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Collection
This collection includes two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of Jewish, Lithuanian-American merchant A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker's approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany.

This collection consists of two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Additional items not contained in the scrapbooks include family photographs, a letter, and a ketubah. The scrapbooks were named for World War I and World War II according to the approximate time of the creation of their contents and the subject matter of the newspaper clippings. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker's approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany. Most of the correspondence is between Michael Barker or Anna Harris Barker and immediate and extended family members.

Barker created the scrapbooks from financial ledgers of his businesses in New Jersey and Wilson, North Carolina, and the financial entries are largely obscured by scrapbook inserts. While he created a majority of the content of the scrapbooks, some items were added after his death, presumably by another family member.

Collection
The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

Collection
Online
אברהם יהושע השל היה מלומד והוגה דעות בעל שם בינלאומי, תיאולוג ופעיל חברתי ופוליטי. השל נולד בוורשה, פולין, נצר למשפחת רבנים חסידיים מיוחסת ולמד פילוסופיה בברלין. הוא גורש מפרנקפורט והגיע לוורשה ומשם עקר ללונדון ערב הפלישה הגרמנית לפולין. לאחר שהות קצרה בלונדון היגר השל לארצות הברית. בתחילה לימד בבית המדרש לרבנים של התנועה הרפורמית בסינסנטי, ולאחר מכן עבר לסמינר היהודי התיאולוגי בניו יורק שם שימש כפרופסור לאתיקה ולקבלה עד מותו בשנת 1972. בנוסף להשתתפותו הפעילה בנושאים של צדק חברתי ובדיאלוג הבין-דתי, היה השל גם מלומד ומורה רוחני ותרם תרומה חשובה למדעי היהדות. כהוגה דעות של הדת היתה מטרתו של השל להגביר ולהעמיק את התובנות הרוחניות של היהדות ובמהלך חייו השפיע על דורות של יהודים ולא- יהודים. הארכיון האישי של אברהם יהושע השל מקיף את השנים 1880-1998 ומתעד את חייו האישיים, האקדמיים והציבוריים. הארכיון כולל תכתובות, כתבים של השל ועליו, כתבי יד מודפסים, קטעי עיתונות, כתבים שיצאו לאור ומעט תמונות וחפצי קודש. האוסף מספק תובנות לזהותו של השל כמנהיג רוחני ומסביר כיצד היה מעמדו זה קשור בקשר עמוק לחייו האישיים והמקצועיים. האוסף מחולק לפי הנושאים הבאים: חומר מוקלט, התכתבויות, חומר אישי ומשפחתי, פעילות ציבורית, חומר מוגבל וכתבים. Abraham Joshua Heschel was an internationally known scholar, author, activist, and theologian. He was born in Warsaw, Poland into a distinguished family of Hasidic rebbes, and studied philosophy in Berlin, Germany. In 1938 he was deported from Frankfurt to Warsaw where he escaped to London just before the Nazi invasion. After a brief time in London he immigrated to the United States, first teaching at the Hebrew Union College and then at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America where he taught as Professor of Ethics and Mysticism until his death in 1972. In addition to his active participation in social justice issues and his interfaith work, Heschel was also a scholar and religious thinker who made significant contributions to Jewish studies. As a philosopher of religion, his goal was to make the spiritual insights of Judaism understandable and over the course of his lifetime influenced generations of Jews and non-Jews. The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life. The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings.

The Abraham Joshua Heschel Papers span the years 1880 to 1998 and document Abraham Joshua Heschel's personal, academic, and public life, including his long-term involvement and leadership in social activism and other public activities, his reputation as a compelling and sought-after public speaker, and his far-reaching influence as a scholar and religious thinker. Items in this collection include correspondence, writings by and about Heschel, typescripts, clippings, printed material, and a small amount of photographs and artifacts. The materials in the collection provide insight to Heschel's identity as a spiritual leader and how this role was inextricably connected to his personal and professional life.

The collection is organized into the following series: Audio, Correspondence, Personal and Family Materials, Public Activity, Restricted, and Writings. Heschel maintained a meaningful, yet complex filing system. To balance preserving the original order with making the collection as accessible to researchers as possible, several key elements have been added to the collection guide:

•Scope note at the folder level. In many cases folder titles in the collection were reused, abbreviated, in Hebrew, or did not exist. Short descriptions of folder contents have been included not only to provide context for the materials, but also to make distinctions between the varying titles.

•Supplied/enhanced folder titles. In the case of missing or abbreviated titles, supplied titles (in brackets) were created. For folder titles written in Hebrew, the original folder title was documented along with its transliteration and English translation.

•Language extent. There are varying degrees in the amount of language materials in each folder and oftentimes multiple languages are represented in a single folder. To assist researchers, each folder description includes a note identifying the language(s) and their extent in the folder, with the dominant language listed first. The absence of a note indicates that all materials in the folder are in English. The following language categories are used: "A few" indicates that 1-25% of the materials are in another language(s); "Some" 26-65%; "Most" 66-99%; and "All" 100%.

Additionally there was a large of amount of clippings included in the Heschel collection which were generally in fragile condition. Where possible, these clippings were photocopied for preservation purposes and the originals discarded.

Collection

The Abram Kanof Papers, 1858-1996, contain printed material, correspondence, writings, and photographs primarily reflecting Dr. Kanof's research and writing in the field of Jewish ceremonial art; his role in the development of the Tobe Pascher Workshop of the Jewish Museum, New York, N.Y.; his curatorship at the North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, N.C.; and to a lesser extent, his patronage of the arts. The Abram Kanof Papers are relevant to the study of religious art in the Judaic tradition, and they also document Dr. Kanof's contributions, as a researcher, patron, and administrator, to the study of the relationship between art and Jewish liturgy and worship.

A substantial part of the collection consists of printed material, including exhibition programs, handbills, articles, journals, and clippings, which is contained in the Subject Files Series. Information pertaining to topics within this series includes art and religion; symbolism; synagogue architecture and decoration; the American Jewish Historical Society; Jewish ceremonial art; liturgical or ritual objects; and artists, including Ludwig Wolpert and Moshe Zabari, both resident artists of the Tobe Pascher Workshop. Primary materials relevant to the history, administration, and programs of the Jewish Museum as well as the development of the Tobe Pascher Workshop are contained in the Subject Files Series. The Correspondence Series primarily reflects Dr. Kanof's role in the formation of the workshop, which was developed to provide for the creation of art and liturgical objects to be used in synagogues as well as serve as an instructional center for training artists.

Pictures of items from exhibitions held at the Jewish Museum and the North Carolina Museum of Art as well as images used in Kanof's Jewish Ceremonial Art and Religious Observance are contained in the Pictures Series. Typescripts, page proofs and galley proofs for Dr. Kanof's works, and offprints and drafts of some of his other writings are contained in the Writings Series.

Selected publications from the Abram Kanof Papers have been cataloged for the rare book collection of the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Collection

Academics and Research Reference collection, 1851-ongoing 1.25 Linear Feet — approx. 1000 Items

The Academics and Research Reference Collection contains materials documenting academic and research matters at the University. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The collection contains documents pertaining to academic and research matters at the University such as curriculum development, advising, academic and research support, interdisciplinary programs, consortia and cooperative programs, research centers, and so forth. The materials include handbooks, clippings, flyers, reports, and proposals. The bulk dates are 1964-1994.

Collection
Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection

Adeline Burr Davis Green papers, 1796-1956 5 Linear Feet — 1551 Items

Married first to David Davis, lawyer, Supreme Court Justice, and U.S. Senator from Illinois, and then to Wharton Jackson Green, agriculturist and U.S. Representative from North Carolina; resident of Fayetteville, N.C. Personal and family correspondence. Includes journal of and letters, 1851-1853, from brother James M. Burr to his wife describing his life in California during the Gold Rush; Civil War letters to Adeline from her cousin (and later second husband), Wharton Jackson Green, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from first husband David Davis describing daily proceedings in the Senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the United Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from cousin James Henry Rice, Jr., ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

Papers of Adeline E. (Burr) Davis Green (1843-1931) include letters, 1851-1853, from James M. Burr, brother of Adeline (Burr) Davis Green, to his wife describing his life in California searching for gold; James Burr's journal entitled "Journal of a Cruise to California and the Diggins" ; Civil War letters from her second husband and cousin, Wharton Jackson Green (1831-1910), later agriculturist and U.S. congressman, while a prisoner-of-war at Johnson's Island, Ohio; letters, 1882-1885, from her first husband, David Davis (1815-1886), jurist and U. S. senator, describing daily proceedings in the senate, social functions in Washington, D.C., and notable persons; letters from friends of Davis concerning personal and political matters; letters, 1906-1928, from Jessica Randolph Smith and others pertaining to the Daughters of the Confederacy; and letters, 1911-1931, from James Henry Rice, Jr. (1868-1935), ornithologist, naturalist, editor, and literary figure, discussing politics, conservation, South Carolina culture, world affairs, especially relative to Germany and Russia, his rice plantations, and the League of Nations.

Collection

Admiral Robert Barrie papers, 1765-1953 6 Linear Feet — 735 Items

Online
Admiral Sir Robert Barrie (1774-1841) served in the British Navy and participated in the Vancouver expedition, 1791-1795; the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars; the War of 1812; and served as naval commissioner in Canada, 1819-1834. Collection includes papers relating to Admiral Barrie's experiences in the Vancouver expedition, 1791-1795; the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars; the War of 1812; and his service as naval commissioner in Canada, 1819-1834. Included is a small group of material relating to the 31st Regiment of Foot in Florida and Britain during the 1760s and 1770s when the Admiral's father, Dr. Robert Barrie, was surgeon's mate. Correspondents include Thomas Manby and James Macnamara.

The collection consists primarily of family papers in which some naval correspondence is intermingled. The letters of Sir Robert and Lady Julia Barrie are numerous. There are letters by Admiral Gardner, Dorothy (Gardner) Clayton, and various naval officers and members of the family. There are groups of legal papers, biographical sketches, genealogy, financial accounts, and photographs.

Family relationships and associations are extensive and are represented by comment, legal documents, and genealogies. The families include: Clayton, Cornwall, Cracraft, Cririe, Dixon, Fothergill, Gardner, Humphrys, Ingilby, Lyon, Shuttleworth, and Uppleby. A small group of photographs includes Sir Robert Barrie, William Barrie, John and Olivia (Page) Fothergill, John and Kitty (Leadbetter) Uppleby, Leadbetter and Eliza (Barrie) Uppleby, Charles Clotworthy Wood, Swarthdale House, and others.

The papers were still owned by the family as late as the 1950s. On Feb. 28, 1951, Charles John Ormond Barrie wrote about them to James S. Matthews of the Vancouver City Archives. Ten years earlier (Aug. 19, 1941) he listed several series of letters, some of which are no longer in the collection--correspondence from Lord Aylmer, Sir George Cockburn, Sir John Franklin, and George Vancouver. The covers for a few of these letters remain in the collection. The covers for letters by Admiral Gardner and copies of letters by Barrie indicate other absent manuscripts. Some papers may have been destroyed during Barrie's lifetime.

Collection
Collection consists of newsletters and other publications produced by advertising agencies and other organizations. Many of the newsletters were intended for internal communications with agency staff and affiliates, although others were aimed at outside distributions. Agencies represented include BBDO, Ben & Jerry's, Dancer Fitzgerald Sample, Doyle Dane Bernbach, Dentsu, Ernest Dichter, Grey, Isidore and Paulson, Levi Strauss, Marsteller, Ogilvy & Mather, and Young Electric Sign. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection consists of newsletters and other publications produced by advertising agencies and other organizations. Many of the newsletters were intended for internal communications with agency staff and affiliates, although others were aimed at outside distributions. Agencies represented include BBDO, Ben & Jerry's, Dancer Fitzgerald Sample, Doyle Dane Bernbach, Dentsu, Ernest Dichter, Grey, Isidore and Paulson, Levi Strauss, Marsteller, Ogilvy & Mather, and Young Electric Sign.

Collection
Advertising clubs are trade organizations that connect people in the advertising, media, and marketing sectors to other professionals and resources. Collection consists of programs, letters, and a buying guide from different advertising clubs in the United States. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection consists of programs, letters, and a buying guide from different advertising clubs in the United States. Programs represent events including annual banquets, awards or competitions, and Maypole dances. Five event programs are from the Advertising Club of Baltimore, two of which feature the club's annual "Outstanding Radio and Television Personality" awards.

Collection

Advertising Ephemera collection, 1850s-1980s 35 Linear Feet — 9,279 items

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century.

The Advertising Ephemera Collection is composed of single advertisements, product and trade catalogs, advertising pamphlets, and broadsides. The advertisements are primarily American and from the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. The collection is divided into broad subject categories, based on the primary type of product or service being advertised, which are arranged in alphabetical order. Within each subject category material is divided based upon the form of the material; leaflets, letters, and sheets printed on both sides; trade cards (mechanical, metamorphic, see-thru, shape, fabric inserts, unusual feature, postcards and insert cards); booklets; special categories; and miscellaneous. A subseries of foreign advertising material consists predominately of travel related literature and is arrange alphabetically by country. The arrangement of oversize materials parallels the original arrangement.

The researcher should note that trade catalogs that are pamphlets may be found in several places in the Perkins Library: this collections; individually in the stacks as fully cataloged items; or as part of groups of old pamphlets for which the cataloging was by main entry only. Advertising broadsides may also be found in the Broadsides Collection and many collections of manuscripts also contain advertising materials.

Some useful reference sources for gathering further information on this type of material include:

Romaine, Lawrence B., "A Guide to American Trade Catalogs," 1944-1900 (New York, 1960).

Hammond, Dorothy, "Advertising Collectibles of Times Past," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1974).

Kaduck, John M., "Advertising Trade Cards," (Des Moines, Iowa, 1976).

McQuarry, Jim, "Collectors Guide to Advertising Cards," (Gas City, Indiana, 1975).

Additions to the collection have not been processed and therefore to do reflect the arrangement of the rest of the collection. Please refer to the detailed description below for more information about their content.

Collection
Collection consists of approximately 400 paper dolls, trade cards, bookmarks and other printed materials that comprised promotional packaging or premium gifts for a variety of products dating from the Victorian era to the 1980s. Dolls depict Mother Goose and other fairy tale and nursery rhyme characters; Victorian men, women and children; animals; occupations; and figures in military, international and ethnic dress. Product classes represented include coffee and other beverages, cotton and linen thread and other sewing supplies, food and patent and nonprescription drugs, Companies represented include A&P, Bendix, Clark's O.N.T., Coca-Cola, Estey Organ, General Mills, Horsman Dolls, J&P Coats, Kellogg, Lion Coffee, McLaughlin Coffee, Morton Salt, Munsingwear, Nestle, Pillsbury, Singer, Western and Southern Life Insurance and Worcester Salt. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.
Collection
The African Americans in Film collection includes ephemeral materials, especially posters and pressbooks, promoting and advertising motion pictures featuring Black actors, directors, and production companies.

The African Americans in Film collection includes ephemeral materials promoting and advertising motion pictures featuring Black actors, directors, and production companies. Materials in this collection include press books, posters, promotional booklets, campaign books, advertising manuals, programs, lobby cards, and other formats. The films documented include silent films, Blaxploitation films, blockbuster action films, musicals, documentaries, and dramas, from smaller Black owned and operated companies to major studio productions. Actors frequently featured in films documented here include Sidney Poitier, Dorothy Dandridge, Pam Grier, Jim Brown, Brock Peters, Fred Williamson, Ruby Dee, Brenda Sykes, Sammie Davis Jr., James Earl Jones, and many others.

Description often includes the format of the material and/or one or more of the Black stars featured in the film. Some description provided by George Robert Minkoff Inc., the dealer from whom part of the collection was purchased, is provided in quotes. Some of that description may have originated from the books Blacks in American films and television: an encyclopedia. and Toms, coons, mulattoes, mammies, and bucks: an interpretive history of Blacks in American films., both by Donald Bogle. The majority of the materials are from the United States, but a few items were created by or for audiences in other countries such as Japan, Denmark, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom, and are noted as such.

Collection

Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

Collection

A. Hollis Edens papers, circa 1850s-1994 9 Linear Feet — approx. 2700 Items

A. Hollis Edens served as President of Duke University from 1949-1960. This collection includes material largely of a personal nature, including correspondence, photographs, printed material, clippings, and scrapbooks. The collection ranges in date from circa 1850s-1994.

The collection includes correspondence, speeches, Duke-related material, Emory-related material, clippings, printed material, scrapbooks, and photographs. The material relates not only to Edens' professional career, but also to his family history and to that of his wife. The majority of the collection consists of family photographs, many of which are unidentified and undated.

Collection

Alan K. Manchester papers, 1905-1975 2 Linear Feet — 2,000 Items

Alan K. Manchester (1897-1983) served as a faculty member in the Department of History at Duke University (1929-1967). Administrative positions held at Duke include Assistant Dean of Trinity College (1934), Dean of Freshmen (1935-1949), Dean of Undergraduate Studies (1949-1956), and Dean of Trinity College (1956-1964). Manchester also worked as a cultural affairs officer at the United States Embassy in Rio de Janeiro (1951-1952) and as a specialist for the U. S. State Department's International Exchange Service Program (Summers of 1954-55). Papers include correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator. Major subjects include Latin American and South American history and economic and political relations between Brazil and Great Britain. The majority of the material is in English. Some material is in Spanish and Portuguese.

Collection consists of correspondence, clippings, photographs, slides, and diaries, bulk 1929-1970. Records prior to 1929 pertain to Manchester's childhood and consist of old report cards, school programs, and correspondence. Later records reflect Manchester's activities as a historian, Foreign Service officer, and administrator

Collection
Retired Chief of the Gastrointestinal Clinic at Mount Sinai Hospital.

Collection consists of medical and pharmaceutical advertisements and promotional materials. Included are posters, booklets, diet guides, recipe books, artifacts (coffee mugs, paperweights, etc.) and other promotional ephemera. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Advertising, Sales & Marketing History.

Collection
Professor emeritus of English and Creative Writing at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; novelist; son of Duke University faculty member William M. Blackburn. Writings and correspondence of Alexander Blackburn, including books, correspondence, drafts, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also includes Blackburn and Cheney family history materials, photographs, and a scrapbook.

Collection contains two accessions. Accession (1999-0184) (1102 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1998), consists primarily of writings by Alexander Blackburn, including books, articles, clippings, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also included are correspondence with writer Frank Waters and some other letters; memorabilia; and editorial files and an almost complete run of the literary journal, Writer's Forum, which Blackburn edited.

