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Abortion rights activist and the publisher of the feminist magazine ON THE ISSUES. The bulk of the collection consists of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for ON THE ISSUES, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists, such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape. The addition (04-041 and 04-062) (18,750 items, 30 linear feet; dated 1971-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial files from Choices Women's Medical Center and predecessor clinics, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files, board meeting files, policy and procedure manuals, subject files, insurance files, program files, grants files, legal files, and files related to ON THE ISSUES magazine. Also included are a small number of Hoffman's personal writings. This accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers. Addition (05-023) (5150 items, 12 lin. ft; dated 1978-2003) consists primarily of administrative and financial records from Choices Women's Medical Center, including correspondence, financial reports, public relations and media files. Also includes board meeting, subject, insurance, program, legal and grant files, as well as policy and procedure manuals; 33 videotapes, 84 slides, 54 photographs and contact sheets; 1 CD-ROM; printed materials; and promotional calendars. Accession is unprocessed and closed to researchers.

The papers of Merle Hoffman span the years from about 1944 to 2001, with most of the papers dating between 1961 and 2001. The collection is arranged in the following series: Choices, On the Issues, Personal Files, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The bulk of the materials consist of the records of Choices Women's Medical Center, a New York City women's health clinic and abortion clinic co-founded by Hoffman in 1971, and the organizational records for On the Issues, a feminist magazine owned by Choices and overseen by Hoffman. The remainder of the collection consists of Hoffman's personal papers, mostly related to her pro-choice activism. The collection also includes writings by or interviews with many activists such as Aung San Suu Kyi, Charlotte Bunch, Phyllis Chesler, Andrea Dworkin, Kate Millett, Marge Piercy, and Elie Wiesel. The correspondence, administrative files, minutes, manuals, reports, surveys, research files, electronic records, clippings, flyers, brochures, newsletters, photographs, and audiovisual materials in the collection provide rich material for the study of the history of abortion, the pro-choice movement, women's health care, and the anti-abortion movement in the United States. The records of Choices Women's Medical Center are especially valuable for understanding the medical practice of abortion, as well as the political context of that practice. Other topics that can be explored through the materials include contraception, women's rights and feminism, and rape.

The political context of abortion is further documented throughout the rest of the collection. Hoffman's writings, speeches, and interviews on abortion illuminate the abortion debate in the media. At the same time, the internal dynamics of the pro-choice movement are documented in files on various New York and national pro-choice organizations. The collection includes some materials on the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF), the National Abortion Federation (NAF), the National Coalition of Abortion Providers (NCAP), the National Abortion Rights Action League (NARAL), and the National Organization for Women (NOW). Especially noteworthy are the detailed meeting minutes and other records for the New York Pro-Choice Coalition, an umbrella organization for New York City pro-choice organizations founded by Hoffman in the mid 1980s.

In addition to her pro-choice activities, Merle Hoffman has been a vocal proponent of patient self-empowerment; an active supporter of various political candidates in New York City; and a feminist activist. The collection reflects these interests to varying degrees. The records of On the Issues magazine are especially useful as a source of writings on a broad range of feminist and other issues.

The Choices Series documents the day-to-day operations of Choices Women's Medical Center, including the clinic's medical policies and procedures, its internal administration, and its relationship with patients and community organizations. The series is divided into the following subseries: Correspondence, Subject Files, Legal Papers, Personnel, Security, Staff Files, Marketing, Operations, and Electronic Format. Much of the series consists of files on administrative issues, dating primarily from the late 1980s to the late 1990s. A few records date from the clinic's early years in the 1970s. The files also document the clinic staff's rising concern about Operation Rescue, militant anti-abortion protests, and anti-abortion violence during the late 1980s and 1990s. At the same time, the Choices records suggest how the ideals of feminist health care and patient empowerment have translated into medical practice. The records primarily provide the perspective of health providers rather than patients; the collection does not include patient medical records. However, patient surveys and a limited amount of patient correspondence provide some evidence of patient experience at the clinic. There is substantial material on the Choices East Project, Hoffman's unsuccessful attempt to establish a women's health clinic in Moscow. Choices' treatment philosophy of patient self-empowerment and its identity as a woman-friendly health care provider are documented in the Outreach Subseries and the Marketing Subseries. Information on patient experiences and reactions to the clinic can be found primarily through patient surveys, patient satisfaction questionnaires, and statistical summaries of patient demographics, all found in the Subject Files, Marketing, and Electronic Format Subseries. Choices organizational charts and staff rosters are available for reference in the Research Room's inventory drawers; please contact Research Services.

