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The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

The papers of the Abbot family consist mainly of correspondence, but also include financial and legal papers, diaries, a letter-book, clippings, printed material, speeches and photographs (including cartes-de-visite, and some cyanotypes and tintypes). The materials date from 1733 to 1999, the bulk ranging from 1860-1910. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises of personal letters exchanged during the Civil War between William Richardson Abbot, headmaster of Bellevue High School, and his wife, Lucy Minor Abbot. Abbot's letters mention battles and political events of the Civil War, including his experience as an officer in the First Regiment of the Engineers Troops (Army of Virginia). Other correspondence includes exchanges between W.R. Abbot and his immediate family, both during and after the Civil War, as well as numerous letters to Abbot from parents of boys attending Bellevue High School. The collection also includes materials from the lives of the children and grandchildren of William and Lucy Abbot. Letters from the Abbot children consist of personal exchanges, accounts of travel in turn-of-the-century Europe, as well as experiences in the German university system. Also included is a brief memoir by Ann Minor, Lucy's sister, documenting childhood experiences in Virginia during the Civil War. There are also papers belonging to the Minors of Charlottesville (Va.), such as correspondence of Charles and John Minor.

While the bulk of the collection is made up of correspondence, the papers also include Abbot's addresses to schools and the Virginia Educational Society; printed bulletins detailing courses of study and formal statements of the teaching philosophy at Bellevue; and an official letter-book, receipts, financial and legal documents relating to the purchase, expansion and daily administration of the school. Other materials relating to the children of the William and Lucy Abbot include educational addresses by their son, Charles Minor Abbot, who administered Bellevue until it closed (1901-1909), as well as biographical material on Virginia Henderson's authoritative influence on professional nursing.

The Abbot Family papers provide the researcher with numerous vantage points onto public, professional and private life in nineteenth-century Virginia, most particularly through personalized accounts of men and women of the time. While the papers follow the families' colonial past from the early eighteenth century into the mid-twentieth century, the collection is noteworthy for its emphasis on military and private life in the Confederacy and in the Reconstruction South. The collection illuminates the experience of the Civil War through numerous windows onto the private lives of individuals; the professionalization of secondary education during the Reconstruction; the social and epistolary conventions of nineteenth century courtship; and the construction of an inter-generational identity, based on extended familial affections and ties to the institutions of Bellevue and the University of Virginia.

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Adelaide Johnson, 1859-1955, was a suffragist, artist, and sculptor. Her original name was Sarah Adeline Johnson; she changed her name to Adelaide in 1878. Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

Collection incorporates primarily Adelaide Johnson's working materials related to her sculpture of Lucretia Mott, Susan B. Anthony, and Elizabeth Cady Stanton that is located at the United States Capitol building, with focus on Susan B. Anthony. There are cabinet cards of Johnson's plaster casts, cabinet cards of Anthony and Anthony and Stanton, several signed, along with albumen, gelatin deveoping-out paper, and matte collodion printing-out paper prints of Anthony; two silhouettes of Mott; a few letters to Johnson; biographical information about her; and related published materials. There are also exhibit labels for the first exhibition to be held at Elizabeth Cady Stanton's House after it was acquired by the Women's Rights National Park at Seneca Falls, curated by Lisa Unger Baskin in 1986 or 1987, and featuring the Johnson materials. The exhibit was also displayed at the Sophia Smith Collection for a Berkshire Conference in on History of Women.

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Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items

Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

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Anthony family of Burlington (Guilford Co.), N.C. Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

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Collection consists of two large cloth-bound photograph albums dating from circa 1881, housing 56 large albumen photographs taken by noted 19th century French photographer Félix Bonfils, who owned the Bonfils studio, and his Syrian assistant Georges Saboungi. The images were sold as souvenirs, and portray cities and towns, landscapes, ruins, monuments, tombs, and other religious and historic sites of Palestine, in areas now occupied by Israel, Lebanon, and Syria. Locations named in the captions include Beirut, Bethlehem, Cana, Damascus, Galilee, the Holy Sepulchre shrine, Jaffa, Jerusalem, the Mosque of Omar at the Dome of Rock, the Mount of Olives, Mount Tabor, Nazareth, Samaria, the Tomb of David, the Wailing Wall, the interior of the house of the English Consul in Damascus, a "crusader's tower" in the village of Ramleh, and various other sites.

