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Virginia Woolf letter and photograph, around 1930 0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items

Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

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Paul Weinberg photographs, 1979-2007 15 Linear Feet — 24 boxes; 10 CD-Rs; 1 oversize folder — 434 Items

South African born documentary photographer. Collection contains over 400 black-and-white and color prints from several of Weinberg's exhibits and books on Southern Africa and other regions. Titles of projects include: Travelling Light; The Moving Spirit; In Search of the San; Going Home; Once We Were Hunters; Kosi Bay; Working the Land & Back to the Land; and Durban: Impressions of an African City. The photographs document rural indigenous communities and urban culture in several African countries; events photographed include religious celebrations and rituals, a poetry festival, and South Africa's first democratic elections (1994). Also included high-resolution scans of photographs in the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

South African-born documentary photographer. Collection contains over 400 black-and-white and color prints, printed in both darkroom and digital formats, from several of Weinberg's exhibits and books on Southern Africa and other regions. Titles of projects include: Travelling Light; The Moving Spirit; In Search of the San; Going Home; Once We Were Hunters; Kosi Bay; Working the Land & Back to the Land; and Durban: Impressions of an African City.

The photographs document rural indigenous communities and urban culture in several African countries; events photographed include religious celebrations and rituals, a poetry festival and South Africa's first democratic elections (1994).

Also included is an oversize publicity poster for the "Moving Spirit" project, and high-resolution scans of the photographs in the collection; the CD-ROMs have been separated from teh collection and their contents mounted on the library server.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Louanne Watley photographs, 1961, 1985, 1994-2010 and undated, bulk , 2000-2010 3.2 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approx. 1590 Items

Louanne K. Watley is a photographer based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. The photographs and supporting materials in this collection span the years 1961-2010, with the bulk dating from 2000-2010, and relate to the religious life of nuns in Catholic convents and abbeys in Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Virginia. Watley's images often focus on the womens' individual features through close-ups of faces, hands, and feet. There are also a few images of Buddhist and Trappist monks and their communities as well. The various tonalities, selective cropping, and other variations in the prints produced from the same negative convey the experimental nature of Watley's approach to photography. The formats are primarily black and white prints with some color prints ranging in size from 5x7 to 24x37 inches, contact prints, Polaroids, large color inkjet prints, and variously-sized negatives. Also contains one CD-ROM with digital versions of Watley's photographs, a CD-ROM of oral histories conducted by Watley of four Catholic nuns and a Buddhist nun, and a small group of professional papers, chiefly informational material and correspondence related to the religious communities Watley visited. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographs and supporting materials in this collection span the years 1961-2010, with the bulk dating from 2000-2010, and relate to photographer Louanne Watley's work in which she documents religious life of nuns in Catholic convents and abbeys in Indiana, Kentucky, North Carolina, and Virginia. The images often focus on the womens' individual features through close-ups of faces, hands, and feet. There are also a few images of Buddhist and Trappist monks and their communities as well. The formats are primarily black and white prints with some color prints, ranging in size from 4x5 to 16x20 inches, contact prints, Polaroids (diffusion transfer process), large color inkjet prints ranging from 24x30 to 24x37 inches, and variously-sized negatives. The photographic materials are arranged into three subseries by format; there are 626 negatives, 638 contact prints, and 23 contact sheets.

The majority of these materials were originally housed in large three-ring binders. Watley shot the images with traditional film and used darkroom processes to develop them. Some negatives were converted to digital form, then into inkjet prints. The various tonalities, selective cropping, and other variations in the prints from the same negative convey the experimental nature of Watley's approach to photography. The collection also contains one CD-ROM of Watley's photographic images, a CD-ROM of oral histories conducted by Watley of four Catholic nuns and one Buddhist nun, and a small group of her professional papers, including informational material about the convents, abbeys, and monasteries; correspondences; personal notes sent to Watley from nuns; and other supporting materials.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Amber Arthun Warburton papers, 1917-1976 and undated 35 Linear Feet — circa 31,400 Items

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Teacher, librarian, specialist in economics, labor, and education; New Deal administrator. Correspondence, diaries, writings, interviews, drafts of studies and reports, scrapbooks, printed material, photographs, and other papers, relating to Warburton's leadership in the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY), 1947-1963; and to Affiliated Schools for Workers, Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (M.A., 1927), Institute of Social and Religious Research, Mount Holyoke College, Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Spelman College, U.S. Children's Bureau, U.S. Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. House Committee on Agriculture. Topics include the rural youth guidance movement, training programs for unemployed teachers in the 1930s, women workers in the 1920s, African Americans in the early 1930s, industrial home work in the Northeast in the late 1930s, migrant farm workers in the Southwest and Florida in the 1940s to 1950s, socioeconomic conditions in coal mining villages in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois in the late 1920s, and in Harlan County, Ky., and Green Sea, S.C., in the late 1940s, and the effects of the National Defense Education Act on guidance in rural high schools.

The Amber (Arthun) Warburton Papers consist of the personal and professional papers of Warburton from 1917 to 1976. The bulk of the material comes from the organizational files of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth during Warburton's tenure as executive secretary and director of research, 1947-1963. Other organizations and institutions represented include Atlanta University, Brookwood Labor College, Columbia University (where she received her M.A. in 1927), Mount Holyoke College, Spelman College, Institute of Social and Religious Research, Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry, Affiliated Schools for Workers, the Federal Emergency Relief Administration, and the U.S. Children's Bureau.

The Warburton Papers contain correspondence, financial statements, writings, interviews, notes, drafts of studies and reports, newspaper clippings, newsletters, printed material, books, magazines, photographs, diaries, and scrapbooks. Most of the papers are printed material. Also includes her diploma from Columbia (1927), and an oversize photograph of the Three Fates Greek scuplture.

The papers are divided into the following thirteen series:

Series
  1. Personal
  2. Brookwood Labor College
  3. Columbia University
  4. Mount Holyoke College
  5. Southern Summer School for Women Workers in Industry
  6. Institute of Social and Religious Research
  7. Spelman College and Atlanta University
  8. Federal Emergency Relief Administration
  9. Affiliated Schools for Workers
  10. U.S. Children's Bureau
  11. Fairfax County
  12. U.S. House of Representatives Committee on Agriculture
  13. Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth

Warburton's connection with these organizations and institutions is noted in the description of each series.

The largest series is the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth Series (AGRY). The series is arranged by subject, in keeping with the arrangement pattern of a 1949 office files index. There are three major subjects within the series: Harlan County (Kentucky), Green Sea (South Carolina), and the National Defense Education Act Study. Each subject contains correspondence, notes, drafts of reports and studies, reports and studies, newspaper clippings, and printed material.

There is overlap among series, especially within the AGRY series. For instance, Warburton might correspond with one person in Green Sea about the Green Sea Institute and later about an upcoming guidance convention. Each letter would probably be found in different subjects: the Green Sea letter under Green Sea Institute, and the convention letter under material about guidance conventions.

The Warburton Papers are a rich source of information on the growth and development of the youth guidance movement in America, especially guidance in rural areas. If combined with the Duke Library's collection of early AGRY papers, a researcher could follow the American rural youth guidance movement from inception to maturation. Furthermore, the numerous surveys conducted in Harlan County and Green Sea contain much material on the socio-economic status and attitudes of people in those communities in the 1940's and 1950's, which may be valuable to the sociologist or historian studying Appalachia or the rural South.

Other highlights include considerable information on the creation, growth, and management of workers' schools and federal training centers for unemployed teachers in the 1930's; in-depth studies of industrial home-work in the Northeast and migrant workers in Texas, Arkansas, and Florida; and excellent pictures of schools, houses, and people in Harlan County and Green Sea. There are also photographs in the Personal, Columbia University, Spelman College and Atlanta University, U.S. Children's Bureau, and Fairfax County series.

Specific subjects are discussed in more detail in the inventory.

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Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

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F. Vester photographs of the Holy Land, approximately 1900 0.7 Linear Feet — 1 box — 1 volume

Collection comprises a photograph album with 38 albumen photographs (6 x 4.25 inches) pasted on sheets of thick cardboard. The album's binding features decorated wood with a Jerusalem cross. The back of the binding is marked "Jerusalem" in English and Hebrew. Photographs are numbered and feature subtitles in English and French. Photographic subjects in Jerusalem include: exterior and interior of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and several stations of the cross, the Wailing Wall, Via Dolorosa, various gates of Jerusalem, Mosque of Omar, Tomb of the Kings, Garden of Gethsemane, and Mount of Olives. Among the images of Palestine are: Jaffa, Tomb of Rachel, Bethlehem, Hebron, Tomb of Lazarus, Jericho, Dead Sea, the River Jordan, and the Tower of David and Hippicus. There is also a photograph of two women at a mill. All but two of the photographs are signed with the American Colony mark.
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Caroline Vaughan photographs, 1977-1992 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 64 items — 63 prints; one brochure

Collection comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, friends, couples, and families. Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University. Also includes several prints and a brochure from an exhibit entitled "Home Ground," featuring Vaughan's family and landscapes from two family farms, 1977-1987. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and four palladium/plantinotype prints, along with a hand-pigmented, textured print. The photographs range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11x14 inches and are all matted, captioned, and signed. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection chiefly comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken by Durham photographer Caroline Vaughan from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, gay and straight couples, friends, and families, Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University who were involved in sixties activism and remained in the area.

There are several photographers featured in the portraits whose work is also in the Rubenstein Library collections: Peter Goin, Alex Harris, Jeeva Rajgopaul, and Margaret Sartor.

Also includes a smaller series of black-and-white palladium/platinotype prints and a bifold brochure from a Duke University exhibit entitled "Home Ground." These prints feature Vaughan's family members posed in the studio and at two family farms in Oxford, N.C. and News Ferry, Virginia, taken from 1977 to 1987 and printed in 1992 and 1993.

The photographs were taken with large-format cameras and an instant camera (Polaroid), and printed and toned by Vaughan chiefly from 1990 to 1993. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and palladium/plantinotype prints, along with one hand-pigmented, textured print. The prints range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11 x 14 inches and are printed on a variety of papers. Some of the palladium prints feature a circular image format. With a few exceptions, the prints are signed, dated, and matted. Titles were taken from original captions inscribed by the photographer on the prints or mats. Some titles for some uncaptioned prints were taken from the photographer's online gallery. Many prints have data on exposure times, shutter, speed, and other data marked on the back.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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American Expeditionary Forces Vladivostok photograph album, 1918-1920 0.25 Linear Feet — 1 item

Collection includes a 7"x10" photograph album, containing 81 black-and-white photographs and photo postcards, documenting the presence of various military forces in Vladivostok, probably taken or collected between 1918 and 1920 by an unidentified soldier in the American Expeditionary Force sent to intervene in the Russian Civil War. Images include street scenes and landscapes, with some portraits and interior scenes; many contain printed or hand-written captions in English. Topics include various modes of military transport, especially ships and trains; military base scenes, particularly those of the Expeditionary Forces; military parades, including Russian and Bolshevik troops; various nationalities represented in the city and among the military forces (e.g., Japanese, Chinese, Czech, French, German, and British), as well as post-battle images of the dead and later funeral processions.

Collection comprises a 7"x10" photograph album, containing 81 black-and-white photographs and photo postcards, documenting the presence of various military forces in Vladivostok, probably taken or collected between 1918 and 1920 by an unidentified soldier in the American Expeditionary Force sent to intervene in the Russian Civil War. Images include street scenes and landscapes, with some portraits and interior scenes; many contain printed or hand-written captions in English. Topics include various modes of military transport, especially ships and trains; military base scenes, particularly those of the Expeditionary Forces; military parades, including Russian and Bolshevik troops; various nationalities represented in the city and among the military forces (e.g., Japanese, Chinese, Czech, French, German, and British), as well as post-battle images of the dead and later funeral processions.

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United Cigarette Machine Company records, 1887-1955 and undated 40 Linear Feet — Approx. 12,000 Items

Lynchburg, Virginia manufacturing company specializing in cigarette machine and car parts; plants were located in the U.S. and Germany. The bulk of the United Cigarette Machine Company collection, dating from 1887-1955, consists of thousands of brownprints ("Van Dyke photoprints") and blueprints related to the various cigarette machines and parts manufactured by the company. These include the Universal, U-K, Improved Bonsack (designed by James Bonsack), and Heckendorn cigarette machines; materials from the 1920s also pertain to the manufacturing of Buick, Dodge, and Chevrolet auto parts. Other files contain black-and-white photographs of products, and company catalogs. Additional material includes contracts, legal papers, appraisals, audits, patent lists, tax reports, and minutes documenting company operations and finances. The center of operations was located in Lynchburg, Virginia; the company also owned manufacturing plants in Germany. A few materials are in French and German.

The bulk of the United Cigarette Machine Company collection, dating from 1887-1955, consists of thousands of brownprints ("Van Dyke photoprints") and blueprints related to the various cigarette machines and parts manufactured by the company. These include the Universal, U-K, Improved Bonsack (invented by James A. Bonsack), and Heckendorn cigarette machines; materials from the 1920s also pertain to the manufacturing of Buick, Dodge, and Chevrolet auto parts. Other files contain black-and-white photographs of products, and company catalogs. Additional material includes contracts, legal papers, appraisals, audits, patent lists, tax reports, and minutes documenting company operations and finances. The center of operations was located in Lynchburg, Virginia; the company also owned manufacturing plants in Germany. A few materials are in French and German. The United Cigarette Machine Company's main factory in Lynchburg was built in 1907, at the crossing of the Southern Railway main line and the Lynchburg & Durham Railroad line.

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William Clair Turner papers, circa 1960s-2013 18.5 Linear Feet

William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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James Augustus Thomas papers, 1895-1988, bulk 1914-1940 86 Linear Feet — 65 boxes

The papers of tobacco industrialist and philanthropist James Augustus Thomas (1862-1940) primarily concern his commercial and diplomatic dealings in East Asia, and the opening of the tobacco market in China and other countries in the early 20th century. Materials include many boxes of correspondence, print and ephemeral materials, and photographs. Correspondents include Herbert Hoover, Robert Lansing, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Sun Yat-sen. Includes materials relating to U.S.-China foreign and economic relations; the marketing of U.S. cigarettes in Asia; the British-American Tobacco Company; domestic policies and financial development in China; political events in East Asia and Europe; and philanthropy in China, including Thomas' efforts to bring Chinese students to Duke University. There are also some personal letters and three audiocassettes of an oral interview with Dorothy Read Thomas, Thomas's widow, with a typed transcript; interview topics include her life in China and St. Petersburg, Russia in the 1920s.

The papers of James Augustus Thomas comprise many folders of correspondence, printed material, and other papers (chiefly 1914-1940), related to his commercial and diplomatic dealings in East Asia and the opening of the tobacco market in China and other countries. Correspondents include Herbert Hoover, Robert Lansing, Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Sun Yat-sen. There are also some personal letters.

The materials document U.S.-China foreign and economic relations; the marketing of U.S. cigarettes in Asia; the British-American Tobacco Company; U.S.-Chinese trade; domestic policies and financial development in China; political events in East Asia and Europe; American foreign policy in East Asia (1920s-1930s); and philanthropy in China, including Thomas' efforts to bring Chinese students to Duke University and other North Carolina institutions.

Printed materials in the collection include reports, economic summaries, essays, conference programs, memos, and ephemera such as admission cards, tickets, and pamphlets. Some materials relate to the World's Fair in New York, and a visit by a Chinese delegation to New York in 1915, illustrated with photographs.

Additions to the collection include three letters pertaining or written to son, Jimmy, by his parents, gelatin silver photographs and a few negatives, and three audiocassettes of an oral interview (by Duke Professor Emeritus Richard Watson) with Dorothy Read Thomas, widow of James A. Thomas, which include a typed transcript. Interview topics include her life in China and Petrograd (now St. Petersburg, Russia) where she taught school briefly; and the social life and customs in Bejing and Shanghai after she married Thomas in 1922.

There are also negative microfilm reels of the series "China Through Western Eyes: Part 3, The Papers of J.A. Thomas c.1905-1923." Positive reels have been sent to the microfilm department.

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Photographs taken by Lt. Col. Sir Percy Sykes to illustrate Chinese Turkestan, the Russian Pamirs and Osh, 1915 April-November 1 album — 1 vol., 48 photograph — 11 3/4 x 9 1/2 inches

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Bound photograph album containing 48 photographs taken by Sir Percy Moleworth Sykes during his travels in a mountainous region of Central Asia, now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, with his sister, Ella Sykes. The gelatin silver prints measure approximately 4 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches and are window-mounted two to a page with calligraphic captions in white ink. Subjects include landscapes, strategic buildings such as forts and trading posts, and local Uighur, Beg, Kyrgyz, and Kazak people and their dwellings and animals, as well as British, Russian, Turkish, and Chinese people and officials. Specific locations in captions include Kashgar, the Tuman River, Yarkand, Khotan, Merkit, Bulunkul, the Pamirs, Tashkurgan, Muztagh Ata, Karakul lake, Tian Shan mountains, and Osh. The images are large, crisp, and rich with detail, offering views of a remote area and its culture during tensions in the decades following the Russo-Turkish War.