Accession (2010-0012) (6750 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1880-1990s) and accession (2020-0099; 11.5 lin. ft) includes writings, drafts, books, and family history materials. Included are materials from Alexander Blackburn's mother, Elizabeth Cheney Blackburn, and the Cheney family.

Collection

Alexander H. Stephens papers, 1823-1954 (bulk 1823-1883) 8 Linear Feet — approx. 3,000 Items

Online
Alexander H. Stephens (1812-1883) was a Georgia lawyer, politician and Vice President of the Confederate States of America. The collection includes a large amount of correspondence as well as bills/receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material. It ranges in date from 1823 to 1954, with the bulk covering 1823-1883.

The collection includes correspondence, bills and receipts, financial papers, legal papers, political papers, clippings and printed material and ranges in date from 1823-1954, with the bulk dated 1823-1883. Due to preservation concerns, some items were copied onto acid-free paper and stamped as preservation copies. The originals were placed in mylar and are located in Box 7. Patrons should consult with Rubenstein Library staff before handling these materials.

The vast majority of the collection is comprised of correspondence, covering the years 1823-1883. Many of the letters in the collection were written to Stephens, although there are letters written in his own hand. Throughout the correspondence are letters written to Stephens by various family members, most notably his brothers John and Linton. The bulk of the correspondence pertains to Stephens' law work, regarding issues such as the settling of estates and the collection of debts. The most prominent topics include family matters, business and legal matters and Stephens' health. Given the expansive amount of correspondence, below is a breakdown by decade of other topics which appear, in an effort to assist the researcher in locating materials of interest:

Correspondence 1823-1839: Topics include States' Rights, slavery, and an Indian war in Florida [possibly the Creek War]. There is a letter from Herschel V. Johnson who sought advice from Stephens in 1839 regarding negotiations with a railroad company.

Correspondence 1840-1849: Topics include local and national politics/views, opinions about President Martin Van Buren, "agricultural politics," Thomas Dorr and the People's Party, the purchasing of slaves, the 1843 Boston visit of President John Tyler and Vice President Daniel Webster, Stephens' nomination to serve in the U. S. Congress, Whigs and Democrats (Stephens was invited to attend several Whig-sponsored barbeques), and the death of Stephens' brother Aaron. There is a letter from United States Representative Marshall Johnson Wellborn which discusses the Judiciary Act (1841). There are also a substantial number of letters written by and to John Bird and letters written to him and Stephens (they were likely law partners). Of note are two letters written in 1844 by [Sarvis] Pearson (presumably a client of Stephens or his firm) to his estranged wife Mary S. Pearson which offer insight into the subject of divorce and marital discord of the time period.

Correspondence 1850-1859: Letters written by Stephens start to appear more frequently. Topics include largely family and legal matters.

Correspondence 1860-1869: Topics include employment inquiries both pre- and post-Civil War, autograph requests, Stephens' book about the Civil War, and the social history of a post-Civil War Georgia. Items of note: There are petitions (1860) by Stephens' district constituents asking him to address them about the presidential election. There are letters asking him for permission to travel into the Union. There are a couple of letters written by Stephens to Jefferson Davis. There is a letter from March 1860 to Pearce Stevons [Stephens] by Rody Jordan, both of whom were not only brothers but slaves as well. The letter is likely written by someone other than Jordan. A letter to Stephens in October 1866 states that his former slave Pearce was charged with murder and asks for Stephens' legal counsel at Pearce's request (he apparently complied based on a letter from 1869).

Correspondence 1870-1879: Topics include requests for employment and financial help, requests for letters of recommendation, Linton Stephens' death, Stephens' paper the Daily and Weekly Sun, the federal government, autograph requests, and Stephens' work with the Committee on Standard Weights and Measures. Item of note: There are documents from 1873 concerning an illegal distilling and corruption case in Georgia.

Correspondence 1880-1883: Topics includes Stephens' opinion of President James A. Garfield, his bid for Governor, requests for financial help and letters of recommendation for men interested in state posts appointed by the Governor, such as Physician of the Georgia Penitentiary. Items of note: There is a letter dated 1883 signed by Secretary of War, Robert Todd Lincoln. There are two letters from 1882 which offer some insight into African-American involvement in Georgia politics.

Collection
Online
Cotton firm from Wilmington, N.C., that for a short period was probably the largest cotton exporting house in the United States. Collection includes account books, ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase and sales journals, inventories, other subsidiary books, and some office files and correspondence. Goods were purchased from the Carolinas, Georgia, Texas, and other states and processed in the firm's compress facilities and sold to Great Britain, France, Germany, and elsewhere in Europe.

The collection consists of an extensive, but incomplete, set of account books, remnants of the office file and James Sprunt's correspondence (personal as well as business letters and papers), and pictures. Among the account books there are long series of ledgers, journals, cashbooks, purchase books, and stock inventories that document the company's operations between the 1870s and 1950s. The ledgers date between 1889 and 1952, and there are private ledgers for 1907 through 1931. The volume of minutes covers 1919-1930, but there are a few others among the offices files along with financial statements, 1885-1915, important legal documents of the partnership and corporation, and assorted other papers.

Correspondence and other papers of James Sprunt and the company date between 1884 and 1952, but they are numerous only for 1904, 1906, 1909-1910, and 1919-1921. The letters date mostly to 1904-1910, and 1919-1921, and are largely files of James Sprunt, reflecting his activities in business and interests in secular and theological education, the Presbyterian church in the U.S., and North Carolina history. Notable correspondents and subjects are Alexander Sprunt (1815-1884), Alexander Sprunt (1852-1937), Alexander Sprunt (b. 1898), James Sprunt (1847-1924), Kenneth Mackenzie Murchison, Francis Herman Packer, John Miller Wells, John Campbell White, Edward Jenner Wood, The Laymen's Missionary Movement, and the Presbyterian mission at Kiangyin, China. Account books, minutes, and correspondence are available also for a number of domestic and foreign subsidaries and branch offices, but these are often quite fragmentary. More than thirty pictures, mostly photographs, illustrate the firm's staff, workers, physical plant, and employees as well as other scenes.

Also included are some papers representing various domestic and foreign subsidiaries and branch offices, especially Champion Compress and Warehouse Company, the Wilmington Compress and Warehouse Company, Alexander Sprunt & Son (of Delaware, a holding company), and the company's offices in New York City and Le Havre, France.

Information about the company's history can be found in: James Sprunt's letters of Nov. 6, 1908; Apr. 9, 1909; Jun. 7 and Oct. 22, 1919; an article in Wilmington's Morning Star from Feb. 11, 1921; and Dictionary of American Biography.

Collection
ALS, in French. Humboldt writes to P.H. Azais and Jules Berger de Xivrey on politics, philosophy, his expeditions, ethnology, natural history and the influence and inspiration of French thought. In 1966 Fritz Lange, of the Alexander-von-Humboldt-Kommission, writes to the Duke Medical Center Library regarding the Kommission's project to locate world-wide all correspondence to and from Humboldt.
Collection

Alexander Weinmann papers, 1614-1986 14 Linear Feet — 7,000 Items

The collection reflects Weinmann's extensive research in the history of Viennese music publishing and is a resource for study of publishing firms in Vienna as well as documenting Weinmann's bibliographical research. The Music Series includes title pages and parts of arrangements, focusing on Viennese publishers and composers, including Georg Druschetzky, Joseph Haydn, Johann Baptist Vanhal, Johann Josef Rösler, and Ferdinand Kauer, as well as Johann Sebastian Bach. Included in the Writings and Speeches Series are manuscript drafts of works related to Weinmann's bibliographies (published in the Beiträge zur Geschichte des Alt-Weiner Musikverlages) as well as bio-bibliographical and historical works. The series also documents Weinmann's study of 19th century Viennese publishing firms including Artaria and Company, Giovanni Cappi, Leopold Kozeluch, Franz Anton Hoffmeister, Carlo and Pietro Mechetti, Tranquillo Mollo, Ignaz Sauer, Johann Traeg, and Thaddäus Weigl. Series includes research by Weinmann's brother, Ignaz Weinmann, on Franz Schubert.

The Research Notes Series consists of bibliographic references and citations, information about works and plate numbers; Weinmann's contributions to the Répertoire international des sources musicales; and Wiener Zeitung references. The Series also concerns Weinmann's work as an editor of the sixth edition of the Chronologisch-thematisches Verzeichnis sämtlicher Tonwerke Wolfgang Amadé Mozarts. Anthony van Hoboken, Willi Boskovsky, Franz Giegling, Anton Fietz, and Arthur Fiedler are among primary correspondents in the collection. Weinmann also collected letters (originals and copies) from persons and publishers he studied, including J.P. Gotthard, Johann Strauss, Franz Xaver Süssmayr, and Tobias Haslinger.

Collection

Alfred E. Edgcomb papers, 1906-1983 and undated 19.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 14,000 Items

Businessman active in the lumber industry. Collection contains correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, photographs, and other materials from lumber businesses beginning before 1910, especially in East Tennessee and in the Philippine Islands with headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. The Insular Lumber Co., Negros Island, P.I., produced mahogany. Also present in the collection are personal and family papers, including numerous photographs.

Collection contains personal and business correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, photographs, and other materials from lumber businesses beginning before 1910, especially in East Tennessee and in the Philippine Islands with headquarters in Philadelphia, Pa. The Insular Lumber Co., Negros Island, P.I., produced mahogany. Also present in the collection are personal and family papers, including numerous photographs and letters to the Edgcombs from friends.

Collection

Alice G. Daniel papers, 1909-1941 0.6 Linear Feet — 270 Items

Collection holds personal papers, letters, farm diaries, photographs, genealogy and miscellaneous materials documenting her relationships with family and their years at the family farm, Tranquility.

Collection
Alice Houston Luiggi was an author, of New York City. Collection comprises research material gathered by Mrs. Luiggi for her book, "65 Valiants" (University of Florida Press, 1965) concerning American teachers who helped establish teacher education and public schools in Argentina during the 1870s and 1880s.

Collection comprises research material gathered by Mrs. Luiggi for her book, "65 Valiants" (University of Florida Press, 1965) concerning American teachers who helped establish teacher education and public schools in Argentina during the 1870s and 1880s. The bulk of the collection consists of letters of various sources about each of the teachers, and notes taken in interviews, and from other sources. There are copies of letters of the 1870s and 1880s by Domingo Faustino Sarmiento and Mary Tyler Peabody Mann. There is information on kindergartens in Boston, Saint Louis, and Washington, D.C.; and the Armstrong, Atkinson, Eccleston, and Stearns families. There is a diary of Sarah Eccleston, 1883-1886; along with pictures of Mrs. Mann and Sarmiento; and photographs of busts of Horace Mann and Abraham Lincoln. There are also 92 black-and-white photographs and 43 negatives providing images of the teachers, including several cartes-de-visite and one tin type.

Collection

Alice J. Cutright Kaine papers, 1864-1947 0.8 Linear Feet — 305 Items

The papers of Alice J. Cutright Kaine document her work primarily as an administrative advisor at the Tuskegee Institute but also include information on her employment as a public school teacher in Springfield, Ill., her service on the board of the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls and the State Board of Control (for prisons), and her travels to Dixfield, Maine, and Nelson County, Va. The collection contains correspondence, writings, legal papers, printed materials, photographs, and ephemera.

The strength of the collection lies with its documentation of Tuskegee Institute. Kaine was hired in 1894 as the head of the Household Department to supervise everything "from the making of bricks to the baking of white bread." (newsclipping, 1947) At the time, Kaine was the only white person on the Institute's staff.

Letters to her brother, Austin Cutright, describe her work her at Tuskegee Institute as well as the Tuskegee community in general. In these letters she speaks frankly about Booker T. Washington's educational philosophy and management style and her close relationship with Washington's wife Margaret and their children. Kaine visited several black families and churches in Tuskegee with the Washingtons and her letters and writings describe the living conditions and religious services she observed as well as the difficulties she had as a white woman in an all black community.

Approximately half of the correspondence from 1896-1903 consists of letters written to Kaine from Tuskegee administrators and Margaret Washington after Kaine's departure from Tuskegee. Letters from J.H. Washington, Superintendent of Industries, contain information on the maintenance of housekeeping practices established by Kaine. Letters from Margaret Washington are of a more personal nature and contain anecdotes and news from Tuskegee. Several of the writings and speeches concern Kaine's work at Tuskegee and describe her experiences from a sympathetic yet somewhat patronizing point of view. A file of printed materials relates exclusively to Tuskegee Institute, and a portrait of the Washington family (ca. 1895) is filed in the photographs series.

Outside of the materials relating to Tuskegee Institute, the papers provide only fragmented documentation of Kaine's life. A few letters to Kaine in the 1860s and 1870s describe her appointment to various teaching positions. Legal papers, writings and addresses, and newsclippings reflect her work with the Wisconsin Industrial School for Girls, the State Board of Control, and various social and civic organizations.

Earlier letters, chiefly written to her husband, depict Kaine's visits in the 1880s to New England, particularly Dixfield, Maine, and to her ancestral home in Nelson County, Va. Letters from Dixfield describe the local community life in detail. The series of photographs contains several views of Lovingston, Va., including churches, the courthouse, a hotel, Negro houses and other homes. Letters to Kaine from her brother during the 1940s detail his life in Milwaukee during World War II and to some extent Kaine's life at the Grand Army Home until her death.

Collection
Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

Collection

Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

Online
Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Allan H. Gilbert papers, 1926-1976 12.56 Linear Feet — 11,525 Items

Manuscripts, research files, correspondence, approximately 1287 black-and-white photographs and photostats of documents from various repositories and used in his research, and 3 reels of microfilm. Subjects of the research files and manuscripts include: Dante, Machiavelli, Milton, Jonson, and Aristotle (his POETICS).

Addition (2007-0141; 400 items, 0.5 lin. ft.) contains index files documenting the Gilbert's book collection. Many of these books are now in the collection at the Rare Book, Manuscript and Sepcial Collections Library at Duke University.

Collection

Allen-Angier family papers, 1843-1971 8 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Online
Collection contains correspondence, speeches, clippings, and printed material, chiefly relating to the career of George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, director of the U.S. Information Agency, and president of the Tobacco Institute. Includes material on the U.S. Foreign Service, the U.S. Information Agency, U.S. foreign relations, India, Iran, the tobacco industry, and the cigarette smoking and health controversy. Also includes family photographs from the Angier house on Trinity Avenue in Durham.

Collection includes papers kept by Zalene Allen Angier which include correspondence, 1936-1969, largely letters from her brother George Venable Allen (1903-1970), diplomat, official of the Tobacco Institute, and trustee of Duke University.

Allen's letters describe his diplomatic career and personal matters, including foreign relations and social life in Greece, Egypt, and Iran in the 1930s and 1940s; the royal family of Iran; the Potsdam Conference; and customs of Saudi Arabia. Letters of the 1950s mention celebrities Allen met, such as Yehudi Menuhin and Aristotle Onassis; and relations of the U.S. with India and of Russia with Yugoslavia. Letters of Allen's wife Katherine Martin Allen reflect diplomatic social life.

Clippings relate to Allen's career as diplomat and as director of the United States Information Agency, to his family, and to his death.

Miscellaneous papers include invitations; White House dinner menus; press releases; a report, February 9, 1932, on Japanese-Chinese relations; articles by Allen; and other printed materials.

There are photographs of Allen and many acquaintances, including Marshall Tito, Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Amjad All, Abba Eban, Wellington Koo, Dwight D. Eisenhower, John Foster Dulles, and William Fulbright.

Papers, 1945-1970, kept by George and Katherine Allen include letters from Eisenhower and Dulles about Allen's shift from the State Department to the USIA; a report on the political situation in Iran, January 21, 1948; correspondence on Egyptian-U.S. relations in the 1950s and the Henry A. Byroade scandal, the Cold War, the cigarette smoking and health controversy, and on Allen's speeches.

Enclosed with a letter from Allen of May 10, 1970, is a petition against slavery by the Baptist Church of Augusta, Maine, dated August 17, 1843.

There are files of speeches and related correspondence on Russia, propaganda, the space race, foreign policy, peace, the tobacco industry, India, Iran, UNESCO, and other topics.

There is material on the Dulles and Eisenhower oral history projects and on various honors and awards received by Allen.

Two scrapbooks contain clippings about Allen's career and family photographs. There is also a photocopy of his book-length manuscript reminiscence of experiences as Ambassador to Iran in the 1940s and 1950s; a letter from Josephus Daniels, 1940, commenting on Allen's review of Daniels' book, Tar Heel Editor; and a tape recording of Allen's address, 1967, to the Tobaccoland Kiwanis Club on the United States in the world.

Collection

Allen H. Godbey papers, 1926-1947 0.3 Linear Feet — 250 Items

Dr. Allen Godbey was a Professor of Old Testament History at Duke University from 1926-1932. The collection contains letters and self-published printed material. The material ranges in date from 1926-1947.

Contains letters and self-published printed materials. Material ranges in date from 1926-1947.

Collection
The Alliance for Audited Media (AAM) is a research firm that provides data services to the advertising and publishing industries. It is headquartered in Arlington Heights, Ill. The collection consists of over 500 16mm microfilm reels of archived printed reports produced by the AAM for subscribing newspapers and publications distributed primarily in the United States and Canada. The reports depict circulation data in a variety of contexts, including coupon distribution, geographical penetration, interactive media, market coverage, trends, and Zip Code analyses. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Alliance for Audited Media mircofilmed reports collection consists of over 500 16mm microfilm reels of archived printed reports produced by the AAM for subscribing newspapers and publications distributed primarily in the United States and Canada. The reports depict circulation data in a variety of contexts, including coupon distribution, geographical penetration, interactive media, market coverage, trends, and Zip Code analyses.

Collection
The Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth was a vocational guidance service organization originally created under the leadership of Orie Latham Hatcher as the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (1914-1921), and later known as the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (1921-1937). Disbanded in 1963. The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth and its predecessors. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives. The records document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Additional subjects addressed in the papers and photographs include economic conditions throughout the South; migration patterns from U.S. rural regions to cities; Appalachian culture, including crafts and music; community life in the South; and employment for African Americans. The collection includes 42 matted platinum prints of rural citizens and scenes in Kentucky taken in the 1930s by noted photographer Doris Ulmann, and include a portrait of her assistant and folklorist, John Jacob Niles.

The records of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY) span the years 1887 to 1963, although the bulk of the collection begins in 1914 with the creation of the organization and ends in 1946 with the death of founder and president, Orie Latham Hatcher. Additional records for the Alliance from 1947 to 1963 can be found in the Amber Arthun Warburton papers, also located in the Rubenstein Library.

