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William S. Carter papers, 1830-1922

3 Linear Feet
Col. William Sylvester Carter (approximately 1833-1902) was a white Confederate plantation owner, businessman, and state representative from Fairfield in Hyde County, N.C. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents, including enslaved and later emancipated African Americans, throughout the mid-ninteenth century. Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War.

Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, and account books from the Carter, Howard, and Spencer families of Hyde County, North Carolina. The ledger books largely relate to William and David Carter's plantations and crops, particularly corn, and also contain expenses and accounts for different Hyde County residents throughout the mid-ninteenth century. A small amount of materials in the ledgers relate to Black people and are indicated with the headings "negro" - this material is sporadic and dates both pre- and post-emancipation.

Correspondence and legal papers in the collection largely relate to the estate management, land, farming, and business or trading expenses for the Carter family. Some materials relate to the American Civil War, including correspondence informing the family of the death of Captain James Carter in 1862. Other materials relate to the enslavement of different men, women, and children, including bills of sale, rental and lease information, and medical expenses accrued by the slaveholders for the different slaves treated on various plantations in the 1850s and 1860s. One document records the names of slaves who self-emancipated themselves following the Union Army victory at the Battle of New Bern. Following the war, most correspondence and legal documents relate to estates and other routine business transactions. There are two election certificates for William Carter in the 1860s, and a draft of a letter to the editor from David S. Carter promoting Democratic candidate Edward J. Warren. The collection also contains several dozen forms returned to the Richmond Boarding House Bureau of Information (1907) reflecting prices of room and board.

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Alonzo G. Beardsley papers, 1787-1897

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,597 items (including 1 vol.)
This collection, largely the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley (founded c. 1868), also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded them, including John Porter, judge and state senator. During the 1850s the collection also includes the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. From 1840 to 1860 the papers concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States. The Civil War period papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy, U.S. Representative from Cayuga County, N.Y. include mention of appointments and promotions; aid to wounded soldiers; defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863, civilian morale, and the activities of Southern sympathizers. Post Civil War materials include the papers of the Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. Letters after 1870 include information about gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872, and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. There is also genealogical material for the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

This collection contains mostly the correspondence of the law firm of Theodore Medad Pomeroy, William Allen, and Alonzo G. Beardsley, also contains the papers of several combinations of lawyers who preceded this firm. The early papers, beginning about 1800, center on John Porter, judge, state senator, and law partner of New York Governor Enos Thompson Throop. In about 1840 the Porter letters merge into those of William Allen, and for the next fifteen years the correspondence reflects Allen's legal practice and depicts life in Auburn, New York. The letters of Alonzo Beardsley begin about 1842, but it is not until 1855 that he and Allen become partners. During the 1850s the papers also include the letters of Samuel Blatchford, a New York City attorney. For the most part, papers during 1840-1860 concern business and legal practice in New York state and throughout the northeastern United States.

For the Civil War period there are the 1860s papers of Theodore M. Pomeroy from Cayuga County, New York, a U.S. representative. Topics include appointments and promotions, aid to wounded soldiers, defenses on the Great Lakes, the organization of the 5th, 111th, and 138th New York regiments, the Conscription Act of 1863 and its enforcement, and civilian morale and the activities of Southern sympathizers, especially in 1863. Pomeroy's correspondence also concerns patronage, party organization and rivalry, and service to constituents. From 1865 to 1870 there is much family correspondence, particularly letters to Nellie Bisby of Attica, New York. Between 1865 and 1868 many papers appear from Dodge and Stevenson Manufacturing Company, makers of reapers and mowers. After 1870 letters of Alonzo Beardsley relate to miscellaneous subjects, such as gold mining in North Carolina and Alabama, 1872; the Oswego Starch Company; and N. M. Osborne & Company, makers of harvesting machines. Numerous legal papers and documents reflect all phases of the Osborne firm's work. There is a large amount of related printed matter. The collection also included genealogical material on the Van Dorn, Peterson, and Quick families of New York.

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Guido Mazzoni pamphlet collection, 1572-1946, bulk 1750-1940

Online
860 Linear Feet — 1626 boxes — 49,648 items
This collection of print materials, many of them rare and ephemeral, was assembled over many decades by Guido Mazzoni, an Italian Senator, Dante scholar, professor, and bibliophile. The approximately 49,648 pieces span the years 1572 through 1946, with the bulk dating from the mid-18th to the early 20th centuries. Topics range widely and include Italian politics, particularly the rise of Socialism and Fascism; Italian humanities, especially poetry, theater, and opera; Dante studies; patriotic writings, including some by Mussolini and others in his regime; and the history and context of both World Wars. Popular literary and cultural serials abound, many with writings by noted authors, including women writers. Given Mazzoni's background in academics, his friendships with publishers, and his residence in Padova and Firenze, many of the authors are Jewish. Many of the pieces were sent to Mazzoni from former students or colleagues and are inscribed to him. Mazzoni collected many rare pieces from the 17th, 18th, and 19th centuries; broadsides from Napoleonic, Medicean, and Borbonic Italian regions are numerous. Formats represented in the collection include: pamphlets, offprints, clippings, full-issue newspapers (many from the Piedmont), libretti, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, political broadsides, epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one handmade photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with map inserts. About 80 percent of the material is in the Italian language: other common languages include Latin, French, English, German. There are also some publications in Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages. The largest and most developed subject areas, with thousands of pamphlets in each series, relate to Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the early 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from its earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscans to the rise of Fascism in the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections relate to Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially opera and popular music; art history; and religious history. The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented by the collection are too numerous to mention in this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed in this guide. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials on Dante Alighieri and his works number in the thousands.

The Guido Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection spans the years 1572 through 1946, with approximately 46,825 pieces in the collection. The bulk of the material, chiefly in the Italian language, dates from the mid-eighteenth to the early twentieth centuries. Formats represented include: pamphlets, libretti, clippings, newspapers, scores, manuscript items, small cards, periodicals, small volumes, broadsides (some very large), epithalamia (pieces produced on the occasion of a wedding), and one photo album. There are many illustrated publications, fine engravings, woodcuts, and items with maps enclosed.

About 80 percent of the materials is in the Italian language, though other languages are represented, most notably Latin, French, English, German, Greek, Spanish, Catalan, Portuguese, and Eastern European languages.

This guide offers access to brief descriptive records for each item. Hundreds of pamphlets, particularly the epithalamia, were described more fully in the library's online catalog and can be found by using the subject keywords "provenance" and "mazzoni guido." A full set of more than 30 volumes held by the library offers photocopied images of Mazzoni's handwritten catalog slips for subject and name access to the pamphlets.

Guido Mazzoni assembled his library in several ways. He purchased many items from rare book dealers and other book sellers in Italy, particularly in Padua, Florence, and Bologna. His colleagues and former students sent him thousands of offprints, extracts, and small volumes of their work, most of them inscribed to Mazzoni. He accumulated materials from his work in the Italian Senate, most notably in areas of education, politics, and the humanities. He also acquired either by purchase or by inheritance entire libraries of academic colleagues, some of whom became his relatives by marriage. Some of these names include Giuseppe Chiarini, his father-in-law, and Raffaello Fornaciari.

The importance of the Mazzoni Pamphlet Collection primarily lies in its contribution to the fields of European and Italian studies. It is a broad but selective bibliography - put into material form, as it were - of nineteenth-century European culture and its transition into the twentieth century. The intellectual arrangement assigned to the pamphlets by library staff places them into thirty-one subject areas.

The largest and most developed subject areas, each represented by thousands of pamphlets, are: Italian history from the inception of population on the Italian peninsula through the 1940s, with emphasis on the 18th and 19th centuries; Italian language and literature from their earliest manifestations through the 1930s; Italian and European politics, ranging from the Etruscan period to the 1930s; and biographical works on Italian notables. Smaller but rich subject collections include Italian education; social life and customs in Italy; archaeology; music, especially popular music and opera; art history; and religious history. Many individual items, particularly literary publications, are ephemeral, rare, and difficult to locate in the United States and even in Italy.

The literary, political, and scientific individuals represented in the collection are too numerous for this introduction, but more detailed information can be found under the section for each subject area listed below. Suffice it to say that virtually every important poet, dramatist, writer, historian, and political figure of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries is represented, and, perhaps more importantly, many minor authors and political figures of those eras whose works are now difficult to find. In addition, prominent scientific individuals of the nineteenth century and early twentieth centuries are represented in the collection. As Guido Mazzoni was the protegé of Giosué Carducci, that poet is most well-represented; also, as Mazzoni was one of the leading Dante scholars in Italy of his time, materials relating to every topic in Dante studies number in the thousands.

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Folder

The Archaeology series contains pamphlets, offprints, extracts, and many illustrated pieces. It is a small group of 233 pamphlets.

Of importance are the pamphlets concerning numismatics, particular excavations during the nineteenth century, papyrus studies, ancient art, and Italian ceramics. There is even an unusual and probably rare guide to the pornographic artifacts in the Museum of Archeology in Naples.

Authors of interest include Medea Norsa, a well-known papyrologist of the nineteenth century, Luigi Pernier, Corrado Ricci, Giuseppe Gerola, Guido Ferrari, Santi Muratori, Astorre Pellegrini, E. Teza, Luigi Milani, Luigi Rizzoli, Settimio Severo, and Luigi Chiappelli.

Related subjects and areas of overlap are found in the Italian Art series and perhaps in the history-related subject areas.

Folder

This is a small group of 147 pamphlets, many of them illustrated, having to do with the design and construction of particular monuments or buildings.

The dates range from 1795 to 1942.

Of primary importance are pamphlets on Renaissance palaces and on the architecture of churches. One group of items has to do with the construction of the new Biblioteca Nazionale in Florence during the 1930s; there are several architects' proposals in this group.

Individuals represented are: Giuseppe Giusti, Adolfo Venturi, Giuseppe Boffito, Luca Beltrami, Raffaello (S), Alvise Cornari (S), Fra Giovanni Giocondo (S), Giuseppe Poggi (S), Battista Covo (S), Jacobo Sansovino (S), Giovanni di Lapo (S), Giuseppe Segusini (S), and Antonio Averlino, "Il Filarete" (S).

There are numerous areas of overlap in connection with this group. Only items strictly having to do with architectural subjects are included in it; for example, for descriptions of buildings that focus more on the history or on the art inside, one should look under "Art, Italian," or "Italy -- History." One can also try "Italy -- Description and Travel" for tourist-oriented publications such as guides to towns or palaces. Some related pamphlets may also be found in the "Italy -- Politics and Government" series if the focus is on a government project, particularly if it is propagandistic. For monuments erected in honor of particular individuals, look under "Biography" and use that person's name. Pamphlets related to monuments erected in honor of historical events will be found under "Italy -- History," or "World War, 1914-1918", and so on.

Folder

This series includes 797 items including pamphlets, clippings, and periodicals, with many illustrated materials.

The areas of Italian art most represented are painting and sculpture; there are also numerous pamphlets on religious art and manuscript illuminations.

Individuals represented are: Luca Beltrami, Adolfo Venturi, Mario Salmi, Leonardo Da Vinci (S), Michelangelo (S), Giotto (S), Lorenzo di Credi (S), Botticelli (S), Sem Benelli (S), Andrea del Verrocchio (S), Giorgio Vasari (S), and many others.

Only items having to do with visual arts or art criticism are found here. One should turn to "Biography" for items related to a specific individual's life and works. For related topics, look under "Archaeology" or "Architecture." Again, some propagandistic works related to Fascism, for example, might be found under "Italy -- Politics and government," as this subject heading would reflect a more relevant and more specific area of interest to researchers rather than the general heading "Art, Italian."

For works concerning non-Italian art, one may search the "History" subject area.

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of portraits and images of women, 1600s-1940s

0.5 Linear Feet
Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. A small portion of the ephemera collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women.

Collection consists of single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name. Examples of women depicted include: Mother Damnable, Moll Cutpurse, Catherine de Medici, Hannah More, Mary Wollstonecraft, Martha Hatfield, and Madame de Genlis. One item is a relief sculpture of the bust of Martha Washington. A small portion of the collection consists of assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a copy of a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers. Many of the items in this collection are loose pages which have been copied or removed from bound volumes.

3 results in this collection
File

Assorted portraits and images of women, approximately 1600s-1930s 3 Files — 2 folders in Box 1, and 1 item in Oversize Folder 1

Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Single sheet pages or items collected by Baskin which tend to contain an engraved or etched portrait, or at times a photomechanical print, of a woman or feminine person. Many images depict European royalty or other aristocratic figures, or women cultural or literary figures. Most pages include a printed caption with the woman's name.

File
Box 1

Assorted examples of advertisements, caricatures, and comics or cartoon illustrations of women. Includes a moveable book-like item which shows a chaste woman before and a party woman after marriage. Also contains an illustrated woman reading with an accompanying poem advising ladies to "Leave reading until you return, It looks so much better at home." Also contains a comic called "Jane" published by Mick White, 1941, which shows a naked woman at an Royal Air Force decontamination center being ogled by various soldiers.

Augustin Louis Taveau papers, 1741-1931

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,862 items
This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1830-1886) of Taveau, of his father, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and of their family. The collection centers around Augustin Louis Taveau and relates to his education, activities as a poet, European travels (1852-1854), career in the Confederate Army, postwar condemnation of Confederate leaders, removal to Maryland (1866), and agricultural efforts. Other subjects include family and legal matters, social life and customs in South Carolina, the education of Southern girls, rice planting before the Civil War, planting in Mississippi and Louisiana (1850s), agriculture and scientific farming in Maryland, Charleston during the Civil War, postwar politics, and other matters. Correspondents and persons mentioned in this collection include William Aiken, Josias Allston, Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, Ralph Elliott, Nathan George Evans, J. A. Gadsden, Horace Greeley, William Gregg, Thomas S. Grimké, Robert Y. Hayne, O. W. Holmes, W. H. Huger, Robert Hume, T. J. Hyland-MacGrath, Andrew Johnson, Carolina Olivia Ball Laurens, Eliza G. Maybank, James L. Petigru, J. J. Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Clifford Simons, Keating L. Simons, Admiral Joseph Smith, Horatio Sprague, John R. Thompson, and members of the Girardeau, Swinton, and Taveau families.

This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence of Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau (1790-ca. 1857), planter; of his wife, Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau (d. 1847); of their son, Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), planter and author; of the latter's wife, Delphine (Sprague) Taveau (1832-ca. 1909); and of relatives and friends.

Papers prior to 1829 consist of a copy of the will of William Swinton made in 1741 and letters between the Swinton and Girardeau families recording Charleston events, the marriage settlement of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball and Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and a copy of the will of Caroline Olivia (Ball) Laurens, daughter of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau by her first marriage. Beginning in June 1829, and continuing for more than a year, the collection contains letters to Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau from her husband, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, while he was in France endeavoring to settle his father's estate.

In 1838 the papers begin to center around Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), while in school at Mt. Zion Academy, Winnsboro, South Carolina and while later studying law and dabbling in poetry while living in or near Charleston, South Carolina and touring Europe from 1852 to 1854. From 1855 until 1860, the papers contain correspondence with the publisher of Taveau's book of poems, The Magic Word and Other Poems (Boston, 1855), published under the pseudonym of 'Alton,' correspondence with the Sprague family in an effort to obtain the remainder of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau's patrimony, papers relative to a mortgage on Oaks Plantation held by Robert Hume, letters relative to the failure of Simons Brothers in Charleston in 1857 and the consequent loss of Oaks Plantation, letters of Taveau describing a trip to New Orleans (Louisiana), with his slaves and their sale, letters of Taveau to his wife describing various plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana, and a series of letters in 1860 to and from Taveau, Ralph Elliott, and Clifford Simons regarding a supposedly slighting remark involving Taveau's credit.

Late in 1861 Taveau settled on a farm near Abbeville, South Carolina, but soon afterwards joined the Confederate Army. His career in the army continued until 1865. Letters to his wife during the war period, include Taveau's accounts of his efforts as a soldier, descriptions of Charleston during the war, copy of a letter evidently intended for a newspaper, protesting that gentlemen of birth and education could get no commissions in the army while sons of tinkers could; accounts of his duties as guard at the "SubTreasury" in Charleston; papers relating to an effort to permit Delphine (Sprague) Taveau and her three children to sail for Europe in December, 1864; and oaths of allegiance and passports issued to Taveau and his wife and children, March 3, 1865, for going to Boston, Massachusetts.

Immediately after the war, the papers contain letters and copies of letters published in the New York Tribune by Taveau under the title of A Voice from South Carolina, stating that former Southern leaders could not be trusted and condemning them for having allowed conscription. Included also are drafts of letters from Taveau to Horace Greeley and William Aiken; letters relative to Taveau's efforts to get the position of collector of the customs at Charleston; accounts of an interview of Taveau with Greeley and with President Andrew Johnson; letter of June 25, 1865, describing conditions in Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina; a copy of a petition signed by Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, William Gregg, and Taveau begging President Johnson to appoint a provisional governor for South Carolina; several letters to and from William Aiken; and letters written by Taveau to his wife in the autumn of 1865 from various points in Virginia including areas near Richmond, Alexandria, and Warrenton, where he had gone in search of a farm.

Taveau and his family finally settled in 1866 on a farm near Chaptico in St. Mary's County, Maryland. From 1866 until 1881, the correspondence is concerned with efforts to obtain patents and money for developing a revolving harrow and a steam plow invented by Taveau; efforts to obtain money for meeting the annual interest on the sum owed for the farm near Chaptico; and accounts of Taveau's literary activities. There are letters and papers bearing on Taveau's efforts to interest the Ames Plow Company, as well as manufacturers of farm machinery in Dayton, Ohio, in his inventions and drawings and circulars relative to the inventions. From 1878 until Taveau's death, his papers contain manuscripts of his poems and correspondence with many leading publishing houses regarding the publication of Montezuma (published in New York in 1883 and again in 1931). Thereafter much of his correspondence consists of letters of thanks from various relatives, friends, and well-known literary figures for copies of Montezuma sent them by Taveau; and letters to newspapers and magazines submitting his poems and usually followed by letters of rejection.

Throughout the collection there are many letters from the mother and sisters of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau, usually in French. Letters of her brothers, however, were generally in English. Among the correspondents are William Aiken, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Johnston Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Smith, and John R. Thompson. Also included are some Unpublished Letters of John R. Thompson and Augustin Louis Taveau, William and Mary College Quarterly, XVI (April 1936), 206-221; Letters of Georgia Editors and a Correspondent, Georgia Historical Quarterly, XXIII (June, 1939), [170-176.]

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Bradley T. Johnson papers, 1851-1909

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes (922 items)
Bradley T. Johnson was a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Maryland who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection includes correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in several states, a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. Included also are a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge along with an anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, law student in Richmond, Va. and son of prosperous Charlotte County family.

Correspondence, personal accounts, Civil War reminiscences of campaigns in Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania of Bradley T. Johnson, a Confederate officer, lawyer, and politician, born in Frederick (Frederick Co.), Md. who later settled in Virginia after the Civil War. The collection also includes a memoir of the 1st Maryland Regiment, C.S.A., a muster roll of the 21st Virginia, Company B, records of a Confederate prison hospital, and an incomplete diary of a trip to Cuba as correspondent during the Spanish-American War. It includes a series of letters from Wade Hampton and from Joseph E. Johnston. Other correspondents include Henry Adams, James Cardinal Gibbons, and Henry Cabot Lodge.