Sir Percy and Ella Sykes co-authored a book based on this journey, titled Through deserts and oases of Central Asia (1920, available online), and many images in the photograph album were used as illustrations, and are noted in this collection guide. It is clear from the narrative written by Ella Sykes (Part I in the book) that she was also taking photographs during their travels, but according to the album's title statement, the images in this album all were taken by Percy Sykes.

The folio photograph album (11 3/4 by 9 1/2 inches) is bound in half green morocco leather over green cloth boards, and comprises 25 pages with a calligraphic title page in white ink; the volume label inside front cover reads "Kodak Ltd series H album."

All titles were transcribed by library staff from the original album captions. Staff also assigned individual identification numbers to the photographs in sequence as they appear in the album.

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Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee photographs, 1960s 0.1 Linear Feet — 5 items

Collection comprises 5 black-and-white gelatin silver developing-out paper photographs taken by SNCC representatives from the Atlanta, Georgia, regional office. One photograph is uncredited, the others were photographed by Joffré T. Clarke, Bob Fletcher, and Tom Wakayama. They are undated, but probably were taken during the 1960s. Subjects in the images are all African-American, and include an elderly woman picking cotton, a young boy drawing with crayons, a little girl in a group watching others, a man slaughtering hogs, and a group building a house.
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Student Action With Farmworkers records, 1950-2020, bulk 1992-2016 135 Linear Feet — 148 boxes

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The records of the Durham, N.C. organization Student Action with Farmworkers comprise: administrative and event files; correspondence; reports, articles, and other publications; student project files; outreach and teaching materials; photographs, artwork, and scrapbooks; audio and video recordings; and materials related to labor organizing and protests across the U.S. Hundreds of student-led projects document through interviews, essays, photographs, videos, and other materials the lives of migrant farmworkers and their working conditions, mostly in NC but also in SC. Major themes in the collection include: history, working conditions, and abuses of migrant farmworkers in the U.S.; education and outreach efforts; housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development for migrant youth; grassroots theater; labor organizing and boycotts; and service learning. Materials are in English and Spanish. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Founded in 1992 in Durham, North Carolina, Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bring students and farmworkers together to learn about each other's lives, share resources and skills, improve conditions for farmworkers, and build diverse coalitions working for social change. The SAF records comprise: correspondence; meeting agendas; student projects; reports, articles, and other publications; event files; teaching materials; photos; scrapbooks; ephemera; and other documentation of SAF's programs. Materials relate more widely to immigrant and migrant worker issues, service learning, labor organizing, and protests and boycotts across the U.S.

The largest series (63 boxes) contains hundreds of individual SAF student projects directed by college-age students and interns as well as farmworker and migrant youths. Materials also include administrative files, many of which house intern applications. Project files typically contain recorded interviews, often with transcripts; essays; notebooks; artwork; poetry; audio and video recordings; theater materials; and photographs in analaog and digital formats. Some photograph albums and collages are also found here. Most of the projects took place in North Carolina but also in South Carolina. Umbrella programs include Into the Fields (ITF) and Levante. Major themes involve worker education, housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development; and grassroots theater as a tool for teaching and activism. Materials are in English and Spanish. Many other materials on SAF projects are found in the Administrative Series.

The large Administrative Files Series contains organizational records created or compiled by SAF staff and are organized in subseries for SAF projects, fundraising, general administrative files, organizations, and resource files (articles, fliers, and other publications).

The Printed Material Series contains Student Action with Farmworkers publications, SAF press coverage, student papers and theses, some children's books, and farmworker-related reports, articles, newsletters, data sheets, resource directories, and alerts from around the world.

The Joan Preiss Papers Series contains records related to an activist and long-time collaborator of SAF. Comprises a variety of printed materials, primarily articles and newsletters, as well as correspondence, protest ephemera, promotional material for unions and activist organizations, meeting notes, student papers, and photographs. The materials relate to migrants and farmworkers both in North Carolina and throughout the United States.

Finally, the Ephemera and Artifacts Series contains items such as posters, t-shirts, stickers, and buttons related to Burger King, Subway, Gallo, and Mt. Olive boycotts and protests. Some materials relate to protests and boycotts in other regions such as Florida and Western states. Also contains SAF publicity ephemera, and props and other materials from the Levante activist theater group.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Deena Stryker photographs, 1963-1964 and undated 6.5 Linear Feet — 2579 Items

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Journalist and photographer. The Deena Stryker photographs collection contains photographs, negatives, and contact sheets generated by the journalist then known as Deena Boyer during two trips to Cuba between July 1963 and July 1964, as well as exhibit prints produced in 2010. During her second trip to the island, Stryker interviewed and photographed Fidel and Raúl Castro as well as other major figures in the Cuban Revolution such as Che Guevara and Vilma Espín. Topics and photographic subjects include key members of the revolutionary government at work and relaxing; and life in Havana and in rural Cuba, focusing on shops, street scenes, rallies, farms, development projects, and schools. There is a draft of the book prepared for publication in Italian by Stryker about her Cuba trips. Stryker's original negatives were processed in Cuba by Alberto Korda, Fidel Castro's personal photographer. All of Stryker's negatives have been digitized and are available online. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Deena Stryker Photographs collection spans the dates 1963-1964 and contains photographs and related material from Stryker's time in Cuba as a journalist for Paris Match. During her stay, she interviewed and photographed Fidel and Raúl Castro as well as other male and female leaders in the Cuban Revolution, including Ernesto "Ché" Guevara, Juan Almeida, Luis Crespo, Armando Acosta, Armando Hart Dávalos, Efigenio Ameijeiras Delgado, Faustino Pérez, Manuel Fajardo Sotomayor, César Escalante, Jesus Montane, Antonio Núñez Jímenez, Guillermo García Frías, Celia Sánchez, Ramiro Valdes Menendez, and René Vallejo.

The Photographic Materials Series contains Stryker's contact sheets, prints, and negatives created during the one-year period; all the photographic material processed by Alberto Korda, Fidel Castro's personal photographer. Topics and photographic subjects include key members of the revolutionary government, male and female, at work and relaxing with family members; life in Havana, including neighborhood and street scenes, and post-revolution housing projects; political rallies and meetings; and daily life and work in rural Cuba, particularly farms, agricultural workers, development projects, and schools. There are also images of Afro Cubans, religious life, and photos of major events such as the Havana trial of accused Batista collaborator Marcos Alfonso in March 1964, and the capture of Cuban fishing vessels by the U.S. Coast Guard in Feb. 1964.

The Correspondence Series contains letters of introduction to Fidel Castro from Stryker as well as one written by Sánchez and a diagram drawn by Raúl Castro. Stryker's analysis of the complexities of nascent post-revolution Cuba is captured in an Italian manuscript draft of the book she prepared for publication in Italy, housed in the Manuscript Materials Series.

An addition to the collection consists of prints produced from the original negatives by documentary photographer Cedric Chatterley for a 2010 exhibit on Deena Stryker's work, with a few other prints used in the exhibit created by Alberto Korda in the 1960s.

All of Stryker's negatives have been digitized and these images are available in their digital form. There are some prints and contact sheet images not represented digitally. Digital images and captions created by the photographer have been transferred to a library server.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements, 1910-1954 and undated 9 Linear Feet — 7166 Items

Lithography company founded in Cincinnati, Ohio, in about 1847. The Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements span the years 1910 through 1954, documenting much of the company's printed poster advertising work from that era. All images are black and white. The core of the collection, the Image Files Series, consists of around 1000 8x10 photographs ("A" images) of advertising designs, and a similar number of smaller printed cards (approx. 5x7 to 5x8, "B" images) of outdoor advertisement designs. The images are accompanied by three different Access Files to be used to browse the collection. These files are in the form of image photocopies ( "job tickets" ) and catalog cards. Most images are of poster (billboard or transit card) designs, but there are also some photographs of tabletop display advertising, window cards and other point-of-purchase displays. The collection documents advertising during a time when transportation was changing in America, and the automobile was gaining in popularity. Billboards began to replace smaller posters, accommodating a more mobile public. It was then that Strobridge turned from its emphasis on circus and theater posters (not represented in the collection) to billboard ads for mass-produced products. Many different products are featured, but perhaps the two most prominent and well-represented campaigns are those for Camel cigarettes and Palmolive soaps. The images form a valuable reference collection of advertising designs, relevant for researchers from a variety of disciplines including commercial artwork, advertising history and design, and popular culture. The collection documents outdoor advertising design during the first part of the twentieth century for what were mostly national brands. Numerous examples are from the era of hand-drawn and painted designs, often signed by artists including Norman Rockwell, Howard Scott, and Dr. Seuss (see his designs for the product Flit). Rarely, an artist is listed on the back of the image. Later designs from the 1940s and 1950s include photographic images, often peppered with celebrity likenesses including John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, and Charlton Heston. Many of the celebrity advertisements promoted tobacco products. Some designs are clearly war-era, such as advertisements depicting a 1943 female factory worker, or one from Schlitz (1942) mentioning war bonds.

The Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements span the years 1910 through 1954, documenting much of the company's printed poster advertising work from that era. All images are black and white. The core of the collection, the Image Files Series, consists of around 1000 8x10 photographs ("A" images) of advertising designs, and a similar number of smaller printed cards (approx. 5x7 to 5x8, "B" images) of outdoor advertisement designs. The images are accompanied by three different Access Files to be used to browse the collection. These files are in the form of image photocopies ("job tickets") and catalog cards. Most images are of poster (billboard or transit card) designs, but there are also some photographs of tabletop display advertising, window cards and other point-of-purchase displays. The collection documents advertising during a time when transportation was changing in America, and the automobile was gaining in popularity. Billboards began to replace smaller posters, accommodating a more mobile public. It was then that Strobridge turned from its emphasis on circus and theater posters (not represented in the collection) to billboard ads for mass-produced products. Many different products are featured, but perhaps the two most prominent and well-represented campaigns are those for Camel cigarettes and Palmolive soaps. The images form a valuable reference collection of advertising designs, relevant for researchers from a variety of disciplines including commercial artwork, advertising history and design, and popular culture.

The collection documents outdoor advertising design during the first part of the twentieth century for what were mostly national brands. Numerous examples are from the era of hand-drawn and painted designs, often signed by artists including Norman Rockwell, Howard Scott, and Dr. Seuss (see his designs for the product Flit). Rarely, an artist is listed on the back of the image. Later designs from the 1940s and 1950s include photographic images, often peppered with celebrity likenesses including John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, and Charlton Heston. Many of the celebrity advertisements promoted tobacco products. Some designs are clearly war-era, such as advertisements depicting a 1943 female factory worker, or one from Schlitz (1942) mentioning war bonds.

The first series, the Access Files, can be used to browse the collection and narrow a search for an individual advertisement before moving on to the Image Files themselves. Items in the Image Files are labeled with an "A" or a "B" indication. The "A" group holds the larger 8x10 photographs and the "B" group contains smaller images (primarily 5x7 and 5x8) printed on cards. There is some duplication between the "A" and "B" groups. The "A" images contain advertisements from the 1910s through the 1950s, and the "B" advertisements were created mainly in the 1920s and 1930s. All point-of-purchase advertising is in the "A" group. There is often indication of the size poster the design was made into (e.g. 24-sheet), a design or perhaps job number (e.g. Camel No. 93), and a title (e.g. "Perfect" for a Camel advertisement with the text "Perfect Taste"). Most designs are presumed to have been created and published by Strobridge, but there are some images stamped "W. J. Rankin Corp." Some images show billboards as they were posted; some of these show the nameplate of the outdoor advertising company that owned the billboard structures.

The name of the collection is seen on folders and sometimes elsewhere as the "Strobridge Lithography Company," but the materials themselves as well as other documentation reveal the name to be "Strobridge Lithographing Company" at the time when most of this collection was created. Almost all advertisements are in English, presumably for posting in the U.S., but a few, such as Spur cigarette advertisements, are in Spanish.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include a number of other outdoor advertising collections, such as the Outdoor Advertising Slide Library, the John Paver Papers, the John Browning Papers, the Duplex Advertising Co. Records, the H.E. Fisk Collection of War Effort Mobilization Campaigns, the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Records, the Outdoor Advertising Poster Design Collection, the Garrett Orr Papers, the R.C. Maxwell Company Records, the Howard Scott Papers, and the John E. Brennan Outdoor Advertising Survey Reports. There are also numerous published items from the era of this collection which provide even more context for the designs.

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Chuck Stone papers, 1931-2007 and undated 36.2 Linear Feet — 18,650 items

Charles Sumner (Chuck) Stone was a prominent African-American journalist, with a career spanning from his early days at the New York Age (1958-1959) to his position as editor and columnist at the Philadelphia Daily News (1972-1991). Between 1965 and 1967 he was special assistant and press secretary to New York representative Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. He served as mediator between the police and suspected criminals for over 20 years, most notably in his negotiation of the Graterford Prison hostage crisis in 1981. He is the author of multiple books, from political analyses to a novel about his time with Powell and (in 2003) a children's book. He was also an educator for many years, as Professor of English at the University of Delaware from 1985-1991 and Walter Spearman Professor of Journalism at UNC-Chapel Hill from 1991 to 2005, when he retired. The collection contains clippings, correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, research files, and printed materials pertaining to the life and career of Chuck Stone. The papers span the years 1931-2007 and document Stone's journalism career and writings, his political career and relationship with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr., and his role as an educator.

The Chuck Stone Papers span the years 1931 to 2007. The collection consists of clippings and other print materials, correspondence, writings, scrapbooks, photographs, a videotape, research files, and diplomas and certificates pertaining to the life and career of Chuck Stone. Of the subject areas documented here are Stone's career as a prominent African-American journalist, his political career and relationship with Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. (including Powell's time as head of the Congressional Committee on Education and Labor), his role as a mediator between suspects and the criminal justice system, and his involvement in civil rights struggles in the United States. Also represented, but to a much lesser extent, is his teaching career at the University of Delaware and UNC-Chapel Hill. The collection is divided into nine series, each described below. Of these, the largest by far are the Clippings and the Subject Files series, which document respectively Stone's journalistic writings (especially during his time at the Philadelphia Daily News) and his research interests over the years, including racial politics in the U.S., African-Americans in the media, the criminal justice system, censorship and free speech, and standardized testing. The collection was acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation.

The Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Congressional Series documents Stone's time as press secretary and special assistant to Powell. It contains office and business correspondence both to and from Stone; clippings and other printed materials about Powell or the Committee on Education and Labor; office files on individual members of congress (notably Florida Democrat Sam Gibbons, partly responsible for the campaign to remove Powell from his position as head of the Committee); files related to the workings of the Committee; press releases written by Stone; and a number of papers relating to Powell's exclusion from Congress in 1967. This series should be useful both for those interested in the career of Powell, since Stone worked for him during a pivotal time in his career, and for those interested in the workings of the Committee on Education and Labor during that time.

The Clippings Series is made up predominantly of Stone's columns from the Philadelphia Daily News and the NEA Viewpoint (a Newspaper Enterprise Association column syndicated by United Media), as well as articles about Stone from various newspapers, and some writings by Stone appearing in other newspapers. Topics addressed by Stone in his columns include racial politics in the U.S., Philadelphia politics, the media, Ireland, Stone's travels in Africa, women's issues and feminism, the criminal justice system, and standardized testing. Researchers interested in Stone's journalism career prior to 1972 will find some earlier clippings here, but should consult the Scrapbooks Series for more extensive materials and clippings from that period.

The Correspondence Series contains correspondence to and from Stone relating to business and personal matters. The majority of this series is made up of general correspondence or correspondence relating to Stone's position as editor and columnist of the Philadelphia Daily News. The remainder of the series comprises topical folders of correspondence, such as the correspondence between Stone and Edward M. Ryder, an inmate at Graterford Prison. Other such correspondence can be found in the "Criminal justice system" subsection of the Subject Files Series.

The Other Writings Series houses Stone's writings not contained in the Clippings Series, such as speeches, sermons, and television transcripts; business documents and research files pertaining to different projects on which Stone worked, such as his attempts to develop his own life or his writings on Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. into a movie, or various uncompleted book projects; and a small subset of writings by others, including an autobiography of Corinne Huff on which Stone worked. It is divided into three subseries to accommodate the restriction on the collection: the Published Writings by Stone Subseries, the Unpublished Writings by Stone Subseries, and the Writings by Others Subseries. Notably absent from this series are manuscripts of Stone's books. Instead, the series contains either shorter published materials, such as publicly delivered speeches, or working documents assembled for the creation of larger works.

The Scrapbooks Series houses the contents of four scrapbooks assembled by Stone during the 1950s and 1960s. They contain a number of clippings, programs, and some correspondence pertaining to his time at the New York Age, the Washington Afro-American, the Chicago Defender, and working for Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. The series is especially useful for documenting Stone's early career and his position as an outspoken African-American journalist and defender of civil rights. Researchers interested in this period in Stone's life should also consult the Clippings Series for more materials from the period in question that are not present in the scrapbooks.