These two large photograph albums were owned by Wilbur E. Hagans, who toured the area of Palestine known as the Holy Lands around 1881. He purchased dozens of souvenir albumen prints from the studio, then upon his return had the cloth-bound albums assembled in New York. The 56 images date from about 1881 and were taken by noted 19th-century French photographer Félix Bonfils, who owned the Bonfils studio, and his Syrian assistant Georges Saboungi. They portray cities and towns, landscapes, ruins, monuments, tombs, and other religious and historic sites of Palestine, in areas now occupied by Israel, Lebanon, and Syria. Locations named in the captions include Beirut, Bethlehem, Cana, Damascus, Galilee, the Holy Sepulchre shrine, Jaffa, Jerusalem, the Mosque of Omar at the Dome of Rock, the Mount of Olives, Mount Tabor, Nazareth, Samaria, the Tomb of David, the Wailing Wall, the interior of the house of the English Consul in Damascus, a "crusader's tower" in the village of Ramleh, and various other sites. In some cases there are small figures visible among the landscapes, but these are the only individuals present in the images.

The two albums measure 14 x 18 inches (37 x 47.5 centimeters); Volume I holds 30 albumen prints, while Volume II holds 26 prints. The prints all measure 9 x 11 inches (22 x 28 centimeters) and are affixed to card mounts, one per print. Some show signs of fading, but most are in good condition. Each print bears the name of one of two photographers: Félix Bonfils (18 prints), or Georges Saboungi (38 prints); some prints are also marked with an identification number assigned by the studio, and these have been included in the inventory.

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Album contains 51 albumen silver prints taken in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka); Bellary, India; Constantinople (Istanbul), and Egypt. A few images are from Nice, France, and Monte Carlo. The album bears no owner's name, but likely belonged to an individual in the British Army. On the first leaf is pasted a large coat of arms with a motto from the Isle of Man. The Sri Lanka images date from 1894-1895 and include: images from Colombo of military barracks, the hotel Mount Lavinia, Galle Face Green, the British Governor's palace; monsoon waves on a breakwater, polo grounds, and a racetrack; views from the town of Kandy and its lake; images from Trincomalee from an Officers Mess; and race scenes from Nuwara Eliya and Colombo. Views from Egypt show the Great Sphinx, streets in Cairo, and palaces in Alexandria. Images from Constantinople include street scenes, mosques, the port, and the arsenal, while those from India include servants with racehorses, and British men and servants at private residences. There are also images of the hospital ship "Spartan"; portraits of the B and C Companies, 4th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Dublin, 1902, and the 1st Royal Warwicks in Bellary, India, 1899; a military camp "Marachah," possibly in Afghanistan; and images of military buildings in Sri Lanka. Many of the Sri Lanka images are credited to William H.L. Skeen, a commercial photographer based in Colombo and Kandy; several prints bear his studio's imprint, while others are unattributed but are probably his. The Middle Eastern views are all prints by commercial photographers: the Zangaki brothers (one print), Schroeder & (three prints) and Sebah & Joaillier (five prints). Many of the commercial prints are captioned in the negatives. Prints range in size from 8 3/4 x 11 to 5 3/4 x 8 inches; most are full-page sizes.

Bound photograph album contains 51 albumen silver prints dating from 1894-1901, taken in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Bellary, India, Constantinople (Istanbul), and Egypt. A few images are from Nice, France, and Monte Carlo. The album bears no owner's name, but likely belonged to an individual in the British Army. Many of the photographs are captioned. Prints range in size from 8 3/4 x 11 to 5 3/4 x 8 inches; most are full-page sizes.

Sri Lanka images predominate, many attributed to William Henry Louis Skeen, a well-known British-born studio photographer based in Sri Lanka; several prints bear his studio's imprint, while others are unmarked but are likely from his studio.

Images from Sri Lanka date from 1894-1895. Colombo views include: Galle Face Green (Colombo); infantry barracks shown from the front and back, with lake, hospital, polo ground and club house; Mount Lavinia Hotel, with infantry barracks room and officers quarters, 1895; and waves crashing over a breakwater during monsoon. Images from other locations include: a panorama of Kandy; Trincomalee from Officers Mess, 1895; Kandy with lake view and Trincomalee street; India rubber trees, Peredinaya Gardens, Kandy; Main Street, Pettah; "A.S.T." (probably the album's owner) in Ceylon, 1894; polo group, Ceylon 1894; Stewards Stand, Colombo Races, 1894; and Nuwara Eliya Races, 1894, "Comewell wins!"