Collection also Includes anonymous April-Dec., 1846 diary, identified with Isaac R. Watkins, a law student in Richmond, Va. and son of a prosperous Charlotte County family.

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Bryant Bennett papers, 1767-1902, bulk 1840-1875

2 Linear Feet
Bryant Bennett was a merchant and planter residing in Williamston, North Carolina (in Martin County). This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston, N.C. and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

This collection contains correspondence and papers of Bryant Bennett and of his family. Included are mercantile accounts of the firms of Bennett and Hyman in Williamston and of Bennett and Price in Hamilton (both places in Martin County), school letters from a normal school in Oxford, North Carolina, deeds, promissory notes, receipts for land sold for taxes, plantation account books containing household and farm accounts, lists of slaves and supplies issued to them, business records dealing with the marketing of cotton at Norfolk, Virginia, agricultural treatises by one S. W. Outterbridge of Martin County, and letters to Bennett after he had moved to Plymouth, North Carolina, in 1869.

Please note that all folder and item titles in this collection guide have been taken from card catalogs and other inventories created in the early 20th Century.

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Caleb Budlong physician's account books, 1817-1843, 1915 and undated

4 Linear Feet — 86 items
Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915.

Collection comprises 8 medical account journals maintained by Budlong between 1817 and 1839. In addition to treatments provided, most often tooth extractions and bleeding, the doctor noted examinations and prescriptions for pills, oils, powders, elixirs, bitters, ointments, and asthmatics, along with cathartic sugars and throat lozenges. Fees are recorded for each entry and payments and regular audits noted. The entries were irregular in regard to date. Included in the collection is an undated typescript list of more than 100 individuals treated in volume 1, indicating that Budlong served as the primary physician for the area during its early settlement. There are indexes for volumes 2 and 8; and these, along with 76 items laid-in to the volumes, including receipts, blotting sheets, lists, calculations, and other notes have been removed to a separate folder. One item laid in is receipt unrelated to the volumes for a payment dated 1915. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections.

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Cornelius Baldwin Hite papers, 1711-1918

4.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,344 items (includes 2 vols.)
Collection contains personal, business, and legal papers of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Jr. and of his family. The material pertains largely to life in Virginia during Reconstruction, with information about social life and customs, and on prominent Virginia families, especially the Marshall family, who were related to Hite by marriage. Includes copies (1709-1711) of passages from the diary of Mrs. Alexander Spotswood, and early legal documents relating to Hardy Co., Va.

The Cornelius Baldwin Hite papers contains report sheets for Cornelius B. Hite, Jr., from several schools in Virginia, 1855-1860; letters from the period of the Civil War, for the most part dealing with the impact of the war on civilians in western Virginia; a large amount of material showing the effect of Reconstruction on Cornelius B. Hite, Jr., and his relatives, including descriptions of economic distress, politics, and the migration of many Virginians to the western United States. There are letters describing social life and community health in Winchester, Virginia, in the 1870s; conditions at Shenandoah Valley Academy, 1868; and a long trip to Texas, 1875-1876. Letters, 1890-1895, are to Elizabeth Augusta (Smith) Hite, mother of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Jr., from her sisters and grandchildren.

The collection also contains legal papers of the Christman, Fravel, and Branson families from 1797; a 19th century copy of excerpts from a journal kept by Ann Butler (Brayne) Spotswood, 1709-1711; and legal papers and letters of the Gales family, 1824-1865. Miscellaneous items include six volumes of songs, poetry, and scrapbooks; bills and receipts; clippings; printed matter; and an account book, 1838-1841, and a ledger, 1839-1841, of Cornelius Baldwin Hite, Sr.

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William Henry Hall papers, 1736-1862

1020 items
The Hall family of Anne Arundel County, Maryland, were enslavers and owners of tobacco plantations. Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

Collection includes three generations of the Hall family and documents their involvement with tobacco and other plantation operations in Maryland during the 18th and 19th centuries, including the shift to lumber and wheat after 1800. Also includes information on cotton plantations in South Carolina and the sale of cotton to England, Maryland politics and government in the 1780s, insurrections by enslaved people, and naval impressment at the time of the War of 1812.

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Folder

The papers begin in 1736, when John Hall (ca. 1717-1790) and his brothers Henry and William become actively engaged in tobacco planting. The letters open with a land indenture of 1745 and continue as business correspondence with London, Annapolis, Baltimore, and local merchants and factories. Comment is made on salt as a necessity for plantation life in 1778 and 1782. An overseer's contract in 1764 gives details of plantation management and enslavement.

A letter is signed by John Hall of "Vineyard" on June 11, 1778. As a member of the Maryland Assembly, he discusses the check and balance theory as it was working out in the "young government" of Maryland, he mentions violent contests, the quit rents and state revenue, militia service, and the role of the governor. In 1787 "Publicanus" addresses the people of Anne Arundel Co. on the topic of paper money.

The will of John Hall (made in 1787) gives his estate as "Bachelor's Choice," on West River, and names his children and their families. Enslaved people are listed as part of the estate. Many of the later letters are from the families of Hall sibilings to William Henry Hall, son of John Hall. A series of law suits occurs in the 1790s as William Henry Hall settles his father's estate.

A letter dated Oct. 3, 1796, to William Henry Hall describes the life of an American seaman impressed into the British navy. Samuel Hopkins, a young Maryland plantation overseer, and John Wilson of Cheraw, S. C., comment in letters to Hall from 1810-1813 on cotton planting in S. C. Hopkins describes on July 1, 1810, a plot by enslaved people to rise against enslavers in the Marlboro District of S. C. In 1813 he writes of hiring a substitute for himself if drafted in the War of 1812. Among W. H. Hall's correspondents were William, John, David, and John G. Weems of Anne Arundel Co., relatives of Mason Locke ("Parson") Weems.

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The bills and receipts contain many an "acct. sale" of tobacco, listing custom duties, charges, etc., in tobacco shipping. Estate inventories for Major Henry Hall, 1758, Thos. Lane, 1790-98, John Hall, 1795, and Mrs. Ruth Hall, 1803, include enslaved people and list possessions. Many mercantile and household accounts are included.

There are 7 volumes dated 1765-1902. Six are account books, two that belonged to John Hall and 4 to William Henry Hall. There is one volume that belonged to Harriet Hall.

Frederick Fraser papers, 1700-1911 and undated

2 Linear Feet
The Frederick Fraser Papers comprises documents of a cotton planter in South Carolina. Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook that contains a variety of materials related to social life in South Carolina and the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards.

The Frederick Fraser Papers include correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, some personal correspondence, assorted financial transactions concerning cotton, some miscellaneous personal papers, and a scrapbook (152 p.). Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. The scrapbook contains a variety of materials related to both the social lives of the De Saussure, Fraser, and several other South Carolina families, as well as their activities during the Civil War, including: correspondence, newspaper clippings, poems, copies of tombstone engravings, invitations, photographs, and postcards. Scrapbook also includes letters from Henry De Saussure Fraser, a surgeon in Virginia. His letters describe military activities and life as a Union prisoner from 1863-1864 in Fort McHenry and Old Capitol Prison, as well as the Charleston earthquake in 1886. The scrapbook also includes a small volume of the De Saussure family genealogy. Persons mentioned in the collection include Thomas Boone Fraser, Sr., Daniel De Saussure, and Henry William De Saussure.

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Box 1

Business correspondence concerning the sale of cotton, including commercial problems during the War of 1812, and particularly in Charleston, South Carolina. Includes an 1872 letter from Iredell Jones concerning his trial as a member of the Klu Klux Klan. Also includes some personal correspondence, primarily with the individuals John Dawson, Ladson, H. Cunningham, and B. W. Martin, and an anonymous individual identitified only as I.H.L.

Fowler family papers, 1779-1870

4.2 Linear Feet — 9 Boxes; 1 volume
Included in this collection are records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones Co., North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph about 1820 engaged in the export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, N.C., 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, N.C. The collection also includes two Yale university diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; and business letters to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother, Bay River (N.C.) general store and liquor merchants.

The Fowler family papers collection Includes records, 1779-1809, of a mercantile business run by Stephen Fowler, Fairfield, Connecticut, and after 1805 of Trenton, Jones County, North Carolina, which engaged in trade between New York and North Carolina. Stephen's son Joseph, about 1820, engaged in export of lumber, naval stores, tobacco, grain, and blackeyed peas from North Carolina to Bermuda; and later in coastal trade from New Bern to New York. There is also correspondence relating to his duties as U.S. deputy marshal, Pamlico District, North Carolina, 1831-1860. Family correspondence predominates between 1840 and 1860. For the Civil War years there are many letters from Joseph S. Fowler, Jr., written largely from the Confederate Commissary Office, Kinston, North Carolina.

The collection also includes diplomas; a ledger of Joseph S. Fowler, (1817-1834), 1836, 1866, 1 vol.; financial and legal papers, 1800-1860; broadsides concerning state policies; the logbook of Absalom Fulford kept on the Neuse River lightship, 1845-1849, recording weather and the passage of ships; certificates for jurors, U.S. District Court, New Bern, 1839-1858; business letters addressed to DeWitt C. Fowler and Brother at Bay River, 1860-1868, a general store and liquor dealer; and a few items relating to North Carolina schools. Among correspondents in the collection are Silvester Brown, Benjamin Q. Tucker, Absalom Fulford, and Wesley Jones.

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Edward Brodnax Hicks papers, 1800-1913

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 7 volumes; approximately 3,516 items
Edward Brodnax Hicks (1800-1858) was a lawyer, sheriff, and plantation owner from Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia. Collection comprises correspondence, legal documents, mercantile records, notes, and other papers, of Hicks and of his son, David S. Hicks, planter, lawyer, land agent, and judge in the same locality. The material relates to legal and judicial activities, Texas land deals, economic conditions in Virginia, and the Atlantic and Danville Railway Co. Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation on the Red River, Arkansas, after 1837. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons at New Orleans during 1852. Correspondents include Thomas Ewing, D.J. Claiborne, Jr., Leigh R. Page, John W. Paup, and Lewis Taylor.

Collection includes business, personal, and legal correspondence of Edward B. Hicks (died 1858), lawyer and planter of Lawrenceville, Brunswick County, Virginia, and of his son, David S. Hicks, lawyer, planter, and land agent. Papers of Edward B. Hicks include jockey club dues, records connected with his duties as sheriff in 1821 and possibly later, and with Hicks' position as superintendent of schools in Brunswick County in 1847.

Included also is an extensive series of letters and papers relating to the operation, in partnership with John W. Paup, of Spring Hill plantation at Red River, Arkansas, in 1837 and later. An early letter, 1840, describes the deaths ("losses") of enslaved persons at the plantation, and the building of better quarters. Letters also show that Hicks engaged in selling enslaved persons in New Orleans during 1852. Other interesting letters are from Lewis Taylor on the War of 1812 and another, in 1817, relative to disturbances at Princeton College, Princeton, New Jersey, caused by refusal of professors to accept state bank notes.

Centering around David S. Hicks, the papers dated after 1858 are largely legal documents, notes, and correspondence concerned with his law practice and the administration of the estate of Edward R. Hicks. The most continuous series among these legal papers is a set of letters from Leigh R. Page, a Richmond attorney. Papers also pertain to the efforts of Hicks and one Turnbull to sell lands in Brunswick County to Northerners.

Included also are records of Hicks's activities as judge of Brunswick County, as dealer in Texas lands, and as an organizer of the Atlantic and Danville Railroad. One letter, June 30, 1866, from D. J. Claiborne, Jr., concerns African American congressmen in the South and his hatred for them amidst fears of a "Negro supremacy." Fifteen letters from General Thomas Ewing are concerned with the Atlantic and Danville Railroad Company.

The volumes, generally mercantile records, seem to have into the collection as a result of Hicks's legal practice and duties as sheriff in Virginia. These are chiefly in the form of account and ledger books.

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Box 1

One letter from November 13, 1840, recently added to the original collection, was written from John Paup, Spring Hill Plantation, Hempstead county, Arkansas, to Edward Brodnax Hicks, his partner in the plantation and resident of Brunswick County, Virginia. His thee-page letter refers to the economics of enslaved labor and buying enslaved persons; illness and the deaths of enslaved persons on the plantation; the cotton crop, insurance, and prices; and the survey of the border between Arkansas and the Republic of Texas.

Slade family papers, 1751-1929 and undated

4.5 Linear Feet
The Slade family were white plantation owners and businessmen in Martin County, North Carolina. This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and family affairs of a plantation owning family in the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances. Also contains materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade.

This collection (2781 items; dated 1751-1929) comprises family and business correspondence, account books, memoranda books, daybooks, time books, court records, and other papers of Jeremiah Slade, Thomas Slade, William Slade, and of several generations of the Slade family. The papers reflect the financial and the family affairs of a plantation-owning family of the antebellum South, and include student letters from the University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and the North Carolina State and Normal College (Greensboro); Mexican War and Civil War letters; legal papers and land deeds, including correspondence and receipts with other N.C. politicians, judges, and officials such as Asa Biggs; plantation records, including lists of enslaved persons; and materials related to slavery and post-Civil War agricultural advances.

There is extensive correspondence between the women of the Slade family, reporting on local and family news as well as offering opinions and accounts of their various studies and activities. There is also a fair amount of business correspondence and account logs from the various Slade ventures, including fisheries, logging, hog farming, tobacco crops, cotton, and horse breeding.

Of note are the materials relating to the forced removal of the Tuscarora Nation in the early 1800s and the leasing of their land through Jeremiah Slade. There are also assorted accounts and receipts documenting guardianship, personal expenses, invoices, and other financial papers relating to the operation of plantations and large farms in North Carolina both before and after the Civil War.

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The family's correspondence includes letters across several generations of Slades and their business associates, friends, and relatives, centering around the family's plantations, farming, and fisheries in and around Williamston, Martin County, N.C.; Tennessee; and Georgia. Early letters document on the activities of Jeremiah Slade, a general during the War of 1812. His letters tend to relate to the fisheries, legal cases, and business issues. Slade served as a North Carolina State Senator from 1809 to 1815, so some correspondence relates to court cases and other activities of the senate. All materials relating to his role as Commissioner for the Tuscarora Indians has been removed to the Tuscarora Nation Series.

The Correspondence Series contains many letters between Jeremiah and Janet Slade and their children, with the majority being from Alfred, Thomas, Mary Ann, James Bog (J.B.), Elizabeth, and William. After the death of Jeremiah Slade in 1824, the family's correspondence tends to center around the activities of his sons, Thomas and William Slade, and their families (they had 12 and 11 children, respectively). Their letters include descriptions of college life at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Trinity College, Wake Forest College, Greensboro Female College/State Normal and Industrial School (now UNCG), and several secondary boarding schools. A few letters early in 1861 are from Henry Slade, a student at Trinity College, Randolph County, North Carolina, until he joined the army in the same year. Henry Slade mentions Braxton Craven, in whose home he boarded.

There is a significant amount of letters documenting the Civil War period, particularly comments on the organization of military companies; campaigns around Yorktown, Virginia, during 1861; fighting, refugees, and the Union occupation in eastern North Carolina; living conditions and high prices; Longstreet's Corps in Caroline County, Virginia, in 1863; and the military situation around Knoxville, Tennessee, in 1863. There are also war letters between Eli Peal and his wife in eastern North Carolina, containing advice on farming operations; payment of taxes; accounts of skirmishes at Camp Burgwyn near Wilmington, North Carolina; slaves running away; difficulty of obtaining clothes; and references to guard duty.

There is a significant amount of correspondence to and from the Slade women (including Elizabeth, Mary, Ann, and Helen) during the Civil War. Letters of "Bog" or J. B. Slade early in 1861 from Harris County, Georgia, reflect enthusiasm for the newly formed Confederacy.

Post-war letters include general family correspondence, with frequent letters between the Slade women, including Janet, Mary, Emma, Martha, and Helen (on the Thomas Bog Slade side) and Annie, Mary, Elizabeth, Helen, and Frances (on the William Slade side). Correspondence also relates to the family's business ventures, including land rentals and other engagements with freedmen, news from the fishery, and reports from various horse breeding ventures. One notable letter is from Fanny, a former slave, writing from Texas in 1867 asking for any information on the whereabouts of her children. She was apparently sold away from them by the Slades. Another notable letter from Mount Airy in 1874 tells of the death of the Siamese twins, Eng and Chang.

The latest letters in the Correspondence series document the activities of James Bog Slade, Thomas B. Slade, and their descendents in Columbus, Georgia, and Martin County, North Carolina. Topics include the Clinton Female Seminary (Clinton, Georgia), the State Normal and Industrial School (Greensboro, N.C.), women's suffrage, Trinity Baptist Church (Caswell Co., N.C.), tobacco farming, hog butchering, and other business interests of the family.

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The Financial Papers series includes financial ledgers, account books, estate inventories, invoices, receipts, orders, lists, censuses and hiring account of enslaved persons, guardianship accounts, and other financial materials documenting the personal and business expenses of the Slades throughout the nineteenth century. Jeremiah Slade's accounts and financial papers have been separated into their own folders; the rest of the family's expenses and income is documented in the General Papers portion of the series. Specific accounts relating to the Conicho Fishery, Lenox Castle, and La Vega horse stud operation are also present in this series. All materials relating the the Tuscarora Nation's accounts with Jeremiah Slade are housed in the Tuscarora Series.

The financial papers of various Slade members also include their tax assessments, sales and evaluations of enslaved persons, estate sales, and personal expenses. Lists of enslaved persons tend to include names, ages, and valuations; other materials include occasional receipts for the sale of enslaved persons; bills for medical care; and account books or lists recording the hiring out of enslaved persons to other farms or plantations in Martin County.

Jarratt-Puryear family papers, 1807-1918, bulk 1843-1879, bulk 1843-1879

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3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 2,349 items (including 4 vols.)
Collection contains chiefly correspondence relating to the Clingman, Jarratt, Poindexter, and Puryear families, early settlers of Surry County, N.C., together with a genealogical table. Subjects include the slave trade between North Carolina and Alabama, 1830-1835; North Carolina during the Civil War and Reconstruction, conditions at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill prior to the war, plantation accounts, the distillation and sale of whiskey, and business affairs. Correspondents include William James Bingham, John Adams Gilmer, and Zebulon Vance.

This collection contains papers of the related Jarratt, Puryear, Clingman, Poindexter and Cash families, and especially of Isaac A. Jarratt, soldier in the War of 1812, landholder, merchant, and distiller.

The collection concerns family matters and local affairs; the education of Mary Jarratt at St. Mary's College, Raleigh, North Carolina; the education of Augustus Jarratt at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and conditions at the university preceding the Civil War; Isaac Jarratt's partnership with Tyre Glen in the slave trade between Alabama and North Carolina, 1830-1835; the Creek War of 1836; United States relations with Mexico, 1842; a survey of Wilson, North Carolina, 1851; frontier conditions in Texas; the Civil War, including troop movements in North Carolina and Virginia, conditions in the Confederate Army, conscription, lists of absentees, official orders for enrolling new age groups, conscription lists, casualty lists, payments to widows, and home conditions; freedmen, including letters from former enslaved persons inquiring about relatives; Jarratt's efforts to get whiskey during the war; North Carolina politics after the war; whiskey taxes; conditions in California; a Texas counterfeit affair in which A. B. Clingman was unjustly suspected; the business affairs of the Jarratt family; the administration of the estates of Samuel L. Davis, William Doss, Sally Doss, and Polly Sapp by Isaac Jarratt and of the estate of Richard Clauselle Puryear (d. 1867) by Jarratt and by his son, Richard Clingman Puryear (b. 1848); and the law practice of Richard Clingman Puryear, including the collection of many claims, 1870-1900.

