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File
Box 51

Correspondence while in Southern California (1928-1930), with E. Fabre Surveyor, with George H. Corbett of Montreal Legal Aid Bureau (1923-1931), with John F. Forward, Public Defender of Hartford, Conn., with Justin Miller (1927-1929), with Birmingham, Ala. (1923-1929), with San Diego, Cal. (1922-1929), with Connecticut, and others.

Collection
The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the African-American community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a racically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

The Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) of Durham was founded in 1920 and served the larger Durham community from the 1920s until the 1970s. The Harriet Tubman branch of the Durham YWCA served the AfricanAmerican community in particular and, through collaboration with the Central branch, fostered integration in a radically segregated Durham. In the 1970s, the YWCA became the home of the Durham Women's Health Co-op and the Durham Rape Crisis Center, which operated out of the YWCA Women's Center. These organizations were central to reform movements throughout Durham, from women's health and childcare to fair wages and civil rights. The YWCA of Durham records reflect both the administrative history of the YWCA, as well as the programs, projects, social events, and community outreach that formed the backbone of the organization. For example, a series of scrapbooks, put together by Y Teen groups, program participants, and residents of the YWCA's boarding houses captures the strength of the YWCA community. The broader impact of the YWCA is evident in their range of programming, especially the clubs they hosted, from PMS and Single Mothers groups to a "Matrons Club." The YWCA's impact is also reflected in administrative and financial materials that tell the story of the Y's work to serve the people of Durham that needed a safe place to build community for themselves and their families.

Collection
A chapter of the Young Women's Christian Association (YWCA) was established at Trinity College (Durham, N.C.) in 1917. In 1925, a new constitution was drafted and the chapter became the YWCA at Duke University. The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records.

The records of the Duke University YWCA span the years 1923 to 1985, with the bulk dating between 1930 and 1970, and include reports, printed matter, correspondence, sermons, clippings, and financial records. Prominent subjects include race relations, annual activities of YWCA, community service, Edgemont Community and sermons preached at Duke Chapel during the 1960s.

Collection includes publications such as 1931 issue of "Opportunity: Journal of Negro Life," published by the National Urban League and 1931 issue of "Black Justice," published by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Collection
The Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University was established at then Trinity College in 1887-1888. In its early years, it functioned primarily as a sort of Bible class. Although it never abandoned its emphasis on Christianity, in its later years the YMCA dedicated itself more to campus and social service projects than Bible study. These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke Universityin the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

These records were produced by the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) at Duke University in the course of their activities as a student religious organization. Materials are present from 1920 to 1969; however, the bulk of the material is from the late 1930s to the early 1960s and consists mainly of annual reports. The majority of the remaining material consists of reports from other student religious organizations. Physical types of materials present include reports, pamphlets, correspondence, minutes, student publications, programs, flyers, and officer lists. There is one artifact, a gavel that is engraved with presidents' initials and years of service, 1945-1955.

The majority of the records consist of reports of campus student religious organizations, and annual reports prepared by YMCA officers, which date from 1936-1967, although they are not inclusive. The annual reports summarize YMCA activities and projects from the past school year, and offer suggestions for the next year. See also catalogued and bound reports at call number 378.756 D887FA. There are two reports generated by the YMCA in the course of their campus activities: a proposal regarding the Freshman Advisory Council and a report on the success of the 1948 fund drive for the World Student Service Fund (WSSF). For more information on the incorporation of the Freshman Advisory Council (FAC) into the YMCA, see the annual report from 1957-1958. The remaining reports were created by other student religious organizations such as the Hillel Society (for Jewish students), the Baptist Student Union, and the YWCA. Correspondence is limited to one item. "Dads' Day" items consist of programs and schedules for the annual fathers' weekend. See also programs at call number 378.756 D887FD.

Publications are limited to examples of the student handbook and the "Dink," a daily publication for freshmen produced during Freshman Orientation Week. For other student handbooks see call number 378.756 D877S. For discussions of activities related to desegregation at Duke, see annual reports 1959-1960 and 1967-1968. Draft counseling materials are limited to announcements of seminars and conferences. For discussions of Vietnam and the selective service system, see annual reports of 1966-1967 and 1967-1968. For more information on Vietnam, the draft, and the counseling center, see YWCA and YM-YWCA Institute for Nonviolent Study and Action materials. Although there are no membership lists, there are quite inclusive lists of officers from 1888-1936 and 1956-1957.

Collection
Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt (née Rochelle, 1881-1980) was the daughter of Durham merchant Leander Sydney and Jeanette Stanley Rochelle. She was the fourth and final wife of Brodie L. Duke and a Durham landowner in her own right. The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt Papers date from 1889 to 1980 and chronicle the personal life of Wylanta as well as the business and financial transactions which she conducted as a prominent landowner in Durham. Materials include correspondence, photographs, and financial records.

The Wylanta Duke Strayhorn Aycock Holt papers date from 1889 to 1980, with the bulk of the materials from the 1920s and 1930s. The collection chronicles Wylanta's familial and social life as well as her business dealings.

The Correspondence Series contains primarily incoming correspondence from Wylanta's sister, Hettie, nieces and nephews, and husbands as well as letters to and from a wide range of friends and Durham citizens. It contains a number of holiday greeting and sympathy cards, but does not contain any correspondence explicitly addressed to Brodie L. Duke.