The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for AGRY and its predecessors, the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (VBVW) and the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (SWEA), and document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives.

Early materials in the Correspondence, Administrative Files, and Clippings and Press Releases series document the Bureau's projects, such as the speaker's bureau and the scholarship program, as well as the Bureau's relationship with other women's organizations such as the Virginia Association of Colleges and Schools for Girls, Southern Collegiate Women (later the American Association of University Women), the National Federation of Business and Professional Women Clubs (BPW), and the National Council of Women.

Strong ties were developed between the Bureau and these organizations during its formative years: Hatcher chaired national and local committees in most of these organizations, and early correspondence and administrative files center on her work with these organizations particularly concerning educational standards and vocational training in women's colleges. In these early records it is often unclear which of these activities were officially adopted by the Bureau or if they were solely Hatcher's activities.

The AGRY's activities documented in the Branch Files Series include benefits, forums, exhibits, and festivals. The New York Branch sponsored several opera benefits to help raise funds during the 1920s. The Rural Mountain Festival, sponsored by the Richmond Branch, was held in 1938. In 1932, the Alliance commissioned noted New York portrait photographer, Doris Ulmann, to photograph rural youth and other individuals in Kentucky. The photographs were subsequently exhibited by several of the branches and were used to promote discussion of vocational issues and the work of the Alliance. Forty-two of these original platinum prints are located in the Photographic Materials Series.

Organizational changes reflected modifications in the organization's goals. Although SWEA continued many of the projects started by the Virginia Bureau, emphasis shifted away from lobbying efforts aimed to open new careers for women and more towards research on women's occupational trends and model guidance counseling programs based on that research. Correspondence during the early 1920s contains letters from faculty and administrators from women's colleges throughout the Northeast and South which describe various approaches (or lack thereof) to providing vocational guidance to students. Administrative files contain information on surveys and on a vocational guidance course for college women which was developed at Goucher College under the auspices of SWEA and tested at Duke University (then Trinity College) and the College of William and Mary. The Publications and Clippings and Press Releases series also contain considerable information regarding Alliance research and activities during this time.

During the mid to late 1920s, SWEA sponsored several research projects through its Rural Guidance Project which examined vocational trends of rural girls in North Carolina and Virginia. While the Correspondence and Administrative Files series document how the projects were organized, the comprehensive data collected during these projects is extant only in resulting SWEA publications such as Rural Girls in the City for Work and the unpublished manuscript "Fifty Rural High School Girls."

Alliance projects in the late 1920s and 1930s consisted of experimental and demonstration guidance programs in rural schools. These projects were located at the Konnarock Training School (Virginia), elementary schools in Albemarle Co., Virginia, Farm Life School (Craven Co., N.C.), and elementary and secondary schools in Breathitt Co., Kentucky, among others. Each of these demonstration projects also resulted in substantial Alliance publications which in most cases represent the bulk of extant documentation of each project. The Photographic Materials series contains many snapshots taken in these various communities, although most are of poor quality and unidentified; there are also negatives in this series. Additional information may also appear scattered throughout Correspondence, Clippings, and Administrative Files series.

The Breathitt County Project Files Series, provides the most comprehensive documentation of the demonstration project which grew to become the Alliance's main research activity from about 1934 to 1942. The project encompassed a wide range of activities including data collection on students' home life, teacher training workshops, vocational guidance programming through the county's Planning Council, and a visit by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1938. Particularly noteworthy in these materials are the extensive raw data files consisting of approximately 2500 autobiographical surveys of students. Additional files contain charts of data compilations and teacher reports which identify trends in students' educational behavior. Photographs of Breathitt County schools, students, and home life, chiefly taken by noted photographer Doris Ullman, are contained in the Photographic Materials Series.

SWEA and AGRY's emphasis on research and dissemination of information was reflected in the increase of published materials produced by the organization. Much of this material is contained in the Publications Series. Clippings of book reviews document the wide-spread acceptance of these publications in a newly emerging field. Several unpublished manuscripts resulting from Alliance research projects are extant in the Writings and Speeches Series and include "Occupations for Educated Women in Durham, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina" (1926), a bound copy of "Fifty Rural High School Girls'' (1930), and final drafts of "When Our Young Folks Come Home to the Smaller Communities" (1945).

Another strategy for publicizing the work of the Alliance was through local and national radio broadcasts. Shows were broadcast from Richmond, New York, and Washington, D.C., and gave information on specific occupations and discussed vocational guidance issues. Broadcast scripts contained in the Writings and Speeches Series feature youths interviewing each other and Orie Hatcher about career goals, a dialogue between Eleanor Roosevelt and Hatcher on the future of rural youth (1938), and a presentation by Amelia Earhart on women in aviation (1931).

The Correspondence, Clippings and Press Releases, and Subject Files series demonstrate the Alliance's shift away from relationships with women's organizations in the late 1920s and towards guidance and educational organizations such as the American Council for Guidance and Personnel Associations (CGPA), National Vocational Guidance Association (NVGA), National Occupational Conference (NOC), National Education Association (NEA), and the U.S. Department of Education in the 1930s. In many of these organizations, Hatcher chaired committees on rural youth, and representatives from these groups served on AGRY's Board of Trustees.

Numerous regional and national conference activities are reflected in the Conference Files Series, with a complete set of conference proceedings and findings contained in the Publications Series. Information on pre-1930s conferences is slim, but additional information on all conferences can be gleaned from the Correspondence and Clippings and Press Releases series. Copies of papers delivered by Alliance members and others are located in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Materials dating past Hatcher's tenure in the Alliance consist mainly of routine administrative correspondence. A more complete set of AGRY organizational records dating from 1947-1963 is located in the papers of Amber Arthun Warburton, her successor. These records continue several series started in the AGRY records such as executive board minutes, publications, project files, and correspondence.

Collection

Allyson K. Duncan Papers, 1914-2019 7.0 Linear Feet — 0.06 Gigabytes

Allyson Kay Duncan is a U.S. Circuit Judge of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit. She is the Fourth Circuit's first female African American judge. This collection consists largely of personal and professional correspondence from Duncan's nomination, induction, and service on the Fourth Circuit, with letters from family, friends, and colleagues across the legal profession. The bulk of the collection dates from the 2000s, but includes some assorted materials from her work as an attorney for Kilpatrick Stockton and the NC Utilities Commission in the 1990s.

Collection consists of Duncan's correspondence, including both personal and professional communications with family, friends, and colleagues, including other judges such as Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Diane Wood, J. Harvie Wilkinson III, William Traxler Jr., and several others; press clippings and articles about Duncan's activities as president for the NC Bar Association and her appointment to and service on the U.S. Court of Appeals (4th Circuit); copies of speeches and programs from her various professional activities for Duke Law School and NC Central Law School, among other appearances; assorted materials from her work for the NC Utilities Commission and Kilpatrick Stockton law firm; her diplomas and awards; some family history materials from her parents and other relatives, including her aunt Helen Blackburn and uncle Armour Blackburn; and assorted photographs, largely unlabelled. Also includes published opinions for the NC Court of Appeals and NC Utility Commission and writings by Duncan.

Collection
After placing her ill husband, Samueal Wall, in a sanitarium, Alma Stikeleather Wall traveled to New York, where she became known as a master of dialects, a singer of spirituals, and a storyteller. She was a great niece of Chief Justice John Marshall. The collection includes some of her writings, photographs of slaves, and photographs documenting the results of the 1926 Miami hurricane. Some correspondence concerns the mental illness of one of Wall's daughters. There are also certificates, a William Jennings Bryan speech, a scrapbook, and diaries belonging to Wall and her daughter.

The Alma S. Wall Papers are organized into the following series: genealogy, correspondence, clippings, printed materials, scrapbooks, and photographs. Alma S. Wall placed her ill husband, Samuel Wall, in a sanitarium and traveled to New York, where she became known as a master of dialects, a singer of spirituals, and a storyteller. She was a great niece of Chief Justice John Marshall. The collection includes some of her writings, photographs of slaves, and photographs documenting the results of the 1926 Miami hurricane. Some correspondence concerns the mental illness of one of Wall's daughters. There are also certificates, a William Jennings Bryan speech, a scrapbook, and diaries belonging to Wall and her daughter.

Collection
The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

Collection
On June 2, 1911, the Omicron Chapter of Alpha Delta Pi was the first sorority to install a national chapter on the Trinity College (now Duke University) campus. Contains the records of the Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, a social sorority for undergraduate women at Duke University. Materials include published histories, a songbook, clippings, correspondence, newsletters, cards, a scrapbook, and invitations. Major subjects include Trinity College history, Duke University history, women college students, sorority songs, general governance of a sorority, and initiation. Materials date from 1927-1979. English.

Collection includes the records of the Omicron chapter of Alpha Delta Pi, a social sorority for undergraduate women at Duke University. The Omicron chapter was established in 1911. Materials include published histories, a songbook, clippings, correspondence, newsletters, cards, and invitations. Major subjects include Trinity College history, Duke University history, Alpha Delta Pi, women college students, sorority songs, general governance of a sorority, and initiation. Materials date from 1927 to 1979.

Collection
The Beta Eta chapter of the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity was established at Duke University in 1929; the chapter dissolved sometime after 1963. Records contain correspondence, bylaws, membership records, constitution, handbook, reports, certificates, and a brief history of the Beta Eta chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi. English.

Contains correspondence, bylaws, membership records, a constitution, a handbook, reports, certificates, and a brief historic profile pertaining to the Beta Eta chapter of the Alpha Kappa Psi business fraternity at Duke University. Materials range in date from 1929 to 1963.

Collection

Alpheus Augustus Hurst papers, 1816-1950 2 Linear Feet — 1340 Items

Ledgers (hard back and composition book), legal documents, family correspondence, almanacs, advertisements, and pamphlets.

Collection
The Office of Alumni Affairs at Duke University administers the Duke Alumni Association, a nonprofit organization serving over 120,000 alumni and former students of Duke University, in addition to thousands of parents and friends of the university. Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter. English.

Records contain class files, administrative materials, fundraising materials, alumni publications records, subject files, photographs, video and sound recordings, and an index to Duke students who served in World War II. Materials include reunion information, correspondence, reports, programs, clippings, and printed matter.

Collection
Alva Carmichael Smith, businessman, managed the Southern Coal Company at Columbus, Georgia, from about 1911 until the early 1930s. He was active in politics in Columbus, where, in 1941, he had been a member of the local executive committee of the Democratic Party for 22 years.The bulk of the collection includes correspondence (1913-1933), relating to Smith's position as manager of the Southern Coal Company, dealing with miners and shippers in Alabama, Kentucky, and Tennessee, and customers in Alabama and Georgia. Includes material on his membership in the local Kiwanis and Masonic organizations.

Chiefly correspondence (1913-1933), relating to Smith's position as manager of the Southern Coal Company, dealing with miners and shippers in Alabama, Kentucky, and Tennessee, and customers in Alabama and Georgia. Includes material on his membership in the local Kiwanis and Masonic organizations.

Collection

Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items

Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

Collection

Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

Online
Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in Appalachia and the rural South in the 1940s and 1950s.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

Collection
Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors in North Carolina. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Amelia Stinson-Wesley is an ordained Methodist minister and advocate for pastoral care of women and abuse survivors. Her papers consist of correspondence, academic writing, periodical excerpts, pamphlets, flyers, and handouts.

Collection
Paint and coatings manufacturer based in Chicago, Ill. Collection includes promotional booklet that discusses water and the waterproofing benefits of asphalt-based paints and coatings. Booklet is illustrated with watercolors by A. Malrose and Chris Marie Meeker. Included is a letter from the company President to then-Duke University President William Few offering the booklet as a gift. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection includes promotional booklet that discusses water and the waterproofing benefits of asphalt-based paints and coatings. Booklet is illustrated with watercolors by A. Malrose and Chris Marie Meeker. Included is a letter from the company President to then-Duke University President William Few offering the booklet as a gift. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection
The American Association of Advertising Agencies, founded in 1917, is the primary advertising industry trade organization. The American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA) Records span the years 1918-1998 and include correspondence, annual corporate and stockholder reports for member agencies, meeting minutes and speeches, biographical summaries, a subject file, and videotapes that document selected activities and functions of the organization. The collection has been compiled from a number of accessions received over time, and so does not represent a comprehensive archive of the AAAA. Certain aspects of AAAA activities, however, are well represented, including a set of card files that document the professional careers of AAAA members over a 50-year period, and subject files that focus on Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigations into complaints lodged against advertisers and advertising claims produced in a variety of media, with a particular emphasis on the ways that products were advertised during and in conjunction with children's television programming. Other topics touched on include advertising self-regulation, antitrust issues, advertising laws, and deceptive and ethical practices in marketing and advertising.

The American Association of Advertising Agencies (AAAA) Records spans the years 1918-1998 and includes correspondence, annual corporate and stockholder reports for member agencies, meeting minutes and speeches, biographical summaries, a subject file, and videotapes that document selected activities and functions of the organization. The collection has been compiled from a number of accessions received over time, and so does not represent a comprehensive archive of the AAAA. Certain aspects of AAAA activities, however, are well represented, including the card files that document the professional careers of AAAA members over a 50-year period, and subject files that focus on Federal Trade Commission (FTC), Federal Communications Commission (FCC) and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigations into complaints lodged against advertisers and advertising claims produced in a variety of media, with a particular emphasis on the ways that products were advertised during and in conjunction with children's television programming. Other topics touched on include advertising self-regulation, antitrust issues, advertising laws, and deceptive and ethical practices in marketing and advertising.

The collection is arranged into four series: Administrative Files, Member Card Files, Vertical Files, and Audiovisual Materials. The Administrative Files Series includes correspondence, member corporate annual and stockholder reports, printed materials, meeting minutes and speeches, and memorabilia. The Member Card Files Series contains approximately 46,000 index cards that briefly document the employment histories of individual members roughly between the years 1920 and 1969. The Vertical Files Series consists of an alphabetical subject file primarily focused on FTC, FCC, and FDA hearings on complaints against advertisers as well as documents and testimonies relating to advertising to children. Also included is a compiled set of writings on advertising during times of recession and war. The Audiovisual Materials Series consists primarily of taped interviews with David Ogilvy and William Bernbach. Original videotapes are closed to patron use. Use copies are currently available for some items. Technical Services staff may need to produce use copies before contents can be accessed. Please contact Research Services staff before coming to use the collection.

Collection
The Durham, N.C. branch of the American Association of University Women was founded in 1913. The records of the AAUW Durham chapter span the years from its founding in 1913 through the 1960s. The central organizational records are almost complete for this period, including minutes of Executive Board meetings, Presidents' files, financial records, membership information, and national and state convention files. The Presidents' files contain chiefly correspondence, but programs, membership rosters, and leadership information are also present. Records are arranged alphabetically by file groups.

The Association of Collegiate Alumnae formed in 1881; the Southern Association of College Women formed in 1903. They merged in 1921 to become the American Association of University Women. The Durham branch was founded in 1913 and became part of the AAUW at its founding in 1921. The records of the AAUW Durham chapter span the years from its founding in 1913 through the 1960s. The central organizational records are almost complete for this period, including minutes of Executive Board meetings, Presidents' files, financial records, membership information, and national and state convention files. The Presidents' files contain chiefly correspondence, but programs, membership rosters, and leadership information are also present. Records are arranged alphabetically by file groups.

Collection
Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. Also includes an original list of titles and a slide projector. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict other types of archaeological sites. The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches. Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection. The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector and by an original list of slide titles. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of a set of sixty-six commercially produced, hand-colored lantern slides, featuring photographic images taken in the early 20th century in areas of modern-day Israel, Palestine, Jordan, Lebanon, and Syria. The slides were sold in sets by the American Colony Stores, the commercial department of a missionary community based in Jerusalem. The landscapes and scenes were intended to illustrate biblical sites, or to remind the viewer of well-known biblical passages, but a few also depict archaeological sites of interest to tourists. The original title for one such set, represented by many of the slides in this collection, was "Lantern slides and art photos produced by the American Colony photographers illustrating Bible lands."

The slides measure 4 x 3.5 inches and are housed in a typical paper mat and a glass cover, sealed on the borders with black tape. They are stamped with "American Colony Photographers" on the top of the frame and "Jerusalem, Palestine" on the bottom. Titles in the collection inventory are transcribed from handwritten titles on the slide mounts.

Locations include but are not limited to: the city of Jaffa (Tel Aviv); Sea of Galilee; Jerusalem; Bethlehem; Mount of Temptation (identified with Mount Quarantania); Jericho; Jordan River; Mount Hermon; Bethsaida; Mount of Olives; Emmaus (El- Kubebeh); the mosaic floor at Beit Jibrin; River Abana (El-Barada); Tyre; and the Temple of Sethos. There are also two glass slides with maps of ancient Middle East and Palestine. Five of the slides are damaged and are filed at the end of the collection.

The collection is accompanied by a lantern slide projector, and by 10 cardboard squares cut out from the original slide boxes, showing the title of the collection and lists of slide titles.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection
The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection consists of materials collected by the American Dance Festival pertaining to choreographers, dance companies, and others involved in modern dance, including printed materials, newspaper and magazine clippings, press kits, programs, and correspondence.

The collection consists of materials collected by the American Dance Festival pertaining to choreographers, dance companies, and others involved in modern dance, including printed materials, newspaper and magazine clippings, press kits, programs, and correspondence.

Collection
The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a six and a half week summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

The collection includes photographic materials created and collected by the American Dance Festival, including negatives, contact sheets, prints, and transparencies.

Collection
The American Dance Festival is a non-profit organization committed to serving the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers, and professionals in dance-related fields. It presents a summer festival of modern dance performances and educational programs, hosts community outreach activities, and sponsors numerous projects in the humanities. Its mission is to create and present new dance works, preserve the modern dance heritage, build wider national and international audiences and enhance public understanding and appreciation for modern dance, and provide training and education for dancers and choreographers. Contains correspondence, lists, administrative materials, memoranda, contracts, legal documents, financial records, class schedules, teaching materials, student records, clippings, press releases, publicity materials, brochures, tickets, posters, and other printed materials created by or related to the American Dance Festival.

Contains correspondence, lists, administrative materials, memoranda, contracts, legal documents, financial records, class schedules, teaching materials, student records, clippings, press releases, publicity materials, brochures, tickets, posters, and other printed materials created by or related to the American Dance Festival before the decision to move to Durham, North Carolina, in the fall of 1977.

