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Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

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International Monitor Institute. Rwanda Videotapes and audiotapes, 1992-1999 4 Linear Feet — 7 Gigabytes — About 335 items — 7.04 GB

The non-profit agency International Monitor Institute (IMI) operated between 1993 and 2003, primarily to assist international war-crimes tribunals by collecting, indexing and organizing visual evidence of violations of international human rights law. The International Monitor Institute Records, Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes span the dates 1992-1999, and comprise audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations in Rwanda. The collection contains videotape segments of news broadcasts as well as documentaries of the Rwandan genocide, including footage of massacre sites and refugee camps, and interviews with both victims and perpetrators of the genocide. The collection also contains audiotapes of broadcasts from Radio Télévision Libres des Milles Collines (RTLM) and Radio Rwanda, classified as incitement to genocide, as well as several recordings produced by Reporters without Borders. The bulk of materials in this collection are audiotapes of RTLM broadcasts.

The Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes section of the International Monitor Institute records contains descriptions of 47 tapes and 282 audiotapes collected by IMI that depict human rights issues and themes in Rwanda. These materials span the years 1992-1999. The videotapes largely document massacre sites and mass graves, evacuations, the role of missionaries and human rights activists, and conditions in refugee camps holding both victims and killers. Several documentaries and news reports examine the development of a genocidal ideology in Rwanda tied to its colonial past, as well as offer histories of Tutsi/Hutu animosity, including the role of the Belgian colonial government, France, and the Catholic Church. Many of the materials in this collection offer an analysis of government structure and politics in Rwanda before and after the genocide. In addition, this collection includes various news segments reporting on the movements of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) and the Rwanda Army as well as the effectiveness of the United Nations in the conflict; includes a documentary on Belgian soldiers killed in Rwanda.

The majority of audiotapes in this collection are RTLM and Radio Rwanda broadcasts inciting violence and orchestrating the genocide, encouraging youth to join military actions, and frequently referring to specific targets, such as Bilyogo and Nyamirambo. Broadcasts also include frequent reference to Inyenzi (cockroaches) and Inkotani (Tutsi Rebel Army). Many of the RTLM broadcasters accuse the Rwanda Patriotic Front (RPF) of the assassination of President Habiyarimana and argue that the Inkotani want to exterminate Hutus and so they must, in turn, be exterminated. Broadcasters speak out against French intervention and accuse the Belgians of alignment with the Rebel Army. The remaining audiotapes were produced by Reporters without Borders (RSF).

The majority of the materials in this collection are in French and Kinyarwanda. Both documentaries and news reports take the form of interviews with Rwandans about the massacres and interviews with members of the RPF as well as with figures involved with organizing the killings. The collection includes interviews with notable figures, such as Théoneste Bagosora on his role in the genocide, Ferdinand Nahimana, the former director of Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM) about his failure to stop broadcasts that fueled the genocide, as well as accounts given by members of the death squad.

The series in this collection include the Rwanda Videotapes Series, the Rwanda Audiotapes Series (Audiocassette), and the Rwanda Audiotapes Series (Electronic Records). The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Audiotapes Series. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive. Further material from the IMI Rwanda records can be found in IMI's organizational records, including printed transcripts of many of the audiotapes. All videotapes in this collection are in Betacam SP format. Please note that the descriptions of the tapes in this collection are based on IMI's data and were not originally drafted by Rubenstein Library Staff. Further organizational material on Rwanda can be found in the International Monitor Institute Records, also at the Rubenstein Library.