The Clippings Series includes excerpts from newspaper columns and articles which Wylanta collected throughout her life. These clippings include the regular opinion column written by Wylanta's brother, Zapheus A. Rochelle, notes from the society section chronicling Wylanta and others' visits and travels, and coverage of Wylanta and Stayhorn's 1923 motor vehicle accident in Nice, France, as well as other political and social subjects.

The Financial Records Series encompasses deposit slips, receipts, dividend notices, ledgers, and correspondence evidencing Wylanta's business transactions. The series also contains information about her property ownership in the city of Durham.

The Miscellaneous Series contains assorted handwritten notes and printed commercial images.

The Photographs Series includes a number of portraits of Wylanta, her husbands and her family as well as numerous images of as-yet unidentified individuals. The materials include images of Wylanta in her wedding gowns, snapshots, and portraits. There are also a handful of images of places and an early x-ray of Wylanta's arm following an accident.

Collection

Wyatt T. Dixon papers, 1850s-1987 3.6 Linear Feet — Approx. 2700 Items

The Wyatt T. Dixon Papers span the 1850s to 1987, although the bulk of the material dates from 1918 to the 1960s. The collection consists of diaries, vintage photographs, photomechanical prints, postcards, clippings, correspondence, speeches, scrapbooks, printed materials, forms, military records, leaflets, and maps. The Photographs Series comprises the largest portion of the collection. The collection documents the history of Durham, N.C., the Dixon family, activities of the United States Army, American Expeditionary Forces, 30th Division, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, from 1917 to 1919; Durham, North Carolina; and Dixon's career as a journalist.

The World War I Series chronicles the activities of the American Expeditionary Forces, 113th Field Artillery Unit, Battery C, which consisted primarily of men from Durham, N.C. Dixon's diaries chronicle the unit's movements and activities in the United States and Europe including England, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg. Battery C was involved in the Saint Michiel offensive and the Meuse-Argonne Campaign. The diaries describe camp life in the United States and Europe, including daily routines; camp conditions; outbreaks of measles and other medical situations; and the soldiers' personal recreational activities. The journey by ship to Europe is also described in detail, including the sale of food to the soldiers and the conditions on board. Civilian responses to the soldiers as they visited or traveled through towns and cities in America, France, Belgium, and Luxembourg are noted throughout the diaries. Dixon mentions a unit of African-American soldiers was at Mont Dore, France. There are some snapshot photographs of Battery C which Dixon probably created with his Kodak camera and some formal panoramic photographs of the entire unit. Letters written by Dixon and his family while he was in the Army are found in the Writings Series.

The Writings Series contains some personal correspondence and a diary, but the bulk of the series documents Dixon's career as a writer for newspapers published by the Durham Herald Company in Durham, N.C. In his column "How Times Do Change," Dixon described life in Durham and the surrounding area and the manner in which cityscapes and social life had changed over the past decades.

The Photographs Series consists primarily of photographs and documents social life and cityscapes in Durham, N.C. Images include buildings such as banks, businesses, cemeteries, churches, court houses, dams and power plants, hospitals, hotels and inns, plantations (abandoned), post offices, schools, and tobacco warehouses and factories. There are street scenes and aerial views. Many of these local images appear to have been collected by Dixon to illustrate his articles. Pictures of people include portraits of family members and friends, and candid scenes of groups engaged in social activities. There are images of events such as holiday celebrations and parades. Transportation, including trolleys, buses, fire fighting equipment and train depots, is also documented.

The Durham Printed Materials Series and the Miscellaneous Series include information about the City of Durham and Durham County, genealogical information about Dixon's family, and the minutes book of a social club for young men.

Collection

W.W. Parleir papers, 1909-1937 1.8 Linear Feet — 9 Items

W.W. Parleir (d. 1937) was an outdoor advertising executive in Alabama during the 1910s through the 1930s. He worked at Theiss, Douglas & Ribble (Birmingham) and at Capital City Advertising (Montgomery), and was Chairman of the Outdoor Advertising Association of Alabama 1934-1937. The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The W.W. Parleir Papers include clippings and photographs, along with an obituary notice that appeared in the Outdoor Advertising Association of America newsletter. Campaigns include American Legion, United States Tires, Charlotte Fair, and Norris candies. Other photographs depict meetings of the Poster Advertising Association and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America. Arranged alphabetically.

Folder

Various personal and professional writings, clippings, pamphlets, and speeches created and collected by the Bryants and Zellers. Includes early speeches made by JEB at the Wesleyan Seminary at Kent's Hill, Maine, showing his early thoughts on temperance, slavery, and women. The series also includes writings and clippings pertaining to political conventions (including the Freedmen's convention of Georgia in 1866), historical views of the differences between the North and South that were being shaped during Reconstruction, and JEB's shift in focus from educating Black people to educating the Southern White working-class people. There are also diaries by Emma Spaulding Bryant, scrapbooks by Alice Zeller and her husband Julius Zeller, and a biography written by Alice Zeller about her parents (John and Emma). Some of the materials are not original and are typescripts and photocopies.