Views of Egypt are from 1898 and include the Great Sphinx; Gizeh, palace of Prince Hussein Kamil Pacha; Alexandria, Palace Mehemed Ali; Alexandria, palace Ras-el-tin; photograph of a print titled, "Birds Eye View of the Battle of El-Teb"; "Old Cairo"; and a city street in Cairo. Views from Constantinople include the interior of Mosque Sainte Sophie; a street scene; panoramic view of the city and old port; view of the Golden Horn and arsenal; Mosque Hamidiye and Yildiz palace; and an Ottoman porter (studio portrait). The Middle Eastern views date from the mid-1890s and are all by commercial studios: the Zangaki brothers (one print), Schroeder & Cie, Zurich (three prints) and Sebah & Joaillier (five prints). Many of these are captioned in the negatives.

India images are dated later and include: the 1st Royal Warwicks, Bellary India, 1899; Indian servants with race horses; and Indian servants and staff outside private residence with two English men in suits. There are six total residential images, undated and without captions.

There are several commercial views from Europe: Nice, France: "Cascade du chateau" and an image from the Promenade des Anglais, 1901; and a view of a Monte Carlo theater, 1901.

Military images include: the hospital ship "Spartan," 1900; C Company of the 4th Royal Warwickshire Reg.t Dublin, 1902; B Company 4th Royal Warwickshire Reg.t Dublin, 1902; and a loosely inserted image captioned "Officers War. R. Peshawar" with names of officers recorded in pencil on verso. The final image is labeled "Camp Marachah," possibly in Afghanistan. Two smaller glossy copies of an image of men with well-bred horses in a desert landscape are laid in the closing pages.

On the first album leaf is pasted a coat of arms with the original Latin motto crossed out, and a different one written below in period ink, "Quocunque jeceris stabit", meaning "Whichever way you throw, it will stand," the motto for the coat of arms of the Isle of Man.

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Carlo Naya photograph albums of Venice, 1860s-1870s 3 Linear Feet — 4 bound volumes; 92 albumen photographs — Volumes: 18 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches; Prints: 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches — 92 albumen prints in four bound volumes

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Four cloth-bound souvenir albums house 92 oversize mounted albumen prints of Venetian landmarks, taken by notable photographer Carlo Naya during the 1860s and perhaps into the 1870s. Handwritten captions are expressed in Italian with some English terms, and are transcribed exactly as they appear. Nearly all the images measure 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches, and almost all bear the studio negative number. Subjects include well-known landmarks of Venice, including churches, palaces, canals, bridges, and piazzas, along with city monuments and statuary such as the Winged Lion of St. Mark. Other images show interior details such as tombs, bas-reliefs, altars, and grand staircases. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

These four bound albums house 92 oversize albumen prints showing images of Venetian architecture and artworks taken by notable photographer Carlo Naya during the 1860s and perhaps into the 1870s. The images were secured using the wet-collodion process on large glass plate negatives.

The cloth-bound albums measure 18 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches and each contains just over 20 prints mounted on hinged boards. The albums bear the English title "Venice" on the spines and covers, and are numbered I-IV. Album four reveals the large signature of a former owner - J.E. (John Edwin) Chase, an art collector and amateur naturalist of Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Subjects favored by Naya for these albums are the churches, palaces, canals, bridges, and piazzas of Venice, along with city monuments and statuary such as the Winged Lion of St. Mark and the equestrian statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni. The photographer's focus is on the elements of design and light; the few small human figures present in most images are included for purposes of scale. Featured sites include: the Palazzo Ducale; Piazza San Marco and the Basilica di San Marco; the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri); the Gran Canale; and the church of SS. Giovanni and Paolo. Many images show interior details such as tombs (Titian and several Doges of Venice), bas-reliefs, altars, and grand staircases. In short, albums such as these display the subjects most sought-after by a knowledgeable tourist, and may have served as visual encyclopedias for educational institutions.

Nearly all the prints measure approximately 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches, each mounted on card stock with a handwritten caption below, the photographer's blind-stamp from his Riva Schiavoni studio, and the studio's negative number, which appears in the image. The captions are expressed in Italian with some English terms, and have been transcribed exactly as they appear, with a few errors retained. Only one sequence of images bears a date - 1865. There is a handful of prints with no negative numbers - these have been assigned an identification number starting with "UN." A few prints are signed by Naya (or Naija, as it is sometimes written).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Charles Davis Jameson was an American civil engineer who lived and worked on railroads in China with the Perkin Syndicate between 1895-1918. The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan. There are seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are also 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan.