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The records of the documentary project Indivisible: Stories of American Community span the dates 1988-2002. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. The project was sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies of Duke University and the Center for Creative Photography at the University of Arizona, and co-directed by Tom Rankin and Trudi Stack. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The records of the documentary project "Indivisible: Stories of American Community" span the dates 1988-2002, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1999 to 2002, the primary timeframe for the project. Through documentary photographs and oral histories, project records, videos, and other materials, the collection documents the social conditions in twelve American communities as well as the history of the project, which explored civil activism, struggle, and change in the following locations: the North Pacific Coast of Alaska; Ithaca, N.Y.; San Francisco, California; Navajo Nation, Arizona and New Mexico; Eau Claire, South Carolina; Delray Beach, Florida; Western North Carolina; Stony Brook, N.Y.; San Juan, Texas; Chicago, Illinois; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and the Yaak Valley, Montana. Each project is fully described in its entry in this collection guide. The project co-directors were Tom Rankin of the Center for Documentary Studies and Trudy Wilner Stack of the Center for Creative Photography. The project was also supported by the Pew Charitable Trusts, the NEA, and other agencies.

The photographs in this collection, most of which formed part of a traveling exhibit, were taken chiefly during 1999 by twelve well-known documentary and landscape photographers working in partnership with project oral history interviewers. The photographers are Dawoud Bey, Bill Burke, Debbie Fleming Caffery, Lucy Capehart, Lynn Davis, Terry Evans, Lauren Greenfield, Joan Liftin, Reagan Louie, Danny Lyon, Sylvia Plachy, and Eli Reed. Their images capture the experiences of individuals participating in grassroots initiatives addressing American social issues such as housing, immigration (in particular, Haitians in Florida), the natural environment, race relations, youth empowerment, and economic and cultural development, and others.

Also preserved in this collection are detailed oral histories recorded in each community, with audio recordings and transcriptions; information on the traveling exhibit; and materials on other project outcomes, including a hardbound large-format book of the images, a postcard exhibit, a guide for educators, booklets and other publications on community organizing, and radio and television programs. Other files document the establishment of research archives based on the documentary project's output, at Duke, in Arizona, and in each of the twelve communities.

The collection is arranged into three series: Audiovisual Resources, Photographs, and Project Files. Audiovisual Resources houses the interview tapes as well as other media associated with the project; Photographs includes photographic prints, most of which accompanied the project book and exhibition; Project Files houses the interview records as well as tape lists, logs, and transcripts in both paper and digital formats. Additional supporting materials found in the Project Files Series include postcards and videocassette tapes from exhibits; a CD-ROM of the 2001 website; field notes in paper and digital format; and other office files generated by the project and its staff, including Tom Rankin, one of the project co-directors.

Acquired as part of the Archives for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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International Monitor Institute records, 1986-2006 530 Linear Feet — Approximately 10,100 Items

The non-profit agency International Monitor Institute (IMI) operated between 1993 and 2003, primarily to assist international war-crimes tribunals by collecting, indexing and organizing visual evidence of violations of international human rights law. The International Monitor Institute Records span the dates 1986-2006, and primarily comprise audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations around the world. Countries represented include: Burma (Myanmar), Bosnia and Hercegovina, Cambodia, Kuwait, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Thailand. Includes master and use copies of approximately 6000 videocassettes and 100 audio tapes and audiocassettes. The video and audio material is indexed by an extensive database developed by IMI which includes keywords, air dates, segment producer, segment title, and in some cases, transcripts and stills from the video. There are also many photographs and slides taken in the same regions, depicting destruction in areas of conflict, forced labor, refugees and refugee camps, and protests. The majority of the photos were taken on the Burma/Thai border, in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and refugee camps in Rwanda. Finally, there are extensive organizational records, including an extensive database of the audiovisual components. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

Note: The video and audio tape holdings of the Interntional Monitor Institute records are described in separate finding aids. A large portion of these tapes, particularly that section dealing with the Balkans, is not yet processed. Inventories are currently available for the following sections:

Burma Tapes, circa 1990-2002

Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes, 1992-1999

The International Monitor Institute Records span the dates 1986-2006, and primarily consist of audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations around the world. Countries represented include: Burma (Myanmar), Bosnia and Hercegovina, Cambodia, Kuwait, Iraq, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, and Thailand. Includes master and use copies of approximately 6000 videocassettes and 100 audio tapes and audiocassettes. The video and audio material is indexed by an extensive database developed by IMI which includes keywords, air dates, segment producer, segment title, and in some cases, transcripts and stills from the video. There are also six boxes of photographs and slides taken in the same regions, depicting destruction in areas of conflict, forced labor, refugees and refugee camps, and protests. The majority of the photographs, almost all color snapshots, were taken on the Burma/Thai border, in Bosnia and Hercegovina, and refugee camps in Rwanda. One set of seven folders are images taken by staff of the Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children (now known as the Women's Refugee Commission). There are other images that come from United Nations organizations, including the International Refugee Commission. Finally, organizational records from the offices of IMI comprise a significant amount of the materail in this collection, including an extensive database of the audiovisual components and transcripts from war crimes tribunals.

