
5 Linear Feet — 14 boxes; 18 volumes — 5,641 Items
Henry Watson, Jr. (1810-1891) was a plantation owner, enslaver, and lawyer of Greensboro, Alabama. Collection includes letters, diaries, business correspondence, and papers (chiefly 1828-1869) relating to Watson's career in law, his planting activities, his accumulation of property (including enslaved persons), establishment of the Planter's Insurance Company, farming conditions in antebellum Alabama, politics in Alabama before the Civil War, activities of the Watson family, the migration of Watson's family and relatives to various places in the West, secession in Alabama, Watson's removal to Germany during the Civil War, his return to the U.S. after the war, and his postwar career in Connecticut and Alabama. Also includes correspondence with his partner, John Erwin, a Whig leader; land grants to Edwin Peck signed by Martin Van Buren; letters from Confederate soldiers imprisoned at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters from Henry Bernard; and early letters from Elisha Stanley describing Pittsburgh, Pa., Cincinnati, Ohio, and Kentucky, the mercantile business during the War of 1812, the martial spirit and activities of the Kentuckians during the War of 1812, and the disastrous effects of peace on mercantile pursuits. Also in the collection are letters and papers of John Watson (d. 1824), including fragments, complete literary manuscripts, and papers relating to the settlement of his estate; and letters and diaries of Henry Watson's brother, Sereno.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence and papers of Henry Watson, Jr. (1810-1891), lawyer, plantation owner, and enslaver. Early papers relate to John Watson (d. 1824), a frequent contributor to Joel Barlow's American Mercury, and include fragments and several complete literary manuscripts; papers relating to the settlement of John Watson's estate; and several letters to Henry Watson, Sr., from Elisha Stanley. This Stanley-Watson correspondence describes Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Kentucky; mercantile business and the activities of Kentuckians during the War of 1812; and the disastrous effects of peace on mercantile pursuits.

The papers centering on Henry Watson, Jr., concern his education at Hartford, Connecticut, and at Harvard College, Cambridge, Massachusetts; a visit to Greensboro, Alabama, in 1831; return to his home in East Windsor, Connecticut, for the study of law with Henry Barnard; his return to Greensboro in 1834 to begin the practice of law; the establishment of a law practice; the accumulation of property including a plantation and enslaved persons; the establishment of the Planter's Insurance Company; his marriage to Sophia Peck; his efforts to dispose of two shares in the Ohio Land Company; his residence in Europe during the Civil War; and the settlement of his father's estate.

Correspondence describes college life at Harvard College; life in Alabama, with accounts of the soil, settlement, and agriculture; politics in Alabama, 1834-1844; volunteers from Alabama for service in the Mexican War; westward migration; activities of Northern abolitionists in Alabama in 1836; panics of 1837 and 1857; Whig politics in the 1850s; fear in Greensboro of a slave uprising, 1860; the presidential campaign of 1860; secession; the sale of cotton before and after the Civil War; mail service between the North and the South during the war; mobilization and preparation for war; the management of his plantation and the impressment of enslaved persons, tools, and livestock during the war; the difficulties of Southerners in Europe during the war; inflation; railroad building in Alabama; the Union Pacific Railroad; and Reconstruction.

