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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

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The Duke Endowment was established by James Buchanan Duke as a perpetual charitable trust in 1924, with the following types of beneficiaries, mainly residing in North Carolina and South Carolina: non-profit hospitals and child care institutions; educational institutions; and rural churches of the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (now the United Methodist Church). The Duke Endowment Archives span the years 1902 to 2006, with the bulk of the material dating from 1925 through 2006. The collection documents the administration of the corpus of the trust and the charitable contributions made to the categories of recipients named in the Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Endowment. The majority of the records are arranged into series that reflect the organization of the institution, including the Board of Trustees, Treasurer's Office, Controller's Office, Investment Office, Education Division and Committee on Communications, Health Care and Child Care Divisions, and Rural Church Division. Smaller series, documenting such other activities as record-keeping, publications, and history of The Endowment, include: Central Files, Oral History Project, Trust Under Will, Publications, Miscellaneous, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The collection consists of the following types of materials: correspondence; minutes of meetings; financial records; applications for assistance from hospitals, child care institutions, and churches; statistics; publications; oral history tapes and transcripts; architectural drawings and blueprints; photographs; audio cassettes; and miscellaneous records and papers. The geographic focus is primarily North Carolina and South Carolina.

The Duke Endowment Archives span the years 1902 to 2018, although the bulk of the material dates from 1925 through 2006. The collection consists of correspondence; minutes of meetings; financial records; applications for assistance from hospitals, child care institutions, and churches; statistics; publications; oral history tapes and transcripts; architectural drawings and blueprints; photographs; audio cassettes; and miscellaneous records and papers. The collection documents the administration of the corpus of the trust and the charitable contributions made to the categories of recipients named in the Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Duke Endowment. Records are arranged to reflect the responsibilities and operations of the Endowment's trustees, officers, and divisions, with major series including: the Board of Trustees, Treasurer's Office, Controller's Office, Investment Office, Education Division and Committee on Communications, Health Care and Child Care Divisions, and Rural Church Division. Smaller series, documenting such other activities as record-keeping, publications, and the Endowment's history, include: Central Files, Oral History Project, Trust Under Will, Publications, Miscellaneous, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. Subject areas represented in the collection include: the history of foundations, hospital and child care demographics and other statistics, rural church buildings and activities, the construction of Duke University, and the life of James Buchanan Duke. The geographic focus is primarily North Carolina and South Carolina.

When James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment as a perpetual charitable trust in 1924, he formalized a tradition of philanthropy that he and other members of the Duke family had practiced for many years, especially with regard to Duke University (formerly Trinity College). The life of James B. Duke, including his philanthropic interests, is documented in the Oral History Project Series (RESTRICTED) and Miscellaneous Series (RESTRICTED), and, to a lesser extent, the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series' (RESTRICTED) Feasibility Study and Rural Church Division Series (RESTRICTED), Correspondence Subseries. The 100th Anniversary of James B. Duke's birth and interest in Mr. Duke's home in Charlotte, N.C., are documented in the Miscellaneous Series.

The Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Duke Endowment delineates the type of beneficiaries eligible for its support. These include non-profit hospitals and child care institutions; educational institutions; and rural churches of the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (now the United Methodist Church), including retired ministers and widows and orphans of deceased ministers. Beneficiaries usually reside within North Carolina and South Carolina, i.e., generally the areas served by the water power facilities established by Mr. Duke, although under certain conditions other states may be served. The textile mills served by hydroelectric power were of special interest to Mr. Duke. A statistical study of cotton mills that he requested is in the Miscellaneous Series. The Indenture and Deed of Trust specifies that hospitals and child care institutions for Whites and African Americans should be supported. The Duke Endowment provides technical assistance as well as funding. Specific educational institutions were named in the Indenture: Davidson College, Davidson, N.C.; Duke University, Durham, N.C.; Furman University, Greenville, S.C.; and Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, N.C.