There are also seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are albumen and gelatin silver prints. One of the albums is a commercial Japanese album that features hand-tinted photographs. Two albums focus on Shanxi province; three others focus on Beijing. Subjects include waterways and boats, landscapes, groups of Chinese or Westerners, engineering projects, street scenes, rural life, caravans, portraits, missionaries, houses for Westerners, farming and rice crops, and temples and other buildings. Five photographs in photograph album 2 are duplicates of photographs in the William Hillman Shockley photographs collection.

There are 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. Three photographs of international locations, including Fingall's Cave, Scotland; a temple in Agra, India, and a scene of Geneva, Switzerland, are all mounted. The subjects of the other two photographs are a Chinese waterway with three boats, and a courtyard with a Western man being waited on by a Chinese servant. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

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Edward James Parrish papers, 1888-1926 and undated 9.2 Linear Feet — 31 boxes; 3 oversize folders; and 6 volumes — Approximately 1500 items

Tobacco manufacturer, resident of Durham, North Carolina, and Tokyo, Japan. The papers of Edward James Parrish primarily consist of business and personal papers, correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921), and photographic collections of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. Items include a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), and a scrapbook created by their only daughter Lily Parrish. Turn-of-the-century photograph albums relate to the Parrishes time in Japan (circa 1899-1905) and form a large series of their own. Two were assembled by Kichibei Murai of the Murai Brothers, a Tokyo cigarette manufacturing company of which Parrish was the first vice-president; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are seven fine souvenir albums with large hand-tinted albumen prints from noted Japanese studios, including that of Kusakabe Kimbei. There are also personal photograph and postcard albums of the Parrish's travels in Japan, Korea, and China, and Mrs. Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan. Loose family photographs and portraits dating from about 1890 to 1920 round out the collection.

The Edward James Parrish Papers include business and personal correspondence (chiefly 1900-1921) of Parrish and of his wife, Rosa Bryan Parrish. There are also various bills, a notebook on tobacco trade in China and Japan (1894-1900), letter books (1900-1904), photographic collections, several postcard albums, and a scrapbook created by Lily Parrish.

The papers also include Rosa Parrish's reminiscences and impressions of her life in Japan, as well as her writings on the status of women. There are also materials relating to Kichibei Murai's family and to Murai Brothers Company in Japan, close partners and friends of the Parrish family.

Photographic formats include glass plate negatives, loose prints, photo postcards, and over 20 albums. Two of the photograph albums date from the late 19th century and were owned by Kichibei Murai; they contain photographs of his residences and of banks, mines, oil fields, farms and tobacco factories in which he had an interest. Also included are black-and-white late 19th and early 20th century loose albumen and early gelatin silver prints of family members.

The photograph albums document the Parrish family's travels in Japan, China, and Niagara Falls, and include personal snapshots taken at these locations as well as in their home of Durham, N.C.; there are also many commercial souvenir photographs from Japan. The latter take the form of large finely handtinted albumen prints of Japanese scenery, landscapes, cultural sites and temples, clothing, entertainment, and transportation, housed in high-quality souvenir photograph albums; many of these feature highly decorated lacquer inlay covers, elaborate bindings. Most include captions. The studio of Kusakabe Kimbei, a noted photographer, created many of the prints and albums, and the work of other notable studios have also been identified.

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Faithfull family papers, 1864-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 22 items

The Faithful family focuses on the family of Rev. Ferdinand Faithfull and Elizabeth Mary Harrison of Headley Rectory in Surrey, England, and their eight children. Among the children were Esther Faithfull Fleet (1823–1908), who was both a book illustrator and the mother of seven children. The youngest child, Emily Faithfull (1836?-1895), was an feminist reformer, philanthropist, printer, publisher, novelist, and lecturer. Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet.

Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet. The letters, all written by Emily Faithfull, include routine correspondence and thank you notes; other topics include the capacity of Victoria Press to do law work; an honor bestowed on her by the professional women's organization, Sorosis, in New York; a statement in the Guardian newspaper claiming that in a speech she repudiated women's rights as it applied to her work; a request for early assistance with preparations for Christmas in order to provide relief for "some very distressing cases;" and inquiries regarding the printing of her "Jubilee Address" or its distribution. There is one letter to Henry Ward Beecher asking him to hand out notices regarding her upcoming lecture, and mentioning Lucretia Mott's plans to address the audience. Several letters feature the stamp or embossed stamp of the Victoria Press. The carte de visite was produced by the London Stereoscopic & Photography Co., and the mounted photographs by W. & D. Downey of Ebury Street, London. The illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet include a calling card hand decorated in ink and watercolors (?), and a watercolor painting of a parrot.