Collection
This is a collection of pro-Libertarian literature, which includes a wide range of conservative viewpoints. Accession (2009-0196) (1000 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1919-1984) consists of pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, brochures, and other publications and periodicals from a variety of pro-libertarian and right wing organizations, including the American Economic Foundation and the National Economic Council, Inc. Topics include free market capitalism, price stabilization, the elimination or reduction of taxes, anti-communism, the Federal Reserve, inflation and the gold standard, the Marshall Plan, and foreign aid.

Accession (2009-0196) (1000 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1919-1984) consists of pamphlets, newsletters, newspapers, brochures, and other publications and periodicals from a variety of pro-libertarian and right wing organizations, including the American Economic Foundation and the National Economic Council, Inc. There is a wide range of materials, but many are related to topics such as gold and silver, the value of money, conspiracy theories, the taxation of the American people, and inflation. Early materials idealize the work of Henry George, a political economist who proposed a land value tax. Post-World War II materials frequently discuss foreign aid and the Marshall Plan, tending to espouse anti-communist viewpoints. 1970s-era materials tend to discuss gold, inflation, and monetary reform.

Collection
The American Economic Association (AEA) is the primary professional association for economists in the United States. It was established in 1885. Collection documents the activities of the organization and includes ledgers, material related to the AEA's journal, material related to the Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession, and other records.

Primarily records of the American Economic Review, (Accession 2001-0118) specifically journal office files consisting of correspondence, manuscript, book review, and referee files (1969-1998). There are also records for the organization (1886-1984) and for its Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP 1972-1993), including histories, reports, minutes, statistics, as well as membership, account, conference, board member, miscellaneous, and newsletter or editorial office files. Some CSWEP material is also present as 371 machine-readable records. There is a small set of journal office records for the Journal of Economic Literature (1975, 1984-1994 and undated). In addition, there are 50 black-and-white photographs of former association presidents, a 39"x10" black-and-white group photograph taken at an unidentified meeting, 48 rolls of microfilm from the various journals (mostly AER), 63 microfiche of Journal of Economic Literature correspondence ([1968]-1980), and 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes.

Addition (2001-0082) (4000 items, 9.6 linear feet; dated 1998-1999) includes records for the American Economic Review, including correspondence and referee files for rejected and withdrawn articles (1998), accepted articles (1999), and papers and proceedings (1999).

Addition (2002-0215) (21000 items, 33.4 linear feet; dated 1999-2001) contains records for the American Economic Review, including editorial correspondence, referee reports, and manuscripts for rejected articles (1999-2000) and accepted articles (March-December 2001) and papers and proceedings (2000-2001). Also includes 37 electronic documents on one floppy disk.

The collection consists of 15 additional accessions dating from 2003 to 2022 with over 200 additional boxes. These additions have not been processed, but are available for research with permission from the American Economic Association. Please consult the Preliminary Description of Unprocessed Collection (below) for details.

Collection

American Literary Manuscripts records, 1930-1981 11.5 Linear Feet — 8598 Items

The American Literary Manuscripts Records (accession #5-6-81) (8,098 items, 10.8 lf; dated 1930-1979) documents the process by which the guide was created. It contains the correspondence of J. A. Robbins with each of his editors for each region of the United States (the Regional Chairmen), copies of the directives sent to participating libraries, copies of the master list of names to be checked, minutes of editorial board meetings, descriptions of the project, a proposal for a computerized updating of the census of library holdings of American literary manuscripts, negotiations with the publisher, grant requests, and reports. The correspondence between Midwest Regional Chairman, George Hendrick, and his Regional Associates is included in order to demonstrate how the project operated. The questionnaires returned by the libraries in that region are included. There are also ten printouts, included as a random sampling of printouts required. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography.

The addition (accession #89-093) (500 items, 1 lf; dated 1962-1981) contains correspondence, background material, page proofs, post-publication additions and corrections, and publicity relating primarily to the 2nd edition of American Literary Manuscripts published in 1977. It updates the earlier edition published in 1960.

Collection

The earliest documents date from 1927, the year before the first issue was published. New material will continue to arrive as the journal's office deems files inactive. The bulk of the journal's papers consists of correspondence and editorial comments on submitted articles.

Aside from a relatively few submissions which seem to have been rejected after a single reading by the chair or other in-house editor (because they were too long or clearly unsuitable for the journal), articles were sent out to at least two members of the Editorial Board. They sent back written comments and a recommendation (reject, accept, accept pending revision). These responses make up the Editorial Comments Series (1928-1983) and a portion of the Correspondence and Editorial comments Series (1984-1989). By the late 1980s, the journal was receiving several hundred submissions each year, but the editorial comments suggest that the proportion of fine articles in the pool had not been maintained as sheer numbers increased. Members of the Editorial Board take on this responsibility in addition to their normal institutional duties.

The comments in the Editorial Comments Series are sometimes brief and dismissive, sometimes quite elaborate. Even in the absence of the rejected articles themsleves, they are a rich record of individual and institutional critical predispositions. In its early years, the journal was working to establish a solid documentary foundation for the profession of American literary study. Favored topics were unpublished manuscripts, biographical work, and influence studies. The journal was slow to accept the move to New Critical interpretations of texts, reluctant to give up its tradition of more empirical scholarship. Such moments of critical change or expansion - late 1960s psychoanalytical criticism, 1970s feminist readings, 1980s post-structuralism, etc. - are vividly documented by the Editorial Board's varied members. Not infrequently, one reader will enjoy the provocative nature of an article, while the other considers it to be careless scholarship or too polemical.

Most of the correspondence is in the Alphabetical and Correspondence Series. It deals with submitted articles or reviews, but there are more substantial letters dealing with policy, critical positions, and disputes (primarily about reviews).

All other papers are contained in the Subject Files Series. Included there are correspondence preceding and relevant to the inception of the journal; Foerster Prize records; materials relating to the selection of editors and the formulation of policy; annual reports to the American Literature Section of the MLA; materials relating to Duke Press and publicity; and information gathered in the early years about who was doing what with American literature (for the purpose of mapping the field and finding reviewers).

Additionally in the Card Files Series there are three boxes sized for 3 x 5 cards which are full of information saved by the American Literature offices between (roughly) 1928 and 1950. These constitute something like a scrapbook of American literature, containing: bibliography cards; sketches of periods and genres; course descriptions; etc. These materials are typed and handwritten. Finally, there are samples of the 5 x 7 cards used to process and keep track of submissions and book reviews. These cards do not contain information (in either their content or organization) that is unavailable elsewhere, but they do illustrate the process by which articles and book reviews were handled.

The accessions (2009-0177) and (2009-0242) include editorial comments and correspondence from American Literature, beginning in 1993 and continuing through the early 2000s. Materials are organized alphabetically by each person's last name.

(by box/period divisions, including only regular contributors)

1928-1931:
  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Fred Lewis Pattee
  5. Ralph Rusk
1932:
  1. William B. Cairns
  2. Jay B. Hubbell (minimal)
  3. Kenneth Murdock
  4. Ralph Rusk
  5. Robert Spiller
1933-34:
  1. Killis Campbell
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
1935:
  1. Norman Foerster (some)
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Laurance Thompson
1936-37:
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
1938:
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Clarence Gohdes (some)
  3. Ralph Rusk
  4. Robert Spiller
  5. Stanley Williams
1939:
  1. Norman Foerster
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Robert Spiller
  4. Stanley Williams
1940-42:
  1. Emory Holloway
  2. Kenneth Murdock
  3. Austin Warren
  4. Stanley Williams
1950 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
1951 (scanty):
  1. Walter Blair
  2. Harry Hayden Clark
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
1952 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Willard Thorp
  4. George Whicher
1954 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. James D. Hart
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
1956 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Fred B. Millett
  4. Willard Thorp
1957 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Henry Nash Smith
  4. Willard Thorp
1958 (scanty):
  1. Harry Hayden Clark
  2. Ernest Leisy
  3. Russell Nye
  4. Henry Nash Smith
1959 (scanty):
  1. Lewis Leary
  2. Norman Pearson
  3. Henry Pochmann
1960:
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Norman Pearson
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Henry Nash Smith
  8. Floyd Stovall
  9. George Whicher
1961:
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. Theodore Hornberger
  4. Lewis Leary
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
  8. George Whicher
1962:
  1. Charles R. Anderson
  2. Edwin Cady
  3. William Charvat
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Floyd Stovall
1963:
  1. Edwin Cady
  2. William Charvat
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. Theodore Hornberger
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Sherman Paul
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Floyd Stovall
1964:
  1. James Beard
  2. Walter Blair
  3. William Charvat
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Theodore Hornberger
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Sherman Paul
  9. Henry Pochmann
  10. Ernest Samuels
1965:
  1. William Charvat
  2. Richard B. Davis
  3. R.H. Fogle
  4. James D. Hart
  5. Theodore Hornberger
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Ernest Samuels
1966:
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. William Charvat
  4. Richard B. Davis
  5. R.H. Fogle
  6. James D. Hart
  7. Russel Nye
  8. Ernest Samuels
1967:
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. R.H. Fogle
  5. James D. Hart
  6. Russel Nye
  7. Henry Pochmann
  8. Ernest Samuels
  9. Floyd Stovall
1968:
  1. Gay Wilson Allen
  2. George Arms
  3. Richard B. Davis
  4. John T. Flanagan
  5. Russel Nye
  6. Henry Pochmann
  7. Ernest Samuels
1969-1972:
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. Gay Wilson Allen
  3. George Arms
  4. James M. Cox
  5. John T. Flanagan
  6. R.H. Fogle
  7. Allen Guttmann
  8. David Levin
  9. Russel Nye
  10. Henry Pochmann
  11. Ernest Samuels
  12. John D. Seelye
  13. Lewis P. Simpson
1973-1975:
  1. Richard P. Adams
  2. James M. Cox
  3. Lawrence S. Dembo
  4. Warren G. French
  5. Allen Guttmann
  6. Annette Kolodny
  7. David Levin
  8. Russel Nye
  9. Donald Pizer
  10. Patrick F. Quinn
  11. John D. Seelye
  12. Walter Sutton
1975-79:
  1. Sacvan Bercovitch
  2. Lawrence S. Dembo
  3. Warren G. French
  4. Annette Kolodny
  5. J.A. Leo Lemay
  6. Jay Martin
  7. Terence Martin
  8. Roy Harvey Pearce
  9. H. Dan Piper
  10. Donald Pizer
  11. Joel M. Porte
  12. Patrick F. Quinn
  13. Walter B. Rideout
  14. John D. Seelye
  15. Walter Sutton
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Darwin Turner
1979-1983:
  1. Nina Baym
  2. Sacvan Bercovitch
  3. Panthea Broughton
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Don Cook
  6. Hamlin Hill
  7. Annette Kolodny
  8. J.A. Leo Lemay
  9. T. Martin
  10. Hershel Parker
  11. Roy Harvey Pearce
  12. H. Dan Piper
  13. Joel M. Porte
  14. Walter B. Rideout
  15. Charles Scruggs
  16. G. Thomas Tanselle
  17. Linda Wagner
1984-89:
  1. Elizabeth Ammons
  2. Martha Banta
  3. Nina Baym
  4. Lawrence Buell
  5. Cathy Davidson
  6. Scott Donaldson
  7. Norman Grabo
  8. Philip Gura
  9. Hamlin Hill
  10. Marcus N. Klein
  11. J.C. Levenson
  12. Horace Porter
  13. Donald A. Ringe
  14. Charles Scruggs
  15. Kenneth Silverman
  16. Werner Sollors
  17. Robert Stepto
  18. Linda Wagner
  19. Christof A. Wegelin
Collection

American Newspaper Repository collection, 1852-2004 1200 Linear Feet — 12,000 items

The American Newspaper Repository was founded in 1999 as a 501(c)(3) non-profit corporation in order to save a unique collection of original newspapers that would otherwise have been destroyed or dispersed, and to preserve and make available these landmarks of American publishing. Nicholson Baker, author of numerous fiction and nonfiction works, including writings on libraries, founded and served as director of the Repository in conjunction with research for his 2001 release, Double Fold: Libraries and the Assault on Paper. The collection consists of approximately five thousand newspaper volumes (plus several thousand unbound newspapers), most of which came, directly or indirectly, from the British Library. There are long runs of major domestic newspapers as well as many foreign language and immigrant papers, such as the Yiddish Forward, the Irish World, and the Greek Atlantis, trade journals, Communist papers such as the Daily Worker, and other political papers. Many of these runs apparently exist nowhere else in the original format.

The American Newspaper Repository collection consists of approximately five thousand newspaper volumes (plus unbound newspapers), most of which came, directly or indirectly, from the British Library. There are long runs of major domestic newspapers as well as many foreign language and immigrant papers, such as the Yiddish Forward, the Irish World, and the Greek Atlantis, trade journals, Communist papers such as the Daily Worker, and other political papers. Many of these runs apparently exist nowhere else in the original format.

A number of newspaper titles have been separated from the collection and cataloged individually in the library catalog. To locate these titles, search for "American Newspaper Repository" in the catalog.

Collection

Amory Leland Williams watercolors and etchings, 1921-1957 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 36 items — Sizes range from 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 to 13 3/4 x 20 inches

Collection is arranged in two series: watercolor paintings by artchitect and amateur artist Amory Leland Williams, painted from 1923 to 1939; and a group of etchings by various noted American artists, dating from 1921 to 1957, collected by Williams. Most of the watercolors measure about 12x19 inches, and were painted in southern France and Italy, with a few from southern California and the American or Mexican desert. In Europe, Williams painted in brilliant scenes of Greek temples, churches, barns, canals, gardens, and monuments. The etchings are by notable American printmakers such as John Taylor Arms, Louis Rosenberg, and others. A handful are in their original portfolios, as published by the Society of American Graphic Artists.

Assembled by architect and artist Amory Leland Williams, this collection of 36 artworks is arranged in two series: watercolor drawings by Williams, painted from 1923 to 1939; and a group of etchings and one lithograph by various noted American artists, dating from 1921 to 1957, collected by Williams. The prints range in size from 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 to 13 3/4 x 20 inches, with most measuring roughly 12x19 inches.

The watercolors are scenes from southern France (near Grasse) and Italy (Rome, Sicily, Stresa, Venice), probably painted during a trip in or before 1923; there are also some scenes from southern California and the American or Mexican desert, the latest of which is dated 1939. In Europe, Williams captured the brilliant colors of the Mediterranean, focusing on architectural details of Greek temples, churches, barns, canals, monuments, and fountains. Many pieces are signed, dated, and titled. One shows the Vittorio Emanuele monument in Rome under construction in 1923. Another, a small pastel caricature, is titled "Impression of the Kaiser" also from 1923.

The 10 etchings and one lithograph are by notable American printmakers such as John Taylor Arms (2 prints, one of which is inscribed at length to Williams), Louis Rosenberg (3 prints), and one each by Carl Schultheiss, Victoria Hutson Huntley, Richard Bishop, Warren Davis, and Don Sucuum. A handful are in their large original portfolios with an explanatory title sheet, as published by the Society of American Etchers, later known as the Society of American Graphic Artists (1952).

Collection

Collection consists primarily of manuscripts and research materials related to Turnipseed's writings (1902-1960s), in particular his multivolume, unpublished autobiography I Tried: An Autobiography of Andrew Spencer Turnipseed. The collection documents Turnipseed's ancestry, early life, and roles as a theologian and activist. Includes many folders of personal and professional correspondence (1929-1980s); lectures and sermons (including 13 audio cassettes); course materials; and travel files. In addition, there are subject files on topics such as Methodism; civil rights; race relations and Southern politics; and public education, including higher education for African-Americans in Alabama. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

André Kertész photographs, 1919-1984 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 31 photographic prints — 8x10 and 11x14 inches

Collection of 31 black-and-white photographs by André Kertész provides a sampling of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through 1984, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris (1920-1984), and several each from Budapest and New York City. There are also two female nude studies from his 1930s series "Distortions," two still lifes, and several landscapes. The majority of the gelatin silver prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. On the backs are various markings, including dates and identifying marks by Kertész and others, with many bearing a Kertész estate stamp. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 31 black-and-white prints by noted photographer André Kertész provides a portfolio representing the full range of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through the 1980s, the end years of his career, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris in the 1920s and 1930s and 1980s, with a few street scenes from Budapest (1919 and 1920), and a handful from New York City from his later years in that city, with one from 1939. There are two photographs from the 1930s series "Distortions," featuring female nudes with distortion effects. Several images include cats and dogs. There are a handful of landscapes with no known location, and two still lifes.

The majority of the prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. They bear various markings on the backs, including crop marks, dates, and identifying marks by Kertész and others. All but five are marked with the Kertész estate stamp; several bear the photographer's stamp.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Angier B. Duke Memorial, Inc. records, 1923-1999 14 Linear Feet — approx. 9500 Items

The Angier B. Duke Memorial was established in 1925 by Benjamin N. Duke to honor his son, Angier Buchanan Duke (1884-1923, Trinity, '05). The program was reworked in 1946-1947 when the Memorial Scholarship became the University's premier undergraduate award. The collection contains annual reports of various committees, correspondence and memoranda, studies, proposals, financial material, and miscellaneous material. A majority of the material pertains to loans, awards, and scholarships funded by the Angier B. Duke Memorial and ranges in date from 1923-1999.

The collection contains material pertaining to the operation of the Angier B. Duke Memorial, Inc. scholarship, award, and loan programs. The material ranges in date from 1923-1999. General files include material relating to all of the scholarship programs offered by the Angier B. Duke Memorial, Inc.: Summer Study at Oxford, Self-Determined Educational Experience, In-Class Scholar Award, and the Angier B. Duke Memorial Scholarship; reports, correspondence, and miscellaneous material. The restricted series contains bound annual reports of the scholarship and prize committees, a sampling of student loan applications, and annual Memorial Scholar student essays. Financial papers include loan amounts and balances, assorted vouchers, corporate investment material, and several oversize items: bound ledgers, cash books, and journals.

Collection
Chief of Protocol and ambassador to Spain, Morocco, and Denmark under the Kennedy, Johnson, and Carter administrations; resident of New York, N.Y., Long Island, N.Y., and Washington, D.C. The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

The collection chiefly consists of correspondence; scrapbooks and diaries; photographs; diplomatic papers; sound recordings and films; interviews, appointment books; clippings; printed material; and business papers, all documenting Angier Biddle Duke's life and career, especially his role in United States politics and diplomacy during the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, as well as his philanthropic activities and his leadership roles in non-profit institutions. The materials also document the social and political activities of members of the Duke, Drexel, and Biddle families, and their residences in New York City and Long Island. In addition, the papers contain information on economic and social conditions in post-war Europe during Duke's ambassadorship to Spain, and information on Pakistani refugees and other international crises. Other topics include civil rights and desegregation (especially in Washington, DC).