For the original corpus of The Endowment, James B. Duke assigned shares of stock from Duke Power Company, British-American Tobacco Company, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, George W. Helme Company, Republic Cotton Mills, and Judson Mills. The Indenture stipulates how income and capital from the corpus should be managed and includes specific directives for handling the stock of Duke Power Company. Continuous records for the financial management of the assets of The Duke Endowment are in the Treasurer's Office (RESTRICTED), Controller's Office (RESTRICTED), and Investment Office Series (RESTRICTED). The volumes in the Controller's Office Series include records of payments made and management of the corpus as well as The Endowment's general operating expenses, such as salaries, rents, furniture, and supplies. The Investment Office Series contains records pertaining to companies in which The Duke Endowment invested. The Treasurer's Office Series includes an historical overview of The Endowment's expenditures and includes the minutes of the Finance Committee, which was established in 1975. The Treasurer's Office Series includes Beneficiary Information System reports, which provide geographic breakdowns of payments to institutions from the inception of The Duke Endowment to the present, and a summary that lists each institution or beneficiary group and how it used funds from The Endowment. The Treasurer's Office and Investment Office records do not reflect the overall financial management of The Duke Endowment.

The first members of the Board of Trustees of The Duke Endowment--Nanaline H. Duke, George G. Allen, William R. Perkins, William B. Bell, Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Walter C. Parker, Alexander H. Sands, Jr., William S. Lee, Charles I. Burkholder, Norman A. Cocke, Edward C. Marshall, and Bennette C. Geer--were named in the Indenture as parties of the second part. As stipulated by the Indenture, the trustees were required to meet at least ten times a year and the minutes of the meetings were to be recorded. The minutes are located in the Board of Trustees Series (RESTRICTED). Miscellaneous papers and pictures of some trustees, especially of Watson S. Rankin, a physician, who was also head of the Hospital and Child Care Divisions for many years, are in the Miscellaneous Series. Rankin was an early proponent of rural hospitals as a way to make health care available to greater numbers of citizens. The related correspondence of Graham L. Davis, assistant to Watson S. Rankin, is in the Health Care and Child Care Division Series (RESTRICTED), Health Care Subseries. The Publications Series includes material by or about several trustees.

The Indenture directed the trustees to expend funds for the establishment of Duke University. Designated by Mr. Duke "as one of the principal objects of this trust," a percentage of The Duke Endowment's corpus was to be applied annually for its support. Duke Construction Company was organized by the Board of Trustees to build the university (now known as the West Campus). The architect Horace Trumbauer designed the campus buildings and plant, and the landscape was designed by Olmstead Brothers. Financial records for the construction of Duke University, including the operation of Duke Construction Company, are in the Controller's Office Series (RESTRICTED) and architectural drawings for the buildings, campus plot, and landscaping are in the Miscellaneous Series. Documentation of The Endowment's support of the other educational institutions named in the Indenture, including disbursements and income generated, is in the volumes in the Controller's Office Series.

Non-profit hospitals receive support from The Duke Endowment for free days of care for individuals unable to pay the costs of hospitalization. If all the funds designated for free days of care are not spent in any given year, excess funds may be used for support of hospital construction, maintenance, and equipment. Medical education is also supported, and technical assistance for administrative functions is provided through published manuals. A similar arrangement was established for societies, agencies, or institutions that cared for orphans and half-orphans. The Health Care and Child Care Divisions, Central Files (RESTRICTED), and Publications Series provide detailed documentation for institutions and programs that receive assistance from The Duke Endowment.

The history of hospital services and statistics for the types of admissions in North Carolina and South Carolina, especially rural areas, can be studied in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Health Care Division Subseries [NOTE: Formerly known as the Hospital and Child Care Divisions Series and the Hospital Division Subseries, respectively]. The applications from individual hospitals, as well as summaries and statistics that group institutions into comparable categories, provide important documentation about the various types of hospitals and their clients in North Carolina and South Carolina, including hospitals' economic statuses, physical plants, and in-patient and out-patient demographics. Most of the earlier statistics include breakdowns for the number of African American and White patients served and their medical profiles.

The history of institutional child care in North Carolina and South Carolina is documented in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Child Care Division Subseries. The Child Care Division applications for assistance describe the individual institutions that request support from The Duke Endowment. The applications include information about the physical plant, administration and financial status, population statistics, and the physical care and education of children. The summaries use the information in the applications for assistance and group it by type of institution, e.g., religious, community, county, state, more than 150 beds, under 151 beds with farms, White, African American, etc.