Folder

This subseries contains materials which were clearly written by others or could not easily be identified as being written by Heschel, materials presumably collected and used by Heschel or sent to him for background research or topics of interest to him, and notes clearly not in Heschel's handwriting. Types of writings include articles and publications about Heschel and a variety of other topics, essays, translations of some of Heschel's works, reports, addresses, typescripts, manuscripts, lists, pamphlets, and clippings.

Folder

Contains written and typed drafts, research notes, correspondence, proofs and galleys, electronic records, and other materials related to Millett's publications, speeches, and interviews. Works by other authors can be found in the Writings by Others subseries at the end of this series, arranged by author name.

Materials on Sexual Politics, Flying, Sita, The Basement, The Loony-bin Trip, The Politics of Cruelty, and Mother Millett are located in individual subseries. Less extensive material on Millett's other published books can be found at the beginning of the Other Writings Subseries.

Millett's own folder titles have been retained when possible. For each book title, undated drafts and notes come first, followed by book reviews, fan mail, contracts, and material collected by Millett as background for the book. Book drafts are sometimes labeled by letter, as in "draft A" or "draft B." This does not imply that one was written before the other, but only gives an order to their presentation.

The Other Writings subseries offers material related to Millett's articles and unpublished manuscripts. The Interviews subseries contains correspondence, clippings, and a small number of transcripts of interviews with Millett. The Speeches subseries includes notes and drafts, along with related records, while the Engagements subseries primarily consists of correspondence about speaking engagements, and materials from conferences in which Millett participated. Subseries files are in chronological order.

The series includes some documents in electronic format. In general, electronic documents are grouped with corresponding from which diskettes were taken from, or folders containing related paper documents. If there is no corresponding folder, the documents are marked "electronic format only." Electronic versions of book drafts are in chronological order together with other dated material. For each electronic document, the container entry provides the file name, the date the file was last modified, and the number assigned to the original computer disk on which the file was received. Please contact the Rubenstein Library to request access to electronic records.

Additional correspondence from readers, correspondence with publishers and Millett's agent, and correspondence regarding articles and speeches by Millett can be found in the Correspondence series.

Research material for Going to Iran and additional book reviews, especially for Sexual Politics, are located in the Clippings series.

The Printed Material series includes additional reviews, interviews, and articles by Millett.

Audio recordings for drafts of The Loony-bin Trip and A.D. are located in the Audiovisual Material series, which also includes recordings of Millett's speeches, readings, and interviews.

Folder

Although most of the Writings and Speeches Series consists of sermons, class assignments, or debates, there is some printed material included if the items contained handwritten notes. The Brotherhood folder contains sermons and other items relating to race relations, mostly within the context of the Methodist church and its relationship with African Americans. The Sermons and Notes folder include several eulogies and many prayers by Mr. Stott and other ministers, which cover a wide range of topics from the scriptures. Some of these sermons have been transliterated into Japanese.

Folder

Manuscript drafts, notes, and notebooks for published and unpublished works by Blyth. Arranged alphabetically by subject. Many of the files relate to his books on Japanese poetry, humor, and Zen, as well as to his works about British and American literature. Some materials are written in Japanese. Of note, there are 20 folders of notebooks about senryū poetry, which are written in Japanese and translated into English with explication. It appears that there were a few contributors to the notebooks other than Blyth; these included Toshiko Chiba and Laura Rill. Blyth mentions Toshiko Chiba in the prefaces to several of his books. There are also some haiku translations by Akiko Kobayashi. Other files relate to unpublished works and to research interests about animism, culture and mysticism, the British poet John Clare, language, love, and satanism. Almost none of the files have dates, but the majority were likely created between 1948 and 1964.

Folder

Handwritten, typed manuscripts resulting from Ridlon's research into surgical and therapeutic treatments for conditions such as scoliosis, spondylitis, and other diseases or deformities. Also includes several folders of ephemera, letters of reference, diplomas and certificates. Ridlon's obituary is also included. The writings are divided into several sections: a set of bound volumes containing manuscripts and reprints; a series of reprints, arranged in alphabetical order by title; and a folder of loose newsletters and articles.

Folder

The Writings Series contains Link's creative and scolarly writing, much of it undated. There are general notebooks with drafts of creative work (some with scattered lecture notes included), screenplays, book proposals and drafts, Link's dissertation, along with articles, poetry, and short stories. Much of the material in the series remained unpublished. See the Diaries and Journals Series for Link's commentary about individual items in the series. For the writings in digital formats, some disks contain parts of different projects stored together. In these cases, they often appear in the General sub-series.

Folder

This series contains copies, reprints, drafts, notes, and other documents associated with Chamberiln's scholarly and popular writings and his service as an editor. These include: reprints and copies of published journal articles and book chapters; draft writings; reviews of published work by Chamberlin and others; copies of books written by Chamberlin; and files from Chamberlin's activity as an editor.