The St. Louis Series is a small series housing clippings and correspondence related to Stone's brief position as ombudsman for the St. Louis Post-Disptach, overseeing their coverage of the 1997 mayoral election. The series is divided into a Published Materials Subseries, which houses clippings from the Post-Dispatch and related newspapers, and an Unpublished Materials Subseries, in which can be found correspondence, business documents, and responses to several readers polls conducted by Stone.

In the Subject Files Series can be found Stone's research files on different subject areas, arranged alphabetically. The files contain primarily clippings, but also some correspondence and notes. Several subcategories that are heavily represented and should be mentioned are the files on censorship and the first amendment, on the criminal justice system, on standardized testing, and on materials relating to his time at UNC-Chapel Hill. There are also numerous files related to racial politics in the U.S., but these files are less discrete than the categories described above and are to be found throughout the series rather than under a specific subheading.

The Teaching Materials Series contains a small amount of material pertaining to Stone's teaching career. The bulk of this series comes from his time at UNC-Chapel Hill, and includes syllabi, exams, assignments, student papers, and other teaching paperwork. Most heavily represented in this regard is Stone's popular class on censorship, for which there are multiple syllabi and exams from different years and semesters.

Finally, the Audiovisual Materials Series collects photographs touching on all aspects of Stone's life, from press photos of Stone and Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. to family portraits. Also included in this series are a videotape of a documentary about Powell, press passes and identification badges, and an election pin kept by Stone.

Unprocessed Addition 2009-0009 (50 items; .2 lin. ft.; dated 1963-2005) comprises primarily photographs, but also contains a few letters, clippings, awards, and a dvd-r. The original DVD-R is closed to patron use; however, the information on the disk has been migrated to the electronic records server.

Addition 2012-0099 has been processed and included in the original collection's description as boxes 64-66. Some parts of this addition have been interfiled into existing boxes.

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Wolfgang F. Stolper papers, 1892-2001 (bulk [1930s-1990s]) 29 Linear Feet — 18,525 Items

Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

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Joseph John Spengler papers, [ca. 1896]-1987 111.8 Linear Feet — 60,387 Items

Chiefly correspondence, printed material, critiques of publications, bibliographies, class notes, and other papers relating to his career, publications, and affiliation with different economics associations (26,378 items, 52.7 linear feet; dated 1928-1987). Some are photocopies of Spengler's correspondence with William Richard Allen. The collection also includes manuscripts of some of his works, information concerning Duke University's administrative policies and staff, reprints of published articles relating to his career, and a charcoal portrait. (1-9-87, 88-010, 93-180, 00-213) No container lists exist for these accessions.

Addition #93-294 (34,009 items, 59.1 linear feet; dated [ca. 1896]-[ca. 1976], bulk 1914-1960) contains primarily business and Spengler and Kress family correspondence, especially between Dot and Joe ([ca. 1919]-[ca. 1976]). Also includes manuscripts for Dot's genealogical novel, Family Saga in America ([ca. 1930s]) and Joe's work, Life in America; as well as Dot's journals and diaries (1924-1939, 1969). There are Christmas cards, postcards, and newspaper clippings; photographs of family and friends, including 2 tintypes, 32 cartes-de-visite, 1 color and 91 black-and-white prints, and 76 healthy nitrate negatives; and lace knitted by Dot's grandmother.

Also includes 6 photograph albums kept by Dot, two of which contain pictures taken by her with a brownie camera in and of Piqua, OH (1914-1919). The other albums contain photographs and memorabilia depicting Dot's life as a college student at Miami University, OH (1919-1921); and two showing views of the Spengler's homes, friends, and life in Tuscon, AZ, Tampa, FL (1930-1938), and Durham, NC and Duke University (1932-1940). The latter also records the 1938 Duke University faculty baseball team.

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Social Democrats, USA records, 1937-1994 (Bulk 1970-1994), bulk 1970-1994 101.9 Linear Feet — 60,551 Items

This collection (20,700 items, 35.5 linear feet, 1937-1984, bulk 1970-1984) includes office files and correspondence, and records from various organizations, such as the Young Social Democrats and the Youth Institute for Peace in the Middle East. Of note are some materials on prominent socialists, including Eugene Debs, Norman Thomas, and Carl Gershman. There are also important periodicals and special publications from 1937-1968 documenting American labor history, the Jim Crow Era, and civil rights issues in the 1960s. (96-104)

Addition (39,851 items, 66.4 linear feet, 1950-1994, bulk 1980-1994) includes correspondence with local chapters; organizational files on Young Social Democrats clubs, benefits, national conventions, fund raising, the yearly Eugene V. Debs Award dinners, and membership (including membership cards); subject files on people (including Bayard Rustin), other leftist organizations (especially Socialist International), labor unions, and countries and regions (including South Africa, Poland, Spain, the Soviet Union, and Latin America); and publications and newspapers related to socialism. Material also includes 108 electronic computer files that have been migrated to the Special Collections server; 2 cloth banners and 3 plaques/awards; 351 black-and-white photographs; 8 color prints; 4 videocassettes; 243 audio cassette tapes; 2 digital audio tapes; and 4 phonograph records. (01-0079)

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Steven B. Smith "Photographs of the suburban West" exhibit prints, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 1 CD-ROM, 26 prints — 27 prints; 1 CD-ROM

Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch black-and-white matted digital prints used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch matted black-and-white digital prints exhibited at Duke University and used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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J. Holmes Smith papers, 1939-1940 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet

Missionary of the Methodist Episcopal Church in India from 1930 to 1940, at Lal Bagh Ashram in Lucknow. Recalled to the United States in 1940 after participating in activities supporting Indian Indepedence and opposing India's forced participation in WWII as part of the British Empire. Collection comprises a telegram (8 Dec. 1939) to Smith from Jawaharlal Nehru inviting him to a meeting, an undated black-and-white photograph of that meeting or another Smith held with Nehru and others, a letter from Nehru regarding Smith's advancing in the United States the cause of India's independence (10 Jan. 1940) and commenting on imperialism, a letter from Rabindranath Tagore urging support of India's independence (16 Jan. 1940), and an undated booklet containing an"Homage" to Mahatma Gandhi following his death.

Collection comprises a telegram (8 Dec. 1939) to Smith from Jawaharlal Nehru inviting him to a meeting, an undated black-and-white photograph of that meeting or another Smith held with Nehru and others, a letter from Nehru regarding Smith's advancing in the United States the cause of India's independence (10 Jan. 1940) and commenting on imperialism, a letter from Rabindranath Tagore urging support of India's independence (16 Jan. 1940), and an undated booklet containing an"Homage" to Mahatma Gandhi following his death.

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Barbara Shor papers, 1953-2000 and undated, bulk 1970s-1998 21 Linear Feet — 5159 Items

Oracles and books on divination (01-045)(28 items, 1.8 linear feet; dated ca. 1970s-1990s and undated), including 17 decks of tarot and other cards, many enclosed in fabric or leather. Shore designed two of the decks, "The Earth Alliance Deck" and "The Earthrise Deck." Also includes sets of runes and I Ching coins, a pendulum, an edition of the I CHING, a rune book edited by Ralph Blum, and other printed material regarding the I CHING and tarot cards.

The addition (01-248) (5131 items, 19.2 linear feet; dated 1953-2000, bulk 1970s-ca. 1998) documents Shor's work on dreams. Includes 41 volumes of meditation and dream journals by Shore (1974-1999); other journals and dream documentation and interpretation by Shor and others; correspondence; and dream-related periodicals, including Dream Network Bulletin. There are also drafts of Shor's poems, short stories, essays, and dream handbooks (ca. 1953-2000), including Unexpected Gifts, Open Channel, Dreaming with Angels, Shared Dreaming, Dream Tool Kit: How to Remember and Encode Your Own Dreams, Small Gifts, and The Swan; records from the Dreamgate Shared Dreaming Project; notes on or from other dream-related workshops; 11 black-and-white and 3 color photographs; and 197 computer disks containing circa 9800 electronic documents.

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William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jerome J. Shestack papers, 1944-2011 and undated, bulk 1965-2000 128 Linear Feet — 86 boxes — Approximately 57,000 items — Approximately 57,000 items

Jerome Shestack was a prominent lawyer and human rights advocate. His papers chiefly document the leadership roles he undertook for social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files, organization files, writings and speeches, publications and clippings, as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary. Topics covered in the collection include but are not limited to: the history of the American Bar Association; law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina; the rights of the mentally disabled; and Shestack's role in standing against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The papers of Jerome Shestack span the years of 1944 to 2011, and document the leadership roles he undertook for legal and social justice organizations such as the American Bar Association, the Lawyers Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, the International League for Human Rights, the United Nations Commission on Human Rights, the American Jewish Committee, the International Criminal Court, and many others, and the histories of those entities. Series include extensive correspondence and subject files; organization files; writings by Shestack and others, such as reports, editorials, articles, and speeches; publications and clippings; trial testimonies and proceedings; as well as a small collection of personal files, photographs, and Shestack's World War II diary.

The materials provide insights into Shestack's many professional achievements and how his work in the legal profession intersected his passion for human rights. Shestack held leadership roles in many law and human rights organizations, often simultaneously; therefore, the materials also reveal how organizations often collaborated with one another to address human rights from a legal standpoint. A large portion of the material focuses on Shestack's dedication to the law profession through his active roles in the American Bar Association, which includes his position on the 1987 judicial committee against the Supreme Court nomination of Robert Bork, as well as his role as American Bar Association President from 1997 to 1998.

Other materials in the collection demonstrate Shestack's work to promote and defend human rights on a broad international scale. Significant file groups for countries and their associated human rights cases include Argentina, China, Israel, Russia, and South Africa. His particular interests pertaining to human rights include but are not limited to: law and legislation related to international and domestic human and civil rights; American government policies on human rights; Jewish human rights issues; the defense of political dissidents such as Andrei Sakharov; disappeared persons in Argentina and other human rights abuses; the rights of the mentally disabled; and the history of human rights advocacy.

The worldwide respect Shestack gained for his advocacy work is represented in the collection through extensive correspondence and subject files documenting his connections to notable human rights activists and prominent political leaders, including President Jimmy Carter, President George Bush, René Cassin, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Some audiovisual materials are scattered throughout the collection: a CNBC interview of Shestack as ABA President, International League for Human Rights Awards Dinner cassettes, Wingspread Interview cassettes, a Court TV Bosnia Trial VHS recording, and a recording of the Independent Counsel Symposium. Original media are closed to use; listening or viewing copies must be made for access.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Semans family papers, 1878-2008 and undated 76.2 Linear Feet

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Collection consists of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materials reflecting the philanthropic, financial, cultural and social activities of the Semans family and other wealthy families in North Carolina and New York. A major focus is the interrelationship of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent families. Additionally, the papers document the roles of Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect women in politics and childcare issues during the early 20th century.

The papers of the Semans family span the years 1878 to 2008. The collection consists of four large sub-collections: the Mary Duke Biddle Family Papers, the James H. Semans Family Papers, the James H. and Mary D.B.T. Semans Family Papers, and the Elizabeth Lucina Gotham Family Papers. There are also series for films, oversize materials, and later additions.

Through files of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materialsThe collection reflects the philanthropic, financial, cultural, and social activities of the Semans family. Major areas of focus are the personal and social relationships of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent, and other wealthy families from North Carolina, New York, and elsewhere. Additionally, the papers document the roles Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans, and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect on women in politics and childcare during the early twentieth century.

Individuals represented include Mary Duke Biddle (daughter of Benjamin Duke), Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Nicholas Benjamin Duke Biddle, Angier Biddle Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, Elizabeth Lucina Gotham, and Josiah Charles Trent as well as other members of the Duke, Biddle, Trent, and Semans families. Political, arts, and educational leaders are also represented.

Subject areas represented include: families in the late 19th and 20th centuries; the arts in North Carolina and other cities; charities, particularly in North Carolina; childcare and women in nursing; The Duke Endowment; Duke University and other universities and colleges; the North Carolina School of the Arts; education; genealogy of the four families; personal finances; philanthropy; the history of Durham, NC, and its politics and social life; vocational rehabilitation; and the Methodist church, particularly in NC.

The 25 16mm film reels in the collection are chiefly children's cartoons from the 1930s-1940s, but there are also wartime newsreels and a few films for adults, some as early as 1916-1917, and some travel film. Audio tapes consist chiefly of personal family recordings, a set of memoirs dictated onto cassettes in 1977 by Mary D.B.T. Semans, and music performances.

Some portions of the collection are restricted or closed to use; please consult this collection guide for details before coming to use these materials.

For additional collections of Duke family papers, see the Washington Duke Papers, the Benjamin Newton Duke Papers, and the James B. Duke Papers. For further information on the contributions of the Duke family to Duke University, contact the Duke University Archives.

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Reginald Sellman negatives, 1911-1935 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

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Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two prints, all taken by amateur photographer Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935, chiefly in Baltimore, Maryland and environs. There is also a detailed handwritten index to over 100 images. Subjects include Susie Ford, possibly Sellman's fiancée; his wife Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman, and their son Bruce Darden Sellman. Places featured include Baltimore residences, streets, bridges, railway stations, monuments, parks, and hospitals and medical institutions such as Johns Hopkins Medical School and the Biedler and Sellman Sanatorium, founded by Reginald Sellman's father, William A. B. Sellman. There are many snapshots of family members, and photos taken during hikes, camping trips, and visits to parks. Maryland locations include Baltimore County historic sites and parks: the Owing's Mills area, Gwynn's Falls, Chatalonee, Loch Raven, Druid Lake, the Chesapeake's Eastern Shore, Elk River, and the Patapsco River. The Sellmans often visited relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are also many images taken in early 20th century Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, Kinston, and Raleigh, including the Raleigh Methodist Orphanage. Some photographs feature commercial fishing scenes and cotton transport.

Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two small prints, all taken by amateur photographer and Baltimore resident Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935. They were originally stored in four black cases, one of which has been retained for the collection. The collection also includes Sellman's meticulous hndwritten index cards. The images are arranged in original chronological order and listed by the photographer's original identification number has been retained; the titles were also taken from the original index cards.

The snapshots were chiefly taken in Baltimore, Maryland and Baltimore County, and depict buildings, streets, bridges, railway stations, parks, rivers, and monuments, and many family members, especially Reginald's friend (possibly fianceé) Susie Ford, and later, his wife Obedience, and their son Bruce. There are quite a few photographs taken on day trips to historic sites and parks in Baltimore County such as St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Chattalonee, Gwynn Falls, Owings Mills, Massey, and Lake Roland. Sellman clearly enjoyed being outside; there are many images of activities such as camping, hiking, and visiting parks and Eastern Shore recreation areas.

Reginald's father, William A. B. Sellman, was the founder of a Baltimore sanatorium, thus there are views of hospitals, including many marked "B.S.S.," almost certainly the Biedler Sellman Sanatorium on Charles Street, where Reginald Sellman was listed as a physician; a few interior shots of the "B.S.S." include an operating room. There are also exterior views of medical teaching institutions such as Johns Hopkins Hospital. In one of the two positive prints in the collection, Susie Ford is shown wearing a nurse's uniform.

There are images of apartment buildings and houses where Reginald and other family members lived, and some interior shots of rooms. There are many casual snapshots of family members. Later images depict Sellman's young son, Bruce, as a baby and young boy, along with his mother, Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman (O.D.S.). She first appears in the images as Obedience Cox Darden, at her own commencement at a nursing school in May 1914.

Reginald and Obedience Sellman often visited her Darden family relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are many vacation photographs from the 1920s taken in Raleigh, Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, and Kinston, N.C. Depicted are train stations, relatives' houses, railroads, street scenes, and businesses, some owned by relatives. A long series features scenes from the Methodist Orphanage in Raleigh, possibly where relatives worked. Zylpha or Zylphia Darden, Obedience's cousin, often appears with baby Bruce. There are many scenes from Beaufort, N.C., with commercial fishing, streets, and the waterfront.

Other earlier vacation spots depicted that Reginald visited with Susie Ford include the Eastern Shore, with Tollchester Beach and its amusement part and piers; Harper's Ferry, West Virginia; and the Blue Ridge in Virginia. The last images from 1935 feature Susie Ford's grave and monument in Mount View Cemetery (undentified state); she probably died in spring 1914.

Also in the collection are four sets of handwritten index cards listing each negative's identification number, roll of film and frame, caption, and technical details such as camera settings, exposure, film number, and date when image was developed. The cards are filed at the beginning of each group of negatives represented by the set. One original black storage case has also been retained, as well as advertisement and leaflets featuring photographic supplies, and an envelope of paper corner mounts.

Apparently, Sellman also photographed with glass plates, but these are not present in the collection. There were also several places in the storage case where the film negatives were missing; in these cases, only the titles remain, taken from the index cards.

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Peter Sekaer photographs, circa 1937-1940 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 15 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, sometimes including original photographer's numbers. Other markings sometimes include titles, locations, and dates assigned by former owners or the agency; and credit information.