Minutes in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Health Care and Child Care Committee Subseries document some discussions of how funds would be allocated by The Duke Endowment. The published Annual Reports of the Hospital and Child Care Divisions include substantial statistical information and summary reports about specific institutions served during the year. These reports, located in the Publications Series, are a useful place to begin research about hospital and child care. Reports for these divisions are also in the Year Books.

Between 1915 and 1924, Mr. Duke made systematic contributions to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for churches in the North Carolina and Western North Carolina conferences. His contributions were first administered through the Board of Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In 1920 Trinity College began to administer the funds. The Church Architect Program files in the Rural Church Division Series (RESTRICTED), Miscellaneous Subseries reflect another arrangement between Duke University and the Rural Church Division. The creation of The Duke Endowment established a formal trust to continue similar support for building and operating rural churches, income for superannuated ministers, and widows and orphans of deceased ministers. The records of the Rural Church Series, Building Grant Files and Church Maintenance Files Subseries document the assistance that individual churches received to build, maintain, and operate churches. Many of these records include oversize blueprints or architectural drawings. There are also records for special projects and other activities supported by The Duke Endowment. The Correspondence Subseries includes information about the concerns of specific churches as well as Methodism and religion in general. Area economic conditions were often described in the correspondence.

The Education Division and the Committee on Communications are currently responsible for publications produced by The Duke Endowment. The Publications Series is a useful starting place for information about The Endowment's activities for a given year or for a historical overview of the foundation. Publications, especially the Annual Reports and Year Books, provide information about the trustees and staff; changes in the organization of The Duke Endowment; and summary information about various divisions, including financial distributions and income, statistics, and specific programs and activities supported by The Endowment at various institutions. Additional publications are in the Miscellaneous Series. Daily operations of The Duke Endowment are documented in the General Correspondence in the Central Files Series. Some general history about The Endowment is located in the Miscellaneous Series, including a signed copy of the Indenture and anniversary celebrations of the 1930s, 1960s, 1970s, and 1990s.

The Oral History Project Series (RESTRICTED), a project initiated in 1963, records the reminiscences of people who were knowledgeable about Duke University, the Duke family, and North Carolina and the region in general. The interviews were conducted by Frank W. Rounds of the Oral History Project of Columbia University. The correspondence includes outlines of the names of interviewees and the subjects they were to discuss.

Two groups of non-print materials and of oversize materials complete the collection. The Photographic Materials Series (RESTRICTED) contains approximately 200 photographs relating mainly to the Rural Church Division Series, especially the Committees on Church Architecture, and to the Miscellaneous Series. Several audio cassette recordings in the Audiovisual Materials Series (RESTRICTED) document miscellaneous meetings and addresses pertaining to the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series. Although series from throughout the collection are represented in the Oversize Materials (RESTRICTED), this group is particularly rich in blueprints and other architectural drawings that support related materials in the Miscellaneous Series and in the Rural Church Division Series, Building Grant Files Subseries.

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European tourist travel negatives, between 1910-1915 36 items — 1 box — 34 nitrate negatives; 2 original processing envelopes — 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white travel images taken mainly in European cities. Subjects chiefly focus on popular tourist landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to be all women and at least one young child. Locations identified by library staff include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are unidentified, as are the photographer and subjects. It is assumed that some locations are in London or England, as one of two commercial photograph processing envelopes from the London firm Selfridge's accompanying the negatives is marked "English trip 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white tourist travel images mainly taken in European cities sometime between 1910-1915. Subjects chiefly focus on landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to include women and at least one young child. Identified cities include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are uncertain, as are the identities of the photographer and subjects. Two commercial photographic processing envelopes are from the London firm Selfridge's; one is marked "English trip, 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

The dating is taken in part from the 1913 date on the processing envelope and from a billboard advertising a musical being staged in Paris.

Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Garrett Orr Papers document the artistic output and personal files of advertising executive Garrett Orr. Although the collection spans the years circa 1873 to 1994, the bulk of the materials fall within two main periods: the 1890s to 1914, comprising a photographic collection of old poster images; and 1930 to 1965, which approximates the span of Orr's professional life. The collection includes the original drawings, water colors and paintings produced by Orr as designs for the outdoor advertising campaigns of a wide variety of products such as Gillette razors, Ipana toothpaste (Bristol-Myers), Lucky Strikes and Viceroy cigarettes (Brown & Williamson), Mazola corn oil (Corn Products Refining Company), Seagram beverages, Verney fabrics, and White Rose tea. Also included are folders of photographs, slides and negatives of Orr's advertising work for approximately 550 companies (with index). In addition, a collection of almost 200 large-format negatives and photographs document images of 19th- and early 20th-century posters for plays, musicals, minstrel shows, circuses, and hotels. A large set of clippings files contain published examples of the work of over 100 graphic artists and illustrators contemporary with Orr, including Floyd Davis, Ronald McLeod, George Petty, Howard Scott, Ben Stahl, Jon Whitcomb, and J. Walter Wilkinson. The collection is organized into five series--the General Files Series; the Artists and Illustrators Series; the Product Files Series; the Other Photographic Materials Series; and the Sketches Series. Large-format items from the Artists and Illustrators Series and Sketches Series have been relocated to Oversize Materials.

Closely related collections held by the Rubenstein Library include: the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Poster Designs; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Slide Library; the Duplex Advertising Company Billboard Images and Records; the Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements; the R.C. Maxwell Co. Records; the Howard Scott Papers; and the John Paver Papers.

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Hans Horst Meyer papers, 1831-1943, 2004 and undated 8 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — approx. 201 items — Approximately 201 items

Hans Horst Meyer was a pharmacologist and scientist on the faculty of the University of Vienna in the early 20th century. The papers are mostly in German, and consist of Meyer's professional correspondence; diplomas and awards; a few professional writings; an autograph book with signatures and correspondence of notable scientists and others; genealogical papers relating to his attempts in the late 1930s to document his family's ancestry; several volumes, including a family Bible and a diary of his son Arthur's first six years of life; and professional and personal photographs. There are two photographs of neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (Boston), inscribed to Meyer (1914 and 1929), and a sketch by Cushing. There are a few letters from family members, one of which describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany. An addition to the collection consists of a few letters, photographs, negatives, and other memorabilia relating to Meyer's son, Arthur W. Meyer, personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, and Arthur's son Horst, who became a physicist at Duke University. The Hans Horst Meyer papers form part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The papers, mostly in German, document pharmacologist and scientist Hans Horst Meyer's career and personal life, and consist of personal and professional correspondence; written pieces; genealogical documents; diplomas, medals, and awards; a Bible and other assorted volumes; professional and personal photographs; and an autograph album.

The certificates and medals were received by Meyer between 1901 and 1937, and come from a variety of international scientific organizations, such as the New York Academy of Medicine, the Royal Society of Physicians in Budapest, and the Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences. Meyer also received the German Order of the Red Eagle and honorary citizenship of the city of Vienna. Also included is a small group of letters and printed materials relating to honors received by Meyer, as well as a reprint of Meyer's chapter in the Handbuch der experimentellen Pharmakologie.

Of note are two portrait photographs of pioneer neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing (1914 and 1929), both inscribed to Hans Horst Meyer, and a warm letter from Cushing to Meyer's son Arthur, a physician. A sketch of a spongioblast, attributed to Cushing, rounds out this group.

The personal papers include a group of official documents, identity and voting cards, and correspondence with parishes and German officials, attesting to Meyer's efforts from about 1938 to 1939 to document his family's religious heritage and obtain a new German identity card, possibly in order to leave the country. Meyer died in Vienna in 1939 while his application was still under review. Also among the personal papers are a few letters from family members, one of which, dated October 6, 1939, describes in detail the correspondent's experience in Poland during the invasion of that country by the Germans, and his or her return to Germany.

Meyer's personal papers are accompanied by a German bible, a volume of poetry and quotations, and a journal in which Meyer recorded his son Arthur's first six years of life. There are also photographs of Hans Horst Meyer with various family members: his wife Doris, shortly after marriage, his sons Arthur and Kurt, his daughter-in-law Lotte, and grandchildren.

The autograph album contains 147 autographs and letters of well-known and lesser-known Germans, most of whom lived in the 19th century. Included are a letter each from Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Johann Christoph Friedrich von Schiller, and Clara Schumann, a postcard from Johannes Brahms, and the autographs of many individuals, including Henrik Ibsen and Charles Dickens.