Details on Angier Biddle Duke's life as well as information on the Duke, Biddle, and Drexel families can be found in the Biographical Data Series. These materials include some of A.B. Duke's military records; articles on A.B. Duke; articles and biographical entries on A.B. Duke; "in memoriam" booklets from his first wife's funeral and the funeral of Angier Buchanan Duke, A.B. Duke's father; and genealogical materials on the families. Selected condolences out of the hundreds sent to Robin Chandler Duke after her husband's death in 1995 also reveal much about the personality and life of A.B. Duke. In addition, the narratives in the Diaries Series offer a great deal of material concerning the personalities of A.B. Duke and his family and acquaintances throughout his life.

The Correspondence Series also offers information on the Duke, Biddle, Semans, and Trent families, though correspondence between immediate family members makes up a small percentage of this large series. The correspondence files are most useful for the documentation they provide about A.B. Duke's career. Additional biographical data on A.B. Duke and family members, particularly useful for information on Robin Chandler Duke's social and political activities, can be found in the Clippings Series.

The Photograph Albums and Photographs Series contains hundreds of photographs of the Duke, Semans, and Biddle families. Some early photographs of Angier Biddle Duke were taken during his enlistment in the Army from 1940-1945. An album entitled "A celebration of the life of Benjamin Newton Duke, 1979" can be found in the Scrapbooks Series. Finally, as A.B. Duke served as president of the Duke Family Association of NC from 1988-1995, there are a number of items related to the meetings of this genealogical association found in the Correspondence Series.

Angier Biddle Duke was best known for his ambassadorial skills and his political acumen beginning with his appointment to the office of Ambassador to El Salvador in 1952 as the youngest ambassador ever appointed to a post. His subsequent career in diplomacy and politics, including his appointment as Chief of Protocol under Presidents Kennedy and Johnson, is well-documented throughout the majority of the series. A series of written and taped diaries entitled the "Ambassador's Diary" are especially interesting for A.B. Duke's candid reflections on his experiences.

The political and social events of the 1960s and 1970s are well-represented in the papers in the multimedia formats associated with the Audio, Film, and Videotape Series, containing numerous recordings of speeches, toasts, and visits of foreign dignitaries; the Scrapbooks and Photograph Albums and Photographs Series, which hold many candid and formal photographs of politicians, diplomats, celebrities, and artists; and the Clippings Series. One scrapbook covers President Kennedy's trip to Berlin, West Germany; another oversize scrapbook covers an international incident at Palomares, Spain (1966): while Duke was that country's ambassador, an undetonated U.S. nuclear bomb was lost off the coast of Spain, then recovered after an increased international outcry against nuclear weapons. Materials in the Protocol Papers Series also concern Kennedy's assassination and the transition to a Johnson White House during the period when A.B. Duke was Chief of Protocol. As Jacqueline Kennedy had already become a good friend of A.B. Duke's family, there are items in the Correspondence Series reflecting her close relationship with them in the difficult years after her husband's assassination.

The head of the State Department Office of Protocol serves as principal adviser to the President and Secretary of State on matters of diplomatic procedures governed by law or international customs and practice. Angier Biddle Duke's responsibilities as Chief of Protocol from 1961-1965 and 1968, including his role in the arrangements for the Kennedy funeral, are best represented by materials in the Protocol Papers Series, arranged alphabetically by country, and by many valuable letters and telegrams in the Correspondence Series, and in the Writings and Speeches Series. In addition, a great deal of relevant information, both contemporary and retrospective in nature, can be found in the Interviews Series. Several important volumes in the Scrapbooks and Diaries Series are also were created as records of his tenure as Chief of Protocol, and the Pictures Series contains many candid and formal photographs during this period. Finally, events relating to the Office of Protocol are found in audio or film format in the Audio, Film, and Video Series. Memorabilia from this period such as invitations, dinner menus, guest lists, and souvenir programs from inaugurations abroad can also be found in the Miscellaneous Series.

A.B. Duke's extensive organizational activities in later decades are documented in the Correspondence, Subject Files, Interviews, Printed Materials, and Writings and Speeches Series. A large number of materials reflect A.B. Duke's long involvement in the administration of Long Island University as well as in other institutions such as the International Rescue Commission, various Democratic committees, CARE, the NYC Dept. of Civic Affairs and Public Events, the Spanish Institute, the Appeal to Conscience Foundation, the Japan-American Institute, the World Affairs Council, and the American Council of Ambassadors, and many others. The Subject Files and other series also illustrate A.B. Duke's later involvement in organizations attempting to establish more democratic structures in countries such as El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Guyana.

Some materials also reflect Robin Chandler Duke's later involvement in politics, including her unsuccessful bid for the Democratic nomination to fill Koch's congressional seat in 1978, and her role as chairwoman of Population Action International.

Although they contain relatively few documents, the Legal and Financial Papers provide some information on A.B. Duke's income and financial activities, and on the Doris Duke Trust; also in the legal papers is a publisher's contract for the biography of Doris Duke and a copy of Angier Buchanan Duke's will. Other legal and financial matters related to the Duke and Biddle families, particularly the Doris Duke estate (1995) are referred to on a regular basis in the Correspondence Series. Very little is to be found in the collection on the administration, maintenance, or acquisition of Angier Biddle Duke's residences in Washington, NYC, or Long Island, though some illustrations of residences can be found in the Clippings and Pictures Series.

Collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library which contain information relevant to the Angier Biddle Duke Papers include the James Buchanan Duke Papers and especially the Semans Family Papers. The Duke University Living History Program collection, also in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, contains an interview with Angier Biddle Duke recorded in the 1970s.

Collection

Angus McDougall Scrapbook, 1926-1964 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 Item

Angus McDougall taught sculpture in Durham, N.C. and made numerous sculptural renderings of Duke University professors, students, and affiliates, as well as other major figures including Helen Keller and Frederick Douglas. His scrapbook contains photographs of his sculptures and his human subjects, family photos, clippings, a book jacket and correspondence.

Scrapbook contains family photos, photos of Angus McDougall's sculptures, clippings, a book jacket for George Roy Elliot's 1953 Flaming Minister: A Study of Othello as a Story of Love and Hate designed by McDougall and a 1959 letter with accompanying photographs from "Brother Tom."

Collection

Anna Jean and Lillian Snowden papers, 1890s-1938 7.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes and 2 oversize folders

Anna Jean and Lillian Snowden were two Black women born in Lexington, K.Y. Anna Jean became a teacher, and Lillian became an accountant and important figure in the Indepedent Order of St. Luke. Collection includes event programs, photographs, clippings, and other material that document the education and social lives of both women, especially their involvement in the Black community. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection includes commencement and event programs, especially for musical events and society meetings, as well as diplomas for Anna Jean and Lillian Snowden. Also included are postcards, photographs of family and friends, clippings, publications, and other material related to the academic and social lives of Anna Jean and Lillian. Of particular note is a large, panoramic photograph showing the 1916 graduating class of Howard University. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection

Anna Schwartz papers, 1929-2012 23 Linear Feet — 0.08 Gigabytes — 17500 Items

Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research and collaborator with Milton Friedman on numerous works, including A Monetary History of the United States, 1867-1960. Schwartz also served as the executive director of the United States Gold Commission from 1981 to 1982. Collection consists largely of Schwartz's professional materials, including economics research and subject files on monetary policy, gold, the Federal Reserve, currency, and the 2008 Financial Crisis; collaborations with other economists; correspondence, largely professional but including some personal letters; Gold Commission materials from the 1980s; Shadow Open Market Committee materials; and writings, including lectures and articles by Schwartz. Another significant part of the collection is the Milton Friedman series, which includes correspondence, writings, and other materials relating to Friedman and his work.

The Anna Schwartz Papers consists largely of Schwartz's professional materials and has been divided into 9 series and 1 file: Correspondence, Personal Materials, Conferences, Subject and Research Files, Writings, Gold Commission, Shadow Open Market Committee, Milton Friedman Materials, Writings by Others, and Electronic Materials.

Schwartz's Correspondence ranges from her college years through 2012, with the majority of material dating from the 2000s. Correspondence has been arranged chronologically and largely reflects Schwartz's research interests and collaborations with other economists. Particularly in her later years, Schwartz saved various email forwards and printouts on news and economics sent from her correspondents, and those materials are also kept in the Correspondence series. Milton Friedman's correspondence is held in the Milton Friedman Series.

Another significant portion of the collection is Schwartz's Subject and Research Files, which include materials on economics, monetary policy, banking, various countries, the Federal Reserve and its many activities, foreign exchange rates and intervention, currency, and many other miscellaneous topics. This series has been arranged alphabetically and has overlaps with other series in the collection, including Schwartz's Writings and Correspondence series.

The majority of Schwartz's Writings series related to various lectures and articles by Schwartz, although the series does contain some drafts and edited works from Schwartz's books as well as accompanying material such as appendices or editor correspondence. It has been arranged chronologically, with Schwartz's book reviews consolidated at the beginning of the series. Writings by Friedman, including collaborations between Friedman and Schwartz, are housed in the Milton Friedman Series.

Writings By Others is large series that includes drafts and final versions of articles collected or sent to Schwartz by colleagues. Most of these relate to Schwartz's research interests. This series also includes reader reports by Schwartz for various articles. It has been arranged alphabetically by author.

Three series reflect Schwartz's professional service. The Conferences Series reflects Schwartz's attendance and involvement in various economic conferences throughout her career. It is arranged alphabetically by conference. The Shadow Open Market Committee Series is a small series reflecting her service on the committee in the 2000s. It includes meeting materials as well as papers presented by Schwartz and other committee members. The Gold Commission Series encompasses materials from Schwartz's service as executive director of the Gold Commission from 1981 to 1982, and includes reports and research materials on gold and the gold standard; drafts, comments, and copies of the final report; and correspondence from the committee and the general public on issues regarding gold.

The Milton Friedman Materials Series includes all materials in the Schwartz Papers that relate to Milton Friedman and Schwartz's work with him, including joint writings and collaborations. Correspondence from Friedman is housed in this series. It also includes a large number of Friedman's writings, such as his columns for Newsweek and Wall Street Journal, and articles and talks by Friedman that Schwartz collected over the years. Some of these were drafts or working papers sent to Schwartz by Friedman for comments. Another portion of the series is the Writings About Friedman sub-series, which includes news clippings, essays, Nobel Prize coverage, and obituaries and memorials.

The Personal Materials Series includes Schwartz's Barnard College materials, interviews and clippings about Schwartz, versions of her curriculum vitae, and her date books from the 1950s through the 2000s.

The Electronic Materials File includes files received from Schwartz's office at the National Bureau of Economic Research office in New York City. The electronic materials cover professional and personal papers of Anna Schwartz, including correspondence, conference files, research files, writing drafts, writings, newspaper clippings, photos, and her bio/CV.

Collection
Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan was a professor of French at Duke University from the 1960s through the 1990s. The Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan Papers include biographical materials, writings, a textbook, and other materials from her life in France and at Duke University.

The collection consists of photographs, writings, and memorabilia from Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan's life and work as a professor of French at Duke University. Photographs span Anne-Marie Bryan's life and include images of her family, including her husband and children; the majority of the images are reproductions of originals. Writings include a copy of her textbook Fast French (published posthumously), a typed manuscript copy of a memoir in French as well as selections from a separate memoir in English. Also included are copies of some artwork created by Anne-Marie Deprés Bryan, a biography written by her daughter Yvonne Bryan Tomek, and poems about her life written by her son-in-law and former student, James Tomek.

Collection

Ann Henshaw Gardiner papers, 1753-1970 15 Linear Feet — 38 boxes — 3,588 Items

Online

The Ann Henshaw Gardiner Papers begin in the early years of the settlement of Berkeley County, Virginia, with two pioneer families, those of Captain William Henshaw of Springfield MIlls, Mill Creek, and of William Snodgrass of Clifton Mills, Back Creek. Both groups married into other prominent families of the region, so that their papers furnish two hundred years of local history and genealogical material for Berkeley County. The Andersons, the Verdiers, the Turners, the Evanses, the McConnells, the Pendletons, the Robinsons, and the Rawlingses, among others, appear throughout the collection.

The early letters are predominantly business in character, concerning the land transactions of John Turner, the surveyor of Berkeley County who registered the land titles of many local families. He was related to the Snodgrass family through his marriage to Ruth Rawlings.

By 1814, the correspondence is centered in Robert Snodgrass and his brother Stephen. As Berkeley County produced wheat in abundance, the sale of flour from its mills became increasingly important. The Henshaws of Mill Creek in particular left records of sales of large quantities of flour on the Alexandria and Baltimore markets. The Snodgrasses in this period were also milling although their records are not as numerous for their sales.

Both the Henshaws and the Snodgrasses were involved in the political affairs of Berkeley County. Levi Henshaw (1769-1843) was a gentleman justice of the peace, captain of militia, a member of the county court and of the Virginia House of Delegates, and sheriff in 1840. Robert Verdier Snodgrass (1792-1861) was commissioner of county revenue, a member of the Virginia House of Delegates, and colonel of the 67th Regiment of Virginia Militia. Their papers reflect these offices, both in the correspondence and in the legal papers. Levi Henshaw (1815-1896) married Sarah Ann, the daughter of Robert Verdier Snodgrass, thus uniting the papers of both families.

Berkeley County was an agricultural community, whose conditions were reflected in references to slaves in estates, as runaways, and for sale or hire.

Robert Verdier Snodgrass was concerned in both Democratic politics and legal business with Charles James Faulkner. His son-in-law, Israel Robinson, wrote to Snodgrass of political conditions in Washington, D. C. where he was an office holder. (Later Israel Robinson became clerk of the county court, a judge, and a Confederate general) The son of Robert Verdier Snodgrass, Stephen, became postmaster at Hedgesville, Va., in 1855.

By 1860 the settlement of various family estates reveals a maze of Snodgrass relatives. A letter from a cousin in 1860 comments on John Brown's raid and the arrival of the Japanese Embassy in Washington.

The outbreak of the Civil War shows divided political opinion in the family. In 1862, a letter describes the condition of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad in wartime and of the Negroes in Washington, D.C., where slavery had been abolished. Stephen Snodgrass, a Unionist, did not have an easy time at Hedgesville during the war, and he had to have papers attesting his loyalty. On May 12, 1865, comment is made upon the assassination of President Lincoln.

Henshaw papers predominate after 1865. Business is dull; the collection of money, difficult.

As the family has scattered, letters of cousins come from many places, and grandchildren write to Sarah Ann (Snodgrass), the widow of Robert Verdier Snodgrass.

The first William Henshaw (1736-1799) in Berkeley County had married Agnes Anderson. William was the son of Nicholas Henshaw who came from Philadelphia to Berkeley County; thus Nicholas is the settler, William the first of that home. In 1886 correspondence begins about the history of the Anderson family; letters continue into the twentieth century.

By the 1890's Valley of Virginia Henshaw and her sisters, Mabel and Francis Little Henshaw, begin to write letters about genealogical matters; in particular, the Rawlings family is the subject of great interest.

Mabel Henshaw married Dr. Samuel H. Gardiner. Her concern for history led her to teach at Shepherd College, Shepherdstown, Jefferson County, W. Va., where she also served as librarian. Mrs. Gardiner was a district chairman of the West Virginia Equal Suffrage Association with correspondence in 1915 and 1916 which reveals the methods women were using to insure the pas sage of the woman suffrage amendment to the Constitution of the United States.

The daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Gardiner, Miss Ann Henshaw Gardiner, historian, scientist, and teacher, founded nursing education at the Duke University Hospital in 1930.

Between 1926 and 1930, Mrs. Mabel Gardiner wrote to many friends who remembered details of family weddings in the mid-nineteenth century. As late as 1940 she corresponded with R. B. Woodworth on the history of the Tuscarora Church and other Berkeley County churches. A picture of the Tuscarora Church is with these papers. (See Picture Cab. II-7)

The heart of the Ann Henshaw Gardiner Papers is the collection of legal papers which date from 1763. Both the Snodgrasses and the Henshaws as justices of the peace and county office holders were involved in a great deal of legal business through the ions . A grouping of legal papers for both families is followed by special sections on land surveys, on estate settlements, and on militia.

The general file of legal papers begins with gants from Lord Fairfax in the 1760s, when Berkeley County was still a part of Frederick County, Virginia. Richard Rigg, the land agent for Lord Fairifax, was the first surveyor in the district settled by the Henshaws and the Snodgrasses. Rawlings family deeds appear in the 1770s.

At the end of the Revolutionary War, John Turner appears as a chain carrier for the land surveys of the County. He became county surveyor, an office which he held until his death in 1811.

Among the family wills is that of Nicholas Henshaw (died 1777). With the deaths of Robert and Stephen Snodgrass in 1830 and 1832, a great deal of administrative work for their estates enters the papers, as Robert Verdier Snodgrass was appointed executor for both men. (Robert V. Snodgrass was the sone of Stephen Snodgrass) David Hunter and Israel Robinson are the clerks of the county court in these early documents.

Schools, roads, runaway slaves, the hiring of servants mail are concerns Which occupy the papers. With the death of Robert Verdier Snodgrass in 1861, his estate is settled and the legal papers belong to the Henshaws from that date.

The second division of legal papers concerns the settlement of a number of estates, usually those of relatives . The Turner and Gorrell families had intermarried with the Snodgrasses and Henshaws. The earliest papers dating from 1798 contain the will and estate inventory of Joseph Evans. Israel Robinson was executor of the estate of Elan Miller in 1849.

A large group of legal papers concerns the acquisition of land, basic in Virginia economic life in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Survey plats began in 1753 in old Frederick County, which had been established in 1738. From it Berkeley County was created in 1772. The first surveys, made for the Rawlings and Morgan families, were for land purchased from Lord Fairfax. Richard Rigg, his surveyor, signed the plats showing the Fairfax grants. Rigg is followed by surveyors Thomas Jones and Josiah Swearingen. Many names of early settlers appear in the survey papers. In the 1780' s a chain carrier, John Turner, began to make surveys. He married Ruth Rawlings, whose land plats are in the papers. John Turner became surveyor for Berkeley County and remained in office till his death in 1810. His son Thomas, who was his deputy, succeeded him as surveyor for the county; The estate papers of the Turner family, elsewhere in the legal papers, show them as early residents of old Frederick County.

In 1803 land office records appear in conjunction with the survey appears. By this time Robert Verdier Snodgrass was a county commissioner of revenue who worked with the Turners in the sale of land.