Volumes include a plantation account book, 1834-1881, containing lists and prices of enslaved persons bought and sold in 1834 and 1835; a plantation account book, 1866-1871, recording supplies and cash advanced to tenants; an administration book, 1845-1848, concerning the estate of Matthew A. Doss; and a ledger, 1869-1870, of Isaac A. Jarratt & Sanderford, a general mercantile firm, containing the records of the sale of whiskey.

Knight family papers, 1784-1960 and undated, bulk 1840s-1890s

5.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes
Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Correspondence, 1817-1895 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

Correspondence consists chiefly of business letters by John Knight and his partners and friends. However, there are also many letters by Knight family members and their relatives and friends. The correspondence begins in 1817 with letters from Mary (McCleery) Knight in Indiana to her sister Frances (McCleery) Beall, William M. Beall's wife. There is also correspondence between Fanny Knight, John and Frances Knight's daughter, and Thomas McDannold during their courtship. Correspondence also includes letters from friends and relatives while the Knights were traveling abroad. Many letters also mention John Knight's attempts at various cures for ill health, including water cures, hot springs, and baths.

Between 1830 and 1864, Knight's business correspondence with Enoch Pratt, a Baltimore banker in charge of Knight's finances, William Beall, and others, predominates. Topics include: the U.S. political and economic climate: the conflict between Henry Clay and Andrew Jackson; the cotton market; banking and bank failures; investment in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; the purchase and sale of slaves, with some bought by William Beall and sent to Knight in Mississippi; the treatment and medical care of slaves; the operation of Knight's plantations; piracy on the Mississippi River, 1841; cholera and yellow fever epidemics in New York and New Orleans in 1832, 1833, 1837, and 1841; the economic panic of 1857; education at the Frederick Female Academy, Frederick, Maryland; financial conditions in the United States during the Civil War; the relations between the United States and England during the war; and the course of the Civil War, especially the Union invasion of Maryland. One early letter from Roger Brooke Taney to William Murdock Beall explains his refusal of the vice-presidency and discussing his interest in the U.S. presidency.

Other smaller groups of correspondence were written by Frances "Fanny" Knight McDannold, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, her children Knight and Alexandra, and husband Thomas McDannold, and that family's acquaintances.

The correspondence ends with a much smaller series of letters, which include items to Frances S.Z. Knight from her grandchildren, and other correspondence reflecting her financial and legal activities as she managed her husband's large estate and the guardianship of her grandchildren even as she approached old age.

Some additional correspondence can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers series.

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Notebooks, 1831-1884 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

A variety of small volumes kept by family members make up this series. Frances Beall Knight's 1831-1879 notebooks include a scrapbook with a few entries from her husband and friends, pasted-in clippings with obituaries for Elisha Beall, William M. Beall, and Zeruiah Bell, pasted-in engravings, copied poems, and other writings. There is also a notebook with medical and financial content; a notebook with mostly religious content; and a notebook on various subjects.

There is one notebook from 1858 identified as John Knight's, in which he describes the family's trip to Russia. Also in the series are Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight's booklets of schoolwork dated from the 1840s to 1854.

This series also includes four anonymous notebooks. The smallest item, from after 1862, is actually a small folded sheaf of notes on world history, perhaps from a lecture or a book. Another small volume, circa 1864, contains needlework patterns, recipes, and housekeeping notes, and may be Fanny Knight's; a notebook from 1884 listing traveling trunk and bank vault contents, and medical receipts, which may be Frances B. Knight's while she acted as guardian of her two grandchildren; and another is a baby journal recording in detail the first years of Knight McDannold's life, 1875-1882.

Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated

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1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items
Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including lists with names of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; enslaved persons and tenants (including some lists of enslaved persons); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 names of enslaved persons from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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Correspondence, 1820-1920 and undated 11 folders — Approximately 600 items

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About one third of the correspondence dates from the 1820s to 1865, and two-thirds dates from after the Civil War to the early 20th century. Included are 46 letters from the Civil War period to and from members of John and Susan Bullock's family, chiefly concerning their son Walter Bullock's service in the Confederate Army.

Topics in the correspondence typically include family matters such as schooling, illnesses, courtship and marriage, deaths in the family and in the community, farming, sales of agricultural crops, religious life, visitors and local events, and some business matters. There is also some mention of the Spanish-American War in later letters.

There are many letters from the daughters and sons of John and Susan Cobb, especially from William, James, Richard, Walter, Alfred, George, Sally, Lucy, and Beck. Grandchildren's letters and many letters from Beck to her mother Sally (Tarry) Hamilton make up the bulk of the late 19th and early 20th century letters.

Family names also appearing in the papers include: Boyd, Goode, Eaton, Farrar, Hamilton, Harrison, Tarry, Taylor, and Watkins. There are also frequent mention of Andersons, Grahams and Hendersons.

Place names associated with the Bullocks and their relatives are: Williamsborough (or -boro), Granville County, NC (now Vance County), the principal home place for the Bullocks; Wheatland, Tarboro, Warrenton and Rocky Mount, NC; Petersburg, Soudan, Boydton, and Skipwith, VA. There are some letters from Tennessee and Mississippi, where the Bullocks owned land. Other place names appearing include Grassy Creek and Oak Hill, Granville County.

The Civil War letters mostly were sent to and from Walter Bullock and his parents, but there are a few from his brothers, several of whom apparently also served for a time, and other people. They give details about camp life, food and diet, health issues, weather, furloughs, troop movements, and rumors about events. There are frequent requests for supplies from home. One letter bears a long description of the battle of Kinston, NC, 1862; another from an encampment "near Norfolk" dated March 1862 mentions a major naval engagement at the mouth of the James River. A letter from June 1862 brings the news that a Bullock son was taken prisoner. Another letter from John Bullock to a friend announces that Walter was taken prisoner in June 1864, probably when Captain George W. Kirk and Union cavalry overran Camp Vance (Burke Cty.). There is one letter from Walter writing from Johnson's Island, Ohio, September 1864; he then writes several letters from Kenansville, NC in early 1865, and describes the last months of the war. Camp Vance (Burke County), figures most prominently in Walter's letters, who seems to have been by then in the 68th Regiment, and Camp Holmes, near Raleigh. Other place names include Camp Mangum, NC; Camp Arrington, VA, 1862; "in the trenches," Petersburg, VA, November 29, 1864; and Kenansville, NC, December 1864. There are a few letters relating to Captain William Wallace White, who also appears at the head of a militia roll in the Other Papers series.

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Financial Papers, 1808-1876 and undated 6 folders — Approximately 500 items and two volumes.

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Two account books, and loose receipts, bills, promissory notes, estate papers, and other financial records concerning the Bullock family, particularly John Bullock's general store in Granville County (now Vance), and the 19th century farms and small plantations of the Bullocks and other relations. Of particular note are two 1836 documents concerning the purchase by John Bullock from the Torrey or Toney family of an African American woman, Kitty, and her three children, Martha Ann, Mordecai, and Sally.

Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1823-1954 (bulk 1823-1883)

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8 Linear Feet — approx. 3,000 Items
Alexander H. Stephens (1812-1883) was a Georgia lawyer, politician and Vice President of the Confederate States of America. The collection includes a large amount of correspondence as well as bills/receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material. It ranges in date from 1823 to 1954, with the bulk covering 1823-1883.

The collection includes correspondence, bills and receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material and ranges in date from 1823-1954, with the bulk dated 1823-1883. Due to preservation concerns, some items were copied onto acid-free paper and stamped as preservation copies. The originals were placed in mylar and are located in Box 7. Patrons should consult with Rubenstein Library staff before handling these materials.

The vast majority of the collection is comprised of correspondence, covering the years 1823-1883. Many of the letters in the collection were written to Stephens, although there are letters written in his own hand. Throughout the correspondence are letters written to Stephens by various family members, most notably his brothers John and Linton. The bulk of the correspondence pertains to Stephens' law work, regarding issues such as the settling of estates and the collection of debts. The most prominent topics include family matters, business and legal matters and Stephens' health. Given the expansive amount of correspondence, below is a breakdown by decade of other topics which appear, in an effort to assist the researcher in locating materials of interest:

Correspondence 1823-1839: Topics include States' Rights, slavery, and an Indian war in Florida [possibly the Creek War]. There is a letter from Herschel V. Johnson who sought advice from Stephens in 1839 regarding negotiations with a railroad company.

Correspondence 1840-1849: Topics include local and national politics/views, opinions about President Martin Van Buren, "agricultural politics," Thomas Dorr and the People's Party, the purchasing of slaves, the 1843 Boston visit of President John Tyler and Vice President Daniel Webster, Stephens' nomination to serve in the U. S. Congress, Whigs and Democrats (Stephens was invited to attend several Whig-sponsored barbeques), and the death of Stephens' brother Aaron. There is a letter from United States Representative Marshall Johnson Wellborn which discusses the Judiciary Act (1841). There are also a substantial number of letters written by and to John Bird and letters written to him and Stephens (they were likely law partners). Of note are two letters written in 1844 by [Sarvis] Pearson (presumably a client of Stephens or his firm) to his estranged wife Mary S. Pearson which offer insight into the subject of divorce and marital discord of the time period.

Correspondence 1850-1859: Letters written by Stephens start to appear more frequently. Topics include largely family and legal matters.

Correspondence 1860-1869: Topics include employment inquiries both pre- and post-Civil War, autograph requests, Stephens' book about the Civil War, and the social history of a post-Civil War Georgia. Items of note: There are petitions (1860) by Stephens' district constituents asking him to address them about the presidential election. There are letters asking him for permission to travel into the Union. There are a couple of letters written by Stephens to Jefferson Davis. There is a letter from March 1860 to Pearce Stevons [Stephens] by Rody Jordan, both of whom were not only brothers but slaves as well. The letter is likely written by someone other than Jordan. A letter to Stephens in October 1866 states that his former slave Pearce was charged with murder and asks for Stephens' legal counsel at Pearce's request (he apparently complied based on a letter from 1869).

Correspondence 1870-1879: Topics include requests for employment and financial help, requests for letters of recommendation, Linton Stephens' death, Stephens' paper the Daily and Weekly Sun, the federal government, autograph requests, and Stephens' work with the Committee on Standard Weights and Measures. Item of note: There are documents from 1873 concerning an illegal distilling and corruption case in Georgia.

Correspondence 1880-1883: Topics includes Stephens' opinion of President James A. Garfield, his bid for Governor, requests for financial help and letters of recommendation for men interested in state posts appointed by the Governor, such as Physician of the Georgia Penitentiary. Items of note: There is a letter dated 1883 signed by Secretary of War, Robert Todd Lincoln. There are two letters from 1882 which offer some insight into African-American involvement in Georgia politics.

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Henry W. Jones papers, 1813-1877

4 Linear Feet
Henry W. Jones was a farmer, lawyer, magistrate, and distiller from Granville County, North Carolina.

Correspondence and Assorted Family Material is primarily personal correspondence sorted by year. One folder contains handwritten genealogical information about Jones and his lineage. Almost all of the correspondence is addressed to Henry W. Jones, though most of the correspondence came after his death in late 1871 or early 1872, and is addressed to a son, Edward H. Jones of Oxford, N.C. Nearly all of the correspondents, both before and after 1871/1872, were children and children-in-law of Henry W. Jones, most of whom resided in Hopkins Co., Ky. The notable exceptions to this are John and Alice Beasley, a son-in-law and daughter who lived in Tex., and P. H. Gooch, a nephew who lived in Farmington, Mo. Agriculture and family matters are the dominant subjects covered by the correspondence. One family matter of particular interest was an effort by some of Henry W. Jones's children, particularly Soloman W. Jones, a local Methodist preacher, to convert their father to Christianity. These same letters also document the revivals that swept Kentucky in the 1850s. There are also several letters that comment on life in the C.S.A. Army, including ones by E. H. Jones (55th Regiment, N.C. Troops) and B. F. Jones (17th Regiment, N.C. Troops).

The first portion of Legal and Financial Papers contains individual folders with records relating to Jones's career as a magistrate (tax records, election rolls, and warrants) as well personal financial information (distillery taxes and personal tax receipts). The remainder of the series is general financial and legal correspondence sorted by year. This series also contains several account books for business partnerships between Jones and his father-in-law, David Parker.

The final series--Printed materials, clippings, and printed work--contains newspaper clippings, political pamphlets, and other printed material related to farming, legal issues, as well as North Carolina and national politics.

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Alexander Sprunt and Son records, 1779-1960

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6082 items
Cotton firm from Wilmington, N.C., that for a short period was probably the largest cotton exporting house in the United States. Collection includes account books, ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase and sales journals, inventories, other subsidiary books, and some office files and correspondence. Goods were purchased from the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas, and other states and processed in the firm's compress facilities and sold to Great Britain, France, Germany, and elsewhere in Europe.

The collection consists of an extensive, but incomplete, set of account books, remnants of the office file and James Sprunt's correspondence (personal as well as business letters and papers), and pictures. Among the account books there are long series of ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase books, and stock inventories that document the company's operations between the 1870s and 1950s. The ledgers date between 1889 and 1952, and there are private ledgers for 1907 through 1931. The volume of minutes covers 1919-1930, but there are a few others among the offices files along with financial statements, 1885-1915, important legal documents of the partnership and corporation, and assorted other papers.

Correspondence and other papers of James Sprunt and the company date between 1884 and 1952, but they are numerous only for 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921. The letters date mostly to 1904-1910, and 1919-1921, and are largely files of James Sprunt, reflecting his activities in business and interests in secular and theological education, the Presbyterian church in the U.S., and North Carolina history. Notable correspondents and subjects are Alexander Sprunt (1815-1884), Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), Alexander Sprunt (b. 1898), James Sprunt (1847-1924), Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, Francis Herman Packer, John Miller Wells, John Campbell White, Edward Jenner Wood, The Laymen's Missionary Movement, and the Presbyterian mission at Kiangyin, China. Account books, minutes, and correspondence are available also for a number of domestic and foreign subsidaries and branch offices, but these are often quite fragmentary. More than thirty pictures, mostly photographs, illustrate the firm's staff, workers, physical plant, and employees as well as other scenes.

Also included are some papers representing various domestic and foreign subsidiaries and branch offices, especially Champion Compress and Warehouse Company, the Wilmington Compress and Warehouse Company, Alexander Sprunt & Son (of Delaware, a holding company), and the company's offices in New York City and Le Havre, France.

Information about the company's history can be found in: James Sprunt's letters of Nov. 6, 1908; Apr. 9, 1909; Jun. 7 and Oct. 22, 1919; an article in Wilmington's Morning Star from Feb. 11, 1921; and Dictionary of American Biography.

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Folder
Online

James Sprunt had very extensive correspondence files, of which only a small portion has survived. A year's letters were subdivided alphabetically and included both the incoming originals and the outgoing copies. The years represented by a sizeable body of papers are 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921, but they are probably quite incomplete. All of the papers have been arranged chronologically. The series also contains "other papers," which cannot be identified with their original files. Most of the material came from James Sprunt's files.

The series represents a variety of Sprunt's personal and professional interests. Business operations, the cotton market, and domestic and foreign economic conditions are constant concerns. There was frequent communication between Sprunt and his relatives and business associates in Liverpool. His work as vice consul for Great Britain and Germany appears occasionally. Prominent among his activities and charities is the Presbyterian Church in the U.S., the southern body of the Presbyterians. He was a member of the First Presbyterian Church and assisted other congregations in Wilmington and Chapel Hill, where he financed the remodeling of the church as designed by architect Hobart Upjohn. He made substantial contributions to the mission in Kiangyin, China. The interdenominational Laymen's Missionary Movement and its general secretary, John Campbell White, are also prominent in the papers, along with the southern Presbyterian part of of that organization. Sprunt was a principle mover in the arrangements for a statue of George Davis, Confederate attorney general and native son of Wilmington, and there is much correspondence about it, including that with Francis Herman Packer, the sculptor. Sprunt was a trustee of the University of North Carolina and a benefactor of Davidson College, and there are communications between him and the schools' students and officials. Other educational institutions represented include Columbia Theological Seminary, Union Theological Seminary, the antecedents of North Carolina Central University, and other colleges and academies in the South, including several historically black colleges. River and harbor improvements at Wilmington are noted. Scattered political correspondence includes references to state elections, the N.C. Supreme Ct., and the U.S. District Court for Eastern N.C., and the Wilmington riots of 1898. There are several letters about the N.C. Literary and Historical Association and the N.C. Folklore Society, and about other episodes of state history, such as blockade running during the Civil War, President Taft's visit to Wilmington in 1909, Governor Benjamin Smith, and the monument for the Revolutionary battle at Moore's Creek. Correspondence with and about Woodrow Wilson mainly concerned a Carnegie pension for Henry Elliot Shepherd, an educator, but there are a few minor items of a political nature. Sprunt communicated with Senators Lee Slater Overman and Furnifold Simmons about various matters.

Several close relatives of James Sprunt had distinguished careers and are also represented by letters and references: his brother Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), a Presbyterian clergyman at Charleston, S.C.; Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, an architect in New York who was a brother-in-law; Edward Jenner Wood, a nephew and physician who was a pioneer in the campaign against pellagra; and Joseph Austin Holmes, another brother-in-law who was a geologist, chief of the technological branch of the U.S. Geological Survey in charge of the investigation of mine accidents, 1904-1907, and the first director of the Bureau of Mines established in 1910.

Mary Calvert Stribling papers, 1835-1930; bulk 1920-1929

6.5 Linear Feet
Mary Calvert Stribling (1870-1951) was a civic leader, of Martinsburg, West Virginia. Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area. Includes scattered business and family papers.

Papers (chiefly 1920-1929) relating to Stribling's work as an officer of the West Virginia Division of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and as an official of the Red Cross in the Martinsburg, W. Va., area.

Other papers include: A diploma of Mary Brown Riddle from Woodburn Female Seminary in Morgantown, W. Va. (March 28, 1860); agreement of 1874 between John S. McClellan and M. Nascimento of Philadelphia and C. Strlbling of Baltimore for forming a partnership under the firm name of J.S. McClellan and Co. to manufacture silk and cassimere hats; letters from McClellan to Strlbling about their business; Indenture of 1875 severing Strlbling's relationship with the firm; letters, and will of C. K., Strlbling, who between 1845 and 1847 commanded the U. S. Receiving ship Pennsylvania; catalogue of Prince Edward Academy, Worsham, Va., for 1879; business papers of Mrs. Ann E. Strlbling, wife of Cornelius Strlbling, deceased; reports by Ann E. Strlbling, guardian of her children Chas. R., James M., Mary C, and Sue Brown Strlbling, to the orphans' court in Baltimore and in Martinsburg on the expenditures which she had made for her children and In keeping of their property; letters of Chas. R. While at Hampden Sidney College: business papers of Joseph A. Wishard, proprietor of a hotel in Smithsburg. Md.; programs of a music and a travel club in Martinsburg; sermon notes; broadside by Carrie Chapman Catt entitled "Mrs. Catt on League of Nations and the Presidential Election"; pamphlet published by the Pro-League Independents; papers relating to the dismissal of Gutzon Borglum as the sculptor of the Stone Mountain Confederate Memorial and to attempts to raise funds for the continuation of the work on that monument by Augustus Lukeman.; materials relating to Wilson College, Chambersburg, Pa., and to Mary Baldwin College, of which Mary C. Strlbling was an alumna. Bulletin of the Swarthmore Chautauqua, Swarthmore, Pa.; and programs of services at the Presbyterian Church in Martinsburg; map of Winchester Presbytery.