Peter Sekaer (1901-1950) was a Danish-born American photographer. Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Sekaer from about 1937-1940, while working for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses. The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Danish-American photographer Peter Sekaer from about 1937 to 1940, who was working at the time for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses.

The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 inches to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches; some are mounted on board, the largest of which is 16 x 20 inches, but for the most part they are unmounted and 8 x 10 inches or smaller. Titles in this collection, if present, originate from the prints; if there is no title, a brief description has been provided by library staff.

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Raleigh H. Sears Photograph collection, 1917-1926 and undated 0.6 Linear Feet — 300 Items

Raleigh Sears was a member of the American Expeditionary Force, stationed in Siberia during World War I. Collection includes photographs and postcards from Sears' travels during his military service. Some of these are labeled as being from Vladivostok, Russia; others are of an unidentified Asian country, and still others are of Honolulu and miscellaneous naval vessels. The majority of the photographs are black and white prints or images sized 3.5x5.5 inches; most do not have labels or descriptions. There are also 4 panoramas that will require additional conservation work. In addition, there are some miscellaneous papers from Sears' post-war work on railroads, as well as research and photocopies about his military service.

This collection consists largely of unlabeled photographs dating from Raleigh Sears' military service in the American Expeditionary Force during and immediately following World War I. The photographs are supplemented by captioned postcards, some color tinted, which appear to date from the same period. The postcards and photographs include images from the travels of Sears' unit, including stops in Hawaii, Asia, and Siberia. The majority of these photographs are of scenery, rather than of the troops or military images. However, there are notable images of ships, posing sailors and soldiers, and buildings like a YMCA.

Hawaii appears only briefly in images that are labeled as Honolulu. The photographs from Asia document the scenery, buildings, and people of an unidentified country: it is likely either Japan or China. Occasionally these photographs include images of an American soldier interacting with local people or posing for a picture. There is no label confirming that this man is Sears. The postcards also include images from Asia, at times uncaptioned. Some of the Asia postcards are scenery in Yokohama, Japan.

The scenes from Siberia are easier to identify. There are several photographs of dead, snow-covered men on the ground, usually with other soldiers looking over the corpses. It is unclear where in Siberia these events occured, and no labels exist for those photographs. The postcards from Siberia are typically of scenes from Vladivostok, including the arrival of troops and views over the port.

The collection also includes 4 panoramic images: 3 rolled photographs and 1 folded postcard. Two photographs and the postcard are scenic photographs of Vladivostok. The third panoramic photograph is a formal portrait of troops, unlabeled and undated.

There are also five photographs of Raleigh Sears' family members.

The photographs in this collection are accompanied by David and Robert Alexander's research on Raleigh Sears' military service, as well as a few miscellaneous papers from his post-war life. The most significant of these his an insurance policy from a railroad company, which reveals that he was a coal chute man in 1926. The rest of the collection includes some documentation on the life of Robert Alexander.

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Hannah L. Schmitt photograph album, 1920-1922 0.5 Linear Feet

Hannah L. Schmitt was a camper at Michigamme girls camp in Michigamme, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula. Schmitt was born in Toledo, Ohio. Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing.

Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing. Places visited mentioned are Baldy, Pequaming, Sand Island, and Flat Island. Almost all of the images have captions written by Schmitt; several of them were later inked in color. There is also a photograph of the Hebard's Mill at Pequaming, Michigan, the mill that Ford Motor Company purchased in 1923. Photographs on several pages in the back of the album are of Schmitt family members, and were taken outside of the camp. A number of the images were developed by a Michigan company named "Forster's-Calumet." In addition to the photographs, the album contains some manuscript items, including notes, poetry, a Western Union Telegram (regarding Schmitt's relationship with a West Point Cadet), along with a 7-page story that represents each camper and staff member as clouds at dawn.

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Lynn Saville photographs, 1972-2015 and undated 21.5 Linear Feet — 20 boxes — 295 items

The collection dates from 1972 to 2015 and consists of over 200 large color and black-and-white photographic prints of nighttime scenes selected from the work of photographer Lynn Saville in urban centers such as Paris, Rome, Venice, New York City, Durham, North Carolina, Los Angeles, Vermont, and other locations. The collection also includes 30 portraits of artists, feminists, writers, family members, and other individuals, as well as self-portraits. Supplemental materials such as book reviews and book maquettes round out the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of selections of work from photographer Lynn Saville's portraiture and night photography from urban America, dating from 1972-2015. Formats include traditional darkroom gelatin silver prints, color prints, and a small number of digital prints. Sizes range from 11x14 to 20x24 inches.

The Portraits series includes 30 images of poets, photographers, family members, friends, and prominent women such as Barbara Jordan, Adrienne Rich and Bella Abzug. The collection's primary focus, however, is Saville's more recent work, housed in the Nocturnal Photography and Dark City series, containing 205 photographs of night scenes in the United States and Europe, particularly New York City (with a focus on Brooklyn) and Paris. Other locations include Los Angeles, North Carolina, Vermont, Paris, Rome, and Venice.

Selected images are also available online as part of a Duke University Libraries digital exhibit.

There is also a Supplemental Materials series which includes printed matter such as articles and book reviews, and a documentary film directed by Anna Borden about Saville's career and photography (2003).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Margaret Sartor photographs and papers, 1966-2003 14.5 Linear Feet — 545 Items

Margaret Sartor is a photographer and instructor at Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies. Her Photographs and Papers collection includes photographs of the American South, and some materials from her book project on William Gedney.

The 2001 Accession (2001-0074) (260 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1985-2000) contains black-and-white prints (16x20 and 11x14) by Sartor, focusing especially on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2002 addition (02-083) (38 items, 3 lin. ft.; dated 1984-2001) contains thirty-eight 16x20 black-and-white photographs printed by Sartor in 2001 from negatives shot 1984-2001. Focus is on home, family, and suburban life in the American South.

The 2003 addition (03-121) (47 items, 1.5 lin. ft.; dated 1987-2003) comprises forty-seven exhibition quality black-and-white 16x20 prints by Sartor, shot between 1987 and 2003, but mostly printed in 2002 and 2003. Subjects include women and family in the suburban South.

The 2015 addition consists of materials relating to Sartor's book, What Was True: The Photographs and Notebooks of William Gedney, published in 2000. This materials has been arranged into a Book Projects series.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2020 120 Linear Feet

Sarabande Books is a non-profit literary press publishing poetry and fiction. The Sarabande Books records include materials documenting the founding of the company as well as yearly publishing materials.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

Addition 2021-0075 (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2019-2020) includes author files for books published in 2019 and 2020, Sarabande Writing Labs brochure, 2019 and 2020 catalogs, press releases and reviews for 2019 and 2020 books, and annual reports.

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Haruka Sakaguchi photographs, 2020 May 2.0 Gigabytes — 20 files (10 .tif, 10 .doc)

Haruka Sakaguchi is a Japanese-born freelance documentary photographer currently residing in New York City. Her project, "'I Will Not Stand Silent.' 10 Asian Americans Reflect on Racism During the Pandemic and the Need for Equality" addresses pandemic-fueled racism against Asian Americans. Created by Sakaguchi in collaboration with TIME photo editors Sangsuk Sylvia Kang and Katherine Harris Pomerantz, the black-and-white digital photographs and accompanying textual accounts tell the stories of ten young Asian Americans who share their experiences of racism during the pandemic and how their perspectives have been shaped by the Black Lives Matter protests. Each person's project entry consists of a first-person account in Word file format and a digital image file in Tiff format showing a portrait of the individual laid atop a larger photograph of the location in New York City where they were harassed. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

"'I Will Not Stand Silent.' 10 Asian Americans Reflect on Racism During the Pandemic and the Need for Equality" is a project that addresses pandemic-fueled racism against Asian Americans. Created by photographer Haruka Sakaguchi in collaboration with TIME photo editors Sangsuk Sylvia Kang and Katherine Harris Pomerantz, the project comprises photographic portraits and narrative accounts of ten New York-based Asian Americans who share their experiences of racism during the pandemic and how their perspectives have been shaped by the Black Lives Matter protests.

Each person's project entry consists of a black-and-white .tif image file showing a portrait of the individual laid atop a larger photograph of the location where the individual was harassed, and a Word .doc file containing a one-paragraph narrative text of that person's account. The image titles were created by the photographer. The photographer Haruka Sakaguchi's portrait and narrative related to her own incident of racist harassment is included in the group of ten experiences.

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Rotary Club of Durham records, 1915-2005 19.5 Linear Feet — 10,093 Items

The Rotary Club of Durham was chartered in 1915 as part of Rotary International, an organization of service clubs. The records from the Rotary Club of Durham include bulletins, committee files, membership cards, board minutes, anniversary projects, photographs, scrapbooks, and other miscellaneous materials relating to the activities and members of the club.

The records from the Rotary Club of Durham include bulletins, committee files, membership cards, board minutes, anniversary projects, photographs, scrapbooks, and other miscellaneous materials relating to the activities and members of the club.

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Fannie B. Rosser papers, circa 1860s-1973, 2012, bulk 1920s-1973 1 Linear Foot — 750 Items

Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs document the personal relationships and professional activities of Rosser, a successful single African American businesswoman. Correspondence, 1920s-1940s, pertains to Rosser's business ventures in regard to the management of her rental property in Lynchburg, Virginia, and Durham, North Carolina; personal loans made to family and friends during the Depression; and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Later correspondence centers around her relationships with her foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, and Rosser's niece, June. A folder of printed materials includes news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries, and a 2012 publication about Fannie Rosser's foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, active in the NAACP in Fresno, California. Family photographs date back to about the 1860s and include an early ambrotype, cabinet cards, and snapshots of Rosser and her friends in the 1920s and her daughter's family in Fresno, Calif., in the 1960s.

The papers of Fannie B. Rosser document the personal and professional life of a black businesswoman within a fiscally sound African American community in Durham, N.C. Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs reflect both her business activities and her relationships with close friends and family members from the turn of the century to the 1970s.

The bulk of the correspondence until the 1950s pertains to Rosser's business ventures, including maintenance of her property, personal loans made to family and friends, and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Letters from her lifelong friend and business partner, Virginia Randolf of Lynchburg, Va., document the process of maintaining Rosser's rental property over the course of thirty years. They highlight, among other things, the apparent ghettoization of the neighborhood in which her houses were situated, and Randolf's personal and financial response to that process.

Friends and family members often deferred financial matters to Rosser, a careful and respected business woman, and were often dependent on her for monetary support. The correspondence illustrates Rosser's financial acumen and demonstrates the extent to which her personal relationships and business activities overlapped. Of particular interest is an exchange with the Wilhoite's, a couple to whom she loaned $1000, during the Depression. Their correspondence illustrates the personal nature of her business dealings and the difficulties Rosser had in balancing finances and friendships.

Later correspondence centers around Rosser's relationships with her foster daughter Mattie Burton Meyers and niece June. There are scattered references to the political climate of the 1960s, and correspondence from Mattie mentions her work with the NAACP. Also, in the printed materials there is a 2012 published biography of Mattie written by her granddaughter Sharon Revis-Green.

The printed materials consist of materials such as news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries. A large series of financial and legal papers, 1895-1969, provide extensive detail on Rosser's investments, insurance policies, and legal activities. Many of these documents are associated with firms such as the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, where Rosser was employed.

The photographs in the collection date back to the early 1860s and are mostly individual portraits and group photographs of African American family members and friends. An unidentified ambrotype of an African American woman dated prior to the Civil War indicates that the family might have been free.

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Mel Rosenthal photographs, 1975-2011 3 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — Approximately 92 items

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by native New Yorker Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The second project depicts Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, living in New York State during the last decade of the 20th century and the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and a workshop on documentary photography, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 80 black-and-white photographs taken by New York City native Mel Rosenthal, stemming from two documentary projects. The first documents the destruction by arson of an entire South Bronx neighborhood in New York City in the 1970s, with images of burned-out buildings and inhabitants who were forced to abandon their homes. The neighborhood is the same one where Rosenthal grew up, and the series features a portrait of Mel Rosenthal in his old bedroom.

The second project examines the daily lives of Arab Americans, including men, women and children of Syrian, Egyptian, Moroccan, Algerian, Jordanian and Palestinian descent, in New York State in the early 2000s. Scenes include images of children, professionals, neighborhood life, and the religious lives of Christians, Muslims, Greek Orthodox, Maronites, Jews and Coptics. It was exhibited shortly after the 2001 terrorist attacks.

Selected images in the Rosenthal collection were exhibited at Duke University and these available online. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Exhibit prints in their mats measure 16x20 and 20x24 inches.

Also included are some publicity items for exhibits and workshops on documentary photography, a music CD with photography by Rosenthal, and an audiocassette recording of Rosenthal speaking at an exhibit opening in 2004.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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John Ridlon papers, 1846-1936 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 oversize folders; 1 pamphlet binder

Physician, surgeon, and professor specializing in orthopedic medicine, practicing in New York State and Chicago, Illinois. Collection consists of medical case files and casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographs, ephemera, diplomas, and medical illustrations dating chiefly from the 1890s-1920s, relating to Dr. John Ridlon's career and extensive research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of illustrations in the form of medical case photographs and photographic prints of early X-rays. Accompanying the papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's medical military training at a base in Plattsburgh, N.Y., and some during his service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. Duplicate and similar images are found in glass plate and nitrate film negatives. A set of 49 glass lantern slides of his time in the WWI medical camp were used to illustrate lectures about his experiences; a reprint of the lecture text is in the collection. There are also a handful of photographic portraits of Ridlon. Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P.D. Wilson, R.K. Ghormley, J.E. Goldthwait, A.B. Judson, R.W. Lovett, H.W. Orr, S.W. Mitchell, and H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

This material, which documents John Ridlon's medical career, consists of medical case files, casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographic materials, diplomas and ephemera, and medical illustrations, relating to Ridlon's research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of medical illustrations in the form of photographs mounted on board, photographic prints of early X-rays, and printed illustrations on loose sheets that show patients, symptoms or deformities, and treatments such as surgery, braces and casts; many of them were used by Ridlon in his published works.

Among the bound volumes are six casebooks (1889-1892); four letterbooks (1873-1903); an autograph manuscript, "Some comments on the principles and practice of Hugh Owen Thomas" (undated); a scrapbook of figures and illustrations (undated); three volumes composed of reprint clippings and manuscript notes (undated); and a bound volume of 88 reprints (1888-1923). There are also many diplomas and certificates received by Ridlon from various educational institutions.

Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P. D. Wilson, R. K. Ghormley, J. E. Goldthwait, A. B. Judson, R. W. Lovett, H. W. Orr, S. W. Mitchell, H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children.

Accompanying the professional papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. The photos were taken by several photographers at a medico-military training camp in Plattsburgh, N.Y., around 1916. Ridlon reported on these experiences at a medical conference in 1917 and used a set of 67 glass lantern slides to illustrate the lecture, 49 of which survive in the collection; a reprint of this paper is also available in the collection.

In the same series there is a set of 30 glass plate negatives and still image nitrate film negatives; these materials are closed to use but contain duplicate or similar images found in the print photographs. Finally, there are several portraits of Ridlon, chiefly photographs taken in his office and examination room, taken in 1911. A glass plate negative with a bust portrait of Ridlon rounds out the photographic series.

The collection also contains several folders of ephemera, early professional diplomas and certificates, letters of recommendation for Ridlon's Chicago appointment in 1892, and his obituary.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Ronald Reis photographs, 1954-2014 20.5 Linear Feet — 26 boxes; approximately 4018 items

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The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work (1962-1974) contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. The later body of work (2004-2014) contains 3,719 black-and-white and color laser inkjet prints, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Reis focused his camera on street scenes primarily in New York and New England, but also in Colorado and the midwest, in Europe (Italy, England, Ireland, and Greece), and in the Middle East. His images capture anti-war demonstrations, feminist and gay pride parades, and ethnic festivals, while also documenting the more quotidian life of urban neighborhoods, street markets, and other public spaces such as Speakers' Corner in London's Hyde Park and New York City's Washington Square. The earlier black-and-white gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, while the laser inkjet prints measure 11x17 inches. There are also manuscript and printed materials such as a curriculum vitae, some correspondence, exhibition publicity, articles, and photo essays. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets, and consists of documentary images taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from major European cities. The later body of work contains 3,719 laser inkjet prints of black-and-white and color documentary images taken by Reis in the 2000s, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Most of these images are of New York City street scenes.

An avid amateur street photographer influenced by Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Louis Stettner, Reis focused his camera on street scenes in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East during the 1960s, then in the 2000s. Favorite locations chosen by Reis include London's Hyde Park Speakers' Corner, Portobello flea market, and Trafalgar Square; New York's Bryant Park, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square; and market scenes in Connecticut and Jerusalem. Other images portray anti-Vietnam War protests in Bryant Park, gay pride and ethnic festivals and parades, amusement parks, and other street scenes.

The collection is arranged in three series: Photographs, Negatives, and Manuscript and Print Materials.