On the Issues (1983-1999), a feminist magazine, was founded by Merle Hoffman and produced by Choices staff. The magazine covered a broad range of feminist issues and topics, including but not limited to abortion and other women's health issues. During the 1990s the magazine became increasingly professionalized, moved from annual to quarterly publication, and operated more independently of Choices. The documents in the On The Issues Series provide an extensive record of the magazine's production and distribution. They primarily date from the 1990s and are organized into the following subseries: Issues, Correspondence, Article Files, Editorial Files, Production and Distribution, Marketing, Staff Files, Administration, and Electronic Format. The series includes a nearly complete run of issues. Files include reader surveys; mailing lists; drafts and correspondence from contributors; editorials by Hoffman and other writers; and working files maintained by individual editors and production staff. Electronic files contain similar materials, and include graphics.

The Personal Files Series is arranged into the following subseries: Correspondence, Writings and Speeches, Subject Files, Politics and Activism, New York Pro-Choice Coalition, Calendars, Phone Messages, Clippings, General Personal Files, and Electronic Format. The materials extensively document Hoffman's work as a writer, public speaker, organizer, and activist for abortion rights and other feminist causes. Hoffman's personal publicity materials, including curriculum vitae and biographical sketches, can also be found in this series. There are also some records of Hoffman's childhood and personal life. The correspondence, found in both the Correspondence and Electronic Format Subseries, contains significant personal exchanges with feminists, friends, and colleagues that span many decades. Pro-choice organizations represented in the series include the New York Pro-Choice Coalition (NYPCC), the National Organization for Women (NOW), the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), and the National Association of Abortion Facilities (NAAF). The series also contains Hoffman's phone message books, calendars, and scrapbooks, including those related to her work at Choices and On the Issues. Electronic files contain a variety of correspondence, mailing lists, graphics, Choice and On the Issues documents mixed on the same disks, and a few writings. Overall, the series amply illustrates the porous nature of the boundary between Hoffman's personal activities and her work at Choices and On the Issues.

The Photographic Materials Series contains a variety of material related to Choices Women's Medical Center, On the Issues magazine, and Hoffman's personal activities. Especially notable are the numerous images of the Choices clinic facilities and procedures, and the detailed visual record of pro-choice rallies and other events involving Hoffman during the 1980s. Political figures pictured in this series include Bella Abzug, Hilary Clinton, Andrea Dworkin, Geraldine Ferraro, Flo (Florynce) Kennedy, Congressman John Lewis, and Gloria Steinem. Other photographs in the Personal Subseries include portraits of Hoffman and snapshots from a vacation at the feminist Camp Sister Spirit.

The bulk of the Audiovisual Materials Series consists of audio recordings on cassette tape of New York City radio talk shows featuring Merle Hoffman as an interview subject. Most interviews date from the 1970s or early 1980s. In some cases, these recordings feature Hoffman responding to listeners in call-in discussions of abortion, or conducting debates with anti-abortion representatives. Other audio recordings include interviews conducted for On the Issues stories and radio advertisements for Choices. Videotape recordings include several episodes of "On the Issues," Merle Hoffman's cable access television show, and some documentary material on Choices and its patients. Materials are not immediately accessible until use copies can be made upon request. Please consult with reference staff before coming to use the collection.

Finally, the Ephemera Series contains various memorabilia, including a box of Choices condoms, buttons, and banners with feminist and political slogans.

Later accessions (2004-0041, 2004-0062, 2005-0023, and 2012-0049) have been added to the end of the finding aid. Boxlists are included when known.