The Snodgrass family was involved in militia affairs from 1798, when Robert (d. 1830) was a 1st lieutenant in the 67th Regiment 16th Brigade, 3rd Division, Virginia Militia. This county regiment was divided into local companies, each of which was subdivided into classes of roughly seven men. Class rolls, rosters, and officers' lists make up the official papers. By 1820, Robert Verdier Snodgrass was serving as an officer. He became colonel of the 67th Regiment in 1838, thereafter making annual returns.

The constitution of the Berkeley Rangers was drawn up on November 26, 1859, to organize a company of militia from Berkeley County. This company is listed as the Berkeley Border Guards Co. D. 2nd Virginia Infantry, C.S.A. Army, under J.Q.A. Nandenbousch of Martinsburg.

The financial papers are divided between Levi Henshaw I and II and Robert Verdier Snodgrass. Bills and receipts, loans, and household accounts increased as the nineteenth century brought a less self-sufficient life on the farms of Berkeley County. The Snodgrasses no longer lived at the Bill on Back Creek, but had moved to Hedgesville.

With such long family histories in Berkeley County, it was to be expected that descendants of the Henshaws and Snodgrasses should turn to writing the history of their section of Virginia. Valley of Virginia Henshaw was a leader of the Daughters of the American Revolution in Berkeley and throughout West Virginia. Her sisters, Mabel and Frances, were in Martinsburg by 1916. They were the children of Levi Henshaw II and Sarah Ann, the daughter of Robert Verdier Snodgrass.

Mabel (Henshaw) Gardiner wrote a thesis on the history of Martinsburg in 1930 for the degree of Master of Arts at the University of West Virginia. This work was developed into Chronicles of Old Berkeley by Mrs. Gardiner in collaboration with her daughter, Ann Henshaw Gardiner. Published in 1938, this history is based on the Ann H. Gardiner Papers and contains the diaries which Captain Levi and Hiram Henshaw kept on trips to Kentucky, ca. 1828-1830.

Ann Henshaw Gardiner graduated from Shepherd College and went into training in nursing at the Massachusetts General Hospital. She saw service in World War I in a United States Army base hospital in France (U.S. Base Hospital NO. 6). In 1927 she wrote her thesis "The Development of the External Form of the Squid Embryo," at Kansas State Agricultural College for the degree of Master of Science. With the manuscripts of this work are pamphlets and papers of Francis Noyes Balch on Cephalopods.

Broadsides and pamphlets refer to Berkeley County and its history, to estate sales in the county, to the Whig Party, to the militia, and to the Free masons.

Clippings pertain to family members and to the story of Martinsburg and West Virginia. A series of articles by B. F. Voegle on local history is also in clipping form.

Among the miscellaneous material is a manuscript arithmetic book, 1790-1791, which was used by Robert Snodgrass II.

The volumes contain a number of old account books and other records. Family data for the Snodgrasses is preserved in their Age Book, 1821-1861 for each generation from William to Robert Verdier Snodgrass, as well as a list of the family slaves and their ages. Daybooks and farm books date fray 1803 to the 1840's. Four postal card albums, an autograph album, and scrapbooks with many other miscellaneous volumes are in the collection.

At the end of the papers are two albums and two manuscript histories of the first ten years of the Duke University School of Nursing. Pictures, programs, invitations, and clippings in the first album document the beginning of the nursing program in 1930. In the second album are photographs of nursing and laboratory classes

A number of letters, poems, and pamphlets unmounted in albums, conclude the nursing papers On December 27, 1934, the Duke University School of Nursing Alumnae Association was organized with a constitution. A reprint from the Southern Medical Association Journal contains the speeches made in April, 1931, at the dedication of the Medical School. Among the pictures are a number of photographs of members of the various classes of the Nursing School. The Henshaw family is well illustrated by pictures of individuals, their homes, and antique furnishlngs. For further details on this collection, see F. Vernon Aler, History of Martinsburg and Berkeley County, West Vlrginia; Willis F. Evans, History of Berkeley County West Virginia; and A. H. and M. H. Gardiner, Chronicles of Old Berkeley.

119 items and 9 vols., added 5-30-71, are letters, financial and legal papers, and scrapbooks and albums of the Henshaw, Snodgrass, and Gardiner families. Manuscripts of the early nineteenth century pertain to the settlement of estates, land transactions, and the hiring of Negro slaves and their deposition. The volumes center in nine scrapbooks and albums - five of which contain post cards of France and all of which are illustrative of the career of Miss Gardiner.

1 item and 1 cassette tape added, 1-24-73: Copies of the address Miss Gardiner gave at the fortieth anniversary banquet of the Alumni Association of the Nursing School of the Duke Medical Center, April 10, 1970.

2 items added, 5-5-84: Letters written by Robert Verdier Snodgrass to his wife Sarah Ann Snodgrass, in Hedgesville, Va., while he was attending a session of the state legislature in Richmond as a delegate. He describes the city of Richmond and a party given by Governor David Campbell, and mentions political colleagues, a military parade, and the failure of the legislature to elect a United States Senator.

Description from the Duke University. David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library Manuscript Card Catalog.

Collection

Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely papers, 1870-1988 7.2 Linear Feet — 4,700 Items

The Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely Papers, 1870-1988, contain chiefly correspondence and diaries but also include legal papers, pictures, and clippings. The collection primarily documents the life of Blakely as a Clinton, S.C. housewife and mother, and of her children, Florence Ella Blakely and Ann Newkirk Blakely McLeod. Much of the Correspondence Series consists of personal letters by family members and friends written to Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely, her husband Ralph Royd Blakely, daughters Florence Ella Blakely (a Duke University librarian), and Ann Newkirk Blakely McLeod. A large portion of this series contain correspondence (1921-1978) between Annie and Ralph Blakely before they were married. Although the Diaries Series (1927-1978) contains primarily the journals of Annie Lois Newkirk Blakely, other family members Florence Ella Blakely and Inez Robertson Blakely, are also included. The Pictures Series contains family photographs of vacations, holidays, and weddings. The Legal Papers Series primarily contains banking and investment correspondence, as well as personal legal Items, such as Annie Blakely's discharge papers from the U.S. Army and Ralph Blakely's discharge papers from the U.S. Navy after World War I. The Miscellaneous Series includes War Ration Books from the 1940s and photocopied newspaper clippings that pertain to the Blakely and Newkirk families.

Collection

Ann Preston Bridgers papers, 1871-1967 and undated 8.8 Linear Feet — 3,100 Items

The papers of Ann Preston Bridgers span the years 1871-1967, although the bulk of the material covers the period 1925-1963. Included in the collection are correspondence, manuscript drafts and notes, business items and programs related to the Raleigh Little Theatre, contracts, wills, newsclippings, and photographs.

Miss Bridgers' life is best documented in the correspondence. It is chiefly of a personal nature, between Miss Bridgers and her family, including her sisters Elizabeth (Bab) and Emily and to a lesser extent her brother Robert. Elizabeth was the wife of Jonathan Daniels, son of Josephus Daniels, and there are several letters from Jonathan to the Bridgers and references made to his parents. Later correspondence includes letters from Bab's daughter, Elizabeth and her husband Charles (Chick) B. Squire, in which they often critiqued each other's writings.

Elizabeth Lawrence, horticulturist and author of gardening works, is also represented extensively in the correspondence from the mid 1930's until about 1948. Other correspondents include George Abbott, whose correspondence dates primarily from 1962 to 1964, and various literary agents.

The Writings series comprises the bulk of the collection, and includes works by Miss Bridgers and other members of her family and friends. Coquette, the work for which she is best known is not represented in this series. There is, however, information regarding this play, which opened on Broadway in 1927, in the Correspondence, Legal and Financial Papers, Raleigh Little Theater, and Clippings series. Also included in this series are several drafts of "Those Without Freedom," an unpublished novel about the South after the Civil War.

The National Union Catalog Pre-1956 Imprints lists two published works by Miss Bridgers: Coquette, where she is listed as the joint author, and an article in the Saturday Review of Literature in 1935 about Thomas Wolfe. Drafts and background material for this article are located in the Writings series. Other persons represented in the Writings series include: Emily and Robert R. Bridgers; Elizabeth (Daniels) Squire; and Elizabeth Lawrence.

The efforts of Miss Bridgers and others involved with the founding of the Raleigh Little Theater are reflected in the Correspondence and Raleigh Little Theater series.

In addition to legal papers relating to the play Coquette, the Legal and Financial Papers series also includes documents concerning the will and estate of Miss Bridgers' aunt, Emily Bridgers, receipts, and other miscellaneous financial data. Financial concerns of the family are also found in the Correspondence series.

The Clippings series contains reviews of the Broadway production of Coquette, as well as book reviews and newspaper columns by Miss Bridgers. The series also provides information about Miss Bridgers, other family members, and miscellany items.

Genealogical information about the Bridgers family, an engagement book Miss Bridgers kept while traveling in Europe (1961), and other items comprise the Miscellany series.

The Photographs series contains three albums of photographs. Some appear to be of theatrical productions; many are of unidentified persons. Loose photographs include those of Ann Preston Bridgers, George Abbott, Mr. and Mrs. Josephus Daniels, and Miss Bridgers' grandfather, Robert Rufus Bridgers.

Collection
Anthony family of Burlington (Guilford Co.), N.C. Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection

Newsletters, executive meeting minutes, directories, correspondence, election information, meeting critiques, and other printed matter document the activities of the Appalachian Society of American Foresters between 1921-1994. Records found in the collection include position descriptions, committee charters, by-laws, and copies of the organization's journal, Trail Blazer. There is also a report on the recovery from Hurricane Hugo (1989).

Collection
Aristide Caviallé-Coll was a French organ builder and musician. The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe, and the Americas, as well as his incorporation of technological innovations into his instruments. This material was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

The collection includes unbound, full-size prints from microfilm of letters, monographs, first drafts, contracts, and indexes which reflect the extent of Caviallé-Coll's work in France, Europe and the Americas, as well as his incorporations of technological innovations into his instruments. The material in this collection was used by Professor Fenner Douglass in his book "Caviallé-Coll and the Musicians; a Documented Account of the First Thirty Years in Organ Building," and the collection includes the author's index cards and notebooks.

Collection
Arlie R. Slabaugh was a publisher, hobby shop dealer and mail order promoter, and collector of periodicals related to the mail order business. The collection offers an overview of the mail order industry during pre-war and World War II-era in the United States. It is believed to have been created by Arlie R. Slabaugh, who was primarily a collector of coins and paper money, as well as a mail order promoter. The collection contains periodicals, amateur newspapers, hobby catalogs and printed ephemera, primarily from the 1930s-1940s, but also including examples from the 1920s and 1950s. Most are monthly periodicals, published as staple-bound or self-folding newsprint or glossy pamphlets, with some illustrations. Many of the items are regional in scope, possibly originating from major printing centers and distributed to local markets, particularly in the U.S. South, the Midwest and California.

The collection offers an overview of the mail order industry during pre-war and World War II-era in the United States. It is believed to have been created by Arlie R. Slabaugh, who was primarily a collector of coins and paper money, as well as a mail order promoter. The collection contains periodicals, amateur newspapers, hobby catalogs and printed ephemera, primarily from the 1930s-1940s, but also including examples from the 1920s and 1950s. Most are monthly periodicals, published as staple-bound or self-folding newsprint or glossy pamphlets, with some illustrations. Many of the items are regional in scope, possibly originating from major printing centers and distributed to local markets, particularly in the U.S. South, the Midwest and California.

Restrictions on Access: Original newsprint items in oversize box are closed to researchers. Use copies are available in the collection.

Collection

Arlin Turner papers, 1927-1980 15.6 Linear Feet — circa 9750 Items

The papers span Turner's career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. Comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature, including Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. There are also letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations, including the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association, Committee for American Studies, and the Associated Research Council. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature, including Southern literature, American humor, Nathaniel Hawthorne and George Washington Cable.

The Arlin Turner Papers, 1927-1980, span Turner's entire career as a scholar of American literature, from his undergraduate education at West Texas State University in 1927 to his death in 1980, when he was an instructor at Southwest Texas State University. The Turner Papers are comprised primarily of personal and professional correspondence with scholars and publishers of American literature. The correspondence includes letters, printed matter, reports, and minutes that Turner collected as a member or officer of organizations to which many of these literary scholars belonged. These materials, in addition to the clippings, printed materials and other writings Turner collected, provide insight into the development of the profession of American literary scholarship in the 1920s and 1930s; demonstrate the major concerns, issues, conflicts, and interests of its practitioners over the following four decades; and record research advancements and contributions to scholarship on the literary figures of most interest to Turner. The Turner Papers also document the development of high school, collegiate, and graduate level instruction in American literature through the organizational records and course materials, the latter of which include Turner's personal writings and research notes, subject files he collected, clippings, lecture notes, and other printed materials on various authors or genres of American literature. Finally, this collection provides glimpses into Turner's personal career and scholarly thought through the writings which are included, both those he presented orally as speeches or lectures, or those he published as articles or books. The Turner Papers are organized into five series: Correspondence, Course Materials, Organizations, Printed Material, and Writings and Speeches.

A student of the first generation of American literature scholars in the 1920s, Turner played an important role in the network of scholarly exchange that was vital to the emergence of the discipline in the decades following. Turner kept in contact with numerous colleagues in colleges and universities across the United States and throughout the world, including many former graduate students who later became influential literary scholars and critics themselves. The Correspondence Series, 1930-1980, documents Turner's role in this network of scholarly exchange. The Individuals Subseries, 1930-1980, includes Turner's most voluminous correspondents: American literature specialists and authors Gay Wilson Allen, John Q. Anderson, Louis Budd, Robert Cantwell, James B. Colvert, Eddie Gay Cone, Benjamin Franklin Fisher, Albert Mordell, Norman Holmes Pearson, William Stafford, and Edmund Wilson. The Publications Subseries, 1934-1979, contains portions of Turner's communications with editors, publishers, and presses primarily regarding article reviews or manuscript evaluations of others' work. This subseries also contains some information concerning Turner's own articles, manuscripts, and various published works. Correspondence, brochures, press releases, reports, and contractual information concerning Turner's speaking engagements or attendance at professional meetings is collected in the Conferences, Speeches, and Lectures Subseries, 1961-1978 (bulk 1961-1964). Miscellaneous materials comprised primarily of letters arranged by subject are assembled in the Other Correspondence Subseries, 1948-1979 and undated This subseries also contains research notes, memos, and printed material. These papers document Turner's visiting professor appointments and awards, as well as his interest in topics such as the Duke University Library, the Huntington Library, George W. Cable primary sources, and international scholars of American Literature.

The Course Materials Series, undated, is comprised of information Turner collected to aid in composing classroom lectures, and other teaching materials. He maintained an extensive set of files on American authors, which can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Author Subseries, undated Most files contain a brief biography of the author and list of his major compositions, but may also include copies of their works, a typescript of Turner's lecture on the author, and related materials such as clippings or Turner's handwritten research notes. Turner also collected files on genres of literature, delineated both by region, such as Louisiana or British literature, or by style, such as Short Stories or Recent Fiction. These can be found in the Lecture Notes, By Subject Subseries, undated The Class Files Subseries, undated, contains Turner's teaching materials including syllabi, quizes, and exams. These files pertain to courses Turner taught (or in a few early instances, took) in subjects including American Literature before the Civil War, Post-Civil War Literature, Hawthorne and Melville, American Humor, and Southern Literature. Specific course numbers and titles have been provided wherever possible.

Arlin Turner was an active leader and participant in many of the organizations associated with his profession and interests, which are chronicled in the Organizations Series, 1929-1979 (bulk 1936-1979). These scholarly groups developed policies, conducted studies, and otherwise governed the profession. Thus, Turner's influential positions in most of these associations render his thorough collection of organizational records both valuable and useful. Folders in this series primarily contain correspondence, minutes, memoranda, reports, and printed matter such as newsletters, brochures, and clippings. Most notable is Turner's work with the Modern Language Association (MLA), whose American Literature Section members are primarily responsible for the spread of American Studies programs across the globe. Turner's records also document his work with the South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA), the American Studies Association (ASA), and the Southeastern American Studies Association (SEASA). This series likewise chronicles Turner's leadership roles in the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE), the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH).

Turner was also a member of the Committee for American Studies, the advisory group for the Conference Board of Associated Research Councils' (CBC) Committee for International Exchange of Persons (CIEP). The Organizations Series also includes files on the selection of Fulbright Scholars that he collected as a member of that committee. In addition, Turner served as chairman of this committee during the period in which the "Loewenberg controversy" consumed the CIEP's affairs. When Prof. Bert J. Loewenberg was denied a Fulbright Award in 1959 despite the committee's recommendation, its members threatened to resign in protest against allegations that Loewenberg's past political activity was to blame. Thus, significant amounts of correspondence from fellow committee members Ray Billington, John Hope Franklin, Harvey Wish, and Charles Barker regarding the controversy is found in this series.

Arlin Turner accumulated a significant number of clippings, newsletters, pamphlets, reprints, and publications related to American Literature. These are collected in the Printed Material Series, undated Included in this series are materials from the Educational Testing Service (ETS), memorabilia from Turner's time at the University of Hull in England, literary magazines, and miscellaneous clippings primarily regarding Southern writers (especially North Carolina authors), William Faulkner, and the New Critics (a.k.a. The Fugitives).

The Writings and Speeches Series, 1938-1980 and undated (bulk 1964-1977), contains copies of Turner's significant oral presentations and other written work, both published and unpublished, in addition to some writings of other authors he accumulated. Files from Turner's speaking engagements include both correspondence and typed copies of his presentations. This series also contains unidentified speech notes and writings, in addition to a bound typescript with handwritten edits of Turner's Nathaniel Hawthorne: A biography . Writings about Turner, including obituaries, tributes, his curriculum vita and the like, are also found in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Collection

Armistead Burt papers, 1759-1933 3.6 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 5,675 items

Armistead Burt (1802-1883) was a planter, lawyer, and U.S. Representative from Abbeville, S.C. Collection contains political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress. The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection includes the political and legal correspondence of Armistead Burt (1802-1883), South Carolina planter and member of U.S. Congress.

The political correspondence deals largely with the policies of John C. Calhoun and the question of secession. After 1860 the material relates chiefly to Burt's law practice, especially to the management of estates of Confederate soldiers, and the Calhoun estate. Other matters referred to include the political corruption and economic conditions in postwar South Carolina. Among the correspondents are Armistead Burt, Pierce M. Butler, Henry Toole Clark, Thomas Green Clemson, T. L. Deveaux, James H. Hammond, A. P. Hayne, Reverdy Johnson, Hugh S. Legare, Augustus B. Longstreet, W. N. Meriwether, James L. Petigru, Francis W. Pickens, Robert Barnwell Rhett, Richard Rush, Waddy Thompson, and Louis T. Wigfall.