Folder

Hand- and typewritten manuscripts, notebooks, bound volumes, together with research notes, for published and unpublished books and articles. Not included are the Guide to Religious Pageantry (published in 1923) and The Project Method in Religion (Ph.D. thesis, University of South Carolina, 1924). Works represented are: 1) Autobiography, tentatively titled The Young Bee Makes the Honeycomb, [1959-1960]. 2) A Boy's Life of Albert Schweitzer, undated 3) Character Building, various dates 4) Cherokee Legends of the Great Smokey Mountains, [1954-1962] 5) Child Development, writings on, various dates 6) Childhood and Character, [1929] 7) College term papers, Harvard, [1911-1912]. 8) Counseling College Students, [1930-1967]. 9) Doorways of Duke, [1950], on Duke architecture. 10) Duke University and the Things of the Spirit, undated 11) Family counseling, writings on, various dates. 12) Fiction, unpublished short stories, various dates. 13) Gullah. Duke University Press, 1940. Bound typescript and personal copy. 14) History of the Southern Christian Advocate, undated The Advocate is a South Carolina Methodist publication. 15) Life Among the Gullah Negroes, undated 16) Life and Times of Washington Duke, undated 17) A Little Girl Named Maggie, [1953, how Maggie Valley, N.C. got its name.] 18) Miscellaneous articles 19) The Negro in the Methodist Church. The Board of Missions and the Church Extension, The Methodist Church, 1951. Bound copy inscribed to Dr. and Mrs. Gross. 20) A Negro Story Nobody Knows: When Negro Methodists sat in Southern Churches (tentative title), undated [on the pre-Civil War period] 21) Writings on Religion 22) A Southerner Looks at Segregation, 1955 (written in response to the Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education) 23) Speaking of Boys, undated (Chapter 3) 24) The Story of Lake Junaluska, 1950, and Chief Junaluska. 25) Where Your Hillbilly Music Comes From, undated

Folder

Original order has been retained. Contains academic writings by Charles Ellwood in the form of chapter drafts, articles, editorials, lectures, and speeches, many with annotations, almost all relating to sociology and related academic topics. Many speak to significant issues of the day, including race relations, eugenics, and political society. Later pieces from the 1930s and early 1940s reflect the issues of totalitarianism, religious conflict, and war. This series includes many of Ellwood's writings, most notably book reviews and letters to the editor; other pieces are found in the Writings series. Folder contents are arranged in rough chronological order.

Folder

The Writings series includes materials related to Heschel's books, articles, speeches, lectures, addresses, and other writings. This series also includes a large amount of Heschel's handwritten and typescript notes on a wide variety of topics and writings by other individuals. The Writings series contains six subseries: Addresses, Lectures, and Speeches, Articles, Books, Notes, Other Writings by Heschel, and Writings by Others. Detailed descriptions are below.

Collection

Wright H. Everett papers, 1853-1998 and undated 27 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

Wright H. Bill Everett (1925-2010) was a media space salesman for several major magazines, and the founder of his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co., that specialized in a variety of print materials combining humorous captions with still images from silent movies. The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audiotapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, Maclean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office? Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Wright H. Everett Papers span the years 1853-1998 and include correspondence, photographs and negatives, 8mm and 16mm films and audio tapes, print advertisements, layouts, presentations, research reports, pamphlets and brochures that document Everett's career selling advertising space in national magazines as well as his own businesses, Flix and the W.H. Everett Co. Magazines represented in the collection include Advertising Age, American Home, Flying, Progressive Grocer, Reader's Digest, Reminisce, Suburbia Today, Time, Western Advertising and Woman's Home Companion. Other companies represented include American Greeting Cards, Hunter Snead, Lennen-Newell, MacLean Hunter Media and Remington Advertising. There are also files relating to Everett's book How Were Things At The Office?

Collection

Worth family papers, 1844-1955 and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 694 Items

Prominent family of plantation owners, lawyers, politicians, and businessmen from Randolph County, North Carolina, residing in Asheboro and Wilmington. Correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency. Includes letters to Jonathan Worth (1802-1869), lawyer and governor of North Carolina, to his son, David Gaston Worth (1831-1897), commission merchant and manufacturer, when he attended the University of North Carolina and when he was superintendent of the salt works at Wilmington, N.C., during the Civil War; correspondence of David with his wife, Julia Anna (Stickney) Worth, and his son, Charles William Worth, when attended Bingham School and the University of North Carolina; and letters of Barzillai Gardner Worth. Other correspondents include Edwin Anderson Alderman, Robert Bingham, Josephus Daniels, Hannibal Lafayette Godwin, John Wilkins Norwood, Lee Slater Overman, James Hinton Pou, Cornelia (Phillips) Spencer, and George Tayloe Winston.

The papers of the Worth family of North Carolina contain correspondence, business records, and other papers, pertaining chiefly to family matters, business affairs, opposition to Southern secession, politics in North Carolina, fertilizer manufacturing and marketing, textile industry, Zebulon Baird Vance, and patronage during the early years of Woodrow Wilson's presidency. Includes the papers of Jonathan Worth (1802-1869), lawyer and governor of North Carolina, including a few of his official papers as governor during Reconstruction, 1865-1868; correspondence relating to his business interests and law practice; and letters of Jonathan Worth and Martitia (Daniel) Worth in the 1850s to a son at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, concerning family matters and the construction of a plank road near Asheboro, North Carolina. Also among the papers identified with him are commissions signed by him as governor and a copy of a newspaper article concerning a speech he delivered at the Negro Educational Convention (October 13, 1866) and a certification of election returns in Beaufort County (October 20, 1866).