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Robert Bausch papers, ca. 1968-1999 4.9 Linear Feet — 3408 Items

This collection documents the professional and creative life of writer and teacher Robert Bausch. Materials include handwritten, typed, and electronic (computerized) drafts of published and unpublished novels and essays, including The Gypsy Man, On the Way Home, Almighty Me, For God's Sake, and A Hole in the Earth; galleys and corrected proofs of his published novels; incoming andoutgoing correspondence--including copies of electronic mail--with writers, editors, readers,students, and family; a few typescripts of works by others; book and movie contracts and royalty statements; andaudiocassette tapes of Bausch's class discussions and readings by authorsGeorge Garrett, Bausch, and Bausch's twin brother Richard Bausch.

(15 tapes) (2500 manuscript items) (31 disks) (893 computer files)

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African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

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Daniel Levinson Wilk is a historian. Muravchik was a longtime staff member of the Socialist Party of America and the Jewish Labor Committee. Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

Collection comprises an audiocassette tape of the oral history interview conducted by Wilk with Emanuel Muravchik while Wilk was completing his graduate work at Duke University. The interview primarily focused on Muravchik's career in the Socialist Party, particularly from the 1920s to the 1950s, and mostly in New York State. Related topics include Muravchick's education; the process followed to place Norman Thomas on the New York State ballot as a Socialist Party candidate for the 1940 Presidential election; the relationships between socialists and communists; approaches used to build the Socialist movement; union and other organizing; as well as the impact of WWII on the movement and its leaders. Among the noted persons mentioned was J. Edgar Hoover. There is no transcript for the interview, and two digital files have been created from the audiocassette.

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The Durham Traditional Arts Survey was conducted in the early 2000s as part of the Document Durham project within the Community Programs department at the Center for Documentary Studies. Participants consisted of folklorists and photographers who traveled through Durham County, attempting to document the diversity of various communities by focusing on traditional artists within those communities. One outcome of the DTAS was the Home Made Visible: Durham 2002 exhibition, which highlighted Durham traditional arts and crafts. Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Includes fieldwork reports, interview tapes, slides, photographs, and other documentary material from the research and observations conducted by participants in the Durham Traditional Arts Survey Project. Durham communities and artists represented in the project include African American, African immigrants, Latino, Middle Eastern, Jewish, South Indian, and Asian, as well as occupational traditions and rural community traditions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The Neighborhoods Project was created as part of the Community Programs department within Duke's Center for Documentary Studies. According to the CDS website, it offered North Carolina elementary school teachers an innovative and effective way to meet social studies goals outlined in the state's standard course of study. The project provided a way to engage students in their own communities, focusing on their individual lives and stories through photographs, narrative writing, and storytelling. It provided a series of experiential learning activities that encouraged the use of photography, oral history, and narrative writing in an exploration of community and citizenship. Collection includes black-and-white photographs, negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes where whites, African Americans, and Spanish-seeking citizens live. Some materials are in Spanish. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection includes black-and-white photographs (a few are hand-colored), negatives, and slides from projects created by students at Durham's E.K. Powe and W.G. Pearson elementary schools between 1997 and 2004. The images document the social life and the built environment in Durham, N.C., in city neighborhoods where the students live; they feature children, pets, houses and places of business, groups of adults, and other neighborhood scenes. Also includes some student booklets and publications highlighting their projects as part of the program. Materials are sorted by school, with miscellaneous or unidentified materials in the last series. Also contains electronic and audiovisual recordings that require reformatting before use.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2018 118.5 Linear Feet — 106.0 lin. ft.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

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International Monitor Institute. Rwanda Videotapes and audiotapes, 1992-1999 4 Linear Feet — 7 Gigabytes — About 335 items — 7.04 GB

The non-profit agency International Monitor Institute (IMI) operated between 1993 and 2003, primarily to assist international war-crimes tribunals by collecting, indexing and organizing visual evidence of violations of international human rights law. The International Monitor Institute Records, Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes span the dates 1992-1999, and comprise audiovisual materials related to IMI's documentation of contemporary conflicts and human rights violations in Rwanda. The collection contains videotape segments of news broadcasts as well as documentaries of the Rwandan genocide, including footage of massacre sites and refugee camps, and interviews with both victims and perpetrators of the genocide. The collection also contains audiotapes of broadcasts from Radio Télévision Libres des Milles Collines (RTLM) and Radio Rwanda, classified as incitement to genocide, as well as several recordings produced by Reporters without Borders. The bulk of materials in this collection are audiotapes of RTLM broadcasts.