Addition (2007-0070) (approx. 4000 items, 120 linear ft.; dated 1990-2002) contains master and use copies of videocassettes related to human rights violations around the world.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

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Kentucky Foundation for Women records, 1985-2017 62.0 Linear Feet — 168 Gigabytes

Sallie Bingham was the founder and first Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women and profoundly shaped its goals. The overall purpose of the Foundation is to support feminist women in the arts. The collection includes materials about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art, and women's culture. Additionally, the collection includes grant applications and files, files for the publication, The American Voice, and information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, among other materials.

The Kentucky Foundation for Women Records span the dates 1985-2017. The collection provides a rich source of information about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art and women's culture. The records of the Foundation include a range of materials, primarily a large number of grant files, including applications and supporting materials of those awarded grants. Also notable are the files for its publication, The American Voice, which include correspondence, copy-edited drafts of poetry and other writings, business records, other publications, miscellaneous ephemera, broadsides, and books of poetry. In addition, there is information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, miscellaneous correspondence, subject files, annual reports, newsletters, and brochures. The records consist primarily of files, but videocassettes, audiocassettes, and compact disks are also included. The collection is divided into four series: Administrative Files, Project Files, American Voice Files, and Grant Files.

The Administrative Files Series contains Foundation newsletters; administrative correspondence; minutes of Board of Directors meetings; and financial, legal and tax papers. The Project Files Series contains papers on short-term special projects, as well as long-term projects such as the Hopscotch House and the Wolf Pen Women Writers Colony. The American Voice Files Series contains information regarding the publication of the feminist literary journal The American Voice. The series contains correspondence between the editors ( Frederick Smock and Sallie Bingham) and contributors; copy-edited drafts of poetry, prose, and non-fiction essays; business records; broadsides; chapbooks (i.e. hand-bound books); miscellaneous publications; and a partially complete run of the journal. Some of the better-known authors to be published in The American Voice include: Paula Gunn Allen, Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Jorge Louis Borges, Kay Boyle, Jo Carson, Andrea Dworkin, Elaine Equi, Doris Grumbach, Joy Harjo, Fenton Johnson, Robin Morgan, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Firor Scott.

Finally, the largest series, the Grant Files Series, contains documentation on the evolution of the Foundation's grant program over the years, as well as files on those projects that received grant monies from the Foundation from 1986 to 1993. The Foundation awarded grants to both men and women, though women are in the majority. The grants supported the work of visual artists, writers, scholars, musicians, composers, documentary and fiction filmmakers, playwrights, painters, sculptors, puppeteers, quilters and other fabric artists, political activists, advocates for physically handicapped women, and those concerned with women and religion and women's employment issues. A unique concern of the grant givers was supporting the exploration and improvement of the situation of women in Appalachia, encouraging women to explore and study the wilderness, and defining and encouraging the emerging field of Ecofeminism.

The addition (Accession 2001-0012) (2208 items, 3.8 lin. ft.; dated 1986-1999) continues to document the process of publishing The American Voice. Materials include correspondence, board minutes, grant applications and evaluations, financial statements, video (3) and audio (4) cassettes and one audio compact disc, and information files for volumes 32-49. Also included are writings by Sallie Bingham. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (Accession 2007-0126) (5 lin. ft.) consists primarily of files documenting the organization's grant program, and also includes project files, files related to the feminist literary journal The American Voice, publications, and files from Hopscotch House.