An addition to the collection consists of personal memorabilia, including photographs, glass slides, and a few letters, relating to Hans Horst Meyer's son Arthur, and his close relationship as personal physician to Boris III, King of Bulgaria, until Arthur's suicide in 1933. The letters are addressed to (Johannes) Horst Meyer, Arthur's small son, who eventually became a physicist, emigrated to the U.S., and joined the faculty of Duke University.

With the exception of the autograph album, originally in the holdings of the Rubenstein Library general collections, the Meyer papers were acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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The records of the Harriet Wasserman Literary Agency span the dates 1948-1993, with most of the records dating after 1974. The records dated prior to 1981, when the agency was formed, are those of writers who were Wasserman's clients when she was employed at the Russell and Volkening agency and stayed with her when she formed her own agency. The collection documents the careers of individual writers and in doing so indicates the varied activities of a major literary agency: preparation and submission of manuscripts, negotiation of contracts, handling of foreign and reprint rights, publicity, and the differing ways affairs are handled for lesser known or beginning writers and for major authors. Among the more prominent American fiction writers included are Richard Bausch, Saul Bellow, Frederick Buechner, Oscar Hijuelos, Josephine Humphreys, Ruth Prawer Jhabvala, Alice McDermott, and Reynolds Price. In addition, records about historian George F. Kennan and philosopher and historian Allan Bloom are included. The correspondence is primarily about professional matters, although some sense of the personal relationships between the agent and the more prominent clients can be gleaned.

By far, the Bellow papers comprise the largest group relating to any single author, and cover the longest span of years, from 1948 to 1993. There are relatively few papers from 1948 to 1972, but those present contain a few personal letters to Bellow from his contemporaries such as the novelists Ralph Ellison and Wright Morris. The bulk of the Bellow papers date from 1973, and convey a clear impression of the activity surrounding his increasing fame, particularly with the publication of Humboldt's Gift, the 1975 Pulitzer Prize for that novel, and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1976. After that date his later career is sketched in detail and follows from inception through publication such works as The Dean's December, More Die of Heartbreak, and It All Adds Up.

The collection includes, in smaller amounts, material about the careers of other authors. In the current accession, the Bausch and Jhabvala papers are particularly rich among the fiction writers. Bausch's career is outlined from his breaking into the profession in the mid-1970s to his establishment as a major author by the late 1980s. Jhabvala's papers pick up in mid-career, when she has already published several novels and won the Booker Prize in England, but prior to her growing fame as a screenwriter for Merchant Ivory Productions. Her correspondence also includes a number of letters from director James Ivory and producer Ismail Merchant, particularly relating to the development of the film The Autobiography of a Princess (1975) and the accompanying photography book of the same name.

Of special note are the records about Reynolds Price and Josephine Humphreys. While the HWLA collection contains some unique items about these writers, especially Price, scholars should be aware that the Library is also the primary repository for the personal papers of these writers. Much more information is available in their respective collections.

Among non-fiction writers in the current (1995) accession, the papers of historian George F. Kennan and philosopher Allan Bloom document their careers in the 1980s. Most of the Bloom papers relate to the publicity surrounding the publication of The Closing of the American Mind, particularly reviews and speaking engagements. The Kennan material is more varied, including not only Wasserman's correspondence on Kennan's behalf, but several dozen lengthy letters from Kennan to Wasserman and others.

The 1999 addition (accession #1999-0275) (19,500 items, 32.5 lin. ft.; dated 1974-1999 and undated) expands on all of the collection series, especially materials related to Saul Bellow.

The 2001 addition (accession #2001-0050) (816 items, 12 lin. ft.; dated 1974-2000 and undated) includes book manuscripts, galley proofs (some inscribed), correspondence, notes, and other materials relating to the authors represented by the literary agency. Other materials include sixty-four black-and-white photographs, one black-and-white negative, four color photographs, and one audiocassette tape. Authors included in this addition are Richard Bausch, Jay Williams, Suzi-Lori Parks, Laurel Lee, Karla Kuskin, Elinore Clark, Perrin Ireland, Frederick Buechner, John Tyler Bonner, Martha Moody, Eugene Walter, Caroline Winthrop, Paul Lussier, Sharon Flake, Reynolds Price, Josephine Humphreys, Saul Bellow, George Dawson and Richard Glaubman, Julia Markus, George F. Kennan, Carole L. Glickfeld, Mark Winegardner, Michael Stewart, Diane Vreuls, Sandra Gould Ford, Charles McPhee, Mark Smith, and Harriet Wasserman herself.

