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Collection

Rebecca West note, 16 August 1931 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 item — 12.5 x 16.5

Rebecca West was a British writer and critic. The Rebecca West note consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown correspondent reading, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

The collection consists of a single autograph manuscript note to an unknown recipient which reads, "With Miss Rebecca West's compliments." On letterhead stationery: 15, Orchard Court. Portman Square.W.1., Welbeck 3606.

Collection

Agnes Smedley letters, 1930s-1947 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Agnes Smedley was a journalist, writer, and left-wing activist remembered for her activity on behalf of the Communist cause in China during the 1930s. It is believed that she engaged in extensive espionage activities while she lived in Shanghai from 1929-1941. The Agnes Smedley letters consist of three letters by Smedley, the first of which was written while she lived in Shanghai, and the second two while she lived at the Yaddo artists' colony during the 1940s. The first letter is a request for a social engagement, and the second two letters discuss the particulars of her political observations and writings while she lived and worked in China.

The collection consists of three letters written by Agnes Smedley; the first to a Miss Gates, and the second two addressed to Corporal James A. Frankel. The single-page autograph manuscript letter to Miss Gates is written on letterhead stationery with Smedley's Shanghai address identifying her as the "Correspondent of the Frankfurter Zeitung in China." She asks Miss Gates to have "tiffin or tea" with her and wonders "Do you ever have extra time to see strange people?" The second manuscript letter, two leaves with text on all four sides, is dated December 27th, 1944. It primarily concerns Emily Hahn's book "China To Me." Smedley writes, “Miss Hahn spent 9 years sleeping around in Shanghai ... When the Japs took Hong Kong she wrote that she would just have died had she gone to a concentration camp like other Americans. So she went to the Japs and said, 'I’m a bad girl.' So the Japs left her free and she fooled around with them in Hong Kong, drinking and carousing, while the bastards were killing our men... But we Americans find this 'hot stuff' and put it up as a best seller... Miss Hahn is a propagandist for the Chinese reaction. She’s never seen a Chinese Communist, yet she’s agitating against them in N.Y... She led a purely personal life in two Chinese port cities but now poses as an authority on political and military matters of China." The third letter, autograph typescript dated March 23d 1947, was originally enclosed in Frankel’s copy of Smedley's book Battle Hymn of China, and addresses Frankel's questions about the Xi'an Incident of 1936 and the capture of Chiang Kai-shek. Smedley directs Frankel to her article on the topic published in The Nation magazine, as well as "her book."

Collection

Queen Silver papers, 1891-1995 1.6 Linear Feet — 96 items

Queen Silver (1910-1998), a life-long resident of Los Angeles, California, was known from a young age as a Freethinker (atheist), feminist, and socialist. Collection includes letters, clippings, broadsides, flyers, a pamphlet, and black-and-white photographs, some mounted, as well as two color photographs.

Collection includes letters, clippings, broadsides, flyers, a pamphlet, and black-and-white photographs, some mounted, as well as two color photographs. Much of the material relates to Silver's lectures on humanist topics, but in addition to letters by Silver there are also letters from an admirer, a teacher, and from her mother. Items predating Silver's birth include a broadside for a speech by and photographs of her mother.

Collection
In the late 18th century, Eleanor Butler (1739-1829) and Sarah Ponsonby (1755-1832), also known as the Ladies of Llangollen, left their lives in the upper tiers of Anglo-Irish society and made a home for themselves in Llangollen, Wales, to the disapproval of both their families. Butler and Ponsonby appeared to have understood their relationship as a marriage, and they were known for dressing alike in masculine clothing. They were part of an emerging culture of 'romantic friendship' between same-sex couples. While they lived a life of rural retreat, the Ladies' relative celebrity and social status meant that their home Plas Newydd became a salon. They hosted the many of the intelligensia of the day, including poets such as Wordsworth and Byron, and the reigning Queen Charlotte. The collection is largely made up of letters by the Ladies, as well as materials about Llangollen, the cultural haven of Plas Newydd, and images of the Ladies in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

The Ladies of Llangollen Collection is made up of materials both by and about Lady Eleanor Butler and Miss Sarah Ponsonby's life at their home, Plas Newydd, in Llangollen, Wales.

The largest part of the collection is the letters written by and to the Ladies. Most of the correspondence takes place between Sarah Ponsonby and her cousin Mrs. Sarah Tighe, along with letters from Eleanor Butler, their neighbor Ch. L. West, and the Fownes family, Sarah Ponsonby's cousins and former guardians. The manuscripts include poems by the Ladies, as well as an account written about the Ladies of Llangollen by Ch. L. West and an album by a visitor to Llangollen. The papers contain items and images of the Ladies of Llangollen, Llangollen Vale, and the traditions of Wales in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Guidebooks, maps, and printed materials make up the materials about the history of the Ladies' beloved Llangollen. The images of the Ladies and their home in Llangollen Vale make up the largest part of the image files.