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Amy Morris Bradley papers, 1806-1921, bulk 1841-1921

3 Linear Feet
Amy Morris Bradley was a nurse and agent of the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War as well as an educator in Maine, 1840s-1850s, and Wilmington, N.C., 1865-1890s. Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

Collection comprises correspondence, diaries, record books, and photographs documenting Bradley's family life and teaching in Maine during the 1840s, her travels throughout the South and Costa Rica in the 1850s, her duties as a nurse at several U.S. Sanitary Commission convalescent camps during the Civil War, and her post-war work in Wilmington, N.C., where she founded free schools for white children in 1866 and 1872 under the auspices of the Soldiers' Memorial Society and worked as an administrator in the public school system until 1891. The collection includes two salted paper prints and several albumen photographs of Civil War relief camps, some by noted photographer Alexander Gardner.

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Folder

Series contains letters to and from Amy Morris Bradley, related ephemera, notes and receipts, third-party correspondence about Bradley, and one folder of newspaper clippings. The majority of material relates to Bradley's time in Costa Rica, her work as a field nurse and for the U.S. Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, and her time as an educator in Wilmington, N.C.

In addition to family letters, there are several letters with soldiers and their relatives thanking her for her service. Included is a petition from 1865 signed by 320 soldiers recommended to the Secretary of War that Bradley be commissioned to major in the U.S. Army for her service. Clippings relate primarily to the Tileston Normal School, although some are also about Mary Hemenway, a benefactress of Tileston. Later correspondence comes from parents of students in Wilmington and from former students, many of whom maintained a close friendship with Bradley over many years. Ephemera includes programs of events at Tileston.

Battaile Muse papers, 1726-1891, bulk 1777-1800

7.2 Linear Feet — 18 boxes
Battaile Muse (1750-1803) was a planters' agent, of Berkeley Co., Va. (now Jefferson Co., W. Va.). Collection includes correspondence, account books, memoranda, and other papers. The collection concerns the movement from Tidewater farms to western Virginia, the progress of the Revolutionary War, sale of farm produce, the treatment of slaves, business operations, the Mercer (1776-1783) plantations and Fairfax estates, and Muse's career as a rental agent for George Washington in Frederick and Fauquier counties, Va. (1784-1792). Correspondents include W. M. Cary, Bryan Fairfax, Ferdinando Fairfax, G. W. Fairfax, Thomas Fairfax, J. L. Gervais, Tobias Lear, Richard Bland Lee, Warner Lewis, Stevens T. Mason, James Mercer, John Francis Mercer, Hugh Nelson, George Nicholas, John Hatley Norton, Thomas Rutherford, Magnus Tate, Hannah Fairfax Washington, George Washington, and Warner Washington.

Collection includes correspondence and papers of Battaile Muse (1750-1803), agent for large Virginia planters and plantation owners, relating to the desertion of Tidewater farms by Virginia planters for the more fertile areas in Loudoun, Fauquier, Frederick, and Berkeley counties; the progress of the Revolutionary War; planting and the sale of indigo and other farm products; the treatment of slaves, the estate of James and John Francis Mercer, 1776-1783; the Fairfax estate; and Muse's career as rental agent for George Washington in Frederick and Fauquier counties; 1784-1792. Included also are account books and memoranda listing rent collections and other business operations. Four letters, 1847-1848, relate to a dispute in the faculty of the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia.

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Armistead Burt papers, 1759-1933

3.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 5,675 items
Armistead Burt (1802-1883) was a planter, lawyer, and U.S. Representative from Abbeville, S.C. Collection contains political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress. The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection includes the political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress.

The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

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Folder

Series includes political and legal correspondence mostly related to John C. Calhoun and the secession question. Later correspondence deals with Burt's law practice. Correspondents include: Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legaré, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, james L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

David Bullock Harris papers, 1789-1894

6.6 Linear Feet — 12 boxes, 5,075 items (including 9 volumes)
Collection contains correspondence, account books, receipts, statements, and other papers, chiefly relating to David Bullock Harris's training at West Point (1829-1833), his military career, and his tobacco business in Virginia, Kentucky, and England. Includes Civil War military papers and maps, accounts of the sale of slaves, and accounts of trade with Brazil. Also present are letters from Frederick Overton Harris, David's father, while in the Virginia House of Delegates, and from Nathaniel W. Harris, his brother and business partner. Other correspondents include P. G. T. Beauregard, D. H. Mahan, and Sylvanus Thayer.

This collection contains the business and personal correspondence of David Bullock Harris (1814-1864), tobacco exporter and Confederate general; and of his father, wife, and children. Harris's father, Frederick Harris, while in the Virginia House of Delegates, wrote letters to his wife and later to David Bullock Harris. Otherwise the papers reflect the career of David Bullock Harris, many being concerned with the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, while Harris was a student there, 1829-1833.

Included also are many letters relating to Harris's tobacco business in Virginia and Kentucky; and to the Civil War, with military papers and maps. There are also many letters to Harris's widow, usually from her children; many receipts and account books relating to the tobacco business; prices current; statements of J. K. Gilliat and Company, tobacco importers in London; letter of N.W. Harris, brother of David Bullock, concerning the tobacco business; letters from William T. Barrett, brother-in-law and partner of Harris in Kentucky; and letters concerning Harris's successful venture in trading with Brazil, exchanging flour for coffee.

Among the correspondents are P. G. T. Beauregard, D. H. Mahan, and Sylvanus Thayer. Added material includes an account book, 1845-1857, listing prices of slaves; personal and business correspondence and financial and legal papers, including items addressed to Miss Chattie C. McNeill, St. Paul's, North Carolina; settlement of estates of D. C. Overton, Martha Overton, and D. B. Harris; Harris's tobacco business; and the sale of slaves.

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Dilmus J. Appleberry papers, 1810-1927, bulk 1850-1896

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1,750 items
Business, family, and legal correspondence, accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, land surveys, and other papers. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House, Va., Altantic and Virginia Fertilizing Co. of Richmond, Va., and Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

This collection contains business, family, and legal correspondence of plantation owner Dilmus Appleberry. It is largely composed of accounts, bills, invoices, indentures, and land surveys. Letters, some of a business nature, comprise about five percent of the collection. Correspondents whose names appear most often are Pettit and Leake, a legal firm of Goochland Court House; Atlantic and Virginia Fertilizing Company of Richmond, Virginia; and Dilmus Appleberry's nephew, Thomas A. Bledsoe.

1 result in this collection

Lisa Unger Baskin collection of women's work and domestic arts ephemera, 1700s-1940s

1 Linear Foot
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

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File
Box 1

Decorative trade cards (ranging in size from 5x8cm to 11x19 cm) advertising businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. These trade cards all appear to originate from Great Britain or the United States.

File
Box 1, Oversize-folder 1

Assorted printed examples of items related to women-owned business ventures, pay, and income, including: life insurance for women brochures; advertisements and catalogs issued by women for boarding houses, ladies' classes, or gardening or grocery supplies; help wanted advertisements from various businesses, seeking women to hire for work as inspectors and door-to-door sales agents; a pay bill for Champfleurie Garderners' and Labourers' including Thomas and Mrs. McIntyre (1865); tickets, handouts, and circulars for services offered by women; lace specimen samples from Mme. Gurney and Co; a pensioner card for a firefighter's widow. There are some oversize materials in this section, including: a 1922 diploma (43x56 cm) for Nina E. Wilcox, earning a Philosopher of Chiropractic from the National College of Chiropractirs; a broadside advertising a 1914 recital by Louise Thornton, reader and impersonator in Boston; a broadside for Mrs. E. C. Cowdrey, Milliner, in Falls Village, Conn.; a Daly's Theatre playbill from 1884 , printed on fabric, with advertisements for E. A. Morrison's Elegant Bonnets; and a broadside (34 x 42cm) advertising the 1839 sale of two adjoining tenements in Godalming, "Late the Property and Pesidence of the Widow Crouch, deceased; who for many years carrier on the Trade of a Cooper, and for which the Premises are well adapted."

Dismal Swamp Land Company records, bulk circa 1660s-1860s, 1810-1879

4 Linear Feet
Collection comprised of 9 boxes of company records and 5 ledgers of organizational material of the Dismal Swamp Land Company, a shingle production company in existence between 1763-1879. Letter books, receipts spanning the entirety of the company's existence, and legal documents make up the bulk of the collection.

The Dismal Swamp Land Company records consist of company records spanning the 17th-19th centuries, with the bulk falling in the mid-to-late 19th century. The majority of records consist of financial documentation, including receipts for the purchase of equipment by the Company and numerous receipts for customers detailing quantities and prices of shingles purchased. Monthly ledgers and an account book are also present. The records include legal documents surrounding surveys of the Dismal Swamp, indentures, wills, and several powers of attorney for shareholder meetings. Incoming correspondence intended for the Company's presidents, mainly from employees and shareholders, makes up the majority of the Correspondence series.

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Funkhouser family papers, 1786-1941, bulk 1836-1908

6 Linear Feet
The Funkhouser family lived in Virginia with members moving West with the expansion of the Unites States. Other Funkhouser descendants moved into Ohio, Maryland and New Jersey. The collection contains correspondence, diary and other papers, chiefly 1836-1908, of the Funkhouser family of Mount Jackson, Va. including Andrew Funkhouser. Topics discussed include conditions in the West, opposition to slavery, and economic conditions in the U.S. after 1837; Civil War letters discuss camp life of Union and Confederate soldiers and the state of the South. Post-war letters are mainly personal. Includes a diary (1863) kept by G. H. Snapp, a minister of the United Brethren in Christ Church, telling of religious life among soldiers and civilians.

The collection contains family letters and business papers of the Funkhouser family, and, after 1910, of the Miller family. Most of the papers prior to 1830 are deeds for land in Philadelphia and Virginia. There are two land patents, one signed by Edmund Randolph, governor of Virginia, to Peter Hoshaur, 1788, and one signed by Joseph Johnson, governor of Virginia, to Andrew Funkhouser, 1851.

From the 1830s there are numerous letters from relatives in Virginia, Ohio, Missouri, Indiana, and Wisconsin describing the move westward, religion, railroads, economic conditions, land speculation, opposition to slavery, commerce, Indians, army forts, legal affairs, stock raising, farming, sickness and health, and the Mormon problem in Missouri. Many of these letters are from Funkhouser's son-in-law, John Kerr, a lawyer and speculator. There are also several wills and estate papers.

Civil War letters include items from R. H. Simpson with directions for his home farm and statements about Walker's and Archer's brigades on Funkhouser's land and the amount of wood they used. There is an account book mentioning Confederate Army purchases; papers relating to a claim against the United States for farm buildings, equipment and products burned or seized by order of General Sheridan; and tax in kind estimates and receipts. A diary of Rev. G. H. Snapp of the United Brethren in Christ Church, a brother-in-law of Andrew's son, Casper, discusses his circuit, revivals, conferences, and chaplains in the army; there are also many letters to Snapp down to 1900.

Other letters are from commission merchants in Winchester, Baltimore, Alexandria, and Washington both before and after the Civil War; price current bulletins from Washington, 1890s; and other business letters. Most of the letters after 1880 are from the children of Casper Funkhouser. There is a related genealogical and biographical sketch. These letters describe Shenandoah Seminary, Dayton, Virginia, 1880-1882; Bonebrake Theological Seminary, Dayton, Ohio; teaching at various places in Ohio, Maryland, Virginia, and New Jersey in the 1880s and 1890s; and family affairs. Papers concerning the family of Edward J. Miller include tax receipts, wheat allotment applications, and condolences on Miller's death.

Printed materials with the collection relate to teaching, insurance, an 1899 civil service examination, and standing orders for a mental hospital. Other business papers include tax receipts for Andrew Funkhouser, 1830-1886; tax receipts on Missouri land, 1850-1880; notes, receipts, and bills. Numerous letters refer to the temperance movement in the United Brethren Church and to Andrew Funkhouser's work as a trustee. In the 1880s there are business papers of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly.

Bound volumes include the roll of shareholders and minutes of the meetings of the Shenandoah Valley Assembly, daybooks, 1847-1861, and a ledger, 1836-1843, of Andrew Funkhouser, a list of the personal property of Jacob R. Funkhouser, 1856, and daybooks of John Bauserman, a merchant of Hawkinstown, Shenandoah County, Virginia.

2 results in this collection

William Holland Thomas papers, 1814-1900s and undated

30 Linear Feet
White agent and representative for the Cherokee, merchant, lawyer, and trader, of Haywood Co., N.C. Collection includes correspondence, account books, day books, ledgers, and other papers, relating to Thomas's life in western North Carolina; the removal of the Cherokee and the status of those who remained; the development of intrastructure including turnpikes and railroads in North Carolina; Civil War fighting in east Tennessee; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and his private business operations as a white trader among the Cherokees. Includes records of Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties, and business correspondence and accounts of Thomas's son, also William Holland Thomas, a merchant and farmer of Jackson County, N.C.

Collection contains letters and papers of William H. Thomas (1805-1893) concerning his life and businesses in western North Carolina; his role as a white agent representing the Indians in negotiations and communications with the U.S. government; the removal of the Eastern Band of Cherokee on the Trail of Tears; the legal and financial conditions of Cherokee who remained behind in North Carolina; the building of roads and railroads through Western North Carolina; fighting during the Civil War in East Tennessee, including Thomas's leadership of Thomas's Legion in the Confederate Army; postwar administration of Indian affairs; and private business of Thomas, including some documentation of his declining health and his institutionalization for mental instability. There are also account books, day books, and ledgers showing a record of goods bought and sold in Thomas's five stores in Haywood and Cherokee counties. Included also are business correspondence and miscellaneous accounts, 1875-1890, of his son, William Holland Thomas, Jr., merchant and farmer of Jackson County, North Carolina.

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Thomas's assorted correspondence along with extensive notes, loose account pages, and other miscellaneous items are sorted chronologically by year into General Papers. There are also volumes with travel diaries for various business ventures and letterbooks with copies of his incoming and outgoing correspondence. This series documents his various businesses and investments, his Confederate service during the Civil War, his work as an Indian agent, and his family life and friendships. Additional material on his work with the Eastern Band of Cherokee can be found in the Cherokee Papers Series; additional contracts, reports, and petitions relating to railroads and turnpikes can be found in the Infrastructure Series.

Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975

4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items
The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

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Most of the earliest items pertain to Mrs. Walton's family, the Bakers, who had settled in Hingham, Massachusetts at least by the eighteenth-century. Letters to Mrs. Walton comprise a major segment of this series, including those to her from her father, James Baker, 1880-1882. Included are courtship letters from George Walton, a physician who attended Eleanore Walton while she was convalescing near Deland, Florida. Most were written from 1891-1892, after she returned to her home in Chicago. Letters from George Walton after the marriage suggest financial hardship and indicate that the couple was frequently separated from the beginning of their marriage and during the early childhood of their son Loring. After 1895, there is a gap in the correspondence.

Also included is George Walton's 1896 diary of a trip via wagon from Indiana to Florida. Later material and correspondence in the series pertains to Eleanore Walton's work as a clubwoman and motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri from the 1920s to 1948, when she retired and moved to Durham, N.C. to live with her son Loring Baker Walton, who was on the faculty at Duke University.

The papers of Loring Baker Walton, make up a separate and larger series in this collection. An extensive series of correspondence between Eleanor and her son is located there.

George Wesley Johnson papers, 1829-1939

10 Linear Feet — 7 boxes, 2,620 items and 77 vols.
Correspondence, daybooks, in the early 1840s, ledgers, notebooks, accounts, bills, receipts, orders, promissory notes, postal records, and other papers (chiefly 1831-1888) of George Wesley Johnson and of his family. The material pertains to Tennessee agriculture, purchases of goods in Philadelphia and other northern cities before and after the Civil War, Wake Forest College, the University of North Carolina, Greensboro Female College, economic conditions after the Civil War, and the mercantile activities of the Johnsons.

This collection contains business and family papers of George W. Johnson, postmaster, justice of the peace, general merchant, and farmer; of his brother and business partner, James M. Johnson; of George W. Johnson's son, Francis Marion Johnson; and of other members of the family.

The collection contains letters to George W. Johnson from friends in Tennessee relative to agricultural and economic conditions there, 1838-1844; letters between George W. and James M. Johnson while one or the other bought goods in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, before the Civil War; bills, accounts, receipts, orders, promissory notes, and letters of a business nature, including occasional reference to another brother of George W. Johnson, Hiram, who had a financial interest in the mercantile establishment; numerous letters from George W. Johnson, his wife, Martha Johnson, and friends, including one at Wake Forest College, North Carolina, to Francis Marion Johnson while the latter was a student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1855-1858; letters, 1858-1861, from another brother of George W. Johnson, J. H. Johnson, who-was operating a store at East Bend in Yadkin County, North Carolina, as well as references to the debt of Olin High School, North Carolina, notices of meetings of Mocksville Lodge No. 134, letters to Martha Johnson from her daughter, Jennie, while a student at Greensboro Female College, North Carolina, 1857-1859, prices of foods and general commodities, letters from Eagle Mills, Buffalo Paper Mills, and W. Turner's cotton mill at Turnersburg, North Carolina, and bills of lading for various commodities.

Material during the Civil War period is limited to a few letters in 1863 from W. G. Johnson (younger brother of George W. Johnson) near Kinston, North Carolina; tax in kind returns and a petition from Francis Marion Johnson asking for military exemption on the basis of operating a grist mill. Postwar material consists largely of mercantile records of the Farmington store showing that goods were purchased from wholesale firms in New York City; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Richmond and Lynchburg, Virginia; Baltimore, Maryland; and Winston-Salem, Charlotte, Wilmington, and Salisbury, North Carolina.

Volumes consist of small notebooks, recording goods bought by George W. Johnson; daybooks; ledgers; postal records of the Farmington, North Carolina, post office, 1838-1856, including postage books, newspaper postage books, and receipt books for registered letters; blacksmith accounts; itinerary of a journey made by George W. Johnson, S. Taylor, and D. N. Reynolds through North Carolina and Tennessee in 1836; minutes of the Farmington Lodge No. 46 of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and the Davie County Division of the Sons of Temperance. Included also are a few business letters from Nathaniel Boyden and Son, and a letter to Francis M. Johnson from a friend in Norfolk, Virginia, describing a typhoid epidemic in 1855.

2 results in this collection

G. Hope Summerell Chamberlain papers, 1821-1946

10 Linear Feet
G. Hope Summerell Chamberlain was an author, artist, and civic worker, of Raleigh (Wake Co.) and Chapel Hill (Orange Co.), N.C. Letters from 1821 to 1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

Letters from 1821-1946 concern family matters for the most part but also reflect Chamberlain's career as an author of local history and her work at Duke University as the house counselor of Pegram House. Scattered earlier letters include one from Herbert J. Hagermand of the American Embassy at Saint Petersburg, 1889; letters on the Russo-Japanese War, 1905; and letters from John Spencer Bassett, 1903. The remainder of the collection includes genealogical material on the Chamberlain family; clippings of articles about Chamberlain and her books; drafts of some of her writings; a copy of a journal of a trip to Europe in 1792-1793; diary of Chamberlain's trip to Europe in 1929; and personal diaries, 1923-1926 and 1943.