The Photographs Series is divided into two chronological subseries: 1954-1979 and 2004-2014. The first subseries contains 289 11x14-inch gelatin silver prints, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. These black-and-white images were taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from Athens, Barcelona, Como, Dublin, Florence, Jerusalem, London, Rome, and Venice. In general, each 8x10-inch contact sheet is followed by selected prints from the same roll. The prints and contacts are organized chronologically.

The second subseries contains 3,719 inkjet prints, both black-and-white and color, the vast majority measuring 11x17 inches. The prints, taken between 2004 and 2014, consist mostly of New York City street scenes as well as photographs from Reis's trips to Canada, Colorado, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and North Carolina. These photographs are described at the folder level, with folders containing up to 80 prints.

The Manuscript and Print Materials include an early curriculum vita, some correspondence, exhibition fliers, negative sleeves, articles, and photo essays.

The Negatives Series is arranged by year and month, and titles were taken from original notes on the negative envelopes. They overlap with the prints in the collection to some degree, but there are also negatives present for images that are not currently in the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Charles Bailey Reed scrapbooks and photographs, 1914-1924 and undated, bulk 1918-1919 3.0 Linear Feet — 7 boxes — approx. 1000 items

Radiologist who served in the U.S. American Expeditionary Forces Medical Corps during World War I; originally from Newburgh, Orange County, New York. Collection contains a few pieces of correspondence, telegrams, military orders, booklets, photographs and negatives, and ephemera collected by Captain Charles Bailey Reed during his service with the U.S. Medical Reserve Corps in France, 1918-1919. The items are mounted in two French-made scrapbooks or housed in loose groups. Materials relate to Reed's time as a medical radiologist at Evacuation Hospital Number One, Sebastopol Barracks, Toul, France. Hundreds of photographs, both loose and mounted, were taken by Reed in the U.S., 1914, 1918, 1924, and in Paris, 1918-1919, and in the Evacuation Hospital camp, 1918-1919. Commercially published photographs depict battle scenes and damage in France. Other items include newspapers reports of the Armistice; images from the Paris Inter-Allied Games, summer 1919; printed items produced for American soldiers stationed in France; and Reed's identity card. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Charles Bailey Reed scrapbooks and photographs date from 1914-1924, with the bulk dating from Reed's military service in France from 1918-1919. Materials include correspondence, military orders, postcards, newspaper articles, printed matter, photographic prints and negatives, and ephemera collected by Reed during his tour in France. Topics of interest include medical care and field hospitals during World War I; medical transport; cities in France and damages incurred during the war; and the Armistice and related events in France, including the Inter-Allied Games, Paris, summer of 1919, seen through the eyes (and camera) of Captain Reed.

Most of the material was mounted by Reed in two large scrapbooks, but there was also loose material found at the end of the scrapbooks which has been rehoused, and there are also many loose photographic prints and negatives. Materials are arranged in series by format and roughly chronologically within.

Printed materials and ephemeral items include newspapersand clippings; military bulletins and orders; information produced for American soldiers stationed in France; souvenir programs; ration cards, coupons, and receipts; and Reed's military identity papers. The newspapers consist of the front page of the newspapers, with a few containing additional pages. There are also a few items in German - correspondence and military publications - of unknown origins.

There are hundreds of small black-and-white photographs in the collection, both loose and mounted in the scrapbooks, most deriving from Reed's medical service in France from 1918-1919. In a few cases they are accompanied by negatives. There are images probably taken by Reed or a fellow soldier, and a large group of what appear to be commercially-made images with captions in white lettering; some of the latter are dated 1914 and depict the British front in France (Alsace, Verdun), damaged buildings (including churches and cathedrals), battlefields, cemeteries, French and British soldiers in trenches and camps, dead soldiers (many of whom are German), and biplanes (including downed planes).

Reed's personal photographs depict camps, soldiers' quarters, military vessels, ceremonies, tourist sites, and damaged buildings; there is one picture taken at Fort Riley, Kansas. The centerpiece of the photographs is a large series of images from Evacuation Hospital No. 1, Sebastopol Barracks, in Toul, France; these show camp buildings, hospital interiors, wounded soldiers in the surgery, soldiers and officers, and vehicles used for medical transport. There is one image of what appears to be prisoners of war marching in a group. Other place names include Verdun, Alsace, Rheims, Paris, Marseilles, Cannes, and Avignon; there are some images from Alpine regions bordering Italy. One group of earlier photos is labeled "Watkins Glen, N.Y., 1918," and date from before Reed's July embarcation for Europe. Additionally, there are later photos taken in 1924 of Pine Plains military camp in New York State, now part of Fort Drum.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Tom Rankin photographs and papers, 1977-2016 33.5 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 film reels — Approximately 13,650 items — 33.5 linear feet; approximately 13,640 items

Tom Rankin is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, folklorist, professor of art and documentary studies, and former director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Photographs from the South focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region, as well as portraits of individuals, including portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown, and Southern landscapes. An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes. Finished prints range from 8x11 inch contact prints to 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 large-format prints. Supporting materials include manuscripts, publications files, and two films, all deriving from Rankin's career and art practice. Includes a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work of Tom Rankin in this collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Southern photographs were taken from 1980 to 2007, and focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region; these prints form the largest series, "Sacred Space." Another body of work features portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown. A third body of work, "Portraits from the American South," offers views of Southern people, cultures, and landscapes in both color and black-and-white.

An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes.

Print sizes range from 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches, with many housed in window mats. Along with these prints, there are also 8x11 inch black-and-white matted contact prints. All titles were created by the photographer.

Selected photographs from this collection have been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and other locations. A selection of Rankin's photographs was published in a book, Sacred Space: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta (1993).

Supporting materials in this collection include a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of work from the Sacred Space series, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta," as well as paper records related to his career and art practice, including book publications and book layouts. Also in the collection are two motion films, Dance Like a River (1985), directed by Barry Dorfeld and Tom Rankin, and Four Women Artists (1977), directed by Bill Ferris.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Major General Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey photograph albums of service in South Korea, 1959 July-1960 May 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 3 volumes

Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey was a U.S. Army three-star general who served in South Korea from 1959-1960 as Senior Military Advisor to the Korean National War College in Seoul, South Korea. The three spiral-bound albums house over 300 black-and-white mounted photographs, chiefly in 4x5 and 8x10 sizes, all with typed captions and commentary. The images document the War College campus, Ramsey's quarters, South Korean and American officers in group portraits and in military meetings, dinners, and parties, as well as official tours and visits, including to the DMZ and a U.S. guided missile base; and visits to Seoul streets and tourist sites, rice fields and markets, and to Tokyo, Japan. Ramsey often appears in event photographs. There are a few snapshots of Ramsey's family. Also includes about 20 close-range photographs documenting the violence and bloodshed at student and civilian street protests in Seoul against President Syngman Rhee, known as the April Revolution of 1960.

The three spiral-bound photograph albums in the collection were assembled by U.S. Army Major General Lloyd Brinkley Ramsey, and feature over 300 black-and-white gelatin silver mounted photographs, chiefly in 4x5 and 8x10 sizes, with typed captions and commentary by Ramsey about people, events, and settings. The albums measure approximately 11x13 inches. The photographs, mostly taken by Ramsey but also by other unidentified individuals, chiefly focus on Ramsey's service and travels, and include images of the National War College (renamed the Defense College in 1961) and its personnel; many meetings, dinners, and parties attended by South Korean and U.S. military officers and attaches; official military visits to the DMZ and to U.S. installations, including the newly developed guided missile system base. One set of images documents Military Armistice Commission (MAC) meetings held in August and October 1959 between North and South Koreans and American military officers. Ramsey often appears in snapshots of social events and meetings. Other images document Seoul streets, parks, palaces, markets, a women's school, and rice fields; and scenes from trips to Inchon, South Korea, rural areas, and Tokyo, Japan.

The album includes about 20 close-range photographs of violent student riots and civilian street demonstrations in Seoul against President Syngman Rhee, known as the April Revolution of 1960. The photographer is unidentified. Note: these photographs include potentially disturbing images of bloodied and dying demonstrators, and street violence.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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Tim Portwood papers, 1975-1984 0.4 Linear Feet

Lawrence Timothy (Tim) Portwood (1974-) grew up in Southern California, attended Stanford (A.B., History, 1976), and earned his J.D. with distinction (1979) at Duke, where he was active in the Duke Gay Alliance. Collection comprises documents that Portwood received as a student or alumnus of Duke Law School. Other materials relate to LGBTQ life at Duke, as well as in Durham, North Carolina, and the Southeastern United States in the late 1970s.

Collection comprises documents that Portwood received as a student or alumnus of Duke Law School, including acceptance letters, reading lists and other preparatory materials, local information, directories, a 5th reunion booklet, commencement materials, copies of the Duke Law School newsletter "The Devil's Advocate," and a few photographs. The balance of the collection relates to LGBTQ life at Duke, as well as in Durham, North Carolina, and the Southeastern United States in the late 1970s. There are publications distributed in bars during the period, including Carolina Zipper, Cruise Magazine, Free Press Magazine, Whatever Magazine, and Pink Trash Magazine. There is a file related to the Duke Gay Alliance (1978-1979), along with business cards and a playlist for a few local gay discotheques. Also includes a flyer promoting a defense fund for a psychologist charged in 1977 with an "abominable and detestable crime against nature" under a North Carolina law.

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James Ware Pitts photographs, 1984-1998 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 5 prints — 5 prints

Collection comprises five 4x5 inch matted black-and-white palladium contact prints, featuring abandoned or run-down manmade structures in the natural landscape. Locations include the Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona) and the Olympic Pensinsula. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.
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George S. Pietzcker St. Louis airplane meet photograph album, 1910 0.1 Linear Feet — 1 folder

Collection consists of a photograph album containing 25 developing-out gelatin silver prints of early airplanes and aviators. The album is labeled, "Aero Meet, Lambert Field, St. Louis, Mo., Oct. 1910," and the photographs were taken during this St. Louis Aero Club's meet. The images range in size from 6.25 x 4.5 inches to 7 x 5 inches. Fifteen photographs include views of one or more Wright Brothers' biplanes or parts of them. There are three views of the Bleriot monoplane. Three photos include Theodore Roosevelt, one in a biplane. Aviators pictured include Achibald Hoxsey, French pilot Alfred LeBlanc, Walter Brookins, and Ralph Johnstone. All of the Wright biplanes that are clearly discernible in this album appear to be the Model A or what has been referred to as a transitional model. One negative is available.
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Olive Pierce photographs, 1960-2014 26.5 Linear Feet — 13 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Olive Pierce (1925-2016) was a documentary photographer based in Massachusetts and Maine. The collection comprises several hundred black-and-white photographic prints taken by Pierce over her long career. The earliest images (1960s) feature landscapes and individuals in Maine, a subject Pierce returned to throughout her life. Other subjects include: political protests in Cambridge, Massachusetts and life in the Jefferson Park neighborhood in Cambridge during the 1970s; high school students in Cambridge (1980s); the lives of Iraqi children in war zones in 1999 and 2003, and protests in the U.S. against that war. Also included are print publications featuring Pierce's photographs; publicity for exhibits and lectures; Pierce's 1987 guide to teaching photography; a video on DVD and audio lecture about her work; some correspondence; unpublished book mock-ups and a memoir/diary; a self-published illustrated partial memoir (2014); approximately 2557 film negatives; and about 40 slides featuring images of her early life and family. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Olive Pierce Photographs span the years 1960-2014, with a few copies of family images dating from the 1920s-1940s. The core of the collection is several hundred black-and-white photographic prints documenting coastal Maine and Massachusetts communities and landscapes from 1960-1993; high school student life and life in a housing project in the Jefferson Park neighborhood in Cambridge, 1970s-1980s; children in Iraqi war zones in 1999 and 2003 and protests in the U.S. against that war; and various images of her family, chiefly shot in Maine. A recent addition of 2557 original black-and-white negatives and roughly 40 slides comprises images from her major projects throughout her career, as well as images of her early life and family.

The collection also includes print and manuscript materials covering various aspects of Olive Pierce's personal life and career. These include publicity for exhibits and projects, articles about her work and anti-war activism, and a draft of her 1987 guide to teaching photography. Other items include student papers written in reaction to an exhibit; some correspondence to her children and to politicians and local papers; a self-published memoir in two parts (2014) covering her earliest personal life and her sojourn in Poland during World War II, which set her on the road to becoming a documentary photographer; a book mock-up on Iraqi children's lives during the Iraq War, 1999, and a book mock-up with photos taken in Waltham, Massachusetts in 19966, both unpublished; "From Boston to Baghdad," a spiral-bound memoir/diary with copies of photos, narrative, and maps; and several sets of postcards featuring her images of Iraqi children.

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F. Norman Phelps scrapbook, 1926-1935 and undated 1 Linear Foot

F. Norman Phelps was a Chevrolet sales executive in various cities, including Milwaukee, Wisc.; Detroit, Mich., Davenport, Ia.; Kansas City, Mo.; and Los Angeles, Calif. Full name: Fredrick Norman Phelps; b. 20 March 1895 in Bucyrus (Crawford County), Ohio; d. 23 January 1974 in Piedmont, Calif. Collection comprises a scrapbook (about 54 pgs) documenting Phelps' career as a Chevrolet sales executive. Includes primarily newspaper clippings and black-and-white photographs, although there are also such items as letters, telegrams, news releases, programs (including those for national auto exhibits, sales conventions, and other events), menus, song lyric sheets, a medallion name tag, and other ephemera, all housed in a leather "Chevrolet Sales Speeder" three-ring binder. The newspaper clippings and letters document Phelps' various transfers and promotions; other items cover topics such as company-sponsored hunting events, meals, outings, vintage cars, and skits. There is only one unrelated item: a newspaper clipping from 1926 tells of Phelps' escape from a house fire.

Collection comprises a scrapbook (about 54 pgs) documenting Phelps' career as a Chevrolet sales executive. Includes primarily newspaper clippings and black-and-white photographs, although there are also such items as letters, telegrams, news releases, programs (including those for national auto exhibits, sales conventions, and other events), menus, song lyric sheets, a medallion name tag, and other ephemera, all housed in a leather "Chevrolet Sales Speeder" three-ring binder. The newspaper clippings and letters document Phelps' various transfers and promotions; other items cover topics such as company-sponsored hunting events, meals, outings, vintage cars, and skits. There is only one unrelated item: a newspaper clipping from 1926 tells of Phelps' escape from a house fire.

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Isabelle Perkinson Williamson papers, 1827-1930, bulk 1909-1930 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — approximately 2,520 items

Correspondence and other items of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. There are also letters from and items belonging to Lee H. Williamson. Topics include: life in Charlottesville, Virginia; students of the University; Edwin A. Alderman, University president; work in the Navy Department from 1913-1917; the early moving picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Includes descriptions of the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., Europe during 1909 and 1910, Virginia, the Panama Canal Zone, Rancagua, Chile, and Puerto Rico. Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers; food cards; and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France. The collection also contains information on early moving pictures; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression. Photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, and greeting cards round out the collection.

Collection comprises papers of Isabelle (Perkinson) Williamson, wife of Lee Hoomes Williamson, engineer, and of her mother, Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson. Included are many letters to Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson from former students of the University of Virginia who had patronized her boardinghouse in Charlottesville, Virginia, letters from Isabelle (Holmes) Perkinson to her daughter describing life in Charlottesville, and commenting on Edwin A. Alderman, President of the University of Virginia, and many notes and bills reflecting frequent financial difficulties. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

Many of the letters describe travels: letters from Isabelle P. Williamson to her mother were sent while attending the Georgetown Visitation Convent, Washington, D.C., while on a tour of Europe during 1909 and 1910, while visiting in Virginia and in the Panama Canal Zone, while working in the Navy Department in Washington, 1913-1917, and, after her marriage in 1917, while living near Rancagua, Chile, and in Puerto Rico with her husband. Also included in this collection are letters between Isabelle P. Williamson and Lee Hoomes Williamson.

The collection also contains information on the early motion picture industry; life during the Roaring Twenties; and the beginning of the Great Depression.

Papers relating to World War I consist of letters from soldiers and war workers, food cards, and letters from Mary Peyton, who was with a field hospital unit in France.

Sixty-nine photographs - chiefly of family members and views from a Chilean mining settlement - and ephemera such as postcards, calling cards, tickets, greeting cards, and Lee Williamson's WWI military identification card round out the collection.

Much more information on the collection's contents, written up in 1941, can be found in the Rubenstein Library cardfile catalog; please consult with Research Services staff.

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Friedrich Carl Peetz photographs, 1900. 1 Linear Foot

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The collection comprises a photograph album with 127 black-and-white photographs (several are hand tinted; most are 4.5 x 6 in.) mounted on 22 boards. The album probably belonged to Friedrich Carl Peetz, most likely an officer in the German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) and crew member of the S.M.S. Hertha during the Boxer Rebellion. The images were mostly taken in Tsingtao (Qingdao), Chefoo (Yantai), Hong Kong, Peking (Beijing), and Shanhaiguan during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. The photographs document the German involvement in the Rebellion and primarily depict damage to the Taku Forts, German ships (all are identified) and crew, and temples and other historic buildings visited by the Germans in Beijing and other locales in China. Photographs have German captions written in pencil.