Also included is correspondence with John Erwin, Whig leader in Alabama; two land grants to Edwin Peck signed by Martin Van Buren; letters from Sophia Peck, her brother, William Peck, and her sister, Mary Eliza Peck, while in schools in Hartford, Connecticut, and New York, New York; letters from the brothers and sisters of Henry Watson, Jr., in Illinois, Iowa, and Ohio; letters from William P. Eaton, head of the Female Department of the Cahaba (Alabama) Male and Female Academy; letter of Henry Watson to an editor on the subject of fertilizers; several letters from Confederate soldiers imprisoned at Johnson's Island, Ohio; contracts of Watson with freedmen; a bulletin of the Irving Institute, Tarrytown, New York; tax lists for Greene County, Alabama; printed extracts from the diary of William Watson; bulletin of the Berlin American Female Institute; catalogs of the Cumberland University Law School, Lebanon, Tennessee, 1851-1852, and of the Greensboro (Alabama) Female Academy, 1858; letters, biographical sketch, and list of the writings of Asa Gray; biographical sketch, certificates of membership in various learned societies, and three articles of Sereno Watson (b. 1826), brother of Henry Watson, Jr., botanist, and associate editor of the Journal of Education; and letters of Henry Barnard [partially published: Bayrd Still (ed.), "Observations of Henry Barnard on the West and South of the 1840's," Journal of Southern History, VIII (May, 1942), 247-258]. A large portion of the papers are bills, receipts, and prices current. Volumes include plantation and household accounts, 1834-1866, record of enslaved persons, 1843-1866, bill book of the Planters' Insurance Company, 1854-1863, summaries of magazine articles and account book, 1832-1848, and diaries, 1830-1833 and 1850-1854, of Henry Watson, Jr.; and diaries, 1849-1863, and genealogical notes and records of Sereno Watson.

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Tomlinson Store Ledger B, 1834-1848

1.2 Linear Feet — 1 Item
Tomlinson Store was a steam tanning works, shoemaking establishment and general store run by Allen U. Tomlinson in Randolph County, NC. Ledger B contains accounts of the Methodist and Quaker families that formed Union Institute as well as Brantley York and school faculty.

Ledger B contains accounts of the Methodist and Quaker families that formed Union Institute and later supported Normal College and Trinity College. There are accounts for Brantley York, for all of the signers of the constitution of the Union Institute Society, and for the faculty of the school. The bulk of the entries date from the 1830s.

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Henry W. Jones papers, 1813-1877

4 Linear Feet
Henry W. Jones was a farmer, lawyer, magistrate, and distiller from Granville County, North Carolina.

Correspondence and Assorted Family Material is primarily personal correspondence sorted by year. One folder contains handwritten genealogical information about Jones and his lineage. Almost all of the correspondence is addressed to Henry W. Jones, though most of the correspondence came after his death in late 1871 or early 1872, and is addressed to a son, Edward H. Jones of Oxford, N.C. Nearly all of the correspondents, both before and after 1871/1872, were children and children-in-law of Henry W. Jones, most of whom resided in Hopkins Co., Ky. The notable exceptions to this are John and Alice Beasley, a son-in-law and daughter who lived in Tex., and P. H. Gooch, a nephew who lived in Farmington, Mo. Agriculture and family matters are the dominant subjects covered by the correspondence. One family matter of particular interest was an effort by some of Henry W. Jones's children, particularly Soloman W. Jones, a local Methodist preacher, to convert their father to Christianity. These same letters also document the revivals that swept Kentucky in the 1850s. There are also several letters that comment on life in the C.S.A. Army, including ones by E. H. Jones (55th Regiment, N.C. Troops) and B. F. Jones (17th Regiment, N.C. Troops).

The first portion of Legal and Financial Papers contains individual folders with records relating to Jones's career as a magistrate (tax records, election rolls, and warrants) as well personal financial information (distillery taxes and personal tax receipts). The remainder of the series is general financial and legal correspondence sorted by year. This series also contains several account books for business partnerships between Jones and his father-in-law, David Parker.

The final series--Printed materials, clippings, and printed work--contains newspaper clippings, political pamphlets, and other printed material related to farming, legal issues, as well as North Carolina and national politics.

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C. C. Clay papers, 1811-1925

20 Linear Feet
Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882) was a lawyer, U. S. Senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter from Huntsville, Madison County, Alabama. He was married to Virginia Carolina (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915). His father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866) was a U.S. Congressman and Governor of Alabama. Collection includes personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay, and of his father, Clement Comer Clay; his mother, Susanna Claiborne Withers Clay; his wife, Virginia Caroline Tunstall Clay; and brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay. Letters deal with family matters, including Alabama and Washington, D.C., social life, education, the management of cotton plantations, civic affairs in Huntsville; state and national politics and elections; Clay Sr.'s governorship; Clay Jr.'s service in both the U.S. and Confederate senates; ante-bellum politics; the organization of the Confederacy; Reconstruction politics, including Clay Jr.'s arrest, imprisonment, and his wife's efforts to obtain his release; Clay Jr.'s efforts to retrieve his property and re-establish farming operations, and to settle his father's estate; Virginia Clay's dissatisfaction with Reconstruction period social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts to operate the plantation after her husband's death.