Materials relating to David Gaston Worth (1831-1897) contain essays from David Worth's college days; Civil War correspondence concerning financial conditions in the Confederacy and the Confederate salt works at Wilmington, North Carolina; material relating to the Bingham School, Mebane, North Carolina, and the Fifth Street Methodist Church, Wilmington, North Carolina; there are also some business papers.

Later papers consist of business records belonging to William Elliott Worth: a ledger, 1906-1911, for William E. Worth and Company, dealers in ice, coal, wood, and other merchandise; and records of the Universal Oil and Fertilizer Company, including a ledger, 1903-1914, and a letterpress book, 1906-1907, concerning the manufacture and marketing of various fertilizers, cottonseed oil, and related products.

The papers of Charles William Worth contain letters written to and from his parents while he was a student at the Bingham School, Orange County, N.C., and at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; and letters from many prominent North Carolinians advocating for his appointment as American consul at Shanghai, China, and other political posts, 1912-1913 and later years.

The collection also contains five account books, 1888-1924, of Worth & Worth and its successor, The Worth Co., a large Wilmington firm of grocers and commission merchants which also traded in cotton and naval stores.

Folder

Inscription on inside cover: May, 1905, Michael Barker, Trenton, NJ

The World War I scrapbook includes newspaper clippings related to fundraising efforts for the relief of Jewish victims of the war in Europe, the service of Jewish men in the American armed forces, and the Zionist movement. Also included are receipts for personal and community donations to war relief funds, the Zionist Organization of America Palestine Restoration Fund, and Jewish social welfare agencies, as well as payment of dues for Michael Barker's fraternal order memberships. Other items include letters from the Zion War Orphanage and the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological Seminary in acknowledgement of contributions from the Wilson, NC, Jewish community through Michael Barker; a copy of a petition sent to the President of the United States regarding the status of Palestine; promotional materials from the [American Jewish] Joint Distribution Committee; and a black and white photograph of an unidentified woman.

The visible financial records contained in the ledger date from at least 1905 through 1908, although many pages, including index pages, are obscured by scrapbook inserts. Types of information for Michael Barker's Trenton, NJ business include merchandise transactions with area stores and accounts of profits and losses. Also included are operating expenses for Barker's store in Wilson, NC.

File
Box 13

Prefaced by several early pieces, some relating to the economic crises of the 1930s, including a revised draft of the Home Colonies Plan by Princess Lazarovich (born Eleanor Calhoun) submitted to President Roosevelt. There are materials from the Emergency Peace Campaign of 1936 and post-war peace efforts. There are a group of short editorials or lectures by Ellwood on the war, militarism, peace efforts, and totalitarianism. Also includes "Adjustment of the College Curriculum to Wartime Conditions and Needs, Report No. 3. Sociology," several pages with directions from the U.S. Office of Education, 1942.

Folder

This series consists of 595 items. Formats include pamphlets, newspapers, clippings, and one photograph album. There are many illustrations, mostly photographic. There are also many maps, some in color. One pamphlet is a collection of reproductions of the Dutch Louis Raemaekers' black and white propaganda sketches of atrocities and battles of World War I.

Several literary genres may be found in this sub-collection, including poetry, narrative, diaries, and published letters.

Because of Mazzoni's role as Senator of Italy and participant in World War I action in the Alps, there are a great many interesting items in this group. A large number are official government documents, most of them printed in Italy, England, or France. Many of the items are wartime propaganda, including some early pieces which were published with portions of text censored by the Austrians, after which an unknown person filled in the missing text in pen. Guido Mazzoni fortunately preserved these pieces for later generations to study.

The photograph album is quite unusual and was probably acquired by Mazzoni while he served in the Italian Army near Trento; it is one person's intimate account of the Austrian invasion of the Trento region and the Austrian's defeat one year later (1917-1918). It is written in highly sophisticated, poetic narrative which imitates Carducci's "barbaric meter," and is illustrated with about two dozen intimate wartime photographs.

Any item concerned with World War I is included in this category, even if its imprint date falls outside the dates in the subject heading. Thus there are some pamphlets printed after 1918 whose subject is directly related to the outcome of the war, such as the apportionment of territories north and east of Italy.

Individuals associated with this broad heading include: Ettore Levi, Armando Diaz, Sem Benelli, Camillo Pariset, Giovanni De Caesaris, Leone Wollemborg, Louis Raemaekers, Alberto Lumbroso, and Silvio Crespi.

For related materials that are not linked directly to the war, see the other categories "History," "Italy -- History," and "Italy -- Politics and Government."

Collection

Woody family papers, 1784-1939 9 Linear Feet — 2,389 Items

Family of Quaker merchants and millers residing in Guildford County, North Carolina, with relatives in Indiana and Montana Territory. Collection comprises a rich array of business and personal correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1835-1887) relating to Newton D. Woody, merchant and miller of North Carolina, his Civil War service, and his flight to Indiana in 1865 and eventual return to N.C.; the activities of Frank H. Woody, who traveled to and described life in the territories of Washington and Montana before and after the Civil War. There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by Confederate soldiers, one of whom was in the 21st North Carolina Regiment; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868, as well as economic conditions in North Carolina before, during, and after the Civil War. There are also some documents and letters concerning African American life in the South before, during, and after the war. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. Other topics include the activities of Woody relatives who had migrated to Indiana; the activities of the children of Newton and of his brother, Robert Woody, postmaster, miller, and merchant; and the history of the Society of Friends in antebellum North Carolina. Includes legal documents, business records, and minutes of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, N.C.