2 results in this collection

Graham family papers, 1773-1885

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 1113 items including 11 vols.
Collection contains correspondence, account books, records, sermons, and other papers (chiefly, 1800-1880) of the Graham family of Virginia. Includes letters of the Rev. William Graham, Presbyterian minister and one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University); material relating to the patent on Dr. William A. Graham's fire extinguisher; records (1774-1803) of tuition charges and books bought by Washington College students; and correspondence between Edward Graham and Edmund Ruffin discussing scientific experiments.

This collection holds records of three generations of a family of Scots-Irish Presbyterians. Correspondence of Reverend William Graham (1746-1799), who moved from Pennsylvania to Lexington, Virginia, about 1776 and was one of the founders of Liberty Hall Academy (later Washington and Lee University) refers largely to his investment in land on the Ohio River near Marietta after 1796, and his lawsuit claiming he had been cheated.

The bulk of the collection comprises the correspondence of William's brother, Edward Graham, a lawyer and professor at Washington College. There are many letters between Edward's wife, Margaret (Alexander) Graham, and her children. Represented also are William A., Archibald A., Nancy, Elizabeth, and Edward, Jr. Included is correspondence of Edward Graham with Edmund Ruffin concerning scientific experimentation and many letters concerning the patent application of William A. Graham, an inventor, for his fire extinguisher.

There is also correspondence of Dr. John Graham and Beverly Tucker Lacy, grandsons of Edward Graham. Account books of Archibald Graham of Lexington, 1840-1880, 7 vols., include one volume (6 pp.) on the administration of Edward Graham's estate and the guardianship of Martha and Elizabeth Lyle. Account books, 2 vols., of Edward, Sr., contain judgments and court actions, 1801-1811, and accounts of Washington College, Lexington, 1831-1836. A commonplace book, 1820, may relate to Edward Graham. There is a genealogy of the Alexander and Graham families by John A. Graham.

2 results in this collection

Gregory family papers, 1762-1923

1.2 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 416 items
Correspondence, diaries, and other papers of the Gregory family and the related Pomfret, Beasley, Davis, Smith families of King William County, Va. and later of Granville County, N.C. Correspondence of the 18th century is largely that of Sally Pomfret Beasley with friends (mostly suitors) and relatives prior to her marriage to Stephen Beasley in 1786. From 1786-1830 the correspondence is with relatives of the Smith and Beasley families who are living in North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Ohio. There is a gap in the papers from 1830-1859. After 1859, the papers are largely those of William H. (Buck) Gregory while at the University of Virginia (1859-60), in the Confederate Army (1864-65), and in the merchantile and publishing business in Oxford and Stovall, NC in the 1870's and 1880's. This correspondence contains information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, and education in North Carolina. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis, and there is much correspondence of their courtship. Collection includes lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60,as well as genealogical information on the Pomfret, Gregory, Smith and Alexander families. Also includes diaries for various years between 1873 and 1903.

The collection consists of papers, principally those of William H. (Buck) Gregory, Stovall, North Carolina, while at the University of Virginia, 1859-60, in the Confederate service, 1865-65, and in the mercantile and publishing businesses in Oxford during the 1870s and 1880s. In 1888 he married Mary J. Davis of "Abram's Plains", Granville County, a descendant of Col. Sam. Smith, and there is much of the correspondence that was carried on while they were courting. The collection contains some information on tobacco culture, social life and customs, amusements, education (There are lists of students at Belmont Academy, 1859, in Granville County and at the Oxford Classical and Grammar School, 1859-60.), and a considerable amount of genealogical data on the Davis, Pomfret, Gregory, Smith, Downey, Alexander, Webb, and Winston families.

The Civil War letters are centered around W. H. Gregory and his service to the Confederacy. He was sixteen at the beginning of the war and suffered a physical disability which kept him in reserve units. Letters concern the Granville Greys, Co. K of the 23rd N. C Troops, later the 1st Jr. Reserve (Co. B 70th Regt. Jr. Res.). Dr. T. R. Gregory is in a Yankee prison, and other Gregory relatives write war letters. C. W. Broadfcot, Hugh Lawson Clay, Theophilus Holmes, Joseph Jonathan Davis, Walter Clark, Allen R. Boyd, and Wm. G. Stanard are among the correspondents.

The bound volumes, include a 9 volume diary by William H. Gregory for the years 1873, 1888, 1889, 1891, 1895, 1895, 1898, 1902, and 1903. The contents of these volumes, however, are very meager. See the Samuel Smith Downey Papers to which about 62 items of early Smith-Downey family MSS. were transferred, 8-24-65, from the W. H. Gregory MSS.

2 results in this collection

Harden family papers, 1772-1940

4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 2,531 items including 27 volumes.
Collection includes correspondence, diaries, account books, daybooks, and legal and other papers, of Edward Harden, planter, lawyer, and politician, of Athens, Ga.; of his son, Edward Randolph Harden, lawyer and politician; and of other members of their family. The material concerns U.S. and Georgia politics, Cherokee Indian affairs (1840s), military recruitment in the Civil War, the 44th Georgia Infantry, military operations in the Confederacy, Reconstruction and economic conditions, the Republican Party in the south, social life and customs, genealogy, and other matters. Also includes a diary kept by Evelyn Harden Jackson during the last months of the war referring to the general alarm preceding Sherman's activities in Georgia.

This collection contains political, family, and business papers of Edward Harden (1784-1849), planter and politician; of his second wife, Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden (1794-1874); of their son, Edward Randolph Harden (1815-1884), telegraph operator and lawyer; of their daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden (1811-1887); and of Edward Randolph Harden's children.

Papers of Edward Harden include a diary with information concerning the operation of 'Silk Hope,' a rice plantation near Savannah, with inventory of equipment and work done during 1827; lists of slaves; courtship letters to Mary Ann Elizabeth Randolph; letters to his wife about farm work to be done in his absence; letters of Peter Randolph, father-in-law of Harden; letters to his wife while in the Georgia legislature in 1825; and letters and papers pertaining to his duties as counsel for the Cherokee Indians, U.S. marshal in Georgia, 1843, and collector of the port of Savannah, 1844. Letters in 1846-1847, from Washington, D.C., while Harden served as Indian Commissioner, concern Washington social life and customs, office seekers, bureaucracy, James K. Polk and Sarah (Childress) Polk, and Dolly (Payne) Todd Madison. Also included are letters from Howell Cobb, concerning his efforts to obtain political offices for Harden; legal papers consisting chiefly of depositions, letters, and notes pertaining to Harden's law practice; letters relative to the course of study and tuition fees of Harden's daughter, Mary, while at the Latouche School in Savannah; letters connected with the activities of the Georgia Historical Society; and information regarding Thomas Spalding of Sapelo Island. Other papers consist of an account by Harden of his appointment to and removal from the collectorship of the port of Savannah; receipts; a few account books and diaries; deeds, letters of dismissal, and other papers pertaining to the Mars Hill Baptist Church; and references to various residents of Athens, Georgia, where Harden conducted a law school after 1830.

Letters of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden are to her husband; to her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden, while the latter attended school in Savannah; and to her son, Edward Randolph Harden, while he attended the University of Georgia, Athens, 1829-1830. Papers, 1849-1860, chiefly concern her efforts to get land warrants for her husband's services in the War of 1812, and papers, 1865-1874, deal with her attempts to obtain a pension on the same grounds.

Letters of Edward Randolph Harden from 1854 to 1856 describe his duties as judge of the first court in the territory of Nebraska and conditions there. Letters, 1859-ca. 1870, of Edward Randolph Harden, of his daughter Anna, and of other children of Mary Ann Elizabeth (Randolph) Harden, reflect the poverty of the family and conditions of the time. Civil War letters of Edward Randolph Harden describe the activities of the army while he served as an officer of the Georgia state troops, civilian life, and commodity prices. Postwar letters concern his removal from Rome to Cuthbert and later to Quitman, all in Georgia; and his desultory practice of law supplemented by storekeeping and, in 1870, by work as a census enumerator.

There are also letters of the related Jackson family, including correspondence between Asbury Hull Jackson and his family describing his service in the 44th Georgia Regiment, the fighting around Richmond in 1862, and the battles of Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania. Clippings concern the formation of the 3rd, 4th, 6th, 10th, and 16th Georgia Regiments in the early days of the war.

Among the letters to Mary Elizabeth Greenhill Harden is a proposal of marriage from John Howard Payne, author of "Home Sweet Home!" whom she met when he visited Georgia in the interest of the Cherokee Indians. According to tradition her father refused to allow the match. The collection also contains other proposals, all of which she refused; and her diary, 1853-1883.

Throughout the collection are frequent letters from Henrietta Jane (Harden) -Wayne, daughter of Edward Harden by his first marriage and wife of James Moore Wayne's nephew. Her letters give detailed accounts of life in Savannah and the people there, including mention of James Moore Wayne (1790-1867).

Among the correspondents are John Macpherson Berrien, Sr., Benjamin Harris Brewster, Joseph Emerson Brown, Howell Cobb, William Crosby Dawson, Hugh Anderson Haralson, Benjamin Harvey Hill, Amos Kendall, John Henry Lumpkin, John Howard Payne, Richard Rush, Thomas Jefferson Rusk, Thomas Spalding, Wil]iam Henry Stiles, Israel Keech Tefft, George Michael Troup, James Moore Wayne, and Lewis Williams.

2 results in this collection

James Burchell Richardson papers, 1803-1910 and undated, bulk 1822-1910

3.5 Linear Feet
James Burchell Richardson was a plantation owner, of Sumter District, S.C. This collection contains family letters and business papers of James B. Richardson, plantation owner and slaveholder, and of his descendants. The letters and papers contain references to the allotment of slave labor for road and railroad construction; the impressment of slaves for work on fortifications during the Civil War; political wrangles; James B. and Richard C. Richardson's activities in the Confederate Army; social and economic conditions on South Carolina plantations before, during, and after the Civil War; the postwar depression and poverty in the South; and tenant farming during the postwar period.

This collection contains family letters and business papers of James B. Richardson, plantation owner and slaveholder, and of his descendants. The letters and papers contain references to the allotment of slave labor for road and railroad construction; the impressment of slaves for work on fortifications during the Civil War; political wrangles; James B. and Richard C. Richardson's activities in the Confederate Army; social and economic conditions on South Carolina plantations before, during, and after the Civil War; the postwar depression and poverty in the South; and tenant farming during the postwar period.

2 results in this collection

John Bonsack papers, 1786-1929

2 Linear Feet — 4 Boxes, 2,034 items.
Collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are letters from family members in schools in Virginia, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and New York. Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Va., 1862, and at Bonsack, Va., during the 1880s. There are also references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and politician in and around Roanoke, Va.; accounts of Jacob Bonsack, a merchant in Good Intent, Va., and accounts of Harry E. Plaine, a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Neb., during the 1880s. About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to the two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859).

This collection contains personal and business correspondence, and accounts and genealogical records of the Bonsack and Plaine families, connected by marriage. Included are school and college letters from Emory and Henry College, Virginia, 1851, Calvert College, New Windsor, Maryland, 1851-1852, State Normal School, Millersville, Pennsylvania, 1881, Roanoke College, Salem, Virginia, 1882, and Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, 1883.

Included also are letters concerning woolen factories in Good Intent, Virginia, 1862, and at Bonsack, Virginia, during the 1880s, references to David H. Plaine's work as a churchman, teacher, and a politician in and around Roanoke, Virginia, accounts of Jacob Bonsack (1819-1889), as a merchant in Good Intent, Virginia; and accounts of Harry E. Plaine as a hardware dealer in Broken Bow, Nebraska, during the 1880s.

About fifty letters, 1786-1851, are written in German to two John Bonsacks, father (1760-1795) and son (1781-1859). Included in these are several religious tracts, memorandum books, study notes, and short diaries. The diaries contain accounts of a trip in 1856 from Randolph County, Virginia, to Madison, Wisconsin, travels in the vicinity of Carlisle, Pennsylvania, and a record kept by D. H. Plaine in 1857.

2 results in this collection

John Grammar Brodnax papers, 1830-1929

2 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,389 items.
Collection contains personal, professional and family correspondence of three generations of the Brodnax family, centering around John G. Brodnax. Pre-Civil War letters refer to the sale of slaves; wartime correspondence reflects the fear of the advancing Union forces. Postwar papers include Brodnax's appointment as assistant surgeon general of a North Carolina hospital at Petersburg, Va., overseeing the discharge of disabled Confederate soldiers, and his oath of allegiance to the United States. Also includes letters to his wife during her summer visits with relatives. Many papers concern Mrs. Brodnax's activities in the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy; others relate to attendance of family members at various North Carolina and Virginia schools and colleges. There are also letters from Germany and Europe in the 1870s and 1880s and Mexico in 1910.

This collection contains family correspondence of three generations of the Brodnax family centering chiefly around John G. Brodnax (1829-1907), a Confederate surgeon and practicing physician.

Letters from 1857 to 1867, generally from Lynchburg, Virginia, refer to the sale of slaves and, during the war years, are concerned with the question of fleeing or remaining to face the advancing Federals. Included also are Brodnax's appointment as assistant surgeon general of the North Carolina Hospital at Petersburg, Virginia, and his oath of allegiance to the United States. Other items pertaining to Dr. Brodnax are letters to his wife, beginning in 1881, while she visited her relatives in summer, a speech against railroad taxation in 1879, a group of petitions in 1877 requesting that Brodnax be made superintendent of the North Carolina State Insane Asylum, and an undated article on optical surgery. Included also is genealogical material as well as other materials connected with the activities of Brodnax's wife in the Daughters of the American Revolution and the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

A number of letters were written from schools and colleges attended by members of the family, including Salem Female Academy, Salem, North Carolina, and St. Mary's College, Raleigh, North Carolina, during 1912; N. I. Smith's School in Leaksville during 1879 and 1880; Bingham School in Orange County during 1883; Bingham School in Asheville, and Old Point Comfort College, Virginia, after 1909.

Also included in the collectoon are letters from Mrs. Barr, an aunt of Mrs. Brodnax, and her children from 1877 to 1884 while traveling in Europe and studying music in Germany. There are letters from Mary (Brodnax) Glenn and her family while in Mexico, where her husband worked for a railroad company, a mining firm, and as secretary to the American consul general; letters of this period are filled with references to conditions in Mexico, especially concerning political upheavals around 1910. Included also are papers relative to the settlement of the estate of John Brodnax, Jr., after 1909, and a group of sermons delivered by James Kerr Burch, a Presbyterian minister and father-in-law of Dr. John G. Brodnax.

2 results in this collection

John J. Crittenden papers, 1786-1932

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,055 items, 3 vols.
This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrapbooks, a letter book, and speeches related to John J. Crittenden's service as a Kentucky legislator and governor, as a member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky and the nation during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861. Other papers pertain to the private life of the family, and to the publication of "The Life of John J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). The collection also includes unpublished papers from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

This collection contains family and political correspondence, scrap books, a letter book, and speeches relating to John J. Crittenden's service as Kentucky legislator and Governor, as member of both houses of Congress, and as a Cabinet officer. The papers contain information on the political life and public issues in Kentucky during the antebellum period, with significant material concerning Crittenden's efforts to avert the Civil War by means of a compromise plan in 1861.

In addition to the political related materials are papers pertaining to the private life of the family and the publication of "The Life of John. J. Crittenden," by his daughter, Mary Ann Butler Crittenden Coleman (1871). Also included are unpublished letters from Thomas Hart Benton, James Buchanan, William Butler, Henry Clay, Millard Fillmore, Andrew Jackson, James Madison, John Marshall, James Monroe, Franklin Pierce, Winfield Scott, William H. Seward, Alexander H. Stephens, Benjamin Taylor, Zachary Taylor, John Tyler, and Daniel Webster.

2 results in this collection

John Rutherfoord papers, 1754-1931, bulk 1781-1865

4.5 Linear Feet — 6 Boxes (2,745 items)
Collection contains correspondence, travel journals, account books, memorandum books, farm records, legal records, commonplace books, class notes, and other papers (chiefly 1781-1865) of John Rutherfoord; of his son, John Coles Rutherfoord, lawyer, planter, and state legislator; and of other members of the family. The papers before 1818 are chiefly legal and business papers and include information on family investments in Kentucky lands and other ventures. The papers of John Rutherfoord relate to his career as governor, his agricultural and business affairs; Virginia and U.S. politics, the American Party; the return of fugitive slaves, secession and events preceeding the Civil War, Confederate foreign relations; and family matters; and they include letters from Edward Coles, William Cabell Rives, and others of Rutherfoord's relatives by marriage, concerning agriculture and anti-slavery sentiment in Virginia and relations between the United States and France. John Coles Rutherfoord's papers relate to his attendance at Washington College (now Washington and Lee University) and the University of Virginia, his interests in politics and European travel, his legal activities, his work as a state legislator (1852-1865) and as manager of the family estates, westward expansion, and social life and customs in Virginia. Includes scattered correspondence of J.C. Rutherfoord's wife, Ann Seddon Roy Rutherfoord, referring to life in the South during and after the Civil War, and family matters.

This collection contains family, business, personal, and political correspondence of John Rutherfoord (1792-1866), lawyer, merchant, and governor of Virginia, 1841-1842; of his son, John Coles Rutherfoord (1825-1866), lawyer, planter, and member of the House of Delegates; of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord (1832-1906?), wife of John Coles Rutherfoord; and of Thomas Rutherfoord (1766-1852), father of John Rutherfoord, and Richmond merchant.