The second 2001 addition (accession #2001-0115) (5 items, .1 linear feet; dated 1978-2001, bulk 1997-2001) contains correspondence between Wasserman and Shelley Gruskin. It also includes a playbill for performances of In Dreams Begin Responsibilities and Gimpel the Fool, signed by actor David Marguiles and a copy of Delmore Schwartz's In Dreams Begin Responsibilities and Other Stories. Both book and playbill are mentioned in the correspondence.

The 2003 addition (accession #2003-0051)(12,500 items, 30 linear feet, dated 1982-2000) consists chiefly of client files (correspondence, contracts, financial records, etc.), manuscripts and proofs of books by clients, published versions of books by clients, and related materials. Includes especially significant material for Saul Bellow and a few other authors, including Oscar Hijuelos and George Frost Kennan.

Addition (08-004) (18,000 items; 24 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2006) consists chiefly of client files (correspondence, contracts, financial records, etc.), manuscripts and proofs of books by clients, published versions clients, and related materials. Includes especially significant material for Saul Bellow and a few other authors, including Oscar Hijuelos and George Frost Kennan.

Addition (08-078) (8 items; .2 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2000) includes writing samples for agency authors, as well as literary award kits and publications.

Addition (12-008) (2250 items; 3.0 lin. ft.; dated 1972-2003) consists of agency files about author Reynolds Price, including general correspondence, contracts, book reviews, and other related materials.

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Jim Dow photographs, 1966-2018 18.5 Linear Feet — 41 boxes — The great majority of the negative sheets measure 8x10 inches, with a minority measuring 4x5 inches.

Collection consists of approximately 1905 black-and-white and color sheet negatives from the archive of photographer Jim Dow, representing images printed, published, and exhibited from 1966 to 2018. The photographs document Dow's extensive travels chiefly in Argentina, Uruguay, England, Mexico, and the United States. He is best known for his studies of U.S. 20th century vernacular architecture and landscapes in New England, the U.S. West, Midwest, and the South, with a focus on North Dakota and Massachusetts; for his multi-panel images of sports stadiums and athletic fields, chiefly in the U.S. and U.K.; and for his striking images of private club interiors in New York City, and the architecture and interiors of large public buildings such as churches, museums, universities, and civic buildings in cities around the world. Also featured are his series on food trucks, taco trucks, and their equivalents, "carritos," in Mexico and South America. Regardless of location, many of Dow's photographs include details of outdoor advertising and cultural expressions such as murals, handpainted signs, bar decor, and graffiti. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of approximately 1905 black-and-white and color film negatives from the archive of photographer Jim Dow, representing images printed, published, and exhibited from 1966 to 2018. The images document Dow's extensive travels chiefly in Argentina, Uruguay, England, Mexico, and across much of the United States. There are also images from Canada, Portugal and Scotland. The great majority of the images were shot with an 8x10 inch view camera and color film; the black-and-white negatives measure 4x5 inches and represent his earliest work taken on the road in the U.S.

Dow's images most frequently document exterior architecture and interior spaces with few or no people visible. He is best known for his studies of U.S. 20th century vernacular architecture and landscapes in New England, the U.S. West, the Midwest, and Southern States; for his multi-panel panoramas of baseball, football, and soccer stadiums and athletic fields, chiefly in the U.S., Canada, and U.K.; and for his striking images of private club interiors in New York City, and the architecture and interiors of large public buildings such as churches, museums, and civic buildings in cities around the world.

His earliest images were taken on the road in almost every region of the lower 48 states, beginning in 1966 and continuing through 2018. Starting out in black-and-white then soon transitioning to color, they document small towns and roadside attractions, well-worn business facades, and gathering places such as barbequeue joints, bars, event halls, and diners. North Dakota features prominently, as do Wyoming, Texas, Louisiana, California, Massachusetts, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, and Virginia. Closely related to these are his series on U.S. food trucks and taco trucks, and "carritos," their equivalents in Mexico and South America. Regardless of location, many of Dow's photographs include details of outdoor advertising and cultural expressions such as murals, handpainted signs, bar decor, and graffiti.