Papers of Robert Woody, Newton Dixon Woody, and other members of the Woody family include a rich trove of business and personal correspondence; legal and financial papers; printed materials; and manuscript volumes. The papers of this family concern the mercantile and milling businesses of Robert Woody in Chatham County, North Carolina, and Newton Dixon Woody in Guilford County, North Carolina, in the 1850s; the decision of Newton D. Woody to leave North Carolina during the Civil War and his return in 1865; experiences of Frank H. Woody, a lawyer and clerk, in the Washington and Montana territories in the 1860s and 1870s, in which he mentions clashes with Native Americans and settlers, and reports seeing Sherman in 1878. There are also letters with news from relatives living in Indiana.

Other papers include information about temperance meetings, including the General Southern Temperance Conference at Fayetteville, North Carolina, 1835; hog droving; commodity prices in the last half of the 19th century; general economic conditions in North Carolina and the United States in the 19th century; the upkeep of roads in Guilford County; and the experiences of Mary Ann Woody as a student at New Garden Boarding School, Guilford County, 1852-1853. In addition, there is a bill of sale for slaves and a letter from Alabama describing African American celebrations at Christmas, 1857.

There are also important materials regarding the Civil War and its aftermath, including descriptions of camp life by a soldier in the 21st North Carolina Regiment during the Civil War; experiences of Confederate soldiers in Union prisons at Johnson's Island, Ohio, and Elmira, New York, during the war; and accounts of Reconstruction in Augusta, Georgia, given by a Union sympathizer, 1867-1868. Printed matter in the collection relates to the activities of Unionists in North Carolina during the Civil War and opposition to Ulysses S. Grant and the Radicals. There is also a May 1865 letter saying that John Gilmore of N.C. was dividing land with freed African Americans, and a letter mentioning African American violence during elections in an unspecified state in Dec. 1870.

Volumes in the collection include minutes of meetings of the Orange Peace Society, Orange County, North Carolina, 1824-1830; memorandum books; an account book kept during the construction of a Quaker church at High Falls, North Carolina, 1905-1909; minute book of meetings of the Friends of Prosperity, 1913-1914. Other papers in the collection mention camp meetings and religious revivals in North Carolina and their effect on Quakers. There are also financial record books of Robert Woody and Newton Dixon Woody.

Collection
The Women's Guild of Arts was founded in England in 1907 by textile designer and jeweller May Morris, and grew to about 60 members. The organization offered female artists an alternative to the Art Workers' Guild, the artists' association established in 1884 to encourage excellence in the fine and applied arts, and from which women were excluded until the 1960s. Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes.

Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes. Three letters predate the founding of the organization in 1907. The primary topic of the letters is the crisis within the Guild regarding its women-only status, an argument regarding how restrictive the Guild should be. Pamela Colman Smith wrote to May Morris (22 January 1913) that the reason she joined the Guild was that it made a point of asking its members not to exhibit at women-only shows, as it lowered the standard of work and that the Guild was never intended to be a purely woman's affair. Other letters on the subject come from Evelyn de Morgan, Feodora Gleichen, and Ethel Sandell. Gleichen's letter was circulated to members, and the collection contains a list of those who agreed with her; several letters are marked up to indicate a position on the matter. There is also a draft resolution welcoming any move to widen the scope of the Guild "such as stimulating and interesting lectures not only from our own members but from men and women outside....It is with this in view that we supported the resolution passed at the recent Annual Meeting, inviting as Honorary Associates a few people with whose work we are in sympathy..." (22 January 1913). Other topics in the letters include the role of the president, exhibitions, lectures, and the work of the organization, along with the William Morris Centenary Commemoration in 1934.

Collection
Online
The Duke University Women's Department of Health and Physical Education began in about 1926 and merged with the Men's Physical Education Department in 1975. The Women's Department was responsible for providing required physical education courses, overseeing recreational and athletic activities, and providing a major in physical education. The Department had three chairmen during its existence: Julia R. Grout, Betty F. McCue, and Elizabeth C. Bookhout. The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records include correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. Major topics include the curriculum and administration of the department, student attitudes toward P.E., the attempt to build or renovate the gymnasium facility for women, the eventual merging of the Women's and Men's departments, and the effect of Title IX on women's athletics. English.

The Women's Department of Health and Physical Education Records consist of correspondence, reports, brochures, publicity materials, student records, scrapbooks, and photographs. The records are organized into two series: Alphabetical Files and Scrapbooks.

The alphabetical files primarily cover the period from the 1930s to 1975. Of note are photographs of women participating in physical education classes and sports; materials from the Women's Athletic Association and Women's Recreation Association; several surveys and reports from the 1960s and 1970s about women students' feelings and attitudes toward physical education; correspondence, estimates, and reports about the proposed building of a new facility for the department; correspondence and many reports which document the struggle with the administration to maintain the Department as a separate unit from the men's department in the 1970s; materials that discuss the effect of Title IX on women's sports and the growth of women's sports in the 1970s. Major figures include Julia R. Grout and Elizabeth C. Bookhout, both of whom served as Chairman of the department. The Alphabetical Files also include information on students who majored in physical education. In accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 as amended, Duke University permits students to inspect their education records and limits the disclosure of personally identifiable information from education records.