Collection comprises a photograph album with 127 black-and-white photographs (several are hand tinted; most are 4.5 x 6 in.) mounted on 22 boards. The album probably belonged to Friedrich Carl Peetz, most likely an officer in the German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) and crew member of the S.M.S. Hertha during the Boxer Rebellion. The images were mostly taken in Tsingtao (Qingdao), Chefoo (Yantai), Hong Kong, Peking (Beijing), and Shanhaiguan during the Boxer Rebellion in 1900. The photographs document the German involvement in the Rebellion and primarily depict damage to the Taku Forts, German ships (all are identified) and crew, and temples and other historic buildings visited by the Germans in Beijing and other locales in China. Photographs have German captions written in pencil.

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Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

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Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items

Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

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Garrett Orr papers, circa 1873-1994, bulk 1890s-1914, 1935-1965 18.5 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The Garrett Orr Papers document the artistic output and personal files of advertising executive Garrett Orr. Although the collection spans the years circa 1873 to 1994, the bulk of the materials fall within two main periods: the 1890s to 1914, comprising a photographic collection of old poster images; and 1930 to 1965, which approximates the span of Orr's professional life. The collection includes the original drawings, water colors and paintings produced by Orr as designs for the outdoor advertising campaigns of a wide variety of products such as Gillette razors, Ipana toothpaste (Bristol-Myers), Lucky Strikes and Viceroy cigarettes (Brown & Williamson), Mazola corn oil (Corn Products Refining Company), Seagram beverages, Verney fabrics, and White Rose tea. Also included are folders of photographs, slides and negatives of Orr's advertising work for approximately 550 companies (with index). In addition, a collection of almost 200 large-format negatives and photographs document images of 19th- and early 20th-century posters for plays, musicals, minstrel shows, circuses, and hotels. A large set of clippings files contain published examples of the work of over 100 graphic artists and illustrators contemporary with Orr, including Floyd Davis, Ronald McLeod, George Petty, Howard Scott, Ben Stahl, Jon Whitcomb, and J. Walter Wilkinson. The collection is organized into five series--the General Files Series; the Artists and Illustrators Series; the Product Files Series; the Other Photographic Materials Series; and the Sketches Series. Large-format items from the Artists and Illustrators Series and Sketches Series have been relocated to Oversize Materials.

Closely related collections held by the Rubenstein Library include: the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Poster Designs; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Slide Library; the Duplex Advertising Company Billboard Images and Records; the Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements; the R.C. Maxwell Co. Records; the Howard Scott Papers; and the John Paver Papers.

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Henry Nathaniel Oakes papers, 1904-1974 9.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 5000 Items

Henry Nathaniel Oakes was a minister from North Carolina; he received his Ph.D. from the University of Iowa in 1974. Collection consists of research material for and drafts of Oakes's Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American elected to the episcopacy in the former Methodist Episcopal Church (1920). Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century. Among Oakes's research papers are many folders of typed notes excerpting and commenting on Jones's statements made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

The papers of Henry Nathaniel Oakes chiefly consist of research material for and drafts of Oakes's 1973 Ph.D. dissertation, which focuses on the career of Robert Elijah Jones (1872—1960), the first African American Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church, elected in 1920. Jones was born in Greensboro, North Carolina. Oakes's materials document the relationship between Jones and his close friend Booker T. Washington, Jones's accomodationist approach to racial integration, as well as the black struggle for equality in the predominantly white Methodist Episcopal Church in the first half of the twentieth century.

The earliest dates (1904-1940s) derive from photocopied research materials pertaining to the period during which Robert Jones was active, chiefly from Methodist publications, including reports, newsclippings, articles, and correspondence. These materials contain exceprts and notes on comments Jones made from 1905 to 1920 on abolition, African American business, mob violence and lynching, education, and politics. Also among the research papers are typed notes Henry Oakes took on an unidentified work by Robert E. Jones. Typewritten notes are typically annotated with many hand-written comments and underlined passages. Handwritten notes are often found on the backs of re-used elementary school worksheets.

Additional materials in the collection include University of Iowa forms and policies; correspondence between Oakes and members of the Jones family and Univ. of Iowa faculty; a set of typed transcripts of six or seven interviews conducted by Oakes with Jones family members, ministers, and other individuals; a set of black-and-white photographs of Jones, his immediate family, and Church officials; and five microfilm reels.

Mold remediation has been carried out by Conservation staff on selected portions of the collection. To facilitate access to severely damaged items, photocopies are available for use and are housed alongside the originals.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Noyes-Balch family papers, 1854-1957 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes

The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Photographs of women's college production of a Sanskrit drama, circa 1905 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 62 images on 14 card mounts

Set of 62 captioned black-and-white photographic prints mounted on 14 cardstock boards, documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯. The play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905, at a time when Indian dramas were popularized and produced by many women's colleges. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of cardstock mounts, and portray individual young female actors playing male and female roles, as well as tableaus with groups of actors. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props. Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75 to 8 x 13.75 inches, with the mounts measuring 9x14 inches. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Set of 62 mounted and captioned black-and-white photographic prints documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯; the play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of 14 heavy card stock boards. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75" to 8 x 13.75", with the mounts measuring 9x14" with one exception measuring 10x16. There are a few near-duplicates among the images.

The images feature portraits of costumed female actors playing male and female roles, as well as groups of actors and several long shots of the stage, in which the curtains, scenery, and part of an orchestra pit can also be seen. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures, and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props (these argue against it being Smith College's 1904 production, as it was reported as using Americanized costumes and music). Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River, with small white tents visible on the lawns to the left; the play may have been produced at Northfield during a summer conference. One of the school's alumna, Ruth St. Denis, was an important modern dancer who popularized Oriental dances and dramas; she appeared in Sakuntala in 1905, perhaps giving the impetus to a staging of the play at Northfield Seminary.

The card stock mounts, with their associated images, are arranged in their original order based on the negative numbers visible in each still image: 1-31, 33-38, and 40-62, with numbers 32, 39, and 59 absent. The view of the campus is unnumbered.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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North Carolina Poverty Project records, 1983-2004 and undated (bulk 1986-1997) 30.1 Linear Feet — 19,182 Items

Primarily consists of Executive Board and Sector and Advisory Groups correspondence, memoranda, and meeting records; financial and planning documents, including grant applications; and workshop, seminar, and presentation materials that document the organization's activities to raise awareness of and promote action on the causes of poverty in N.C. Also includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, and other writings by the executive director, J. Gordon Chamberlin; telephone logs and appointment books; various printed material concerning poverty in NC; 11 audio and 15 videocassettes; 134 black-and-white and 10 color prints; 10 color negatives; and 8 data cartridge tapes. (02-234)

The 2006 addition (2006-0055)(600 items, 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1986-2004) contains correspondence, meeting records, publications, and other documents generated by the North Carolina Poverty Project and the Poverty Coalition. Also included is an oversize 7 panel Poverty Display.

The 2007 addition (2007-0023)(3300 items, 4.4 lin. ft.; dated 1982-2003) contains documents related to the executive board including correspondence, financial documents, and planning documents; tax information; documents related to conferences and business trips; photocopies and clippings of articles related to poverty from the New York Times and other newspapers (1986-2001); and lists of library holdings of poverty books at Southeastern universities.

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North Carolina Council of Churches records, 1935-2019 104.25 Linear Feet — 104.25 linear feet

Primarily office files, including commission and committee meeting minutes, reports, correspondence, financial records, printed material, and other items. The files document the council's attempts to marshal churches in N.C. to act on a variety of social concerns, including race relations, poverty, immigration, the death penalty, war and peace, and ecumenism. Special topics include the United Church Women, NCCC Social Ministries, and outreach to migrant and aging populations. The collection includes a scrapbook for the United Church Women, 460 black-and-white and 66 color photographs, 43 color slides, and 60 black-and-white and 142 color negatives. (59,739 items; 94.45 lf; 1935-2001 (bulk 1969-1994)(01-100, 01-135)

Addition (dated 1971-1975 and undated) contains materials related to the organization's ministry with the aging. There are brochures, fliers, publications, and manuals, many regarding how to establish a meals-on-wheels program. This accession is unprocessed.

The 2006 addition (2007-0133)(5,000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1966-1982) contains operational and subject files, including correspondence, executive board meeting files, minutes, reports from sub-committees, and files related to similar religious organizations.

Addition (2020-0094)(3.0 linear feet; dated 1947-2019) contains materials generated by Church Women United in North Carolina, a covenant partner of the North Carolina Council of Churches. These materials include the Constitution of the NC Council of Church Women, annual meeting minutes, annual reports and records, newsletters, directories, bylaws, reports, speeches, projects, brochures, board meeting minutes, budgets, and materials from local units.

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Anne Noggle photographs of Soviet airwomen, 1990-1992 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 36 prints — 11x14; 16x20; 20x24 inches

Anne Noggle (1922-2005), aviator, photographer, author, and educator, traveled to Moscow from 1990-1992 to conduct more than seventy interviews and to photograph former Soviet airwomen who served during World War II as pilots, gunners, bombardiers, navigators, and flight crews. The 36 black-and-white portraits in this collection show the women seated and standing, most in a studio setting; they are in civilian clothing and many are wearing their wartime medals and military insignia. The gelatin silver photographs were printed by Noggle and measure 20x24 (8), 16x20 (6), and 11x14 (22) inches. Almost all appear in her book A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II, published in 1994, also held by the library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 36 black-and-white photographic portraits taken by photographer Anne Noggle of former Soviet airwomen who served during World War II as combat pilots, gunners, bombardiers, navigators, and flight crews. The women are seated and standing, most in a studio setting; they are dressed in civilian clothing and many are wearing their wartime medals and military insignia. The gelatin silver photographs were printed by Noggle and are sized 20x24 (8), 16x20 (6), and 11x14 (22) inches. Almost all the images appear in her book A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II, published in 1994, and also held by the library.

From the Texas A&M Press website for the book: "The women who tell their stories here began the war mostly as inexperienced girls — many of them teenagers. In support of their homeland, they volunteered to serve as bomber and fighter pilots, navigator-bombardiers, gunners, and support crews. Flying against the Luftwaffe, they saw many of their friends — as well as many of their foes — fall to earth in flames. Their three combat Air Force regiments fought as many as one thousand missions during the war... equally courageous were the women's efforts to show the Red Army that they were entirely adequate to the great role they sought. For even though Stalin had decreed equality for both sexes, the women had to grapple initially with deep distrust from male pilots and Red Army officers, against whom they eventually prevailed."

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Nicholas School of the Environment records, 1916-ongoing 41.25 Linear Feet — 32.2 Gigabytes

Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment traces its beginnings to the founding of the Duke School of Forestry in 1938. In the 1990s two other entities, the Duke Marine Laboratory and the Duke Department of Geology, were combined with Forestry to form the Nicholas School. The Records of Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, 1916-ongoing, contain materials created from the school's inception as the Duke School of Forestry (1938) through all its subsequent names: the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the School of the Environment, and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. The collection also includes material about the history of Duke Forest and its use as a teaching and research facility. The earliest materials comprise the papers of Clarence F. Korstian, first director of the Forest and first dean of the School, including his correspondence, early reports about the Forest and the School, and his involvement in the Ecological Society of America, the North Carolina Forestry Association, and the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. The bulk of the collection consists of the School's general administrative records, including annual reports, admissions records, enrollment statistics, information on degrees granted, faculty history and meetings, and surveys and meetings of the School's alumni. Visual materials include posters, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, slides, and digital photographs that document the School of Forestry and the Duke Marine Laboratory.

The Records of Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment contain materials created during the school's entire history, from its founding as the Duke School of Forestry, in 1938, through all its subsequent names: the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies, the School of the Environment, and the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences. The collection also includes materials about the closely-related Duke Forest, especially its history and the School's management and use of it as a teaching and research facility. The earliest materials here comprise the papers of Clarence F. Korstian, first director of the Forest and first dean of the School; his files include his personal correspondence, early reports about the Forest and the School, and material about several professional organizations, particularly the Ecological Society of America, the North Carolina Forestry Association, and the International Union of Forest Research Organizations. Following Korstian's papers, the bulk of the collection consists of the School's general administrative records, including all the following: annual reports, admissions records, enrollment statistics, and information on degrees granted; faculty history, curricula, and meetings; and extensive data on the School's alumni, especially alumni surveys and newsletters and meetings of the Alumni Association. The administrative records are supplemented by extensive visual materials; these contain a small selection of posters and other promotional materials about the School, but primarily consist of approximately 5000 color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, slides, and digital photographs that document a wide variety of faculty and student history and activities at both the School of Forestry and the Duke Marine Laboratory. Arranged in order by accession number, with several small, related accessions merged into single series.

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New family papers, 1858-1931 and undated, bulk 1913 0.9 Linear Feet

Collection contains a scrapbook for the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, describing the route from Birkenhead to London. This is accompanied by 78-page narrative of the trip, which is keyed to the photographs in the scrapbook. Also included are two other drafts of the narrative, "A few impressions" (14 pages) and "The Suffrage Pilgrimage, July 1913" (88 pages). The scrapbook and narratives were possibly prepared by Alice Margery New. Her "Suffrage Quotation Book" that contains signatures of suffragists, including those of Constance Lytton and Emmeline Pankhurst, is also present. In addition, there is another unidentified participant's description (31 pages) of the Birkenhead to London pilgrimage, perhaps written by Alice's mother or aunt. There are five postcards related to the pilgrimage, along with a black-and-white photograph of F. W. Pathick Lawrence, who was imprisoned for his association with militant suffrage demonstrations. Finally, the collection contains an autograph book (1858-1931) containing primarily letters directed to William Newmarch, but with a few Dalby and New family items.

Collection contains a scrapbook for the 1913 Suffrage Pilgrimage, describing the route from Birkenhead to London. This is accompanied by 78-page narrative of the trip, which is keyed to the photographs in the scrapbook. Also included are two other drafts of the narrative, "A few impressions" (14 pages) and "The Suffrage Pilgrimage, July 1913" (88 pages). The scrapbook and narratives were possibly prepared by Alice Margery New. Her "Suffrage Quotation Book" that contains signatures of suffragists, including those of Constance Lytton and Emmeline Pankhurst, is also present. In addition, there is another unidentified participant's description (31 pages) of the Birkenhead to London pilgrimage, perhaps written by Alice's mother or aunt. There are five postcards related to the pilgrimage, along with a black-and-white photograph of F. W. Pathick Lawrence, who was imprisoned for his association with militant suffrage demonstrations. Finally, the collection contains an autograph book (1858-1931) containing primarily letters directed to William Newmarch, but with a few Dalby and New family items.

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Carlo Naya photograph albums of Venice, 1860s-1870s 3 Linear Feet — 4 bound volumes; 92 albumen photographs — Volumes: 18 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches; Prints: 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches — 92 albumen prints in four bound volumes

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Four cloth-bound souvenir albums house 92 oversize mounted albumen prints of Venetian landmarks, taken by notable photographer Carlo Naya during the 1860s and perhaps into the 1870s. Handwritten captions are expressed in Italian with some English terms, and are transcribed exactly as they appear. Nearly all the images measure 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches, and almost all bear the studio negative number. Subjects include well-known landmarks of Venice, including churches, palaces, canals, bridges, and piazzas, along with city monuments and statuary such as the Winged Lion of St. Mark. Other images show interior details such as tombs, bas-reliefs, altars, and grand staircases. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

These four bound albums house 92 oversize albumen prints showing images of Venetian architecture and artworks taken by notable photographer Carlo Naya during the 1860s and perhaps into the 1870s. The images were secured using the wet-collodion process on large glass plate negatives.

The cloth-bound albums measure 18 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches and each contains just over 20 prints mounted on hinged boards. The albums bear the English title "Venice" on the spines and covers, and are numbered I-IV. Album four reveals the large signature of a former owner - J.E. (John Edwin) Chase, an art collector and amateur naturalist of Holyoke, Massachusetts.

Subjects favored by Naya for these albums are the churches, palaces, canals, bridges, and piazzas of Venice, along with city monuments and statuary such as the Winged Lion of St. Mark and the equestrian statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni. The photographer's focus is on the elements of design and light; the few small human figures present in most images are included for purposes of scale. Featured sites include: the Palazzo Ducale; Piazza San Marco and the Basilica di San Marco; the Bridge of Sighs (Ponte dei Sospiri); the Gran Canale; and the church of SS. Giovanni and Paolo. Many images show interior details such as tombs (Titian and several Doges of Venice), bas-reliefs, altars, and grand staircases. In short, albums such as these display the subjects most sought-after by a knowledgeable tourist, and may have served as visual encyclopedias for educational institutions.