Collection
Emmeline and Frederick Pethick-Lawrence were British socialist activists best known for their involvement with the suffragist movement. The collection consists of some correspondence; printed pamphlets and literature collection by the Pethick-Lawrences, as well an Official Programme of the Great Demonstration of Suffragettes in Hyde Park in 1910; and copies of the Printed Statement of Claim and Further Particulars of Statement of Claim following protests by suffragettes in London which resulted in broken windows, particularly accusations of incitement by the defendants (including the Pethick-Lawrences) following speeches, published circulars, newsletters, and meetings of the Women's Social and Political Union in 1911-1912.

The collection consists of four typescript notes and two greeting cards. The first card is headed "Votes for Women, The National Women's Social and Political Union, Greetings and Good Wishes for 1908," addressed to Mr. and Mrs. Grinling from Mr. and Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence. The second card, dated 1936-1937, has a tipped-in photograph of the Pethick-Lawrences, signed "with love from Fred and Emmeline." A typescript letter, on The National Women's Social and Political Union stationery, dated July 8, 1908, is signed by Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to Mrs. Grinling, and asks to have her husband convey a resolution passed at a Woolich suffrage meeting to Prime Minister Asquith. Included is a typescript copy of the letter from Grinling to Asquith carrying out the request. A typescript note, dated September 22, 1922, signed Mrs. Pethick-Lawrence on her letterhead, declines subscribing to something sent to her by Mr. Grinling. A typescript note from Emmeline Pethick-Lawrence to C.H. Grinling, dated October 3, 1945, mentions a copy of a birthday telegram Grinling sent to Gandhi, who she describes as "one of the great moral and religious leaders of the present age ... his reputation and his influence will continue to grow for many years to come." A typescript note signed "Fred," dated July 9, 1945 on "The Rt. Hon. Lord Pethick-Lawrence of Peaslake" letterhead thanks C.H. Grinling for a letter of welcome.

The library also holds a number of individually cataloged printed materials owned by the Pethick-Lawrences.

Collection

May Morris papers, 1909-1931 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — 24 items

Mary "May" Morris was an English artisan, embroidery designer, jeweller, socialist, and editor. Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

Collection comprises letters, an article, a few photographs, and several drawings. There are 16 letters and notes, dated 1909-1931, addressed to "Ada," who was Ada Culmer, the companion/caregiver for May Morris' sister, Jenny. Fifteen of these items were written by May, with one by Jenny. Subjects range from personal matters to Kelmscott business, including May’s editing of her father’s collected works. Much of the content centers on mutual friends and relatives (with a focus on Jenny's ill health); several letters also mention foreign travel. The article, "Mrs. William Morris," The Athenaeum, 1914 Feb. 7, contains the author's memories of Jane Morris, following her death. There is an albumen photograph (4.25 x 5.75-inches) by Ernest Hall of Oxford, showing May Morris at work on one of her tapestries at Kelmscott, as well as a developing out paper copy by Haines of London of a 1905 Carter and Co. photograph (6 x 4.25-inches) of Jane, May, and Jenny Morris, with Ada Culmer. In addition, there is a reproduction of a photograph of Kelmscott manor. Includes three undated reproductions of portraits of female figures.

Collection
Helen Adams Keller was a white American author, political activist, and lecturer. Collection includes letters from Helen Keller to Agatha and Harry Hunter, dated 1930 and undated, thanking them for their food gifts at Christmas. There is another letter from Keller to Frank L. Boyden, dated 1949, regarding the possibility of a bequest by him to the American Foundation for the Blind. Includes his letter in response negating that possibility, but expressing his admiration for her. There is also an unrelated letter in the collection, written by Harry Hunter to Mabel McCormick (Mrs. Ferris? McCormick) in 1951, discussing their respective interests, food, friends, business, and their love for each other. Includes envelopes. Also contains a photograph of Anne Sullivan and Helen Keller, and a postcard with her printed portrait and a salutation in Braille.

Collection includes letters from Helen Keller to Agatha and Harry Hunter, dated 1930 and undated, thanking them for their food gifts at Christmas. There is another letter from Keller to Frank L. Boyden, dated 1949, regarding the possibility of a bequest by him to the American Foundation for the Blind. Includes his letter in response negating that possibility, but expressing his admiration for her. There is also an unrelated letter in the collection, written by Harry Hunter to Mabel McCormick (Mrs. Ferris? McCormick) in 1951, discussing their respective interests, food, friends, business, and their love for each other. Includes envelopes.