The last series in the collection represents commissioned work, and chiefly consists of portfolios taken at New England universities and private schools such as MIT, Yale, Tufts, Vassar, and Phillips Academy (1985-2008).

The negatives in the collection form the first installment of the photographer's archive at Duke University. Additions of corresponding prints, slides, and papers are anticipated.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Juanita Morris Kreps papers, 1921-2001 and undated 41.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 19,925 Items

Juanita Morris Kreps was born January 11, 1921, in Lynch (Harlan Co.), Kentucky. She was Professor of Economics at Duke University (1958-1977), where she held the James B. Duke professorship (1972-1977), also serving as Dean of the Woman's College (1969-1972) and University Vice President (1973-1977). She then was appointed U.S. Secretary of Commerce in 1977 for the Carter Administration and served for two years. Kreps's papers span the years 1921-2001, and contain incoming and outgoing correspondence (1968-1979), many speech drafts (1967-1997), twenty photograph albums, fifteen scrapbooks, 692 color and 595 black-and-white loose photographs, and over 100 negatives. There are also briefing books, reports, notes, minutes, appointee recommendations, speech drafts, and other documents relating to Kreps's cabinet-level work. The audience for her speeches included university students as well as alumni and women's organizations; speech topics focus on education for women, the value of women's work, age and gender in economics and economic markets, and leisure and economic growth. Other correspondence documents Kreps's career positions, some more fully than others, including Secretary of Commerce; Duke University Dean of the Woman's College, especially relating to the merger of the Woman's College and Trinity College; Public Director of the New York Stock Exchange Board; and Women's Research and Education Institute Board of Directors. Photograph albums and scrapbooks detail visits to the USSR, China, and Japan and contain clippings regarding her cabinet position.

The Juanita Kreps Papers span the years 1921-2001, mainly documenting Kreps's career as an economist, academic administrator, and U.S. Secretary of Commerce for the Carter administration. The two series holding the majority of the materials, the Secretary of Commerce and Speeches Series, concern her service in the political and public spheres respectively. The Secretary of Commerce Series is arranged in the following seven subseries: Appointment Books and Calendars, Appointment and Confirmation Process, Correspondence, Notes, Subject Files, Scrapbooks, and Photographs. Photograph albums and scrapbooks detail visits to the USSR, China, and Japan and contain clippings regarding her cabinet position. There are also separate series for correspondence and appointment books that fall outside the scope of the Secretary of Commerce period. The second largest series in the collection, the Speeches Series contain drafts, frequently annotated and accompanied by other material, of Kreps's lectures, speeches, and remarks on occasions such as academic conferences, university commencements, various other university events, and corporate executive board meetings. The subjects are broadly based and reflect her interests in economics, especially in aging and older workers, women's social conditions and education, the value of women's labor, women in the corporate world, and work and leisure issues. Speeches given after her tenure as Secretary of Commerce also cover broader issues about globalization and domestic and international economic policy.

Albeit small, the Correspondence Series spans several decades and documents Kreps's exchanges with academics and scholars, the local and federal governments, and lobbyist groups. Other correspondence documents Kreps's career positions, some more fully than others, including Secretary of Commerce; Duke University Dean of the Woman's College, especially relating to the merger of the Woman's College and Trinity College; Public Director of the New York Stock Exchange Board; Women's Research and Education Institute Board of Directors; and Carter Presidential Center fundraiser. The Appointment Books and Calendars Series records Kreps's busy schedule of events and engagements, and the Publications Series holds her contributions to academic journals, government publications, and books. The Visual Material Series houses images that date from her childhood through her long career; photos taken during her cabinet position are found in the Secretary of Commerce series. Other Files Series contains materials that fall out of the above series, such as teaching materials and publicity clippings.

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Kathy Acker papers, 1972-1997 and undated 21.0 Linear Feet — 0.03 Gigabytes

The papers of Kathy Acker, 1975-1996 and undated, are comprised, for the most part, of manuscript drafts of her novels, short stories, and other miscellaneous writings ranging from early works such as The Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula (1975) to her last novel Pussy, King of the Pirates (1996). Described as a cyberpunk author and performance artist, Acker's novels question the strictures of female sexuality and the power of language.