Nearly all the prints measure approximately 10 5/8 x 13 7/8 inches, each mounted on card stock with a handwritten caption below, the photographer's blind-stamp from his Riva Schiavoni studio, and the studio's negative number, which appears in the image. The captions are expressed in Italian with some English terms, and have been transcribed exactly as they appear, with a few errors retained. Only one sequence of images bears a date - 1865. There is a handful of prints with no negative numbers - these have been assigned an identification number starting with "UN." A few prints are signed by Naya (or Naija, as it is sometimes written).

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Carl Mydans photographs, 1935-1968 2 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 66 items — 66 Items

Photojournalist (1907-2004) for the Farm Security Administration and Life magazine. Collection consists of 65 black-and-white and one color photographs taken during assignments for the Farm Security Administration and for Life magazine from 1935 to 1968. Subjects include rural America, migrant farm workers, and the community of Freer, Texas, during the Great Depression; the Sino-Japanese War and 1940s China; World War II, including the Japanese occupation of the Philippines, General MacArthur's return, the liberation of Italy and France, and the surrender of Japan; Japanese war crimes tribunals; the Fukui, Japan, earthquake in 1948; and the Korean War. Most of the images measure 8x10 and 11x14 inches and have detailed captions. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 65 black-and-white and one color photographs spanning Carl Mydans' career. Images from his early work for the Farm Security Administration include photographs of cowboys and ranchers from Freer, Texas; migrant workers and rural life in Texas and Arkansas during the Great Depression; a photograph of the Capitol building through a Washington, D.C. slum; and political banners from the 1936 presidential election.

The majority of the collection dates from Mydans' time working for Life magazine as a war photographer. Subjects include the Sino-Japanese war beginning in 1941, his time in the Philippines and the battle for Manila, his coverage of the Allies in France and Italy during the liberation of Europe, and his travels with General Douglas MacArthur during MacArthur's return to the Philippines and the subsequent surrender of the Japanese. Mydans' World War II images are fairly evenly split into equal parts combat and street scenes: there seem to be just as many photographs of tea rooms and markets in China as there are photographs of Japanese bombing raids in the Philippines. This portion of the collection also includes some of Mydans' most iconic photographs, including a portrait of General MacArthur with his sunglasses and pipe, a photograph of MacArthur leading the army ashore in the Philippines, and an image of a "collaborator" being shaved following the liberation of France.

Another significant component of the collection is Mydans' post-World War II images, which include Japanese war crimes tribunals, Korean War coverage, portraits of coal miners and politicians in Europe, and photographs taken during the Fukui earthquake. Also included is a self-portrait of Mydans in Vietnam, the only photograph taken in color, from 1968.

Nearly all of the photographs have handwritten captions on the back, which have been transcribed in the Collection Description portion of the finding aid. Some of the handwritten captions have been supplemented by a caption list, available in hard copy in Box 3. Brackets indicate information added by library staff. Some prints are also signed by Mydans.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Munford-Ellis Family papers, 1777-1942 30 Linear Feet — 12522 Items

The Munford and Ellis families were connected through the marriage of George Wythe Munford and Elizabeth Throwgood Ellis in 1838. The earliest papers from the Munford family center around William Munford (1775-1825) of the first generation, George Wythe Munford (1803-1882) of the second generation, and the children of George Wythe Munford, notably Thomas Taylor Munford (1831-1918), Sallie Radford (Munford) Talbott (1841-1930), Lucy Munford and Fannie Ellis Munford. Papers of the Ellis family begin with those of Charles Ellis, Sr. (1772-1840), Richmond merchant; his wife, Margaret (Nimmo) Ellis (1790-1877); and his brother, Powhatan Ellis (1790-1863), jurist, U.S. senator, and diplomat. Later materials include letters from Thomas Harding Ellis (1814-1898), son of Charles and Margaret Ellis, as well as some materials from their other children and grandchildren. Collection contains family, personal, and business papers of three generations of the Munford and the Ellis families of Virginia. The papers contain information on politics, literary efforts, social life and customs, economic conditions, and military questions principally in nineteenth century Virginia. Includes materials on the Civil War and Reconstruction.

Family, personal, and business papers of three generations of the Munford and the Ellis families of Virginia, connected by the marriage of George Wythe Munford and Elizabeth Throwgood Ellis in 1838. The papers contain information on politics, literary efforts, social life and customs, economic conditions, and military questions principally in nineteenth century Virginia.

Letters and papers of the Munford family center around William Munford (1775-1825) of the first generation, George Wythe Munford (1803-1882) of the second generation, and the children of George Wythe Munford, notably Thomas Taylor Munford (1831-1918), Sallie Radford (Munford) Talbott (1841-1930), Lucy Munford and Fannie Ellis Munford.

The letters of William Munford (1775-1825) are concerned with some details relative to the management of his plantation in Mecklenburg County, Virginia, by an overseer, his legal practice in the early 1800s in southside Virginia, accounts of his election to the governor's council in 1805, and political questions confronting the council. The collection also contains letters concerning possible publication by Thomas Willis White of a novel written by Ursula Anna (Munford) Byrd, sister of William Munford. Letters of friends and relatives and members of the first generation of Munfords are also included.

Volumes are an account book, 1799-1873, and a miscellany, 1790-1814, containing poems of William Munford, a list of the books in his library, and a list of subscribers to the Munford and William W. Hening Reports of Cases argued and determined in the Supreme court of appeals of Virginia. Chief of the literary works are two poems, "The Richmond Cavalcade" (1798), and its sequel, "The Richmond Feast" (1799), in Hudibrastic verse aimed at the political maneuvers of the Federalists. Also included are original poems by John Blair, Thomas Bolling Robertson, Anna (Munford) Byrd, St. George Tucker, and Mrs. John Page of Rosewell concerning social matters; and other poems by Munford, some of which were later published in the Richmond Enquirer.

George Wythe Munford (1803-1882), named for the mentor of his father, was clerk of the Virginia House of Delegates, an office which he held until the end of the Civil War, when he attempted farming until forced by reverses to secure a clerkship in the U.S. Census Bureau. Correspondence concerns the Mexican War, including letters from Admiral William Radford aboard the U.S.S. Warren blockading the Mexican coast at Mazatlan; Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Virginia, 1845; Virginia politics, including letters from Henry Alexander Wise while governor; the people and countryside around Lynchburg, Virginia, where he went for recuperation during the summer; his gubernatorial campaign in Virginia, 1863; the fall of Richmond, April, 1865, and his flight to western Virginia, including descriptions of his reactions and those of his relatives, and the uncertainty of the future; his application for a pardon and the response of President Andrew Johnson; detailed accounts in letters to his son, Thomas, of his struggles, work, and the labor system relating to his farming attempts in Gloucester County, Virginia, 1866-1873; his work in preparing a Virginia code of laws, 1873; the Readjuster Movement, which resulted in his removal from office as a clerk in the House of Delegates to which he had returned after farming his experiences as clerk in the census office in Washington, 1880-1882; the Southern Historical Society, of which he was secretary; and people and social life and customs in Virginia, Maryland, and Washington, D.C., including letters from his daughters while employed as governesses. Included also are notes, correspondence, and the original manuscript of his The Two Parsons (Richmond: 1884), published after his death, as well as correspondence about the two ministers, John Buchanan and John Blair. A poems and account book, 1821-1837, contains poetry by George Wythe Munford, including "The Gander Pull or James City Games," and sentimental poems, some written to his relatives; poetic letters; and a cashbook. Other volumes include an inventory of his household furniture purchased in 1834; and account books, 1835-1865.

A large portion of the collection relates to Thomas Taylor Munford (1831-1918), planter, brigadier general in the cavalry of the Confederate Army, and lecturer on Confederate military history. Correspondence pertains to the difficulties of farming, the Civil War, including the shortage of rations, typhoid and diphtheria on the plantation, charges brought against Munford by General Thomas Lafayette Rosser, and the fate of the Confederacy, with copies of letters and orders regarding the mobilization of the Confederate Army and cavalry, reorganization of the cavalry, Munford's promotion to brigadier general, and his command and surrender; postwar financial difficulties; his cattle selling venture; and the Lynchburg Iron, Steel, and Mining Company. The bulk of the material was written after 1875 and relates to Civil War campaigns and battles, especially to the Virginia cavalry and particularly to the battle of Five Forks; Virginia Military Institute; writings on the Civil War; the flag and seal of the state of Virginia; and Virginia history. Many of the letters are annotated, although not always accurately, by Munford's nephew, Charles Talbott III. Correspondence between Munford and many former Confederate and Union officers and soldiers pertains to efforts to collect Confederate cavalry records; the history of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry as well as references to other cavalry units including the 1st, 3rd, 4th, 5th, 7th, and 8th Virginia cavalries, C.S.A., and the 6th New York Cavalry, 4th, 6th, and 16th Pennsylvania cavalries, 1st Maine Cavalry, 1st Rhode Island Cavalry, 1st Massachusetts Cavalry, and 1st Maryland Cavalry, U.S.A.; jealousy between the Virginia and South Carolina cavalries; comparisons between the cavalries of the Army of the Potomac, U.S.A., and the Army of Northern Virginia, C.S.A., and other Confederate and Union cavalries; cavalry operations, tactics, and weapons; the writing and publication of Henry B. McClellan's The Life and Campaigns of Major General J. E. B. Stuart (Boston: 1885); court of inquiry review, 1879-1880, of the role of General Gouverneur Kemble Warren at the battle of Five Forks; accounts of various battles and campaigns of the Civil War, especially the battle of Five Forks, but also the battles of 1st Manassas, Gettysburg, Aldie (Virginia), Chancellorsville, Todd's Tavern (Virginia), and Appomattox; and the dispute between Munford and Rosser over the battle of Five Forks. Other correspondence concerns the history of the guns at V.M.I., including copies of letters from the Marquis de Lafayette, William Davies, Thomas Jefferson, and James Monroe, the trial of Aaron Burr, including copies of letters and documents; the early history of V.M.I.; Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson at V.M.I.; Munford's terms as president of the Board of Visitors at V.M.I., 1884 and 1888; his views on discipline, insubordination, and students; dissension at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, Virginia, in 1885; the Southern Historical Society and its publications, the history of secession, including letters from Douglas Southall Freeman; campaign for a Confederate memorial to be erected in Lynchburg where Munford's regiment was organized and disbanded; the Confederate Veterans Association; the United Confederate Veterans; and race riots in Indiana, 1903.

Addresses and notes concerning Confederate cavalry fighting include a muster roll, 1863; lists of officers; a history of Munford's regiment with detailed accounts of troop movements and activities of Confederate officers, 1861-1863; maps; typed copy of a diary, 1861-1862, of a Confederate soldier describing camp life, hardships, skirmishing, picket duty, and fighting at the battles of 1st Manassas, Dranesville, and Leesburg, Virginia; material on the Maryland Campaign, 1862; typed copy of a diary, May-October, 1864, of Major James Dugue Ferguson, assistant adjutant general of Fitzhugh Lee's Cavalry Division, describing the itinerary and operations of his troops; copies of letters and articles on the Munford-Rosser feud; copy of "Spirit of the Army, Lynchburg, Va., Feb. 25, 1865," concerning the reaction of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry to the peace terms proposed by President Andrew Johnson; and a narrative of the battle of Waynesboro, Virginia, 1865, sent by Colonel Augustus Forsberg, 51st Virginia Infantry, C.S.A. Material on the Battle of Five Forks consists of notes on the battle by General Munford; his unpublished manuscript on the battle; bound volume containing related letters and clippings; a short narrative (22 pp.) on the battle; extracts from the report of General George E. Pickett to General Robert E. Lee; extracts from General Rosser's reminiscences on Five Forks; "Vindication of General Anderson from the Insinuations of General Fitzhugh Lee" by C. Irvine Walker, including Richard Anderson's report to Robert E. Lee, 1866, and part of Fitzhugh Lee's report to Robert E. Lee; narratives by Confederate soldiers on the last days of the 2nd Virginia Cavalry; extracts from the report of General George Crook, U.S.A., regarding the surrender at Appomattox, Virginia; copies of correspondence between Munford and Ranald Slidell McKenzie on Munford's surrender after Appomattox; and Munford's "The Last Days of Fitz Lee's Division of Cavalry Army of Northern Virginia." Other papers relate to the activities of Confederate and Union veterans, including material on the history of the flag and seal of Virginia, and addresses to various veterans organizations and reunions; V.M.I., including material on the return of the bronze statue of George Washington taken by General David Hunter, the history of the French guns, and Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson, and lists of V.M.I. soldiers and officers in the C.S.A. Army; miscellaneous notes and addresses on the Constitution and the right of secession, the Society of the Cincinnati, and the Southern Historical Society; and miscellaneous poetry including "Mexican Campaign Song." Clippings generally pertain to the Civil War, including letters and accounts of the C.S.A. Army clipped from various newspapers; Confederate veterans organizations; Civil War statistics; Confederate generals and field officers of the Virginia cavalry; and the Munford-Rosser feud.

The collection contains many letters of the thirteen other children of George Wythe Munford. Correspondence of Charles Ellis Munford (1839-1862) concerns the U.S. Military Academy, war preparations and military drilling at the University of Virginia, and his recruiting duties. Other letters concern his death at Malvern Hill, Virginia, 1862. Also included are his law notebooks, 1859-1861. Personal and family letters of the daughters of George Wythe Munford contain information of the details of household economy and general conditions during the Civil War and Reconstruction. A scrapbook, 1861-1871, of Lizzie Ellis Munford contains Confederate verse and mementos, including flowers taken from the coffin of Thomas Jonathan "Stonewall" Jackson in 1863 and from the grave of John Ewell Brown Stuart in 1864, and clippings relating to the war. There are also a number of letters from two grandsons of George Wythe Munford, Allan Talbott and Ellis Talbott, written while touring Europe and while studying at the University of Geneva and at the University of Heidelberg, 1886-1889.

Papers of the Ellis family begin with those of Charles Ellis, Sr. (1772-1840), Richmond merchant and partner of John Allan, who was the foster father of Edgar Allan Poe, and of his brother, Powhatan Ellis (1790-1863), jurist, U.S. senator, and diplomat. Letters of Charles Ellis concern business affairs and personal matters, the latter consisting largely of admonitions to his son, James, while a student at the U.S. Military Academy, West Point, New York, and of letters written from the springs of western Virginia. Letters of Margaret (Nimmo) Ellis (1790-1877), wife of Charles Ellis, Sr., are numerous from 1840 to her death and, although generally concerned with family affairs, also contain accounts of war activities and social changes resulting from the Civil War. Correspondence of Powhatan Ellis concerns national politics; party affiliation of John Tyler; the nullification debate in the Senate; Andrew Jackson's stand against South Carolina on the nullification issue; the digging of the James River Canal; his duties as minister to Mexico; Franklin Pierce's policy towards Cuba; Mississippi politics; opposition to Stephen A. Douglas; secession; the Richmond Light Blues; the formation of the Confederacy in Mississippi; legal affairs of William Allan; and family and personal matters, including visits to Berkeley Springs, Virginia.

Correspondence of Thomas Harding Ellis (1814-1898), son of Charles and Margaret (Nimmo) Ellis, merchant and businessman, relate to his education at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, 1831-1832; the Southern Literary Messenger; the Richmond Fayette Light Artillery; his interest in literary activities; his duties as private secretary to his uncle, Powhatan Ellis, in Mexico, 1836, and as first secretary of the legation, 1839-1841; people and events in Richmond, 1840-1860; the Civil War, including preparations in Richmond during the Peninsular Campaign; labor conditions and financial difficulties in the James River Valley after the war; his residence in Chicago, 1871-1883, with detailed accounts of the growth of the city and the great fire of 1871; the Republican National Convention of 1880; clerkships in the Departments of the Interior and the Treasury, 1887-1898; and genealogy of the Ellis family.

Letters and papers of other children of Charles and Margaret (Nimmo) Ellis are also included. Letters of James Ellis (1815-1839) in general were written from the U.S. Military Academy. One contains a reference at the time of the death of John Allan, Poe's foster father, stating that Allan had not "spent his time in a proper way" and making some reference to Allan's second wife, which has been thoroughly obliterated. Charles Ellis, Jr. (1817-189-), left many business and personal letters, the latter consisting largely of family letters and accounts of numerous visits to the springs in western Virginia, especially Warm Springs in Bath County, with minute descriptions of activities, guests, his ailments, and the young ladies whom he escorted during his long life and many sojourns at Warm Springs. Other correspondence concerns the education of James West Pegram at Clifton Academy, in Amelia County, Virginia, 1855-1856; John Brown's raid on Harpers Ferry, 1859; the railroad during the Confederacy, especially the Richmond and Petersburg Railroad during the siege of Petersburg; Ellis's efforts to remain president of the railroad after the war; and the collapse of the gallery in the courtroom of the capitol in Richmond. Correspondence of Powhatan Ellis, Jr. (1829-1906), son of Charles Ellis, Sr., major in the Confederate Army, and planter, pertains to his activities as a student at the University of Virginia, 1848-1850; as an agent to look after family lands in Kentucky; as an officer in the Confederate Army in the western theater, with particular references to the surrender of Fort Henry, the Vicksburg Campaign, and troop movements and military engagements in Mississippi and Alabama; and as a planter in Gloucester County following the Civil War.