The Rwanda Videotapes and Audiotapes section of the International Monitor Institute records contains descriptions of 47 tapes and 282 audiotapes collected by IMI that depict human rights issues and themes in Rwanda. These materials span the years 1992-1999. The videotapes largely document massacre sites and mass graves, evacuations, the role of missionaries and human rights activists, and conditions in refugee camps holding both victims and killers. Several documentaries and news reports examine the development of a genocidal ideology in Rwanda tied to its colonial past, as well as offer histories of Tutsi/Hutu animosity, including the role of the Belgian colonial government, France, and the Catholic Church. Many of the materials in this collection offer an analysis of government structure and politics in Rwanda before and after the genocide. In addition, this collection includes various news segments reporting on the movements of the Rwandan Patriotic Front (RPF) and the Rwanda Army as well as the effectiveness of the United Nations in the conflict; includes a documentary on Belgian soldiers killed in Rwanda.

The majority of audiotapes in this collection are RTLM and Radio Rwanda broadcasts inciting violence and orchestrating the genocide, encouraging youth to join military actions, and frequently referring to specific targets, such as Bilyogo and Nyamirambo. Broadcasts also include frequent reference to Inyenzi (cockroaches) and Inkotani (Tutsi Rebel Army). Many of the RTLM broadcasters accuse the Rwanda Patriotic Front (RPF) of the assassination of President Habiyarimana and argue that the Inkotani want to exterminate Hutus and so they must, in turn, be exterminated. Broadcasters speak out against French intervention and accuse the Belgians of alignment with the Rebel Army. The remaining audiotapes were produced by Reporters without Borders (RSF).

The majority of the materials in this collection are in French and Kinyarwanda. Both documentaries and news reports take the form of interviews with Rwandans about the massacres and interviews with members of the RPF as well as with figures involved with organizing the killings. The collection includes interviews with notable figures, such as Théoneste Bagosora on his role in the genocide, Ferdinand Nahimana, the former director of Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM) about his failure to stop broadcasts that fueled the genocide, as well as accounts given by members of the death squad.

The series in this collection include the Rwanda Videotapes Series, the Rwanda Audiotapes Series (Audiocassette), and the Rwanda Audiotapes Series (Electronic Records). The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Audiotapes Series. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive. Further material from the IMI Rwanda records can be found in IMI's organizational records, including printed transcripts of many of the audiotapes. All videotapes in this collection are in Betacam SP format. Please note that the descriptions of the tapes in this collection are based on IMI's data and were not originally drafted by Rubenstein Library Staff. Further organizational material on Rwanda can be found in the International Monitor Institute Records, also at the Rubenstein Library.

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Larry Schwarm "On fire" exhibit photographs, 1990s, 2003 7 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 76 prints — 76 color photographs; 1 audio cassette

Collection comprises 76 color photographic prints, measuring from 11x14 to 20x24 inches, depicting the annual prairie fires that sweep across east-central Kansas. These images were taken during the 1990s; the artist has continued taking images of prairie fires up to the present (2015). For the 1990s project, published in a book entitled "On fire," Schwarm was awarded the 2002 Honigman First Book Prize in Photography by the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The photographs were displayed in an exhibit entitled "On fire: Larry Schwarm," at Duke University's Rubenstein Library. Also included in the collection is an audio cassette recording of the artist's talk Schwarm gave on November 6, 2003, at the exhibit's opening reception. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 76 color photographic prints, measuring from 11x14 to 20x24 inches, depicting the annual prairie fires that sweep across east-central Kansas. With the exception of one box of unmatted 11x14 prints, the photographs are in hinged window mats measuring 16x20, 20x24, and 24x32 inches. The images were published in a photobook entitled "On fire," for which Schwarm was awarded the 2002 Honigman First Book Prize in Photography by the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The photographs were displayed in an exhibit at Duke University Libraries. Also included in the collection is an audio cassette recording of the exhibition talk Schwarm gave on November 6, 2003. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.