Early papers are those of Isaac Holmes, assistant quartermaster at Petersburg, Virginia, chiefly from Richard Claiborne concerning provisions for Revolutionary soldiers; and of James Webb, apparently a lawyer of Smithfield, Virginia, having connections with John Marshall, Spencer Roane, and John Wickham, consisting of legal correspondence and papers. The papers of Thomas Rutherfoord include a letter, 1810, expressing objections to the embargo; letters concerning family matters and Rutherfoord's ailments; correspondence dealing with business affairs, chiefly his large landholdings in Kentucky and Ohio, and the title and sale of those lands; and an article, 1812, on the necessity of a navy to protect the maritime rights of the United States. Personal correspondence of John Rutherfoord is primarily with relatives, including his son, John Coles Rutherfoord; his brothers, Samuel Rutherfoord, William Rutherfoord, and Alexander Rutherfoord, and their families; relatives of Emily (Coles), Rutherfoord, his wife, including Tucker Coles, Isaac A. Coles, Edward Coles, Andrew Stevenson, and William Cabell Rives; his brother-in-law, Hodijah Meade; and Jane (Rutherfoord) Meade. Letters discuss family news; business matters; agriculture and the operation of their various plantations; the painting of family portraits; the marketing of wheat produced at “Rock Castle,” home of John Coles Rutherfoord, during the 1840s and 1850s; visits to various springs in western Virginia; the insurance society headed by John Rutherfoord; family illnesses, including full descriptions of remedies and medicines; purchase of land; detailed accounts of the construction of a boat for use at "Rock Castle"; purchase of a buggy, including description of various types of buggies; purchase and price of guano; detailed accounts of shipping by freight boats on the James River; purchase of slaves to prevent the separation of families; sympathy for slaves; purchase of shoes and making of clothes for slaver at “Rock Castle”; details of household management, such as the making of candles and the slaughtering of sheep; Richmond social life; and current events. Also included are letters from relatives in Ireland; letters of advice from John Rutherfoord to his son, John Coles Rutherfoord, while the latter was a student at Washington College, Lexington, Virginia, and at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia; letter, 1837, from Andrew Stevenson, U.S. minister to England, describing his and his wife's experiences in diplomatic circles in London, and papers relating to the settlement of the case of the U.S.S. Caroline, burned in 1837 by Canadian troops; a letter, 1832, from William Cabell Rives, while minister to France, concerning the instability of the French government, and Rives's conviction that slavery should be abolished; and letters discussing the activities of Thomas Ritchie (1778-1854), editor of the Richmond Enquirer, especially during 1849. Other papers relate to Rutherfoord's bank stocks, his legal practice, and mercantile affairs in Richmond, Virginia. The political correspondence includes correspondence between Rutherfoord and John Tyler concerning national politics, 1827-1831, Andrew Jackson and his policies, Henry Clay, political intrigue, "sectional cupidity," European affairs, and Tyler's concern for the welfare of the country; correspondence with Governor William H. Seward of New York while Rutherfoord was governor of Virginia pertaining to a controversy over fugitive slaves; letters from Rutherfoord to John Coles Rutherfoord commenting extensively on the American Party or Know-Nothings in Goochland County, Virginia; letters, 1860, from C. G. Memminger regarding national politics, secession, and the possibility of war; letter, 1860, from Rutherfoord to a cousin in London discussing the election of Abraham Lincoln, national politics, and his hatred of abolitionists, and protesting that the Prince of Wales had not been mistreated in Richmond; correspondence concerning the coming of the Civil War, the scarcity of food during the war, and refugees; letter, 1861, from John Brockenbrough describing the Washington Peace Convention and commenting on the compromise plan proposed by John Jordan Crittenden; letter, written under an assumed name, to Rutherfoord from Sir William Henry Gregory, member of the British Parliament with sympathies for the Confederate States of America, regarding the possibilities of recognition of the Confederate government by England and the means of communicating with Rutherfoord's nephew, who was attending a German university [published: Nannie M. Tilley (ed.), England and the Confederacy, American Historical Review 44 (October, 1938), 56-60]; and papers relating to Rutherfoord's service on a committee to assess damages made by the Confederate government in erecting defenses in Richmond.

The papers of John Coles Rutherfoord consist of his letters concerning literature, the activities of the Virginia House of Delegates, work on a banking bill in 1854, the Know-Nothing Party in Goochland County and their opposition to Rutherfoord's candidacy for a seat in the House of Delegates, visits to various springs in Virginia, trips to South Carolina to visit relatives, his courtship of Ann Seddon Roy, and his legal practice; correspondence regarding preparations for a European tour made by John Coles Rutherfoord and Charles Morris in 1851; letters to Rutherfoord discussing Virginia politics in the 1850s; letters from a former college mate, William M. Cooke, describing his legal practice in Saint Louis and Hannibal, Missouri, the slavery question, the growth of Saint Louis, emigrants to California and the sale of supplies to them, hunting grouse on the prairies, and the Know-Nothing Party in Missouri in 1855; letters from John D. Osborne and William Cabell Rives, Jr., containing descriptions of their travels in the North and in Europe and conditions in Paris, France; scattered letters referring to the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Virginia, and to the Southern Literary Messenger and John R. Thompson; and letters from William P. Munford concerning the translation of Homer's Iliad by his father, William Munford, and his own plans to have it published.

Correspondence of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord includes letters to her husband, John Coles Rutherfoord, concerning preparations and plans for her visits to her father, William H. Roy, household matters, and their children; letters from William H. Roy to Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord; papers pertaining to the settlement of William H. Roy's estate; letters from her sister, Sue (Roy) Carter, and from her aunt, Sarah (Seddon) Bruce, describing their children, accouchements, servants, household affairs, crops, care for slaves, and, during the Civil War, refugees, the scarcity of food, family members in the Confederate Army, and crowded conditions in Richmond, Virginia; letters of James A. Seddon regarding the business affairs of Ann Seddon (Roy) Rutherfoord after the death of her husband; letters from other friends and relatives chiefly concerning personal matters; and papers relating to the operation of "Rock Castle," including scattered accounts, contracts for labor, and inventories.

Volumes consist of a notebook on rhetoric by Emily (Coles) Rutherfoord; legal notebook of John Rutherfoord containing notes on Blackstone; personal account book, 1840-1841, of John Coles Rutherfoord; autographs and clippings collected by John Coles Rutherfoord, 1836-1850; commonplace book, 1839-1842, of John Coles Rutherfoord also containing copies of several letters; Index Rerum, 1842, kept by John Coles Rutherfoord while at the University of Virginia; notebooks of John Coles Rutherfoord while a student at Washington College, on various subjects including chemistry, mathematics, Greek history, natural and moral philosophy, political economy, Latin history, law, and the Constitution; case books, 1844-1852, and memorandum book, 1856-1862, containing records of the cases handled by John Coles Rutherfoord; memorandum book, 1846-1864, with notes on farming operations; letter book, 1857-1866, letterpress copybook, 1856-1866, and letter book and commonplace book, 1852-1858, of John Coles Rutherfoord; index, 1856-1865, of the letters received by John Coles Rutherfoord; indices to articles on politics and major events in the New York Herald, 1856-1859, and in the Richmond Examiner, 1862-1865; notebook on Rutherfoord family history; a scrapbook, 1843-1856, relating to the career of John Coles Rutherfoord in the Virginia House of Delegates; and a legal notebook, 1895-1916, of John Rutherfoord, son of John Coles Rutherfoord.

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John Warfield Johnston papers, 1778-1890

2.5 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 416 items.
Collection includes papers of Johnston and of his wife, Nicketti Virginia (Floyd) Johnston, of her parents, John Floyd, governor of Virginia, and Letitia (Preston) Floyd, Letitia's brother, Francis Smith Preston, and other members of the Preston family. Includes letters, fictional and political writings, and other papers, including many references to plantation life, Virginia and national politics, pioneers of southwestern Virginia and genealogical material on the Breckinridge, Buchanan, Floyd, Preston, and other Virginia families.

This collection contains papers of John Warfield Johnston, United States Senator from Virginia, his wife, Nicketti (Floyd) Johnston, and other members of the Johnston, Preston, and Floyd families. The papers of John Warfield Johnston and Nicketti (Floyd) Johnston contain personal correspondence and letters from their children, including letters, 1886, from Joseph Beverly Johnston who was with the Alaska Commercial Company in Ounalaska [Unalaska], Alaska. There are several manuscripts of John Warfield Johnston, including an autobiography, reminiscences of his senatorial career, short stories, and essays on the period of the American Revolution, the Republican Party, General Joseph Eggleston Johnston, and currency problems.

The collection also contains the papers of Francis Smith Preston (1765-1835) and his sister, Letitia (Preston) Floyd concerning pioneer life, plantation management, politics in Virginia and the nation, and family and personal affairs, the papers of the children of John Floyd and Letitia (Preston) Floyd relating to family matters, Roman Catholicism, the experiences of George Rogers Clark Floyd as a territorial official in Wisconsin in the 1840s, and the early career of George Frederick Holmes, the husband of Eliza Lavalette Floyd. It also has a letter, 1863, of Joseph Eggleston Johnston to his wife, Lydia (McLane) Johnston, justifying his actions in the Vicksburg campaign and letters of John Warfield Johnston, father of John Warfield Johnston, and his wife, Louisa (Bower) Johnston, including personal and family correspondence and a few letters to Johnston from John Peter Mettauer.

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Joseph Jones papers, 1681-1895

1.33 Linear Feet — 704 items
Papers of militia officer and customs collector Joseph Jones of Petersburg, Va., and of his children and grandchildren, including business, personal, and military correspondence, deeds, Virginia militia records, general orders, Treasury Dept. circulars, lists of licensed vessels, letters regarding western lands, and papers relating to the port of Petersburg, Va. Correspondents include John Adams, William H. Crawford, Albert Gallatin, Richard Bland Lee, James Madison, Timothy Pickering, John Randolph, and John Tyler.

The papers of Joseph Jones (1749-1824) span the period 1681 to 1895, with the majority of papers dating from 1794 to 1842. The collection is divided into six series: Correspondence, 1781-1895 and undated; Legal Papers, 1681-1888 and undated; Financial Papers, 1772-1875 and undated; Customs Collector Papers, 1796-1836 and undated; Military Papers, 1788-1864 and undated; and Miscellany, 1801-1854 and undated. Within each series the material is arranged chronologically. The Correspondence and Customs Collector Papers comprise the bulk of the collection.

Primarily emphasized in the collection are Jones' land holdings in Virginia, Kentucky, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Ohio, some awarded on account of his military service during the Revolution; his service as Brigadier-General in the 15th Brigade of the Virginia Militia during the Whiskey Rebellion; his work as customs collector at the port of Petersburg; and a variety of legal and financial papers.

The collection covers three generations of the Jones Family. After Jones' death in 1824, papers chiefly relate to his children and other relatives. Among those represented are Jones' sons: Joseph Jr., who managed some of his father's farming interests; R. Benson, who worked for various merchants in New York in the 1840's; Thomas, who was sheriff in Chesterfield County, Va. in 1838; and Thomas' wife, Mary Newton Jones, and her brother Virginia Congressman Willoughby Newton, plus other related families. There is extensive correspondence between Mrs. Mary M. Jones and others (chiefly in the 1840's) indicating that she owned both real estate and slaves. Some of this property was located in Westmoreland County, Va.

Other subjects include reaction to the passage by Congress of Jay's treaty, documents relating to slave holdings, social conditions of women in the 19th century, and the service of Jones' grandson, Captain Thomas Jones, in the 40th Virginia Infantry Regiment during the Civil War.

For further information about Jones, see the Department's William Bragg Papers. Bragg became Jones' business partner about 1770 in Petersburg, Va.

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Sir Anthony Musgrave papers, 1739-1966

8.0 Linear Feet — 16 boxes
Collection contains professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave, of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda Field Musgrave; and of her father, David Dudley Field, lawyer and law reformer. Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life and education, the Unitarian Church, his career in New York and the compilation of that state's civil, penal, and criminal codes, law reform, and his wife, Jane Lucinda Hopkins Field. Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings, pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica, 1877-1883, but also St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, British Columbia, 1869-1872, Natal, 1872, South Australia, 1873, and Queensland, 1883-1888. Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence, letters with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australian politics, and autobiographical and genealogical information.

Collection includes the professional and personal papers of Sir Anthony Musgrave (1828-1888), British colonial official; of his wife, Jeanie Lucinda (Field) Musgrave (1833-1920); and of her father, David Dudley Field (1805-1894), lawyer and law reformer.

The Papers of David Dudley Field concern his early life; his education at Stockbridge Academy and at Williams College, including bills and receipts, and correspondence about student life and professors; religion, especially the rise of the Unitarian Church; his early career in New York; law reform; the compilation of civil, penal, and criminal codes for New York, and as a model for other states; international law, including maritime law and admiralty courts; the reform of municipal government; the Association for the Reform and Codification of the Law of Nations, 1870s; the Institut de Droit International; the laying of the Atlantic Cable, 1866; and the Hague Peace Conference, 1899. Personal correspondence includes letters, 1830s, with the Hopkins family, Mark, Harry, and his future wife, Jane Lucinda; and letters, 1870-1894, with the Muegrave family. Also in the collection are clippings pertaining to the Field and Hopkins families; some legal papers; diaries, 1875-1894, of David Dudley Field; Recollections of My Early Life, Written in the Spring of 1832, by Field; his commonplace book, 1824-1827; his Autobiography, 1805-1836; a journal, 1831-1835, containing comments on his studies and reading; a journal, 1836, principally concerning the fatal illness of his wife; journals, 1836-1837 and 1851, describing his travels in Europe, volume of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field containing recollections of her youth, written in 1832, and a journal, 1833-1835, Poetical Extracts of Jane Lucinda (Hopkins) Field; Personal Recollections of David Dudley Field written in 1892; and correspondence, 1898, relating to a biography of Field written by his brother, Henry Martyn Field.

Sir Anthony Musgrave's papers, correspondence, dispatches, and writings pertain principally to the administration of various colonial governments, particularly Jamaica. Jamaican materials, 1877-1883, concern the case of Pulido v. Musgrave, colonial rule, the immigration of laborers to Jamaica, the membership of the Legislative Council, the reorganization of the judicial system, colonial defense, customs, commercial relations with the United States and Canada, and Cuban revolutionaries in Jamaica. Other papers pertain to the administration of St. Vincent, 1861-1864; Newfoundland, 1864-1869, especially concerning the Newfoundland fisheries. British Columbia, 1869-1872; Natal, 1872, including information on native policy, education and marriage, the constitution, and relations between Natal, the Transvaal, and the Zulus; South Australia, 1873; and Queensland, 1883-1888. There are letters concerning Sir Anthony's writings on political economy, 1870s, as well as pamphlets of his works; correspondence, 1887, concerning the formation of the Westminster Review Company and the publication of the Westminster Review; a Private Letter Book, 1868-1878, containing confidential letters to other officials and personal correspondence; a scrapbook, 1874-1881, with reviews of his writings, and information on the social, economic, and political affairs of Jamaica and South Australia; and a Memorial Scrapbook, 1868-1908, comprised of pictures, clippings, telegrams and letters concerning the death of Sir Anthony.

Lady Musgrave's papers include personal correspondence; letters, 1890-1901, with Samuel Walker Griffith concerning Australia, including information on the federation of Australia, the Australian constitution, labor unrest, the separation movement, and his work as chief justice of Queensland and of Australia; letters, 1910-1911, dealing with Anglican mission work among miners and loggers in British Columbia; "Notes for My Sons," containing biographical information about herself and her relatives; and a scrapbook, 1810-1913, of letters from prominent persons. Other materials include correspondence, 1918-1920, of Mark Hopkins III concerning the work of the Red Cross in France. letters, 1886-1891, from Dudley Field Musgrave (1873-1895), son of Sir Anthony, describing life as a naval cadet and his service in the Mediterranean; correspondence and printed material pertaining to railroads, especially the Berkshire Street Railway Company of Stockbridge; pictures of the Field and Musgrave family members; and genealogical material on the Field, Musgrave, Hopkins, Byam, Sergeant, Dyett, and Abbott families.

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John McIntosh Kell papers, 1735-1944 and undated

9 Linear Feet
The collection includes papers and volumes created by John McIntosh Kell (1823-1900) of the U.S. Navy and his family. Family correspondence includes letters from John McIntosh Kell's period of service in the U.S. Navy, family and buisness papers from the Kell, Nathan Campbell Munroe, and Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe families discussing Georgia policitcs and other local events. Volumes in the collection include logs of the U.S. frigate Savannah, the U.S.S. Falmouth, and Shark. There is also an unpublished manuscript by Kell's wife and scrapbooks she maintained. Includes family legal papers, genealogical materials, writings, and miscellaneous papers.

Collection includes family correspondence consisting of letters from Kell to his mother, Marjory Spalding (Baillie) Kell; his wife, Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell; and his sisters. Beginning in 1841, Kell's letters cover the period of his service in the U.S. Navy. Topics include accounts of cruises; social activities aboard ship and on land; Commodore Matthew C. Perry; the funeral of Commodore Alexander James Dallas; the countryside in the vicinity of Cape Town, South Africa; descriptions of Montevideo and Uraguay; and references to President Carlos Antonio Lopez of Paraguay. After 1860, Kell's letters concern his duties with the Confederate Navy, including running the blockade on the C.S.S. SUMTER and the subsequent abandonment of the ship.

The collection also includes family and business papers of Nathan Campbell Munroe of Macon, Ga., his wife Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe, their daughter Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell, and other members of the Munroe, McIntosh, and Napier families. Topics include Georgia and national politics, Henry Clay and the Bank of the United States; railroad construction in Georgia; Christ Church Episcopal Parish in Macon; Montpelier Institute, Salem Female Academy, and other educational institutions; temperance; the duel between Thomas Butler King, U.S. Rep. from Georgia, and Charles Spalding; town-gown relations at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; riverboat transportation in Alabama; and the fight between the MONITOR and VIRGINIA as described by a Confederate naval officer.

Volumes in the collection include general orders and general watch and quarter bills of the U.S. frigate SAVANNAH, 1843-1847; and logs kept by Kell as midshipman on the U.S.S. FALMOUTH, 1841-1843, and on the SAVANNAH and SHARK, 1843-1847. There is also an unpublished manuscript by Kell's wife, entitled "The Life and Letters of John McIntosh Kell," ca. 1908, and scrapbooks she maintained. Includes family legal papers, genealogical materials, writings, and miscellaneous papers.

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Folder

Collection includes family correspondence consisting of letters from Kell to his mother, Marjory Spalding (Baillie) Kell; his wife , Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell; and his sisters. Beginning in 1841, Kell's letters cover the period of his service in the U.S. Navy. Topics include accounts of cruises; social activities aboard ship and on land; Commodore Matthew C. Perry; the funeral of Commodore Alexander James Dallas; the countryside in the vicinity of Cape Town, South Africa; descriptions of Montevideo and Uraguay; and references to President Carlos Antonio Lopez of Paraguay. After 1860, Kell's letters concern his duties with the Confederate Navy, including running the blockade on the C.S.S. SUMTER and the subsequent abandonment of the ship.

The collection also includes family papers of Nathan Campbell Munroe of Macon, Ga., his wife Tabitha Easter (Napier) Munroe, their daughter Julia Blanche (Munroe) Kell, and other members of the Munroe, McIntosh, and Napier families. Topics include Georgia and national politics, Henry Clay and the Bank of the United States; railroad construction in Ga.; Christ Church Episcopal Parish in Macon; Montpelier Institute, Salem Female Academy, and other educational institutions; temperance; the duel between Thomas Butler King, U.S. Rep. from Georgia, and Charles Spalding; town-gown relations at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa; riverboat transportation in Alabama; and the fight between the MONITOR and VIRGINIA as described by a Confederate naval officer.

Iveson L. Brookes papers, 1817-1888 and undated

Online
1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes, 720 items (inc. 11 volumes)
Collection includes correspondence of a Baptist preacher, landholder, and enslaver in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations, tariff and the nullification controversy, missionary work among enslaved people, student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of antebellum politics. Also discussed are diseases, health, and remedies, Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems along with Brookes' family genealogy and his sermon notes.

Collection contains correspondence of Iveson L. Brookes, a Baptist preacher and landholder in South Carolina and Georgia and his family and descendants. Topics include the administration of cotton plantations; tariff and the nullification controversy; transportation conditions; banking; missionary work among enslaved people; student life in Washington, D.C., and a student's view of ante-bellum politics; diseases, health, and remedies.

His later correspondence also discusses Baptist doctrine and doctrinal disputes, religious revivals, the impact of the Civil War on civilian life, the work of aid societies, the destruction of Rome, Georgia, by Union troops, and wartime economic problems. Correspondence by descendants includes mining near Potosi, Missouri, race relations in marriage and religion, politics in South Carolina in 1877, Columban College in Washington, D.C.; Brookes' family genealogy, and his sermon notes.

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Louis Manigault papers, 1776-1883, bulk 1840-1878

3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes (2,042 items)
Collection contains correspondence, account book, memorandum book (1858), notebook (1852), prescription book (1852), plantation records, and other papers (chiefly 1840-1878), of Louis Manigault and of members of his family. The papers contain information on Charleston, South Carolina, including social and economic conditions, student life at private schools, and the fire of December, 1861; management of a rice plantation, with comments on the transition from slave to free labor; and travel in Paris, London, Brussels, and other places in Europe. Includes a few Civil War letters, an account book of Manigault while at Yale, and letters from a family member at school at the Lyceé Impérial in Paris.