Personal, business, and political correspondence, accounts, diaries, memoranda, college notes, scrapbooks, and clippings of Clement Claiborne Clay (1816-1882), lawyer, U.S. senator, Confederate diplomat, and planter; of his father, Clement Comer Clay (1789-1866), lawyer, planter, U.S. congressman and senator, and governor of Alabama; of his mother, Susanna Claiborne (Withers) Clay (1798-1866); of his wife, Virginia Caroline (Tunstall) Clay (1825-1915), who wrote A Bell of the Fifties: Memoirs of Mrs. Clay, of Alabama, covering Social and Political Life in Washington and the South, 1853-1866: Put into Narrative Form by Ada Sterling (New York: Doubleday, 1904); and of his brothers, Hugh Lawson Clay and John Withers Clay, and of their wives.

Letters deal with family matters, including education of the elder Clay's three sons at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and the University of Virginia, Charlottesville; management of two or more cotton plantations and approximately fifty enslaved people, including a number of bills of sale; civic affairs in Huntsville; state politics, 1819-1860; Democratic and Whig party alignments, rivalries, and disputes; presidential elections, especially in 1844, 1852, and 1856; Clement Comer Clay's governorship, 1835-1837. the Creek War, 1836; the panic of 1837, Clement Claiborne Clay's election as a Democrat to the U.S. Senate in 1853 and his reselection in 1857. Other political matters referred to include the Compromise of 1850; Kansas-Nebraska difficulty; break with Stephen A. Douglas; Democratic Convention of 1860; secession; and organization of the Confederate government. Personal letters refer to social life in Alabama and in Washington, D.C.; visits to springs and health resorts; and Clement Claiborne Clay's travels for his health through Florida, 1851, and later to Arkansas and Minnesota.

Subjects of the Civil War years include Clement Claiborne Clay's political activities in the Confederate States Senate; his relations with Jefferson Davis; Federal raids on and occupation of Huntsville, consequent disruption of civilian life, and demoralization of slaves; J. W. Clay's publication of the Huntsville Democrat in various towns; Clay's defeat in the election of 1863 for the Confederate Senate; his and other agents' work in Canada, assisting in the return of escaped Confederate prisoners to Confederate territory; plots of a general revolt in the Northwestern states designed to join these states to the Confederacy; the Democratic Convention of 1864; Horace Greeley's efforts for peace, 1864; plans and execution of the Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, 1864; Clay's return from Canada, and the final days of the Confederacy.

Material relating to the aftermath of the Civil War concerns accusations against Clay for complicity in Lincoln's assassination, Clay's surrender to Federal authorities, his imprisonment at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and the efforts of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay to obtain her husband's release. Papers for the period 1866-1915 generally pertain to personal matters, principally Clay's poverty, his attempts to retrieve his confiscated property, the settlement of his father's estate, efforts to re-establish farming operations, and his years in the insurance business, 1871-1873, with Jefferson Davis; and Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's dissatisfaction with a restricted social life, her tour of Europe, 1884-1885, and her efforts in later years to operate the plantation. There are occasional references to political affairs.

The volumes consist of an executor's book of the estate of C. C. Clay, Sr., 1866-1869; letter books, 1864-1865; letterpress copy covering insurance business; memorandum books, 1853-1864, containing a mailing list of constituents and other notations; notebook, 1835-1841, containing college lecture notes; receipt books; legal fee book, 1814-1815; scrapbooks, ca. 1848-1903, one of which contains plantation accounts, 1870-1873, and minutes of the Madison County Bible Society, 1820-1830; and the diaries and scrapbooks, 1859-1905, of Virginia (Tunstall) Clay.