Collection also contains two images of Helen Keller. First is a photograph of Keller and Anne Sullivan standing near train tracks, autographed by photographer W.H. Langley and dated 1913. Second is an undated postcard with a printed portrait of Keller and a message in Braille that reads: "I am a co-worker with Helen Keller."

Collection
Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection
Online
Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

Collection
The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures, including authors, poets, playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages.

The collection contains five scrapbooks. Four scrapbooks (1-3, and 5) feature literary figures of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, including authors and poets, as well as twentieth-century playwrights, essayists, and biographers. Scrapbook 4 features celebrities, political figures, and professors. All the scrapbooks primarily contain clippings from newspapers and journals, including articles, poetry, book reviews, obituaries, and editorials. There are often letters and notes bearing autographs of the authors, some of them purchased by Taylor, or obtained with the assistance of Taylor's mother or her friend, Dorothy Kraus. Unfortunately, many of the autographed items have been removed. Pages often include handwritten or typed lists of works. There are several black-and-white photographs, along with photo postcards, and regular postcards. In addition, there are loose scrapbook pages and loose material for creating pages. Scrapbooks have been disbound for conservation purposes.

Collection

Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection
Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a pensioner's card for a firefighter's widow and a pamphlet about life insurance for women.

Collection assembled by Lisa Unger Baskin containing printed ephemera, receipts, manuscripts, handbills, catalogs, decorative trade cards, prospectuses, circulars, political campaign materials, and other advertisements from the United Kingdom, Western Europe, and the United States. The bulk of the collection's materials advertise businesses or services offered by women or for women, including millinery, fancy goods, hair work, tea, painting, teaching, music, bricklaying, gardening, dressmaking, apothecaries, and a clairvoyant. Also includes calling cards and bookplates with women's names, and assorted ephemera relating to women's pay, income, or work, including a penioner's card for a firefighter's widow and pamphlets about life insurance for women. Some receipts, contracts, and statistics record rates of pay or income for women employees, or rates charged by women proprietors. Contains some advertisements for health-related retreats or vacations; circulars seeking to hire saleswomen or other women into different occupations; and some lending library slips. Includes examples of some Lippincott seed catalogs from the early 1900s, art samples and calligraphy by women, and some materials related to domestic arts and homemaking, including advertisements for patterns, sewing, cooking, and landscaping or interior decoration. Some materials relate to women's courtesy and conduct in public spaces, or to their appearance and clothing.

Collection

Lisa Unger Baskin Collection of Photographs, circa 1860-1960s, bulk 1860-1910 4.5 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 514 items — Dimensions are given in item-level entries in centimeters and are approximate. The great majority are standard cartes-de-visite and cabinet card sizes, with more modern prints ranging from 4x6 to 8x10 inches; the largest items, few in number, measure approximately 10x12 up to 11x15 inches. — The majority of the items in this visual collection take the form of 19th century albumen cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards mounted on card stock. As the 19th century wanes, gelatin silver prints, most also mounted, become more common. There are a handful of cased images, stereographic cards, a few tintypes, several platinum prints, and photo-mechanical images in the form of single prints and postcards. Many of the albumen portraits are hand-tinted and card mounts are often ornately decorated, while others are roughly trimmed and spare in detail. Color pigments are chiefly found in hand-tinted photographs or in mechanical prints.

Lisa Unger Baskin, who assembled this collection of photographs centered on women's history and culture, is a bibliophile, collector, and activist. Collection consists of 514 photographs and other graphic items in a variety of formats typical for the time, chiefly albumen, but also including gelatin silver, cased images, and mechanical prints; there are also small groups of true photographic postcards. Along with titles, dates, and content, data points may include biographies of photographers and subjects, studio addresses, and other notes. Roughly three-quarters of the images were produced by commercial women photographers in the U.S., Canada, and Europe. The great majority date from about 1860 to 1920, and the most common format is studio portraits of white men, women, children, and families. There are also many photographs of well-known women artists, entertainers, intellectuals, and activists of the time, as well as images of women in educational and a variety of work settings, on sports teams, posing with uniforms, guns, and tools, and enjoying leisure activities. Roughly 40 images are portraits of African Americans and other people of color or mixed race. Color images are chiefly limited to hand-tinted images and mechanical prints. Acquired as part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection at Duke University.

Collection consists of 514 photographic items, almost all single black-and-white prints, in a variety of formats typical for the 19th and early 20th centuries: largely albumen, with some gelatin silver prints, a few tintypes, daguerreotypes, glass plates, and one cyanotype. There are also some mechanical prints such as Woodburytypes and half-tone prints, and groups of commercially produced postcards, collectible cards, and stereographs. Color images are chiefly limited to hand-tinted images and mechanical prints.