Papers of Louis Manigault and the Manigault family contain letters of many family members including Joseph Manigault, a loyalist living in England during the American Revolution, whose letters to his father in America describe his activities and the difficulties of his position. Letters dated 1802-1808 comment on a drought in Virginia, 1806, criticize the people of the South Carolina up-country, 1808, and discuss the effect of the embargo on Charleston, 1809. Letters from 1808-1824 are from Margaret (Izard) Manigault to her family concerning family affairs and describing the life of the upper class in Charleston, South Carolina, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Personal and family papers of Charles Izard Manigault, 1820-1837, include letters from friends in the Far East and Africa and a military expedition in Sumatra, Dutch East Indies, in 1821; a description of Boston and its foreign trade; comments on the effects of the panic of 1819 in Charleston and Philadelphia; a travel journal kept by one of Ralph I. Manigault's sisters on a trip through the northeastern United States and Canada in 1825; and a description of a cholera epidemic in Philadelphia in 1832. There are also correspondence of Louis Manigault as a student at Yale College, New Haven, Connecticut, in the 1840s, and letters throughout the ante-bellum period on the activities of Delta Beta Phi fraternity at Yale.

Letters and papers, 1837-1883, concern the management of a number of rice plantations owned by Louis Manigault and Charles Izard Manigault, particularly Gowrie plantation on Argyle Island, including slave lists, work schedules, business papers, instructions to overseers, records of provisions and care of slaves, lists of prices for rice, records for construction and maintenance of canals and fields, and correspondence on all phases of plantation work. There is also material reflecting the difficulty of working the plantations after the Civil War, particularly troubles with free labor.

Civil War letters pertain to family life; the Charleston fire of 1861; the effect of disunion on the market for rice and on the discipline of slaves; the imprisonment of a member of the Manigault family at Fort Delaware; and a letter, 1864, critical of conditions at Andersonville Prison, Georgia, and a map of the prison. Louis Manigault's papers, 1878-1882, concern his work as secretary to the Belgian consulate in Charleston and contain a list of Belgian consuls in Charleston, 1834-1882, with biographical information for many of the men. Three of the volumes in the collection relate to Louis Manigault's management of Gowrie plantation, including a prescription book for slave medicines, 1852; a notebook on the preparation of land for rice planting, 1852; and a memorandum book, 1858. There is also an account book from Louis Manigault's days as a student at Yale College, 1845.

2 results in this collection

MacRae family papers, 1817-1943

10 Linear Feet — 4270 items
Correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida. Alexander MacRae's papers concern Florida plantations and their management, the Seminole Indian War (1842), and settlements in southern Florida. Papers of his son, Archibald MacRae, deal with his life aboard ship as a U.S. naval officer, and with his trips to the Azores, Italy, Sicily, Hawaii, South America, and California during the Mexican War. Other papers pertain to railroad construction and management, North Carolina militia (1832, 1839), a general commission business, life in the Confederacy and Confederate Army during the Civil War, postwar business and industrial development in the Wilmington, N.C., area, and a variety of business enterprises with which the MacRae family was connected. Includes writings and papers of Hugh MacRae.

Collection contains primarily correspondence, diary, account books, ledgers, bills, receipts, business records, legal papers, and other material of Hugh MacRae and the MacRae family of North Carolina and Florida.

From the ante-bellum period there are papers of Hugh MacRae's grandfather, Alexander MacRae, concerning the management of plantations in Florida and the second Seminole War; of Archibald MacRae, pertaining to his career in the United States Navy, including a voyage to the Azores and the Mediterranean Sea, 1838, observation of the British attack on Egyptian forces, 1840, participation in the Mexican War in California, voyage to Hawaii, 1847, and descriptions of political and social events in Chile while part of the United States Naval Expedition to the Southern Hemisphere, 1849-1852; of John Colin MacRae and Henry MacRae, relating to the construction and management of railroads in North Carolina and general construction and transportation development in Florida, Georgia, South Carolina, and Virginia, including correspondence concerning quarrels between the Wilmington and Manchester Rail road, headed by Alexander MacRae, and other North Carolina lines; and of John MacRae and Donald MacRae, concerning their general commission business in Wilmington, North Carolina, founded in 1849, the Endor Iron Works (McIver, North Carolina), begun in 1857, and the political activities of John MacRae in Wilmington.

Civil War papers reflecting army life are those of William MacRae, Robert Bruce MacRae, Henry MacRae, and Walter G. MacRae, all of whom served in the Confederate Army, for the most part in North Carolina and Virginia. Their letters describe numerous battles and skirmishes and depict camp life in the 1st, 5th, and 87th North Carolina Regiments and the 2nd North Carolina Regiment, Cavalry. Letters of Donald MacRae, John Colin MacRae, Roderick MacRae, and Alexander MacRae, Jr., concern conditions at home during the war and family business interests, including the sale of cotton, blockade running, operations of an iron works, manufacture of salt, an epidemic of yellow fever in Wilmington, speculation and economic dislocation at the end of the war, and the occupation of Wilmington by Union troops.

Papers for the years after the Civil War are primarily those of Donald MacRae and his son, Hugh MacRae. Papers of Donald MacRae concern the handling of family real estate; settlement of claims on property in Florida; the guano business, particularly the Navassa Guano Company; general business interests, including the development of Linville, North Carolina, as a resort by the Linville Improvement Company and the Western North Carolina Stage Coach Company; and power development, especially the Great Falls Water Power Mining and Iron Company. The papers after 1890 are increasingly those of Hugh MacRae and concern his business interests, including the Wilmington Street Railroad Company, the Consolidated Railways, Light and Power Company, the Central Carolina Power Company in South Carolina, the Tidewater Power Company, and the Investment Trust Company of Wilmington (North Carolina), and his interest in land development and land reclamation, including the formation of farm communities near Wilmington, the promotion of legislation designed to help tenant farmers acquire their own land and to encourage immigration, the creation of the Carolina Trucking Development Company and the Carolina Real Estate Trust Company, and MacRae's work with the National Economy League and the Southern Economic Council in the 1930s.

The collection contains bills and receipts from many of the businesses in which the MacRae family was interested and a number of volumes dealing with personal and business matters, including works on rural rehabilitation; a diary of Robert Bruce MacRae, 1865-1866; a volume of Hugh MacRae's experiment records, 1909; "Roll of the Wilmington Hibernian Society," 1866-1879; account books of Alexander MacRae; record book of Donald MacRae, Company K, 2nd North Carolina Regiment in the Spanish-American War; letter book of Hugh MacRae, 1899-1900; and mercantile and shipping records for J. & D. MacRae of Wilmington, 1858-1860.

2 results in this collection

Massie family papers, 1766-1920s

3.0 Linear Feet — 3 boxes and 1 oversize folder.
The William Massie family owned several plantations in Virginia in the 18th and 19th centuries, and owned several hundred enslaved people during this time. This collection contains the papers and records of several members and generations of the Massie family, based at the Pharsalia plantation in Nelson County, Virginia. Family members represented include Thomas Massie; his children, including Thomas Massie Jr. and William Massie; William Massie's widow, Maria Massie, who inherited Pharsalia; as well as several grandchildren, including Martha, Hope, Florence, and Bland Massie. The bulk of the material in the collection dates from William Massie's ownership and management of Pharsalia, including the purchases and labor of dozens of enslaved men, women, and children in the mid-1800s. The collection also includes detailed agricultural and financial accounts, weather logs, land surveys and plots, a plantation ledger, and family and business correspondence.

This collection contains correspondence, plantation records, deeds, inventory, surveyor's plats, architectural drawings, weather memoranda, crop memoranda, and other papers, received or created by the Massie family. The bulk of the material dates from William Massie's ownership of Pharsalia plantation, and his plantation volumes document the production and agricultural trade of crops and products such as wheat, hemp, flour, bacon, oats, corn, tobacco, rye, apples, whiskey, and wool. These volumes are thorough, with near-daily entries about the weather, different stages of planting and reaping, and the production or yields of different crops, including his orchards, pigs, and horses. Many papers in the collection consist of business letters and financial logs about prices, crop yields, and local commerce. There are also occasional family and personal correspondence, with ongoing conversations about estate planning and divisions (particularly between William and Thomas Massie) as well as health news and reports on different childrens' education. Scattered throughout the collection are records documenting the Massie's reliance on slave labor, including many bills of sale for enslaved men, women, and children, as well as transactional correspondence about the hiring and use of enslaved laborers for field work, harvesting, couriering, quarry work, canal work, wagon driving, weaving, and other skilled trades. Also included in the collection is a commonplace book belonging to Thomas Massie, Sr., with notes about his crops as well as different copies of contracts and agreements he made for management of his plantation. There is an inventory and appraisal of the household and estate held by William Massie at his death in 1862. There are some drawings and maps of different lands, including plans for farming, as well as some architectural drawings of additions to Pharsalia from the mid-1800s. The collection contains some Civil War era materials, including documents relating to Maria Massie's management of the plantation following William's death, and the impressment of different horses, goods, and enslaved people into laboring on Confederate fortifications during the war. There is a deposition by Thomas Massie detailing his Continental Army service (1833); letters surrounding the Massie's hiring of a female teacher for their children in the 1840s; business correspondence between Massie and agents or contacts in Richmond, Staunton, and Lynchburg over different prices and quality of products; postwar correspondence about servant wages; and a detailed description of the Chicago fire (1871).

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Box 1

Assorted manuscript documents from the Massie family, arranged chronologically. Items include correspondence from acquaintances and business contacts regarding crops and prices for tobacco, corn, wheat, rye, hemp, and other agriculture; planning and maps for planting fields, raising pigs, or other farming activities; letters between Thomas and William Massie negotiating estates, land, and boundaries following the death of their father and mother; letters from Thomas James Massie to his father William Massie while away at school, including one about a missing umbrella; a deposition signed by Thomas Massie in 1833 about his 1775 Continental Army service; a fragment of a 1838 land assessment for Nelson County, including mention of Pharsalia. Several pieces of local correspondence indicate they were carried by enslaved people, including Robin, Ned, and Roger, with a slave pass note of their name near the letter's addressee. The folder includes a note from 1831 January 11 from E. Pendleton asking Massie to send an update on Bob, an enslaved person who had been sent to work on Massie's plantation. Includes an affidavit of sale for "a young Negro Woman named Judy, and her Female Child Esther," sold by Thomas Massie to William Massie for three hundred dollars on 1831 April 18. Includes a manuscript copy of an affidavit, dated 1832 May 4, for William Massie from Landon R. Cabell for the sale of "a man slave named Jack, of which slave is now in the possession of said Massie as a hireling" for four hundred fifty dollars. Includes an affidavit for the sale of "three Negroes, vis. Patty, Lizzy, and Dorcus, for the sum of seven hundred dollars" from Reubin G. Coffey to William Massie, 1834 August 29. Includes a note from John Junkins that "Mr. John Hill will deliver my negro woman Betty to William Massie, I having this day sold her to the said Massie" (1835 December 12). In one letter, 1834 October 1, from Thomas Massie advises William on a remedy for an unnamed enslaved boy's eye. Includes an 1837 copy of a note by William Massie agreeing to pay Thomas J. Baird seventy five dollars for the "hire of his Negro man named Henry for one year." Includes a November 1836 receipt by Charles A. Jacobs "the following slaves, which were bequeathed to me" by the estate of David Jacobs: "Jim Clarkson a mulatto man, Phil a boy, Edmunton boy, and Lewis a young man." Includes a letter dated 1836 Dec. 10 from Henry Massie in Louisville, Kentucky, to his uncle William, updating him on the as-yet unsuccessful search for Gil, an escaped enslaved person. Includes a letter dated 1837 March 30 from Thomas Baird to Massie discussing a property dispute between Baird and Mr. Acker over "my boy Henry," whereby Baird agrees to "accept your offer of six hundred and fifty dollars for Henry." Includes a 1837 October 10 bill of sale for "two negro men Milford and Jack" for 1100 dollars, sold by Henry Rose to William Massie and subsequently hired to M. Cabell for labor on the James River Canal. Includes a bill of sale for "a negro girl named Mary Ann," sold by Henry Rose to William Massie on 1837 October 21. Includes a 1827 bill of sale for "a negro girl named Matilda," attached to a 1837 October 27 note by William Massie as evidence of his ownership of Matilda in a dispute between him and John Stevens. Includes a 1837 October 23 bill of sale for "a negro woman Betsy" for six hundred dollars, sold by Henry Rose to William Massie. Includes several bills of sale for enslaved men and women; some are accompanied by correspondence indicating different disputes between the Massies and others about the legal or ownership status of some enslaved people. Includes a 1838 August 27 receipt from Peter Coffey for payment of four hundred twenty dollars by William Massie "in full consideration of a Negro Boy named Joshua." Includes a note from William Massie to Frances Barnett regarding "the hire of Negro man Martin" for the year 1839.

William W. Renwick papers, 1792-1948 (bulk 1840-1927)

2393 items
William W. Renwick was an enslaver and cotton planter from Newberry and Union counties, S.C. Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

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Isabelle Perkinson Williamson papers, 1827-1930, bulk 1909-1930

2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — approximately 2,520 items
Correspondence and other items of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. There are also letters from and items belonging to Lee H. Williamson. Topics include: life in Charlottesville, Virginia; students of the University; Edwin A. Alderman, University president; work in the Navy Department from 1913-1917; the early moving picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Includes descriptions of the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., Europe during 1909 and 1910, Virginia, the Panama Canal Zone, Rancagua, Chile, and Puerto Rico. Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers; food cards; and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France. The collection also contains information on early moving pictures; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, and greeting cards round out the collection.

Collection comprises papers of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. Included are many letters to Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson from former students of the University of Virginia who had patronized her boardinghouse in Charlottesville, Virginia, letters from Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson to her daughter describing life in Charlottesville, and commenting on Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, and many notes and bills reflecting frequent financial difficulties. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

Many of the letters describe travels: letters from Isabelle P. Williamson to her mother were sent while attending the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., while on a tour of Europe during 1909 and 1910, while visiting in Virginia and in the Panama Canal Zone, while working in the Navy Department in Washington, 1913-1917, and, after her marriage in 1917, while living near Rancagua, Chile, and in Puerto Rico with her husband. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. Williamson and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

The collection also contains information on the early motion picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers, food cards, and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France.

Sixty-nine photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, greeting cards, and Lee Williamson's WWI military identification card round out the collection.

Much more information on the collection's contents, written up in 1941, can be found in the Rubenstein Library cardfile catalog; please consult with Research Services staff.

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Box 4

A wide variety of formats includes: Commission Day cards for Wearmouth Bridge, Sunderland, in England, 1827-1843; calling cards, many with sympathy notes associated with the funeral of Isabelle Perkinson in 1924; early 20th century Christmas cards and notes; religious cards; a ticket to the seventh Olympiad, Antwerp, 1920; news clippings, some about engineer Lee H. Williamson's involvement in a Louisiana intracoastal canal; tobacco coupons; a small street map of Berlin; and other items.

Also of interest is a version of "Dixie" with verses composed for World War I. The last item is Lee Hoomes Williamson's military photo identity card from 1918, showing him to be 2nd Lieutenant, Company A, 55th Engineers, American Expeditionary Forces.

Purviance family papers, 1757-1932

3 Linear Feet — 5 boxes, 2,363 items (includes 16 vols.)
This collection contains professional, business, personal and family correspondence and other papers of the related Purviance and Courtenay families of Baltimore, Md., and elsewhere. The collection pertains to Revolutionary War activities in Maryland, shipping and trade, Western lands, settlement of estates, Civil War veterans' activities, the Cuban independence movement, and other matters. Includes papers of John Henry Purviance, U.S. diplomat in Paris, concerning the Monroe Mission (1794), U.S. relations with Napoleon and the Revolutionary French Government; papers relating to the financial affairs of Elizabeth Isabella Purviance Courtenay; papers of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., relating to his career at West Point, his later teaching duties there and at other colleges, and his investment activities; and letters of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., written in Washington, D.C., during the Civil War, describing the city and political opinion there. Correspondents include Alexander Dallas Bache, George William Erving, John Graham, Gessner Harrison, Anthony Hart, William Homes McGuffey, William Maclay, George Mason, James Monroe, Abner Nash, Fulwar Skipwith, George Muirson Totten, Thomas Tudor Tucker, and John Vanderlyn.

The Purviance family papers contain professional and family correspondence and papers of two generations of the Purviance family and several generations of the Courtenay family, related through the marriage of Henry Courtenay and Elizabeth Isabella Purviance in 1811.

The early papers relate chiefly to Samuel Purviance (d. 1787), Baltimore merchant, and chairman of the Committee of Observation for Baltimore County, and consist of records that include the interrogation of Purviance by the Council of Safety for the failure of a plan by the Committee of Observation to capture Maryland governor Robert Eden; correspondence discussing British depredations on American shipping, the extension of the Mason-Dixon line, cession of western lands, complaints against the Vandalia and Indiana Land companies, sale of lands owned by Purviance on the Chillisquaque River near Sunbury (Pennsylvania), lands owned by George Washington on the Kanawha River, and proposed development of the James River Canal; scattered letters from his wife concerning family matters; and letters from his son, John Henry Purviance, regarding his supervision of his father's western lands.

The professional papers of John Henry Purviance, secretary and interpreter to the James Monroe mission, 1794-1796, and secretary of the legation in London, 1804-1810, include memoranda regarding official diplomatic transactions; accounts, 1795, of interviews between Monroe and Jean Debrie, member of the Committee of Public Safety concerning arbitration of the war between France and Great Britain, French suspicion of the Jay Treaty, and the offices of the French in negotiations pending between the United States and Algiers; an account of a conversation between Monroe and one Fulton discussing the efforts of one La Chaise to persuade France to take possession of Louisiana and Florida as a check on American expansion and as a means of luring Kentucky away from the confederation, and Monroe's attempts to strengthen the ties of western territories to the union by asking France to influence Spain to keep the Mississippi River open to American trade; memoranda, 1796, concerning the difficulties of obtaining cash for a draft sent Monroe by the U.S. Treasury; Monroe's outline of a speech to the French National Convention; rough draft of a note from Monroe to the French minister of foreign affairs, Charles Delacroix, pertaining to the Fauchet letter; from Fulwar Skipwith, American consul-general at Paris, regarding Pierre Louis Roederer and the ratification of the treaty of 1800 which concluded the XYZ affair; rough drafts, 1806, of articles by Monroe describing the relations between the United States, Great Britain, and France; copy of a letter from Joseph Lakanal to an unnamed royal personage urging him to assert himself as ruler of Spain; rumors among the French peasantry of the impending return of Napoleon and gossip current in diplomatic circles; document, 1815, of Bon Adrien Jeannot de Moncey, Duc de Conegliano, making recommendations concerning France's foreign policy; letter, 1817, from the minister of Brazil to the U.S. minister containing copies of the correspondence between himself and the Russian minister dealing with a question of diplomatic protocol; and correspondence concerning Purviance's administrative duties.