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Primarily consists of Executive Board and Sector and Advisory Groups correspondence, memoranda, and meeting records; financial and planning documents, including grant applications; and workshop, seminar, and presentation materials that document the organization's activities to raise awareness of and promote action on the causes of poverty in N.C. Also includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, and other writings by the executive director, J. Gordon Chamberlin; telephone logs and appointment books; various printed material concerning poverty in NC; 11 audio and 15 videocassettes; 134 black-and-white and 10 color prints; 10 color negatives; and 8 data cartridge tapes. (02-234)

The 2006 addition (2006-0055)(600 items, 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1986-2004) contains correspondence, meeting records, publications, and other documents generated by the North Carolina Poverty Project and the Poverty Coalition. Also included is an oversize 7 panel Poverty Display.

The 2007 addition (2007-0023)(3300 items, 4.4 lin. ft.; dated 1982-2003) contains documents related to the executive board including correspondence, financial documents, and planning documents; tax information; documents related to conferences and business trips; photocopies and clippings of articles related to poverty from the New York Times and other newspapers (1986-2001); and lists of library holdings of poverty books at Southeastern universities.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Lisa Garmon papers, 1980-2007 6 Linear Feet — 4000 Items

Lisa Garmon, longtime resident of Chapel Hill, NC, was a multi-issue activist, organizing for women's rights, LGBT/queer rights, Latin American rights, and a defender of the environment. Collection contains personal/professional correspondence, subject files, and audiocassette and videocassette tapes of Lisa Garmon, writings and other materials related to the publication of the feminist zine HA!, and a zine collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection contains personal/professional correspondence, subject files, and cassette tapes of Lisa Garmon, writings and other materials related to the publication of the feminist zine Ha!, and a zine collection. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Marty Rosenbluth papers, 1980-2006 and undated 12 Linear Feet — 12,000 items

Marty Rosenbluth was Amnesty International's area specialist for Israel/Occupied Territories in the 1980s. He is also an independent documentary film-maker. The Marty Rosenbluth papers include publications, reports, case studies, press-releases, mailings, communications, leaflets, audiovisual recordings, and ephemera created by Palestinian and Israeli human rights groups. These groups include Al-Haq (Law in the Service of Man), Badil, B'Tselem, Hamoked (Center for the Defense of the Individual), Public Committee Against Torture in Israel, The West Bank Data Base Project, and Alternative Information Center. The papers also feature materials from Palestinian trade unions and United States-based solidarity groups, as well as unofficial, locally published first-person reports of events and conditions in the Occupied Territories.

The Marty Rosenbluth papers include publications, reports, case studies, press-releases, mailings, communications, leaflets, audiovisual recordings, and ephemera created by Palestinian and Israeli human rights groups. These groups include Al-Haq (Law in the Service of Man), Badil, B'Tselem, Hamoked (Center for the Defense of the Individual), Public Committee Against Torture in Israel, The West Bank Data Base Project, and Alternative Information Center. The papers also feature materials from Palestinian trade unions and United States-based solidarity groups, as well as unofficial, locally published first-person reports of events and conditions in the Occupied Territories.

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Talmage Farlow Documentary Film collection, 1979-2011 77 Linear Feet — circa 8000 Items

Filmmaker Lorenzo DeStefano directed and produced a documentary on jazz guitarist Talmage Farlow (1921-1998) titled Talmage Farlow (Productions A-Propos, 1981). The collection contains audio, moving image, and paper materials created and compiled by DeStefano during the production and distribution of the documentary and its related audio recordings.

The Talmage Farlow Documentary Film Collection consists of materials created and compiled by filmmaker Lorenzo DeStefano during the making of the film Talmage Farlow and several related audio recordings. The majority of the materials are in various audio and moving image formats, including 16mm and 35mm film, Hi8, Betacam SP, VHS, DVD, 1/4 inch and 1/2 inch open reel audio tape, audiocassette, and CD. These are located in the Audio and Moving Image Materials Series. The Paper Files Series includes materials maintained by DeStefano on the production, distribution, and marketing of the documentary and its related audio recordings.