The Alphabetical Files are arranged by broad subjects: Addresses, Administration, Annual Reports, Budget, Correspondence, Curriculum, Departmental Studies and Reports, Facilities, History, Photographs, Publicity, Recreation, Staff Meetings, Task Force and Curriculum Committee Action, and Women's Athletics. Within each of these subsections, materials are arranged either chronologically or alphabetically. The original arrangement of the materials has been maintained as much as possible.

The Scrapbooks are compilations of photographs, clippings, programs, correspondence, and other memorabilia. There are three books which date from 1932 to 1975.

Collection
The Woman's Student Government Association (WSGA) was formed in 1918, and the organization continued when the Woman's College was incorporated on East Campus in 1930. The WSGA was responsible for the "regulat[ion] of all matters pertaining to the life of the women of the Woman's College of Duke University, not under the jurisdiction of the Faculty." This autonomy along with the segregated campus life style of the coordinate college allowed female students to develop leadership skills and confidence that an integrated student government may not have allowed them to gain. Collection contains minutes, correspondence, reports, printed matter, memos, clippings, and other official records of the WSGA and its committees, along with records of several student organizations and documents generated by the administrations of the Woman's College and Duke University. Materials range in date from 1919-1974.

Extent: 13.7 linear ft. (22 Hollinger boxes + 1 flat box)

Contents: Minutes, correspondence, reports, printed matter, memos, clippings, and other official records of the WSGA and its committees, along with records of several student organizations and documents generated by the administrations of the Woman's College and Duke University. Subjects include the honor system, class reports, dormitory life, athletics, elections, freshman orientation, social organizations, handbooks, celebrations, and social regulations. The collection includes materials, such as handbooks and surveys, received from other schools, and publications and other material from the National Student Association.

Organization: Series: 1. WSGA Minutes; 2. Correspondence; 3. Subject files; 4. Materials from other colleges; 5. National Student Association; 6. Account books; 7. Student Organizations; 8. Oversize

Restriction: Judicial Board case files closed except by permission, University Archivist. Some folders may contain information restricted by FERPA.

Collection

Woman's College records, 1928-1974 60.4 Linear Feet — 42,305 items

Online
The Woman's College was established at Duke University in 1930, as a coordinate to Trinity College for men. As a coordinate college within Duke University, the Woman's College fostered a community that allowed for shared university faculty, curriculum, and educational facilities, while giving women an opportunity for leadership through their separate student government, social standards committees, and judicial board. It was merged with Trinity College in 1972. The collection includes university administrative records, correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, course schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, calendars, financial information, photographs, audio recordings and other materials. Major topics include coordinate education at Duke University, especially administrative and curricular procedures; relationship between the Woman's College and its students (in loco parentis); social standards policies; women's student government; integration of the Woman's College; student health care; and student organizations.

Materials in the collection include university administrative records, correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, course schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, calendars, financial information, photographs, audio recordings, scrapbooks, and other materials from the tenures of Deans Baldwin, Brinkley, Ball, and Kreps. The university administrative records of other offices such as Dean of Women, Academic Dean, Assistant Dean of Women, and Dean of Freshmen are also present.

Collection
The Woman's College Library dates from the 1927 construction of the Woman's College campus. During the three years required to build the library on West Campus, this was the library for the entire university. In 1930 the Woman's College Library opened officially with a collection of 4,000 books. The collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection contains material pertaining to the operations of the Woman's College Library including clippings, correspondence, and periodical subscriptions. The major topic in the collection is art exhibits including: announcements of art exhibitions; booklets on works of art; biographical sketches of artists; and schedules of exhibitions. Materials date from 1930-1994, bulk 1930-1970.

Collection
Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

Collection

W. M. Piatt and Company records, 1914-1973 12.25 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 6400 items

Collection comprises correspondence, blueprints, proposals relating to construction or the improvement of sewage and wastewater treatment systems. Includes substantial amounts of material on the sewage treatment system for Winston-Salem and Durham, North Carolina. Other North Carolina localities and clients documented in the collection are Burlington Mills, Claremont, Cooleemee, Cothran, Cramertown, Dallas, Erwin Mills, Fairbanks Morse Company, Mooresville, Mebane, North Wilkesboro, and Wake Forest.

Collection comprises correspondence, blueprints, proposals, and reports relating to construction or the improvement of sewage and wastewater treatment systems in the North Carolina Piedmont. Includes substantial amounts of material on a major expansion of the sewage treatment system for Winston-Salem, Forsyth County, for which the firm was a consultant to the city and county, and multiple projects in Durham County, North Carolina.

Other North Carolina localities and clients documented in the collection are Burlington Mills, Claremont, Cooleemee, Cothran, Cramertown, Dallas, Erwin Mills, Fairbanks Morse Company, Mooresville, Mebane, North Wilkesboro, and Wake Forest. Most of the projects date from the latter half of the 20th century.