Items of a more personal nature include papers relating to the financial affairs of his sister, Elizabeth Isabella Purviance, and the claims of her guardian, David Stewart, against the British government for capture of his vessels; commonplace book, 1781, containing extracts from a tour through Great Britain, excerpts from poems, and a few accounts; account book, 1801-1809, of travel expenses in the United States and Europe; commonplace book of excerpts from poems; commonplace book, 1811-1834, containing a travel diary of England and France, expenses, and a discussion of French government; a diary, 1819, of his travels including his impressions of the BayonneBiarritz area noted in the course of a diplomatic mission to Spain; and a memorandum book, 1818, with daily entries regarding weather, correspondence with President Monroe, and personal and financial matters.

Papers of Edward H. Courtenay (d. 1853) include correspondence with his uncle, John Henry Purviance, discussing the former's work and activities at West Point; papers dealing with the settlement of the estate of his grandfather, Hercules Courtenay (d. 1816); correspondence of Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., while attending school in Geneva, New York; personal correspondence concerning family and financial affairs; and personal correspondence with his brother, David Courtenay, regarding dealings in stocks, especially those of the Erie Railroad Company and the Aetna Life Insurance Company.

Other papers of the Courtenay family include occasional records of the 1st Maryland Volunteers under Lieutenant Colonel N. T. Dushane; letters from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., describing his work with the U.S. Coastal Survey, divided sentiment in Maryland during the Civil War, and Washington, D.C.; commissions, appointment and other military papers of Chauncey B. Reese and Henry Brewerton, husbands of Mary I. Courtenay and Sarah Courtenay, respectively, daughters of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr.; correspondence between David Courtenay and his son, William, regarding West Virginia lands which were a part of the Purviance estate, and the discovery of oil on those lands; papers relating to the administration of the estates of various members of the Courtenay family; business papers of William C. Courtenay; financial papers, principally in stock speculation, of several members of the family; financial records of the Maryland Society of the Sons of the American Revolution and of the 5th Maryland Regiment Veteran Corps; letter, 1869, from Edward H. Courtenay, Jr., discussing efforts of Cuba to free herself from Spain and the attitude of the United States towards such efforts, and commenting upon the treatment of Chinese immigrants in the United States; and papers concerning the disappearance and probable death of David S. Courtenay, son of Edward H. Courtenay, Sr., and Virginia (Howard) Courtenay.

Separated volumes include a mercantile ledger, 1781-1816, of Hercules Courtenay containing accounts of food products, tar, rum, ginseng, ships and shipping ventures, and insurance; ledgers, 1764-1779, and account book for debts receivable, 1764-1776, of Dr. John Boyd, Baltimore physician, containing records of an apothecary; books of recipes and remedies. list of American vessels destroyed by the British; daybook, 1801-1804, of merchant Henry William Courtenay with accounts for flour, food, and other commodities; account books, 1824-1826 and 1835-1842, of David S. Courtenay recording money spent for postage, cash received for legal services, expenditures in lotteries, and personal expenses; address book, possibly of David S. Courtenay; anonymous account book, 1815; scrapbook, 1836, of H. W. Courtenay; diary, 1861, of a soldier including a description of his stay in a Confederate prison; and a scrapbook, 1892-1909, of clippings relating to Baltimore and to the Purviance and Courtenay families.

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Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976

3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Roger Fenton research papers and photographs, 1833-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder

The series includes research materials assembled by art historian Marcia M. Mathews on early English photographer Roger Fenton. The earliest date reflects a transcript of a letter from 1833 from Roger to his mother while he was at school.

Mathews does not appear to have published any work based on this research, and there are no drafts in the collection, although she seems to have been involved at some level in Helmut Gernsheim's book on Fenton, published in London in 1954. The dozens of letters to Mathews from Fenton family members (1940s-1957) mention this connection and may shed more light on it.

Other correspondence is from curators at various institutions where Fenton's photographs and papers were located, and from the photography lab where professional copies were made of his original photographs taken in the 1850s.

Included in the series are six 2 1/2 x 4" cartes-de-visite photographs of Roger Fenton and his family (wife and daughters), early 1860s. Other photographs are copies (circa 1940s) and include images of the Fenton home, Crimble Hall (Rochdale Borough, Lancashire, England), and of other family members. There appears to be an original unmounted albumen print of a full standing portrait, probably by Fenton, of his father-in-law (last name Maynard), as well as several copies of photographs by Roger Fenton (1850s). One modern copy photograph is of a sketch of Crimble Hall by Marcia Mathews.

Other items include a copy of a questionnaire about the Fenton family, created by Mathews in the 1940s and sent to various Fenton relatives; it is accompanied by one respondent's handwritten answers.

Sheek family papers, 1767-1939, bulk 1850-1869, bulk 1850-1869

3.5 Linear Feet
Collection contains mainly letters (mostly between 1850-1869) to members of the Sheek family of North Carolina, from relatives who had migrated to Kentucky, Tennessee, Indiana, Illinois, Iowa, and Texas. The letters concern religion in the West, economic conditions, farming on the frontier, Texas during the 1840s-1860s, sectional strife, Civil War experiences, and conditions in the Confederacy and after the war.

The collection contains letters to the Sheek, Smith, and Clouse families of North Carolina from relatives who migrated to Tennessee, Kentucky, Illinois, Indiana, and Texas, concerning land and commodity prices; religion; the Mexican War; Trinity College, North Carolina; farming on the frontier; conditions in Texas, 1840-1870; secession in North Carolina; the experiences of several Confederate soldiers; and Reconstruction. The collection also contains advertisements for books and patent medicines North Carolina ballots; circulars for giris' schools and boys' schools in Lockville and Jonesville, North Carolina; bills; receipts; and summonses from a justice of the peace.

Former collection name: Jacob Sheek and Jonathan Smith Papers.

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American slavery documents collection, 1757-1924 and undated

Online
2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 1 oversize folder
Collection of manuscript items relating to American slavery assembled over a number of decades by the staff of the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. Collection contains items documenting the sales, escapes, and emancipations of enslaved people from colonial times through the Civil War, and to a lesser extent, materials relating to slavery in the United States dating from the post-emancipation period.

The collection brings to light details of the lives and deaths of enslaved and free Africans and African Americans in the southern United States, primarily in North Carolina, Virginia, and Kentucky, but also in Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, New York, South Carolina, and Tennessee. There are also six albumen studio portrait photographs, mounted on card stock, dating from the second half of the 19th century, along with a copper token from the American Colonization Society, dated 1833.

Items have been foldered individually, with the inventory reflecting their titles, geographic origin, and date (if known).

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Picture File, 1700s-1980s, bulk 1814-1950

Online
50 Linear Feet — Approximately 6050 items
The Picture File was created and maintained beginning in the 1950s by the Duke University Manuscript Department staff and its institutional successors as a vertical file of pictorial works separated from manuscript collections as well as acquired individually. The collection is large and diverse, with images dating from the 18th through the 20th centuries. Engravings feature prominently, with photographs a close second. The predominant genre is portraits of political and military leaders, authors, artists, physicians, scientists, and others. Members of the Duke family and others from Durham, N.C. are also present. In the Socialist Party Series there are numerous images of leader Eugene Debs. Topics range widely, with a focus on American history, including the Revolutionary and Civil Wars; history and culture of the southern U.S.; and U.S. and European politics. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Picture File is a large and diverse collection of visual materials ranging from the 17th through the 20th centuries. The bulk of the images in the collection date from the early 1800s through the 1950s. The dominant formats are engravings and photographs. Specific formats include: cartes de visite, cabinet cards, and other albumen prints; tintypes and daguerreotypes (cased and uncased); engravings, lithographs, and other mechanical prints; caricatures and cartoons; watercolors; sketches; postcards; stereographs; small souvenir albums; leaflets; and small broadsides. There are a few cyanotypes and negatives.

The images offer views from most of the southern United States, especially North and South Carolina and Virginia. Many images are from Europe, with a smaller number from Japan and China; a large variety of other countries and locations are represented by a few images. The history of Durham is also well-represented, in addition to other Southern cities and towns, including Raleigh N.C. Many political and military leaders and notable personages, primarily from the U.S. and Europe are present in portraits and caricatures; there are numerous images of Eugene Debs, U.S. Socialist Party leader, and members of the Duke family of Durham, N.C. A significant number of individuals in the People Series are African Americans, ranging from individual studio portraits to groups of individuals and racist caricatures and cartoons; a smaller number are of Native Americans.

The Subjects Series is eclectic, including advertising, cartoons, tobacco, ships, and images from conflicts: Civil War images are abundant, offering views of battles and devastation both rural and urban. There are also scenes from the American Revolutionary War, Spanish-American War, and both World Wars. Finally, the Picture File is home to collections of many engravings and lithographs produced by the 19th century American companies Currier and Ives, L. Prang and Co., and Kurz and Allison; many of them commemorate military leaders or events.

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Visual materials from a wide range of geographic locations separated into subseries by American state/territory or foreign country. More than half of the subseries and materials are of various U.S. states, mostly on the Eastern seaboard. The majority of the U.S. material comes from the assorted subseries of the southern states, the largest of which are Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina. Much of the North Carolina subseries features historical images of Durham.

Most of these pictures of historical or geographic locales do not include people, but there are a significant number of street scenes and the like with many unidentified individuals. Images in this series are mostly photographs and engravings , though there are lithographs, paper prints, clippings, albums, and postcards as well.

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The People Series contains images of individuals and groups from many historical periods. The majority of the images depict prominent American and European (mostly British) white men, such as political and military leaders, clergymen, and nobility. A large portion of the American individuals portrayed in this series are Civil War officers, both Union and Confederate.

Individual portraits make up the vast majority of items in this series. While most are posed studio portraits, there is a significant number of informal images as well as large gatherings of unidentified people. Photographs and engravings make up the largest group of formats in the series, though there are also lithographs, clippings and other printed illustrations, tintypes, handbills, broadsides, sketches, and postcards.

The images in this series are listed alphabetically by name or assigned title. Physical files may retain original (and no longer used) labels such as "Negro" and "Indian."

Thomas Ellison Keitt papers, 1758-1945 and undated

2 Linear Feet — 769 items
Thomas Ellison Keitt was a resident of Clemson, Oconee County, South Carolina. Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Among the papers are records belonging to Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J. L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator. Documents include legal and financial papers and volumes; personal correspondence; speeches and pamphlets; and genealogical materials. Topics in the correspondence sometimes touch on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and refer to life in Charleston, South Carolina. There are also Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Collection comprises papers of the Wadlington, Bauskett, and Keitt familes of Newberry County, South Carolina. Included are a genealogical chart; social and personal letters with some information on slave sales and purchases, cotton mills, smallpox, and life in Charleston, South Carolina; papers of Thomas Bauskett, a planter, and J.L. Keitt, a farmer, attorney, and state legislator; and Civil War letters of Ellison Summerfield Keitt, captain in the 29th Regiment of S.C. Troops and later the 19th S.C. Cavalry Battalion, including muster rolls of Company M, 20th Regiment. Correspondents include James Wadlington, Thomas Wadlington, John Bauskett, Caroline (Wadlington) Keitt, Thomas W. Keitt, Thomas Ellison Keitt, Laurence (who published under the name "Lawrence") Massillon Keitt, Harriet (Sondley) Wadlington, Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington, and William W. Boyce.

Legal papers date from 1770 to 1913, and consist of indentures, wills, deeds, plats, summonses, and records of trial and judgment. Some of these documents concern the work of Thomas Bauskett (an attorney) and James Wadlington (a judge). Other financial papers, 1768-1902, include promissory notes, bills, receipts and small account books of Sarah Cates's children (1819), and Thomas Bauskett (1798). Manuscript volumes include a ledger, 1758-1803, of Thomas Wadlington, Sr.; an inventory of the estate of James Wadlington, 1831-1850; a mercantile account book, 1831-1879, of Ann (Bauskett) Wadlington; and account books, 1931-1939, of Mrs. Thomas Wadlington Keitt, including wages paid agricultural laborers, and subscriptions paid to the Methodist Church at Clemson. There are also miscellaneous speeches, prayers, and writings, and printed material, including pamphlets and clippings related to the Wadlington and Keitt families.

Among the printed materials is a published letter, "For Confidential Circulation Among Members of the Secession Party," dated October 24, 1851, which contains information on the Union party and the secession movement in South Carolina. Clippings contain information on Tammany Hall, the Salvation Army, Lord Randolph Churchill, William Booth, Henry George, and H. Clay Bascom.

2 results in this collection

Townsend Family papers, 1829-1972

2.4 Linear Feet — 1699 items
Consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the large Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont.

The collection consists of genealogical information, correspondence, photographs, diaries, notebooks, and a manuscript autobiography relating to the Townsend family of Felchville, Vermont. The bulk of the correspondence between a large group of family members falls between 1830 and 1939; topics include family matters and spiritualism. One group of letters and a diary were written by a Union soldier, Francis Torrey Townsend, and relate to his experiences in Mississippi and Tennessee as a soldier with Company K, 13th Iowa Infantry. Other materials concern Bessie Meachum's teaching experiences with African-American children at the Beach Institute, Savannah, Ga., at the Lincoln Normal School, Marion, Ala., and at the Rio Grande Industrial School in Albuquerque, N.M.; some of this work was done through the American Missionary Association of the Congregational Church. Some photographs also depict Tougaloo College in Miss., and Le Moyne College in Tenn. Other volumes include the early 20th century diaries of Torrey Townsend and his autobiography; an 1870 diary of Elisa Townsend; a 1892 diary of Mary Meachum; and several diaries and notebooks of Bessie Meachum.

2 results in this collection

William Law papers, 1761-1890

2.4 Linear Feet — 4 boxes, 1,863 items (including 20 vols.)
Collection has personal and business correspondence of William Law, the Dubose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage. As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel Dubose, include records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers. Included also are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, mostly post 1839, include letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839, frequent letters from member of the Cooper and Dubose families, and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often in financial difficulties. J. R. Law was a planter in the Sumter District of South Carolina and in Madison County, Fla., after 1848. Miscellaneous materials include a description of the Alabama River and environs, 1815, accounts of trips to Red Sulphur Springs and other springs in Virginia, 1835, and Civil War letters from William Law's son discussing camp life.

This collection contains personal and business correspondence and papers of William Law (1792-1868), planter, merchant, and leader of the local militia, the DuBose family, and of Cyrus Bacot, with whom Law was connected by marriage.

As captain of the Black Creek Militia, 1813-1820, Law's papers include muster rolls, accounts of courts-martial, lists of absentees with their excuses, and numerous orders. Law's plantation records are confined to frequent lists of slaves, accounts of cotton planted and produced, and weights of hogs killed. The bulk of the papers is concerned with Law's activities as a merchant in partnership with Daniel DuBose, including records of large amounts of cotton sold to Charleston commission merchants, of turpentine and bricks sold, and papers, bills, receipts, account books, daybooks, cashbooks, and ledgers.

Also included in the collection are an account book of lumber sold by Law and Cyrus Bacot, and letters and papers showing Law's activities in the temperance movement and the Presbyterian Church. Personal letters, largely confined to the period after 1839, fall into three categories; letters of sympathy at the death of Law's wife in 1839; frequent letters from members of the Cooper and DuBose families; and letters from Law's brother, James Robert Law, who was often involved in financial difficulties. Letters from James Robert Law are concerned with planting operations in Sumter District, South Carolina, and, beginning with 1848, in Madison County, Florida.

There are also a description of the Alabama River and its fertile lowlands by William I. DuBose written from Fort Claiborne, Monroe County, Mississippi, in 1815; accounts of a trip to Red Sulphur Springs as well as other springs in Virginia in 1835; a long account by James R. Law relative to a marl bed on his Sumter plantation, and Civil War letters from William Law's son revealing numerous incidents of camp life.

2 results in this collection

William Thomas Leavell papers, 1831-1932

5.6 Linear Feet — 17 boxes; 5,136 items
Collection contains the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; along with family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister. The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.

Collection comprises the papers of W. T. Leavell and of his son-in-law, Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald, Confederate officer, attorney, and businessman. Leavell's papers contain correspondence with leaders of the Episcopal Church concerning church business, doctrinal disputes within the church, and debates between the Episcopal Church and other Protestant denominations; and family letters and papers which provide information on the salaries, duties, and home life of a minister.

The papers also contain material pertaining to the economic and agricultural conditions in Leavell's parishes in Virginia and West Virginia and genealogical material on many of his parishioners; letters while a student at Bristol College, Bristol, Pa., 1833-1836, and at Protestant Episcopal Theological Seminary, 1836-37; letters from brothers and sisters in Spotsylvania and Culpeper counties, Va., discussing agriculture; correspondence between daughter Anne Leavell and John M. Daniel in the 1870s, both before and after their respective marriages; and over 200 sermons. Leavell was a teacher at Fairfax Institute, 1837-39. Box 9 contains a diary in which Leavell included much autobiographical information.

The papers of Edward Allen Hitchcock McDonald contain letters from Civil War veterans of McDonald's regiments, the 11th Virginia Cavalry and the 77th Virginia Militia, concerning battles and skirmishes in which they participated; a manuscript copy of McDonald's "The History of the Laurel Brigade," and letters, 1870-1890, pertaining to the Louisville Abstract and Loan Company and general business conditions in Louisville, Ky.

3 results in this collection

William Tilghman papers, 1671-1876

2.8 Linear Feet — 5 Boxes, 900 items
Papers concerned with Tilghman's law practice in Chestertown, Md., and his service in the Maryland legislature (1788-1793). Includes genealogical information about Maryland's Eastern Shore, information about economic and agricultural conditions in Maryland in the late 18th century, Tilghman's vicissitudes because of his Loyalist sympathies during the Revolution, his efforts to advance the interests of his constituents while he served in the legislature, and the Tilghman family. Volumes include a digest of legal cases in which Tilghman participated, legal notes, court dockets, and a summary of estate laws in Maryland. Includes three letters from Henry Pearce. Two of these letters are to James Tilghman, William's father, regarding the purchase of Pearce land, slaves, stock, etc.

This collection houses the papers of William Tilghman (1756-1824), lawyer and chief justice of the supreme court of Pennsylvania. They relate chiefly to his law practice in Maryland, 1783-1793, and to his service in the Maryland general assembly, 1788-1793, and include legal papers dealing with litigation, land sales, the collection of debts, notes, the settlement of estates, and other legal matters. Included are deeds, indentures, wills, estate records, court records, and other legal papers relating chiefly to Cecil, Kent, and Queen Anne counties, a roster, 1818-1819, of the citizens of Charles County, scattered papers pertaining to the Church of England in Maryland, occasional references to personal matters, and legal and business papers concerning the family, including papers dealing with loan transactions and with the settlement of the estate of William Tilghman.

The collection also has scattered papers of Tilghman's father, James Tilghman, a lawyer, several bills and accounts of St. John's College, Annapolis, Maryland, and Charlotte Hall School, Charlotte Hall, Maryland, petitions and acts relating to Tilghman's career in the general assembly chiefly dealing with the settlement of local affairs, including the disposal of reserved lands, an evaluation of land in various counties, and an estimate of the cost of building a turnpike between Baltimore, Maryland, and Washington, D. C., and other papers dealing with legal and business matters.

The volumes are a digest, 1747-1760, of cases at law in which James Tilghman was an attorney, a System of Law concerning Estates by Richard Tilghman IV, legal notes kept by William Tilghman as a young man, and dockets of William Tilghman in the Kent County court for the March 1794 term.

2 results in this collection

Winn family papers, 1780-1925, bulk 1780-1889

5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes, 2,684 items, 27 vols.
Collection contains personal and business correspondence, papers, and volumes, mainly of John Winn (d. 1844), farmer, lawyer, and postmaster, and his son, Philip James Winn, physician and postmaster of Fluvanna Co., Va.,