Collection

Armistead T. M. Filler papers, 1796-1945 6.4 Linear Feet — 4,821 Items

Lovettsville (Loudoun Co.), Va. resident. He was connected with the B. and O. Railroad Co., was a member of the Odd Fellows and the Democratic State Central Committee, and was treasurer of Loudoun Co. Collection contains personal and official correspondence, business papers, and family records. Much of the business correspondence deals with the sale and purchase of guano and the financial affairs of "Linden," the Filler estate. Filler was a livestock speculator, had interests in the marble business, silver mines, and livestock insurance. Included are letters from Woodrow Wilson, J.K. Vardaman, Gen. Marcus Wright, McAdoo, and other prominent national figures. There is also a manuscript account of the cavalry battle of Traveler's Station.

Collection contains personal and official correspondence, business papers, and family records. Much of the business correspondence deals with the sale and purchase of guano and the financial affairs of "Linden," the Filler estate. Filler was a livestock speculator, had interests in the marble business, silver mines, and livestock insurance. Included are letters from Woodrow Wilson, J.K. Vardaman, Gen. Marcus Wright, McAdoo, and other prominent national figures. There is also a manuscript account of the cavalry battle of Traveler's Station.

Collection

Art and Artifacts records, 1915 - 2005 2 Linear Feet — 1,300 Items

Online
In January, 2005, funds granted by the Mary Duke Biddle Foundation allowed the Duke University Archives to survey University-owned paintings within the Perkins Library system. Prior to the survey, records of University-owned art that had been collected by University Archives staff, and these records were organized and collated with the new survey information. Collection includes lists, inventories, correspondence, clippings, notes, memoranda, photographs, and other materials generated 1915-2005 and related to art and artifacts owned by Duke University, including information on the portaits of the Trustees of The Duke Endowment painted by Douglas Chandor. Other artists represented include Charles S. Wiltschek, John Da Costa, Mary Lyde Hicks Williams, Norval H. Busey, Irene Price, Cedric Egeli, Simmie Knox, John A. Furlow, and Nelson Shanks. English.

Collection includes lists, inventories, correspondence, clippings, notes, memoranda, photographs, and other materials generated 1915-2005 and related to art and artifacts owned by Duke University, including information on the portraits of the Trustees of The Duke Endowment in the Gothic Reading Room painted by Douglas Chandor. Other artists represented include Charles S. Wiltschek, John Da Costa, Mary Lyde Hicks Williams, Norval H. Busey, Irene Price, Cedric Egeli, Simmie Knox, John A. Furlow, and Nelson Shanks.

Collection

Art Association records, bulk 1930-1938 1 Linear Foot — 1000 Items

The Duke University Art Association was formed by William K. Boyd in 1930. The Association planned and organized art exhibits, gallery talks, and other art appreciation activities on the Duke campus until the early 1940s. Collection includes minutes, correspondence, photographs, exhibit catalogs, lists of objects, membership lists, and related materials. Major subjects include faculty spouses, art appreciation, the Woman's College Library, the American Federation of Arts, the Carl Shurz Memorial Foundation for the Development of Cultural Relations Between the United States and Germany, the College Art Association, and the Southern States Art League. The bulk of the materials range in date from 1930 to 1938. English.

The Art Association Records include minutes, correspondence, photographs, exhibit catalogs, lists of objects, membership lists, and related materials. Major subjects include faculty spouses, art appreciation, the American Federation of Arts, the Carl Shurz Memorial Foundation for the Development of Cultural Relations Between the United States and Germany, the College Art Association, and the Southern States Art League.

Collection

Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

Collection

Arthur H. Lyons papers, 1891-1933 3 Linear Feet — 15 Items

Collection comprises seven bound typescript volumes containing Lyons' daily accounts of his trips. There are postcards, brochures, and other materials related to his travel that were placed in the volumes. Destinations include Washington, D.C.; New York City; Boston; Nashville; Charleston, S.C.; Jacksonville, Fla.; the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago; the White Mountains; and the Adirondacks. Topics include destinations, the people he meets, hotels, train travel, and scenery. The collection also contains a postcard scrapbook; a pamphlet by James M. Gillis entitled, "The Ku-Klux Klan" (1922); and a bound typescript short story entitled "The Irony of Fate," which fictionalizes Lyons' father's participation in and life immediately after the Civil War. Includes 5 black-and-white photographs. (02-046)

Collection

Arthur I. Bloomfield papers, 1927-1995 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approximately 7200 items

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files.

The papers of university professor and economist Arthur Bloomfield span the period from 1927 to 1995. They consist chiefly of research files from his job as economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, 1941-1958, professional and academic correspondence received or written from 1931 to 1995, research notes on various topics in international finance, notes for his university classes on the history of economic thought, and research files on the pre-1914 gold standard. The papers document Bloomfield's career as economist and professor of economics, with special emphasis on his work as economic consultant for the United States federal government, particularly for the New York Federal Reserve Bank, and for the governments of post-World War II South Korea and Indochina. His chief areas of research activity focused on international banking, evaluating foreign aid programs, the pre-1914 gold standard, and economic development in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries (including the British West Indies), and economy and banking in Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, the Congo, and Zaire. Substantial materials on the history of economic thought can be found in Bloomfield's teaching files. The collection is comprised of six series: Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing; Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series; Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series; History of Economic Thought Series; Research Files Series; and Miscellaneous Series.

The Correspondence Series, Incoming and Outgoing, contains letters received or written by Bloomfield over the period 1931 to 1995. Arranged in folders chronologically, this substantive collection of letters lends insight into Bloomfield's professional and academic life.

The Federal Reserve Bank of New York Series contains material pertaining to Bloomfield's first career, spanning 17 years, as an economist at the New York Federal Reserve Bank. For that position he wrote a number of research memoranda and in-house articles on a wide range of international finance topics. Before World War II he wrote mostly on economic developments in the U.K. and British Commonwealth countries, but after the war his research memoranda involved a broader range of topics.

The Pre-1914 Gold Standard Series contains research notes for an intended book on the functioning of the international gold standard, 1880-1914. Bloomfield embarked on a year-long research trip to Europe in 1957 on a Rockefeller grant, visiting twelve European central banks, including the Bank of England where he spent over six months. In the end, he did not complete the book, but did write three substantial monographs from his notes: Monetary Policy under the International Gold Standard, 1880-1914 (Fed. Reserve Bank NY, 1959); Short-term Capital Movements under the Pre-1914 Gold Standard (Princeton Univ. Press, 1963); and Patterns of Fluctuation in International Investment before 1914 (Princeton Univ. Press, 1968). Although these books are not in the collection, this series contains one file folder for many countries or geographical areas, including: Switzerland, U.S.A., Sweden, Norway, Italy, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, India, Egypt, France, Canada, U.K., Japan, Germany, Finland, Denmark, Russia, Belgium, Netherlands, Austria, and Hungary.

The History of Economic Thought Series is an extensive collection of files on diverse topics in the history of economic thought. After 1974 Bloomfield's research became increasingly devoted to the history of economic thought, and he taught both graduate and undergraduate level classes on the subject at the University of Pennsylvania.

The Research Files Series contains research notes associated with various overseas assignments and trips. Over the period 1949-1984, Bloomfield made numerous trips to developing countries as a consultant, in some cases helping to establish the Central Bank (e.g. South Korea), or in other cases evaluating foreign aid programs to those areas (e.g. Indochina). In addition to notes made in preparation for, and during, these assignments, this series also contains notes for several articles (published and unpublished), speeches, and conferences.

The bulk of the Miscellaneous Series consists of papers from Bloomfield's undergraduate days at McGill University, including one paper written in 1937 for Frank Knight's ECO 305 class at the University of Chicago, titled "Thorstein Veblen and his Analysis of Business Enterprise."

Collection

Arthur M. Proctor papers, 1906 - 1967 5.5 Linear Feet — 4000 Items

Arthur Marcus Proctor (1886-1955) was a professor in the Department of Education at Duke University. He also served as Director of the Duke Summer Session for several years. The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education. English.

The Arthur M. Proctor Papers include correspondence, speeches, articles, clippings, handbooks, photographs, and other materials related to Proctor's career as a teacher of teachers. Includes surveys of North Carolina schools, 1920s-1950s, and handbooks for state high schools, course materials for his work at Duke and other schools, and some files on the Duke Department of Education.

Collection

Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

Collection
Artifacts, memorabilia, pins, awards, textiles, and other materials, either related to or produced by Trinity College and Duke University or collected by Trinity College Historical Society or other offices and individuals as historical curiosities.

Artifacts, memorabilia, pins, awards, textiles, and other materials, either related to or produced by Trinity College and Duke University or collected by Trinity College Historical Society or other offices and individuals as historical curiosities. Includes academic apparel from university leaders, athletic memorabilia, commemorative plates, and shoulder patches from the Armed Forces units that Duke alumni served in.

Collection

Arts at Duke Reference collection, circa 1910-ongoing 0.7 Linear Feet — approx. 350 Items

Online
The Arts at Duke Reference Collection contains files of clippings, programs, calendars and other materials concerning the arts at Duke and at Trinity College, the University's predecessor. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research. For materials pertaining to art at Trinity College, see the Trinity College Reference Collection.

Flyers and posters, newspaper and magazine clippings, calendars, event programs and other materials pertaining to the arts at Duke and Trinity College. The bulk dates are 1972-2000. Includes a plan of the "Woodland Stage" at Trinity College along with programs and contracts for performances at Trinity by the Ben Greet Players and the Coburn Players, circa 1910-1916.

Collection
Online
Asa T. Spaulding was an insurance executive in Durham, N.C. and an activist in civil rights, education, employment, and other work related to minorities' rights. He held various positions in the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company for almost thirty-five years, beginning as its actuary in 1933 and serving as its fifth president from 1958 through 1967. Elna Bridgeforth Spaulding was an activist in civil rights for minorities and women and involved in local politics in Durham, N.C, serving as a Durham County Commissioner for five terms, from 1974 through 1984. The Asa and Elna Spaulding Papers, 1909-1997 and undated, bulk 1935-1983, document an African American family's lifelong involvement in the business, political, educational, religious, and social life of Durham, N.C. The collection consists of correspondence, writings and speeches, printed materials, clippings, photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia that reflect the Spauldings' work with the following organizations and groups: North Carolina Mutual Insurance Company; Mechanics and Farmers Bank; Durham County Board of Commissioners; the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People; National Urban League; Women-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc.; North Carolina Central and Shaw universities; White Rock Baptist Church (Durham, N.C.); and the Lincoln Community Health Center. The collection is divided into two subgroups. The Asa Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in nine series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, North Carolina Mutual Files, Insurance Files, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The Elna Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in six series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials.

The Asa and Elna Spaulding Papers, 1909-1997 and undated, bulk 1935-1983, document an African American family's lifelong involvement in the business, political, educational, religious, and social life of Durham, N.C. The Spauldings were active in a broad range of political bodies, businesses, civic groups, and activist organizations, including among many others theDurham County Board of Commissioners and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, and were among the co-founders of Women-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and Its Causes, Inc. Their long record of accomplishment in the areas of employment, political representation, civil rights, race relations, and women's rights is documented by the collection's rich variety ofcorrespondence, writings and speeches, printed materials, clippings,photographs, audiovisual items, and memorabilia. The collection is divided into two subgroups. The Asa Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in nine series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, North Carolina Mutual Files, Insurance Files, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The Elna Spaulding Subgroup is arranged in six series: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Organizations, Subject Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. Some of these materials have been digitized and are available online.

The Asa Spaulding Subgroup, 1909-1984 and undated, documents Mr. Spaulding's career as an insurance executive and his lifelong activism in civil rights, education, employment, and other work related to minorities' rights. While serving in various capacities in Durham's North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, Spaulding was also instrumental in the development of other local businesses such as the Mechanics and Farmers Bank as well as being active in a number of life insurance organizations at the national level, including the National Insurance Association and the Life Insurance Association of America. As his business career developed, culminating in his becoming the Mutual's fifth president in 1958, his national and international reputation also grew, especially in the areas of civil rights and race relations. This led to his serving on a number of government commissions and task forces and in various organizations concerned with urban affairs. Among the most important of these were the American delegation to a UNESCO conference in India and the National Urban League. Spaulding also maintained lifelong ties to the academic and religious communities. At various times he served on the boards of a number of universities, including North Carolina Central andShaw; in addition he had a long involvement with the Omega Psi Phi fraternity. He was active all his adult life not only in his local church, White Rock Baptist Church, but also in national groups such as the National Conference of Christians and Jews.

The Correspondence Series is characterized not by its depth of material for any one correspondent but rather its reflection of the breadth of Spaulding's contacts in business, government, politics, and education. Among the many contacts represented here are North Carolina governors, United States senators and congressmen, and all American presidents from the 1940s through the 1970s. The Writings and Speeches Series contains Spaulding's articles, opinion columns, press releases, speeches, and other works on a wide variety of topics, including civil rights, economics, education, insurance, principles of business management,race relations, and his travels abroad as a representative of the United States and UNESCO. There are also many of his introductions of speakers at public events and tributes to friends and political figures. A highlight of this series is the wealth of material about Spaulding's own life and career. Most of this was gathered by him for a planned though unpublishedautobiography; it consists of correspondence, drafts, interviews, printed material, and a variety of anecdotes and personal stories,

The Organizations Series is by far the largest series in the subgroup. It documents how far and wide Spaulding's interests and activities ranged beyond his career in the insurance industry, particularly his support of and agitation for civil rights and related issues and organizations. Series highlights include material about the following topics and organizations: his tenure on the board of trustees for theLegal Defense Committee of the NAACP; his work as a member of the North Carolina Advisory Committee to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights; his work with the Women and Minority Directors Seminar (an attempt in the early 1970s to encourage organizations and businesses to hire more minorities at the management level); his activities as an American representative to a UNESCO delegation in the 1950s; and his 1971 mayoral election campaign in Durham. Also to be found here is a collection of materials about White Rock Baptist Church, of which Spaulding was a long time member and director. White Rock Baptist Church was prominent in civil rights activities in North Carolina and hosted many guest speakers.

Spaulding's career in the insurance industry is documented by two series, the North Carolina Mutual Files and the Insurance Files. Spaulding was the actuary for the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company (Durham, N.C.), in the 1930s, its actuary and vice-president in the 1940s, and its fifth president from 1956-1967. Thus the series documents not only Spaulding's career, but the development of the company over several decades into the largest African American-owned business in the world. A particular focus of this series is the dedication of the company's new building in downtown Durham in 1966, probably the major event of Spaulding's tenure as president. TheInsurance Files series reflects his activities in the industry beyond his positions at North Carolina Mutual. A particularly rich group of the papers documents his work with theNational Insurance Association (NIA), of which Spaulding was president in the 1940s. Formerly known as the National Negro Insurance Association, the NIA was an organization of officers of black-owned American insurance companies.

Several smaller series broaden the picture of Spaulding's life and career. The Subject Files contain general biographical data as well as more information about his travels and his campaigns for Durham County Commissioner and Mayor of Durham in the late 1960s and early 1970s. ThePhotographic Materials Seriesalso documents his travels as well as some of the history of North Carolina Mutual, especially the dedication of the new home office building in 1966. The subject matter of theAudiovisual Materials Series is largely biographical or autobiographical. In addition to recordings of some of Spaulding's speeches and public interviews, this series also contains several recordings he made that are apparently materials he was gathering for his planned autobiography.

The Elna Spaulding Subgroup, 1909-1997 and undated, documents Mrs. Spaulding's activism for civil rights for minorities and women and her career in local politics. Although the material spans almost sixty years, the bulk of it is from the late 1960s through the early 1980s. The Correspondence Series contains both personal and professional letters that give an indication of her involvement in local and state politics, advocacy for various groups including women, African Americans, children, and the elderly. Some of the organizations that appear in this series also appear in the Organizations Series.Although some correspondence may appear in the latter series, in general this material is not addressed to or from Mrs. Spaulding individually, but rather is documentation of each organization's work, including meeting agendas and minutes, financial reports, annual reports, and a wide range of planned activities. The papers of the Durham County Board of Commissioners provide the most detailed picture of Mrs. Spaulding's political activity. Her other work has focused on attempts to break down barriers between various groups and their rights. Involvement in these issues, including women's employment, women's rights, and public health, is highlighted by the material fromWomen-in-Action for the Prevention of Violence and its Causes, of which she was the founder--in 1968--and first president, as well as such organizations as the Lincoln Community Health Center. The Subject Filesround out the picture of her career, particularly in documenting her campaigns for public office in the 1970s and 1980s.

Collection

Asian maps collection, 1771-1945 4.0 Linear Feet — 10 items

The Asian Maps Collection comprises maps of Korea, China, and Japan, dated from 1771-1945. Several of the maps are full color, and include woodblock prints.

The Asian Maps Collection comprises maps of Korea, China, and Japan, dated from 1771-1945. Several of the maps are full color, and include woodblock prints. Several maps include information on military installments. A few maps include hand-written notations.

Collection

Associations Reference collection, 1927-ongoing 1 Linear Foot — approx. 600 Items

The Associations Reference Collection contains material about organizations other than the university but with which university faculty, staff, and students have been involved. It contains files of clippings, correspondence, memoranda, and printed materials, and was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

The Associations Reference Collection contains material about organizations other than the university, but with which university faculty, staff, and students have been involved. These organizations, which may be local, regional, or national in scope, include informal unincorporated associations as well as foundations and businesses. The forms of material present include correspondence, memoranda, reports, printed materials, news and magazine clippings, rosters, and forms. Major subjects include the Research Triangle, children's education, Durham's Trinity Park neighborhood, pluralism, and student government. The dates span the years 1927 to 1998 with the bulk being 1964 to 1989.

Collection

Athletic Council records, 1907 - 1993 11 Linear Feet — 9500 Items

The Duke University Athletic Council began in 1907 as the Trinity College Athletic Council. Since that time, it has offered advice and recommendations on the administration of athletics at Duke. The collection includes correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, athletic contracts, schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, financial information, and other materials. Major topics include athletics at Duke University, especially football and basketball; Duke's relationship to intercollegiate athletics associations like the ACC (Atlantic Coast Conference), NCAA (National Collegiate Athletics Association), AIAW (Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women), and CFA (College Football Association); the financing of college athletics; the management of college athletics; college athletes; and Title IX. English.