Collection

Willis Smith papers, 1919-1954 and undated 130.4 Linear Feet — 97,813 Items

Online
Lawyer and U.S. Senator, 1950-1953, from Raleigh (Wake Co.), N.C. Personal, political and professional papers, including correspondence, notes and speeches, financial papers, clippings, printed material, pictures, and other miscellaneous papers. The major portion of the collection consists of personal papers; the office files from his years as U.S. Senator, much of which is routine correspondence; files kept while Smith was president of the American Bar Association, 1945-1946; papers relating to other legal organizations; and files pertaining to his service as chairman of the Board of Trustees of Duke University, 1947-1953.

Personal, political, and professional papers of Willis Smith, Sr., lawyer and U.S. senator, 1950-1953, spanning the years 1919-1954. Collection includes correspondence, notes and speeches, financial papers, clippings, printed material, pictures, and other miscellaneous papers. The major portion of the collection consists of personal papers; the office files from his years as U. S. senator, much of which is routine correspondence; files kept by Smith while he was president of the American Bar Association, 1945-1946; papers relating to other legal organizations, including the International Bar Association, the North Carolina State Bar Association, the Wake County Bar Association, and the International Association of Insurance Counsel; and files pertaining to his service as chairman of the board of trustees of Duke University, 1947-1953. There is also material on the Patrick Henry Memorial Foundation, the Raleigh Chamber of Commerce, the American Counsel Association, the American Judicature Society, the Attorney General's Advisory Committee on Citizenship, Louisburg College (Louisburg, North Carolina), the American Law Institute, the Presidential Memorial Commission, the Association of Life Insurance Counsel, the President's Amnesty Board, the National Probation and Parole Association, the Nuremburg trials, the Interparliamentary Union, the Smithsonian Institution, the United States Territorial Expansion Memorial Commission, and Alben W. Barkley.

Collection
Dr. Willis Edward Byrd was a chemistry professor at Lincoln University. The collection consists of an African American family's papers from the early to mid-twentith century, including correspondence and transcripts from Byrd's education at Talladega College and University of Iowa; some printed materials and writings collected by his parents, Edward D. and Annie L. Jones Byrd, documenting their connections with the Mulberry Rover Missionary Baptist Association, the Better Homes in America organization, and the American Missionary Association; letters to Byrd during his military service in World War II; letters and his employment contract as a chemistry professor at Lincoln University; photographs of Byrd and other family members, some identified, from the early 1900s; and other letters and educational ephemera, including printed materials from Spelman College and Morehouse College. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of assorted printed materials, photographs, and some letters and correspondence relating to the education and employment of Willis Edward Byrd and other members of the Byrd and Jones family, including his parents, siblings, aunts, and uncles.

Byrd's attendance and graduation from Talladega College, and his hiring as a chemistry professor at Lincoln University, represent the bulk of his personal papers. There are some photographs of him, including one in army uniform during World War II, and there are some letters to him from his father that discuss his army service and his father's hopes that he will stay focused on his "life's work," presumably meaning his education. Byrd's series also contains correspondence with prospective employers and transcripts from Talladega, Iowa, and Illinois.

Also included in the collection are materials collected or produced by other members of the Jones and Byrd family. Assorted printed materials collected by parents Edward D. Byrd and Annie L. Jones Byrd reflect their community and church activities in Georgia. The collection also contains family photographs of Byrd's parents' generation, including images of his mother, aunts, and uncles. Correspondence and handwritten drafts and reports from Annie L. Jones Byrd document her communications with Better Homes in America regarding the state of housing and education for African Americans in their community, as well as record her and her sister's search for employment as teachers in the mid-1910s. There are also printed materials from Spelman College and Morehouse College, acquired by Willis Edward Byrd's sibling Sarah L. Byrd King and her husband, Arteria King.

The original acquisition also contains a poll tax and property tax receipt from the early 20th century for Henry Adams, in Brazoria County, Texas; as well as a 19th century tax receipt for "Robert Ballentine's heirs." The connection or relationship these individuals have to the Byrd and Jones family is unclear.

Collection

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

Collection
William W. Renwick was an enslaver and cotton planter from Newberry and Union counties, S.C. Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

Collection includes correspondence and other papers of Renwick, his wife, Rosannah Rogers Renwick, and related members of the Beard, Bothwell, Lyons, Renwick, and Rogers families, including material on South Carolina cotton planting, slavery, politics, social life, and customs; U.S. Representative James Rogers; and the Renwick and Rogers families.

Collection

William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated 31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items

Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

Collection
William E. Tolbert was a Union soldier and businessman of Chambersburg, Pa. Collection includes correspondence and business, personal, and legal papers of Tolbert and several members of the Tolbert (Talbot) and Huber families of Chambersburg, Pa., containing information about family affairs, Republican Party affairs in Chambersburg, and William E. Tolbert's activities with the Chief Engineer's Office of the U.S. Military Railroad in the Division of the Mississippi. There are a number of letters (1883-1922) to Emma Tolbert from her friend Elizabeth Russell, who was a Methodist missionary in Nagasaki, Japan.

Collection includes correspondence and business, personal, and legal papers of Tolbert and several members of the Tolbert (Talbot) and Huber families of Chambersburg, Pa., containing information about family affairs, Republican Party affairs in Chambersburg, and William E. Tolbert's activities with the Chief Engineer's Office of the U.S. Military Railroad in the Division of the Mississippi. There are a number of letters (1883-1922) to Emma Tolbert from her friend Elizabeth Russell, who was a Methodist missionary in Nagasaki, Japan.