Roughly three-quarters of the images were taken by women photographers operating or managing studios in all regions of the United States, with a smaller number in England, Sweden, Canada, and a few other countries; some were well-known but the majority were small business operators in smaller cities and towns. Whenever possible, a brief photographer's biography is included with the image entry.

The majority of the images are studio portraits of mostly unidentified North American men, women, children, and families, with a slight focus on New England. Roughly 40 images are portraits of African American or mixed-race individuals young and old, with a few groups of people of color. There are several ethnographic images of northern African women and a few scenes from Southeast Asia.

In addition to portraiture, the collection offers images of women artists, authors, nurses, teachers, and students who appear in early images of graduation and sports teams. Women and girls in boarding house and hotel rooms, at home, on bicycles, at work in factories, large and small offices, mines, and hospitals, wearing uniforms, brandishing guns and tools, and enjoying leisure activities. One hand-sewn booklet of photographs appears to show scenes from a training school for African American women. Also present are many portraits of female actors, entertainers, and wealthy women. There are very few musicians. Of interest are several photographs of light-skinned enslaved children distributed as abolitionist propaganda.

The cataloger transcribed titles and dates when present and indicated the source location; in the absence of a title, the cataloger devised descriptive titles. The great majority of dates are approximate and are based on the format, biographies, geneaologies, and clothing styles. Much information was derived from history of photography websites and photographer indexes, especially the website Langdon's List of 19th & Early 20th Century Photographers.

Collection
Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse were members of the Society of Friends (Quakers) in England in the mid-1800s. Their son, Edmund Backhouse, married Juliet Fox in 1848. This collection contains personal correspondence between members of the different connected Quaker families based in England, as well as some diaries, genealogical notes, and other printed ephemera from the family. Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection in the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection consists of correspondence, writings, and other ephemeral materials relating to the Fox and Backhouse families, along with materials relating to nineteenth century Quaker communities and families in England. The bulk of the collection is correspondence between different members of the Backhouse family, including Jonathan and Hannah Chapman Backhouse, their son Edmund Backhouse and his wife Juliet Fox, and their grandson Jonathan Edmund (Jed) Backhouse. Caroline Fox is also a routine correspondant. The letters discuss family news, personal activities and travel, religious sentiments.

There are two excerpts of diaries which appear to be by different authors and may relate to Hannah Chapman Backhouse's travels to the United States in the 1830s, or to another family member's travels in Europe or the Middle East. The handwriting of these pages is challenging and the excerpts are unattributed and appear to be undated, so more research would be helpful.

Also present in the collection are some writings, including essays and poetry, typically spiritual or relating to prayer, as well as some honorifics for Edmund Backhouse and a copy of his obituary. There are some manuscript riddles, some watercolors, and some sketches of scenes and still lifes. The collection also includes some ceremonial documents, including a letter from the Society of Friends declaring support for Hannah and Jonathan Backhouse's travels to the United States.

Collection

Helen Paterson Allingham papers, 1868-1916, 2015 3.6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 11 items

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items. The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte de visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items.

The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte-de-visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

Collection
The Women's Guild of Arts was founded in England in 1907 by textile designer and jeweller May Morris, and grew to about 60 members. The organization offered female artists an alternative to the Art Workers' Guild, the artists' association established in 1884 to encourage excellence in the fine and applied arts, and from which women were excluded until the 1960s. Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes.

Collection comprises primarily 81 letters from 29 members of the Women's Guild of Arts between 1902 and 1949. There are 7 additional documents, including draft resolutions, certificates, lists, and notes. Three letters predate the founding of the organization in 1907. The primary topic of the letters is the crisis within the Guild regarding its women-only status, an argument regarding how restrictive the Guild should be. Pamela Colman Smith wrote to May Morris (22 January 1913) that the reason she joined the Guild was that it made a point of asking its members not to exhibit at women-only shows, as it lowered the standard of work and that the Guild was never intended to be a purely woman's affair. Other letters on the subject come from Evelyn de Morgan, Feodora Gleichen, and Ethel Sandell. Gleichen's letter was circulated to members, and the collection contains a list of those who agreed with her; several letters are marked up to indicate a position on the matter. There is also a draft resolution welcoming any move to widen the scope of the Guild "such as stimulating and interesting lectures not only from our own members but from men and women outside....It is with this in view that we supported the resolution passed at the recent Annual Meeting, inviting as Honorary Associates a few people with whose work we are in sympathy..." (22 January 1913). Other topics in the letters include the role of the president, exhibitions, lectures, and the work of the organization, along with the William Morris Centenary Commemoration in 1934.