Correspondents include Jeremiah S. Black, E. C. Bullock, C. C. Clay, Sr., C. C. Clay, Jr., David Clopton [Virginia (Tunstall) Clay's second husband], W. W. Corcoran, J. L. M. Curry, Jefferson Davis, Varina Davis, Benjamin Fitzpatrick, U. S. Grant, Andrew Johnson, L. Q. C. Lamar, Clifford Anderson Lanier, Sidney Lanier, Stephen R. Mallory, Nelson A. Miles, James K. Polk, John H. Reagan, R. B. Rhett, E. S. Shorter, Leroy P. Walker, Louis T. Wigfall, and William L. Yancey.

Description above taken from Guide to Cataloged Collections in the Manuscripts Department of the William R. Perkins Library, Duke University (1980)

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Box 1

Includes a letter from C.C. Clay, Sr, to a "Capt George" regarding the disposition of the estate of someone named Beauchamp to their heirs specifically discusses enslaved people and how they, as "property" would be divided when considered of unequal value, and how they would not be emancipated.

Letters primarily of C.C. Clay, Sr., Susannah Clay, C.C. Clay, Jr., William Clay, between family members, including some from the Withers family (Susannah Clay's family). Also includes a diploma for Virginia Tunstall from the Female Academy of Nashville Tennessee, dated 1840.

Ezekiel Skinner papers, 1834-1836

1 Linear Foot — 40 Items
Ezekiel Skinner (1777-1855) was a missionary and physician who worked in Monrovia, Liberia for the American Colonization Society during the 1830s. Although almost 60 years old, Skinner believed it was his duty to continue the work of his son, Benjamin Rush Skinner, who had died in Liberia a few years before. He returned to the United States in 1837. This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

This collection consists of 15 letters and other related documents (with typed transcripts) written by Dr. Ezekiel Skinner during his time working for the American Colonization Society in Liberia. Skinner travelled to Africa twice beginning in 1834 and finally returning to the United States in 1837. These letters cover both trips and provide information about the day-to-day challenges faced by the emigrants from the United States. The majority of the letters are addressed to his family and written in the style of a journal, but there are also retained copies of Skinner's official correspondence as an officer of the Society. The contents of the letters touch upon various topics such as living conditions, missionary work, interaction with native Africans, and medical care of the emigrants.

1 result in this collection

Joseph Lovell papers, Washington, D.C, 1834-1835

2 items
ALS to Thomas Aspinwall and to William Jenkins Worth relating to accounts and expenses to be paid by the Surgeon General's Office.
1 result in this collection

Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976

3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Roger Fenton research papers and photographs, 1833-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The series includes research materials assembled by art historian Marcia M. Mathews on early English photographer Roger Fenton. The earliest date reflects a transcript of a letter from 1833 from Roger to his mother while he was at school.

Mathews does not appear to have published any work based on this research, and there are no drafts in the collection, although she seems to have been involved at some level in Helmut Gernsheim's book on Fenton, published in London in 1954. The dozens of letters to Mathews from Fenton family members (1940s-1957) mention this connection and may shed more light on it.

Other correspondence is from curators at various institutions where Fenton's photographs and papers were located, and from the photography lab where professional copies were made of his original photographs taken in the 1850s.

Included in the series are six 2 1/2 x 4" cartes-de-visite photographs of Roger Fenton and his family (wife and daughters), early 1860s. Other photographs are copies (circa 1940s) and include images of the Fenton home, Crimble Hall (Rochdale Borough, Lancashire, England), and of other family members. There appears to be an original unmounted albumen print of a full standing portrait, probably by Fenton, of his father-in-law (last name Maynard), as well as several copies of photographs by Roger Fenton (1850s). One modern copy photograph is of a sketch of Crimble Hall by Marcia Mathews.

Other items include a copy of a questionnaire about the Fenton family, created by Mathews in the 1940s and sent to various Fenton relatives; it is accompanied by one respondent's handwritten answers.