The collection includes correspondence, reports, memoranda, minutes, athletic contracts, schedules, statistics, handbooks, newsletters, financial information, and other materials related to the Athletic Council. The first series, Trinity College Athletic Council, contains materials related to the earliest form of the organization. The other materials in the collection derive from the later Duke University Athletic Council. The second series, Duke Athletic Council, contains meetings, minutes, and general files of the Duke Athletic Council. The sixth series, Restricted, contains restricted materials such as student information and Board of Trustee materials. The third series, ACC contains material related to intercollegiate athletics in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The fourth series, NCAA contains minutes, convention proceedings, correspondence, reports and other materials related to intercollegiate athletics in the National Collegiate Athletics Association. The sixth series AIAW contains information about intercollegiate athletics for women. The last series, Oversized Material, contains one folder from the Duke Athletic Council Series.

Collection
North Carolina short-line railroad company established in 1896 and still in operation as of 2008. Correspondence, accounts, financial reports, ledgers, memoranda, publications, and other records (chiefly 1918-1960), of a short-line railway operating between Sanford and Lillington, N.C., in Lee and Harnett counties. Includes communications from the American Short Line Railroad Association and the Association of American Railroads.
Collection

Augustin Louis Taveau papers, 1741-1931 3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes, 1,862 items

This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence and other papers (chiefly 1830-1886) of Taveau, of his father, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and of their family. The collection centers around Augustin Louis Taveau and relates to his education, activities as a poet, European travels (1852-1854), career in the Confederate Army, postwar condemnation of Confederate leaders, removal to Maryland (1866), and agricultural efforts. Other subjects include family and legal matters, social life and customs in South Carolina, the education of Southern girls, rice planting before the Civil War, planting in Mississippi and Louisiana (1850s), agriculture and scientific farming in Maryland, Charleston during the Civil War, postwar politics, and other matters. Correspondents and persons mentioned in this collection include William Aiken, Josias Allston, Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, Ralph Elliott, Nathan George Evans, J. A. Gadsden, Horace Greeley, William Gregg, Thomas S. Grimké, Robert Y. Hayne, O. W. Holmes, W. H. Huger, Robert Hume, T. J. Hyland-MacGrath, Andrew Johnson, Carolina Olivia Ball Laurens, Eliza G. Maybank, James L. Petigru, J. J. Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Clifford Simons, Keating L. Simons, Admiral Joseph Smith, Horatio Sprague, John R. Thompson, and members of the Girardeau, Swinton, and Taveau families.

This collection contains family, personal, literary, and business correspondence of Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau (1790-ca. 1857), planter; of his wife, Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau (d. 1847); of their son, Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), planter and author; of the latter's wife, Delphine (Sprague) Taveau (1832-ca. 1909); and of relatives and friends.

Papers prior to 1829 consist of a copy of the will of William Swinton made in 1741 and letters between the Swinton and Girardeau families recording Charleston events, the marriage settlement of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball and Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, and a copy of the will of Caroline Olivia (Ball) Laurens, daughter of Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau by her first marriage. Beginning in June 1829, and continuing for more than a year, the collection contains letters to Martha Caroline (Swinton) Ball Taveau from her husband, Louis Augustin Thomas Taveau, while he was in France endeavoring to settle his father's estate.

In 1838 the papers begin to center around Augustin Louis Taveau (1828-1886), while in school at Mt. Zion Academy, Winnsboro, South Carolina and while later studying law and dabbling in poetry while living in or near Charleston, South Carolina and touring Europe from 1852 to 1854. From 1855 until 1860, the papers contain correspondence with the publisher of Taveau's book of poems, The Magic Word and Other Poems (Boston, 1855), published under the pseudonym of 'Alton,' correspondence with the Sprague family in an effort to obtain the remainder of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau's patrimony, papers relative to a mortgage on Oaks Plantation held by Robert Hume, letters relative to the failure of Simons Brothers in Charleston in 1857 and the consequent loss of Oaks Plantation, letters of Taveau describing a trip to New Orleans (Louisiana), with his slaves and their sale, letters of Taveau to his wife describing various plantations in Mississippi and Louisiana, and a series of letters in 1860 to and from Taveau, Ralph Elliott, and Clifford Simons regarding a supposedly slighting remark involving Taveau's credit.

Late in 1861 Taveau settled on a farm near Abbeville, South Carolina, but soon afterwards joined the Confederate Army. His career in the army continued until 1865. Letters to his wife during the war period, include Taveau's accounts of his efforts as a soldier, descriptions of Charleston during the war, copy of a letter evidently intended for a newspaper, protesting that gentlemen of birth and education could get no commissions in the army while sons of tinkers could; accounts of his duties as guard at the "SubTreasury" in Charleston; papers relating to an effort to permit Delphine (Sprague) Taveau and her three children to sail for Europe in December, 1864; and oaths of allegiance and passports issued to Taveau and his wife and children, March 3, 1865, for going to Boston, Massachusetts.

Immediately after the war, the papers contain letters and copies of letters published in the New York Tribune by Taveau under the title of A Voice from South Carolina, stating that former Southern leaders could not be trusted and condemning them for having allowed conscription. Included also are drafts of letters from Taveau to Horace Greeley and William Aiken; letters relative to Taveau's efforts to get the position of collector of the customs at Charleston; accounts of an interview of Taveau with Greeley and with President Andrew Johnson; letter of June 25, 1865, describing conditions in Charleston and Columbia, South Carolina; a copy of a petition signed by Henry L. Benbow, A. R. Chisholm, William Gregg, and Taveau begging President Johnson to appoint a provisional governor for South Carolina; several letters to and from William Aiken; and letters written by Taveau to his wife in the autumn of 1865 from various points in Virginia including areas near Richmond, Alexandria, and Warrenton, where he had gone in search of a farm.

Taveau and his family finally settled in 1866 on a farm near Chaptico in St. Mary's County, Maryland. From 1866 until 1881, the correspondence is concerned with efforts to obtain patents and money for developing a revolving harrow and a steam plow invented by Taveau; efforts to obtain money for meeting the annual interest on the sum owed for the farm near Chaptico; and accounts of Taveau's literary activities. There are letters and papers bearing on Taveau's efforts to interest the Ames Plow Company, as well as manufacturers of farm machinery in Dayton, Ohio, in his inventions and drawings and circulars relative to the inventions. From 1878 until Taveau's death, his papers contain manuscripts of his poems and correspondence with many leading publishing houses regarding the publication of Montezuma (published in New York in 1883 and again in 1931). Thereafter much of his correspondence consists of letters of thanks from various relatives, friends, and well-known literary figures for copies of Montezuma sent them by Taveau; and letters to newspapers and magazines submitting his poems and usually followed by letters of rejection.

Throughout the collection there are many letters from the mother and sisters of Delphine (Sprague) Taveau, usually in French. Letters of her brothers, however, were generally in English. Among the correspondents are William Aiken, Oliver Wendell Holmes, James Johnston Pettigrew, William Gilmore Simms, Joseph Smith, and John R. Thompson. Also included are some Unpublished Letters of John R. Thompson and Augustin Louis Taveau, William and Mary College Quarterly, XVI (April 1936), 206-221; Letters of Georgia Editors and a Correspondent, Georgia Historical Quarterly, XXIII (June, 1939), [170-176.]

Collection

The Auxiliary Services Reference Collection contains reports, memoranda, publications, schedules, flyers, charts, news clippings and other materials about the operations of Auxiliary Services. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Collection

Azel Hull Fish lantern slide lecture sets and photographs, 1890s-1940s 9 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — approximately 2300 items

The chief component consists of roughly 2000 lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

The chief component consists of a large collection of lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group and number roughly 2000. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

Collection
Early female graduate of Duke University School of Medicine (M.D., 1946) and pediatrician in private practice in Durham Co., N.C., 1949-1987. The bulk of the papers of Bailey Daniel Webb consist of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Bailey Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, chiefly in community medicine and governance, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore. Records containing personally-identifiable medical information, chiefly pediatric case histories, have been separated and are closed to use.

The bulk of the collection consists of histories and geneaologies of the Webb and Daniel families of North Carolina, going back to the 18th century. Materials include drafts of historical research, memoirs, clippings, pamphlets, programs, 20th century photographs, and many folders of Webb family correspondence dating from the 20th century. Family history material comprises primarily incoming and outgoing family correspondence and geneaological records (1845-2001) for the Webb, Daniel, Smith, and Stinson families and others. Some of this material was gathered by Webb's father, J. W. Webb, for his book, Our Webb Kin of Dixie. Also includes Webb's 1941 doctoral thesis and other school records (1925-1933); as well as binders and scrapbooks compiled by Webb detailing her youth and schooling, private practice and hospital career, international trips, Durham history, and various ancestors and relatives, including N.C. judge Susie Marshall Sharp, James E. Webb, and Stephen Moore.

Papers also include memoirs, largely in verse and written by Webb's grandmother, about slaves on her father's plantation; and an album of sayings related to "Poplar Forest," a home built by Thomas Jefferson, where a relative lived in 1970. The album's cover has an early photograph of the house pasted on. There is also a small amount of information on the histories of Wilson and Wright high schools in North Carolina and a few church histories as well.

Other folders making up approximately a quarter of the collection contain Bailey Webb's professional correspondence and papers relating to her career as a pediatrician and medical community leader in various towns and cities of North Carolina. Correspondents include members of the Trent and Semans families. Includes Webb's diplomas, typewritten memoirs of her career, begining with her medical school training at Duke in the 1940s. A few of these volumes contain patient information and photos - these are currently closed to use.

Collection
Collection consists of 174 postcards with photographs and mechanical prints, featuring scenes and landscapes from locations in what has historically been defined as the Balkans region of Southeastern Europe. Cities represented include: Varna, Bulgaria; Ruse/Rustchuk, Bulgaria; Sofia, Bulgaria; Bitola/Monastir, Macedonia; Negotin, Serbia; Skopje, North Macedonia; Sarajevo; Belgrade, Serbia; Oradea, Romania; Thessaloniki, Greece; Constanta, Romania; Sulina, Romania; Scutari, Albania; and Szegard, Hungary. The assorted postcards contains images of buildings, hotels, shops, government buildings, houses, monasteries, landmarks, and geographic features, as well as scenes of people walking on the street, swimming, sunbathing, shopping, and eating.

Collection consists of 174 postcards with photographs and mechanical prints, featuring scenes and landscapes from locations in what has historically been defined as the Balkans region of Southeastern Europe. Cities represented include: Varna, Bulgaria; Ruse/Rustchuk, Bulgaria; Sofia, Bulgaria; Bitola/Monastir, Macedonia; Negotin, Serbia; Skoptje, North Macedonia; Sarajevo; Belgrade, Serbia; Oradea, Romania; Thessaloniki, Greece; Constanta, Romania; Sulina, Romania; Scutari, Albania; and Szegard, Hunfary. The assorted postcards contains images of buildings, hotels, shops, government buildings, houses, monasteries, landmarks, and geographic features, as well as scenes of people walking on the street, swimming, sunbathing, shopping, and eating.

Collection

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2022 and undated, bulk 1950-2022 661 boxes — 661 boxes; 9 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, printed materials such as articles and clippings, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts and architecture and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs, the New York State Council on the Arts, and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Also includes materials from her work as columnist and author for publications like Ms. Magazine, Harper's Bazaar, and Saturday Review, and as television producer for CBS and A and E. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; artists' biographies and interviews; gender and society; historic preservation from the 1960s to the present; the history of New York City, particularly through art, architecture, and public space; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy; arts programs affiliated with the White House; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others.

Spanning 1876 to 2022, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks, and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

Collection
Bank founded in Barcelona in 1926 as Caja de Ahorros Provincial de la Diputacion de Barcelona and renamed Caixa d'Estalvis de Catalunya in the 1970s. Collection consists of a scrapbook of 39 reproductions of a poster campaign for the bank. Some posters are identified by theme, such as "Peace" or "Today and Tomorrow". Posters are in Spanish and feature art deco images and the Catalan shield. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection consists of a scrapbook of 39 reproductions of a poster campaign for the bank. Some posters are identified by theme, such as "Peace" or "Today and Tomorrow". Posters are in Spanish and feature art deco images and the Catalan shield. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection

Barriner Family papers, 1921-1941 0.4 Linear Feet — 120 Items

Barriner family of Poplar Bluff, Missouri. Brothers Clyde Barriner and Woodrow Barriner were members of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). Collection includes letters chiefly sent to Sarah Barriner of Poplar Bluff, Mo., from her children and relatives. Letters from her son Woodrow Barriner describe daily activities and camp life in Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Company 1727 near Powers, Or., from 1933-1934. Also included are letters from Clyde Barriner in Van Buren, Mo.; from Esther Payne in Sumter, S.C., 1940-1941; from Minnie Hanson of Piedmont, Mo.; and from Opal Hill. Family letters typically discuss social life in customs and hardships caused by the Great Depression.

Collection includes letters chiefly sent to Sarah Barriner of Poplar Bluff, Mo., from her children and relatives. Letters from her son Woodrow Barriner describe daily activities and camp life in Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) Company 1727 near Powers, Or., from 1933-1934. Also included are letters from Clyde Barriner in Van Buren, Mo.; from Esther Payne in Sumter, S.C., 1940-1941; from Minnie Hanson of Piedmont, Mo.; and from Opal Hill. Family letters typically discuss social life in customs and hardships caused by the Great Depression.

Collection
Direct marketing executive who worked at Xerox and Epsilon before founding Directech I eMerge in 1983.

Consists primarily of clippings, brochures and print advertisements relating to companies selling directly to consumers. Periodicals include American Magazine, Harper's Monthly, Hearth and Home, Liberty, McCall's and Youth's Companion. Companies represented include Aetna, Alexander Hamilton Institute, Bristol-Myers, Brunswick, Burroughs, Corn Products Sales (Karo), Gold Medal, Jergens and Sears. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection

Basil Lee Whitener papers, 1889-1968 150 Linear Feet — circa 297,300 Items

Online
Basil Lee Whitener (1915-1989) was a U.S. Representative from Gastonia, N.C. Collection includes correspondence between Whitener and his constituents, other congressmen, and government officials, legislative materials, drafts of bills, financial papers, speeches, invitations, printed material, clippings, photographs, and other papers, chiefly from congressional files (1957-1968), relating to issues of national importance during the 1960s, including the Vietnam War, crime legislation, gun control, riots, civil rights legislation, foreign aid, social security, and the Taft-Hartley Act. Correspondents include Sam Ervin, John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Sargent Shriver, and Strom Thurmond.

Basil Lee Whitener Papers primarily contain the office files of Congressman Whitener when he was the U. S. Representative for the Eleventh District (85th - 87th Congresses) and Tenth District (88th -90th Congresses) of North Carolina. Although the papers span the years 1889-1968, the bulk of the papers covers Whitener's years in office, 1957-1968. Some of the early files from the 81st through the 84th Congresses, are the papers of Woodrow Wilson Jones, Whitener's predecessor in office.

luded in the papers are such Items as correspondence, printed material, invitations, speeches, clippings, financial papers, photographs, as well as legislative materials and drafts of bills. Much of this collection consists of correspondence between Whitener and his constituents, other Congressmen, and government officials.

The papers are divided into the following series:

  • Political
  • Correspondence (General)
  • Correspondence (Legislative)
  • District of Columbia
  • Judiciary
  • Judiciary Committee
  • Speeches
  • Subject
  • Case Files
  • Textile Imports
  • House of Representatives
  • Military and Veterans
  • Military Academy
  • Trips
  • Post Office
  • Grants
  • Invitations
  • General Information
  • Office Files
  • Office Information
  • Personal

By far the largest category is the Correspondence (General), even though it was weeded extensively. The Correspondence (Legislative) Series is also rather large. Both of these series contain extensive correspondence with constituents. Other large series are the Personal Series, which pertains more directly to Whitener's private and unofficial affairs, and the Office Files Series, containing files which seem to have been in active use by Whitener's office staff at the time he left office.

There are information and opinions in the collection on a variety of issues of national importance during the 1960s. Included are the Vietnam War, civil rights legislation, riots, crime legislation, gun control, foreign aid, Social Security, and the Taft-Hartley Act. Other subjects are the U. S. Congress and various bills and laws. There are a variety of letters from prominent persons, such as John F. Kennedy, Robert Kennedy, Sargent Shriver, Strom Thurmond, and Sam Ervin.

The views of Whitener on many national and state issues are revealed within the collection. He supported legislation to combat crime and civil disobedience, a strong national defense, and exerting every effort to bring the Vietnamese Conflict to a successful conclusion. The Congressman was opposed to civil rights legislation, deficit spending, foreign aid spending, and the proliferation of domestic and social programs. Concerning North Carolina issues, Whitener wanted restrictions on textile imports in order to protect jobs, and supported the concept of a balanced economy in the state. As a member of the Committee on the District of Columbia, he authored bills to curb the crime rate in the District of Columbia and a bill to establish a modern rail rapid transit system in the District. In general, Whitener seemed to exhibit the views of conservative Southern Democrats.

Specific subjects are noted in more detail in the inventory. There is some overlap of subjects among the series.

Collection

Bassett Affair collection, 1903 - 2003 2 Linear Feet — 300 Items

The Bassett Affair is a celebrated case that helped establish the concept of academic freedom in higher education in the United States and is a benchmark incident in race relations in the South. John Spencer Bassett, a Trinity College professor, published a series of articles in the South Atlantic Quarterly (1903) that praised the accomplishments of African Americans and offered views on how to improve race relations. A campaign to remove Bassett from the faculty was thwarted by a vote of support for Bassett from the University's Board of Trustees on Dec. 2, 1903. The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of My Recollections of the Bassett Trial, by Robert Lee Durham (1936), The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts, by Baird Straughan (1975), and Crisis at Trinity a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff. English.

The collection contains essays, articles, clippings, correspondence, reminiscences, and other published and unpublished matter including Bassett's article, "Stirring Up the Fires of Race Antipathy" (1903); a scrapbook, 1903-1904, kept by Trinity College officials with newspaper clippings documenting national coverage the case received; copies of letters by Theodore Roosevelt to Owen Wister (1906) commenting on the case and on Trinity; manuscripts of "My Recollections of the Bassett Trial," by Robert Lee Durham (1936), "The Bassett Affair: A Play in Six Acts," by Baird Straughan (1975), and "Crisis at Trinity" a play by John Merritt (1989); lists of related materials in other collections; various shorter articles and speeches including comments by Richard L. Watson and an address to the Academic Council by Terry Sanford; and materials from the centennial celebration of the Bassett Affair, collected by University Archives staff.