The letters of Jane Shelton (Ellis) Tucker (1820-1901) and her husband, Nathaniel Beverley Tucker (1820-1890), relate to their wanderings and his career as a diplomat, Confederate agent in France and Canada, residence in England and political maneuverings in Washington, residence at Berkeley Springs, West Virginia, financial worries, and their frequent changes of residence. Included also are numerous letters of their children, especially of Beverley D. Tucker, later bishop of the Protestant Episcopal diocese of southern Virginia, and of Margaret Tucker. Numerous letters relative to farming operations of Richard S. Ellis (1825-1867) in Buckingham County, Virginia, are in the collection.

Letters during the Civil War and Reconstruction written by friends and relatives of the Munford and of the Ellis families discuss secession; mobilization; high prices; the blockade; difficulties in securing supplies; women making clothes for the army; the need for nurses; auctions of clothing when women went into mourning; refugees; civilian hardships; rumors; damage to salt and lead works; camp life; conscription; health conditions in the army; various battles and campaigns of the Civil War, including 1st Manassas, the West Virginia campaign against General Rosecrans, the surrender of Forts Henry and Donelson, the Peninsular Campaign, the Seven Days battles, the Vicksburg Campaign, the siege of Petersburg, and the surrender at Appomattox; trench life during the siege of Petersburg; fraternization between opposing lines; various Confederate and Union officers; cavalry regulations; the occupations of Alexandria, Virginia, by the New York Fire Zouaves; the possibility of arming African Americans; African American celebrations after the fall of Richmond; depredations by Union troops; the assassination of Abraham Lincoln; restlessness among freedmen; economic distress during Reconstruction; dispute between the Methodist Episcopal Church and the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, over property in Martinsburg, West Virginia; and the 1867 election in which U.S. troops were used to keep order while African Americans voted.

Other papers include original poems and clippings by William Munford, George Wythe Munford, and Bishop Beverley Dandridge Tucker; speeches and essays by George Wythe Munford and Charles Ellis Munford at the University of Virginia; manuscript entitled "History of William Radford's Incarceration in the Tower of London"; bills and receipts relating to household and political affairs; newspaper clippings and printed material concerning family biographies and obituaries, Confederate history, and genealogy of Virginia families; miscellaneous material relating to Virginia history; genealogical information on the Bland, Cabell, Ellis, Galt, Harrison, Jordan, Munford, Nimmo, Radford, Talbott, Tayloe, and Winston families, and a chart of the Munford, Ellis, and Tayloe families; scrapbook of the letters of Thomas Harding Ellis, published in the Richmond Standard, containing material on the Allan family; reminiscences of Thomas Harding Ellis on the boyhood of Edgar Allan Poe; pictures; scrapbooks, 1877-1888 and 1910-1912, of Sallie (Munford) Talbott; account book, 1823-1826, and memorandum book, 1808-1809, of Charles Ellis, Sr.; account books, 1841-1853, of the administration of the estate of Charles Ellis, Sr.; letterpress copybook, 1856-1893, of Charles Ellis [Jr.?]; surveyor's notebook, 1838-1839, and commonplace book, 1835, of James Nimmo Ellis, the latter book containing records of a club formed at the United States Military Academy "for the purpose of acquiring information"; and the Ellis family Bible.

Also contains an album (1860-1890) containing 68 cartes de visites and cabinet cards primarily featuring members of the Munford, Ellis, Tucker, and Talbot families. Most of the subjects are identified and some are hand colored. Among the portraits of family members are George Wythe Munford, Powhatan Ellis, Rev William Munford, Dallas Tucker, Charles Ellis, and Maggie N. Tucker. There are also images of CSA Gen. Joseph Johnston and Jefferson Davis, along with a Mathew Brady photograph of an unidentified man. One card features a collage with images of "Radical Members of the South Carolina legislature." Identified Richmond photography studios include Anderson & Co. and C. R. Rees.

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John Moses photographs, 1974-1993 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 33 items — 31 prints and 2 typed manuscripts

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South. Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," he photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by. The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 23 photographs taken by John Moses, North Carolina pediatrician and photographer, of teenaged parents and their children, chiefly in Durham, North Carolina and surrounding communities, and eight photographs of farmworkers taken in the South.

Seeking to find the "human stories behind the statistics," Moses photographed the adolescent parents - almost all young women - in their homes and urban surroundings. A few images include grandparents. The photographs of farm laborers were taken in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Florida from 1974-1979, and include portraits of children, adults, and older people of all races at work and at home; also includes one of farmworkers protesting on a road as a bus with a Minute Maid sign rolls by.

The gelatin silver prints all measure 11x14 inches. Includes an index of image titles and a three-page statement by Moses about his photography and its relevance to his medical work. The description mentions oral histories conducted by Moses; these audio materials are not currently part of the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Robin Morgan papers, 1940s-2019 and undated, bulk 1970-2019 84.0 Linear Feet

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The collection documents the personal, political, and professional aspects of the life of an important feminist writer of the twentieth century. The largest group of materials consists of documentation on all of Morgan's significant written works: DEMON LOVER; DEPTH PERCEPTION; DRY YOUR SMILE; GOING TOO FAR; A HOT JANUARY; LADY OF THE BEASTS; SATURDAY'S CHILD; her well-known feminist anthologies, SISTERHOOD IS POWERFUL, SISTERHOOD IS GLOBAL and SISTERHOOD IS FOREVER; and other materials on her poems, articles, and other writings. In addition, Morgan's papers hold many items of correspondence with a wide range of individuals, including prominent activists and feminists as well as family members and close friends. There is also a significant amount of correspondence and other material that documents Morgan's role as founder of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, and records related to her role as editor and writer for MS. magazine.

The collection documents the personal, political, and professional aspects of the life of an important feminist writer of the twentieth century. It is organized into the following series: Correspondence, Writings, Speeches and Interviews, Subject Files, Personal Files, Teaching Materials, Audio-Visual Materials, Photographic and Visual Materials, and Oversize Material. The largest group of materials consists of documentation on all of Morgan's significant written works: Demon Lover; Depth Perception; Dry Your Smile; Going Too Far; A Hot January; Lady of the Beasts; Saturday's Child; her well-known feminist anthologies, Sisterhood is Powerful and Sisterhood is Global; and other materials on her poems, articles, and other writings. In addition, Morgan's papers hold many items of correspondence with a wide range of individuals, including prominent activists and feminists as well as family members and close friends. There is also a significant amount of correspondence and other material that documents Morgan's role as founder of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, and records related to her role as editor and writer for Ms. magazine.

Seen in a broader context, the collection provides ample documentation for the study of modern feminism. Morgan's subject files (the second largest in the series) are rich in materials related to the feminist movement in the United States and around the world; and materials concerning sexual health, witchcraft, lesbian feminism, and the social, economic, and political position of women in the world (especially in the Middle East, Russia, and South Africa). There are materials on individual figures such as Bella Abzug, Jane Alpert (imprisoned revolutionary), Patty Hearst, Gloria Steinem, and Marilyn Waring. Other series hold additional materials related to Morgan's career as a writer; several of her speeches and interviews; materials from Morgan's courses she gave on feminism; and photographs and audio-visual materials.

The Correspondence Series spans much of Morgan's adult life. It is divided into two subseries: Correspondence by Name and Correspondence by Decade. The Correspondence by Name Subseries chiefly consists of Morgan's correspondence with family members, friends, fellow feminist activists and contemporary authors and critics. The bulk of the items in the Correspondence by Decade Subseries dates from the 1990s and relates to the production of Ms. magazine. The Correspondence Series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

The Writings Series documents Morgan's career as a poet, novelist, essayist and journalist. Of Morgan's eighteen books, ten are represented in individual subseries. Particularly noteworthy is the material related to Sisterhood is Global, which provides an inside view into the production of the anthology. The series also contains some of Morgan's earliest unpublished writings as well as files containing her comments on other writers' work, and single issues of periodicals in which she published her poetry. The Writings Series is also restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Responsibilities and Privacy Rights form before using the materials.

The Speeches and Interviews Series primarily contains peripheral documentation such as contracts, correspondence, and schedules. However, there are drafts of a number of her speeches and interviews.

Materials which Morgan collected over the years concerning American and international feminism are located in the Subject Files Series. The materials cover a number of topics, including women's economic, political, and social status, and feminist action - especially in South Africa, the Soviet Union, and the Middle East; rape, abortion, terrorism, female genital mutilation, and pornography; and the first feminist demonstration against the Miss America Pageant. Significant figures represented in the subject files include Marilyn Waring, Patricia Hearst, and Gloria Steinem. Two subseries contain administrative information about Ms. magazine and the Sisterhood is Global Institute. The Subjects Series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

The smaller Personal Files Series offers materials related to Robin Morgan's education, early critical writing, and her many trips overseas. The series also includes material that Morgan requested under the Freedom of Information Act from the FBI and CIA about her own activities.

The documents in the Teaching Materials Series are primarily related to Morgan's academic positions at New College (Sarasota, Fla.) and the University of Denver, and the courses she taught on feminism and writing. The files include both administrative documentation as well as actual course material, but there are also clippings related to feminist protests on campus.

The Audio-Visual Materials Series contains numerous interviews on cassette tapes that Morgan conducted in the Middle East, a recording of her reading of selected poems from A Hot January, and a videotape about the production of Saturday's Child. Permission is not granted to publish interviews conducted in the Middle East; the researcher is responsible for obtaining permission to publish. Original copies of audiovisual materials are not open to use; however, use copies are available to researchers.

The Photographic and Visual Materials Series provides a small visual supplement to the other documents in the collection and includes portrait photographs of Morgan taken by the press and by her close friends, as well as snapshots of social gatherings. This series also includes two painted portraits of Morgan. The series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

Later additions (Accessions 2009-0069, 2010-0176, 2015-0060) have not been fully processed, but boxlists are available in the Detailed Description portion of this finding aid. Some portions are restricted or closed.

For collections related to the Robin Morgan Papers, see the Phyllis Chesler, Merle Hoffman, and Kate Millett Papers, all located in the Duke University David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. In addition to Robin Morgan's own papers, the Library also holds the records of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, founded by Morgan in 1984.

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Gary Monroe photographs, 1980-1998 4.5 Linear Feet — 98 items

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Documentary photographer, writer, and lecturer based in Florida. A collection of 100 16x20 black-and-white gelatin silver prints shot by Gary Monroe from 1980 to 1998 in Haiti, in Haitian neighborhoods in Florida, and in Krome Camp, Florida, where Haitian refugees are detained by the U.S. government. Images depict individuals, families, and groups of Haitians and Haitian-Americans in a wide variety of locations, including city streets in Port Au Prince and Miami, rural locales, marketplaces, religious centers, housing interiors, and other locations. Some images of protests and ceremonies are included. Prints are identified by unique number assigned by photographer and arranged by country and then chronologically by number. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

A collection of 100 16x20 black-and-white gelatin silver prints shot by Gary Monroe from 1980 to 1998 in Haiti, in Haitian neighborhoods in Florida, and in Krome Camp, Florida, where Haitian refugees are detained by the U.S. government. Images depict individuals, families, and groups of Haitians and Haitian-Americans in a wide variety of locations, including city streets in Port Au Prince and Miami, rural locales, marketplaces, religious centers, housing interiors, and other locations. Some images of protests and ceremonies are included. Prints are identified by unique number assigned by photographer and arranged by country and then chronologically by number. Some numbers are incomplete. Images with no location information are identified by "n.p." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Maynard Miller photograph album of occupied Japan, 1946 0.50 Linear Feet — 1 box — 1 volume

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Maynard Miller was an African American Staff Sergeant with the 3540th and 3524th Quartermaster Truck Company, an African American company stationed in occupied Japan in 1946. Collection consists of a large photograph album, marked "property of Staff Sergeant Maynard Miller," containing approximately 200 photographs of African American soldiers in Tokyo and other locales in occupied Japan during 1946. Most of the photographs include captions with identification, nicknames, and commentary, including G.I. humor. Several photographs depict African American soldiers with Japanese girlfriends. Other images depict Army living quarters and equipment, clubs, Hirohito's palace, zoo animals, crowds on Japanese election day, and tourist destinations in and around Tokyo. Also included in the back of the album are carbon copies of two vividly eloquent typewritten letters complaining of discrimination -- one about Senator Bilbo and "the Negro problem" in Mississippi (1 p.) and another addressed to the Commanding General, Eighth Army, complaining of discriminatory practices barring African American soldiers from using the swimming pool (3 pp.). Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists of a photograph album, marked "property of Staff Sergeant Maynard Miller" that contains approximately 200 photographs of African American soldiers in Tokyo and other locales in occupied Japan during 1946. Most of the photographs include captions with identification, nicknames, and G.I. humor. Several photographs depict African American soldiers with Japanese girlfriends. Other images depict Army living quarters and equipment, clubs, Hirohito's palace, zoo animals, crowds on Japanese election day, and tourist destinations in and around Tokyo.

Also included in the back of the album are carbon copies of two vividly eloquent letters complaining of discrimination -- one about Senator Bilbo and "the Negro problem" in Mississippi (1 p.), and another addressed to the Commanding General, Eighth Army, complaining of discriminatory practices barring African American soldiers from using the swimming pool (3 pp.).

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Mary McMillan papers, 1936-1997 and undated, bulk 1952-1991, bulk 1952-1991 8.1 Linear Feet — 13 manuscript boxes; 2 oversize boxes; 2 oversize folders — 2277 Items

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The Mary McMillan Papers, 1936-1997 and undated (bulk 1952-1991), consist chiefly of journals and printed material, but also include correspondence, writings and speeches, photographic material, scrapbooks, clippings, videocassettes, audio cassettes, and memorabilia. Arranged in nine series based primarily on the format of the material, the papers illuminate the personal life and professional work of McMillan, a United Methodist missionary and teacher at the Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College in Hiroshima, Japan. In addition to her work as a teacher, the collection documents McMillan's service to the Kyodan, a unifying organization for Christian missionaries in Japan, and to the hibakusha, the survivors of the atomic bomb attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as her peace activism. Also included are materials related to the Topaz Relocation Center, a Japanese-American internment camp in Utah where McMillan worked in 1943. The papers are mostly in English, but include some Japanese language materials.

The bulk of the collection consists of the Journals Series, whose 43 journals contain almost daily accounts of McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, her involvement with the Ushita Christian Church, and her encounters with friends and other people. Also included are her personal thoughts about world events, particularly those related to peace and nuclear disarmament. Beginning on Aug. 11, 1939 with the final preparations for her initial departure, McMillan records her activities through her first year and a half in Japan. The 1939 and 1940 journals document in depth McMillan's adaptation to life in Japan, including her training in the Japanese language and customs, her first visits to various cities throughout the country, and the difficulties she faced as an American woman in pre-World War II Japan. After she and other American workers in Hiroshima were forcibly evacuated on Feb. 29, 1941, journal entries are scarce; however, the almost-daily entries resume in 1952 and continue until the day of McMillan's death on July 19, 1991.

In addition to the journals, McMillan's professional work as a United Methodist missionary and teacher at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College is well documented through the Correspondence Series, Writings and Speeches Series, and Printed Material Series. The Biographical Material Series includes McMillan's handwritten autobiographical notes, as well as newspaper and magazine clippings and booklets documenting McMillan's work at Hiroshima Jo Gakuin College, and with the Ushita Christian Church, which McMillan helped found in 1948. McMillan's correspondence also sheds light on her work through "mission letters," mass mailings which she wrote periodically as a way of updating her supporters in the United States on her work in Hiroshima.

McMillan also was a staunch advocate of world peace and nuclear disarmament, and after her retirement from the United Methodist Church in 1980, she spent much of her time writing letters and speaking in churches throughout the United States promoting her cause. McMillan's role as a pacifist is well well documented throughout the entire collection by her correspondence, photographs of demonstrations and marches, printed materials, and items in the Clippings Series. Much of the material in the Writings and Speeches Series and the Printed Material Series is related to peace activism, and covers topics such as the lingering effects of the atomic bomb attack on Hiroshima and that city's fight for peace, the first-hand accounts of bomb survivors, and the United Methodist Church's pacifist stance.

Also contributing to an understanding of McMillan's life, the Photographic Material Series and the Memorabilia Series offer visual and three-dimensional documentation of her activities as a missionary, teacher, and friend to the Japanese.

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Marcia M. Mathews papers and photographs, 1833-1976, bulk 1939-1976 3.0 Linear Feet — 4 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Marcia M. Mathews (1904-1990) was an art historian and author residing in Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises materials relating to two research projects conducted by Mathews: one on Roger Fenton, lawyer and early English photographer; and a later project on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. The Fenton series includes letters (1940s-1950s) from Fenton descendants, many of which comment on the aftermath of the war; images of the family home, Crimble Hall in Rochdale, England; photographs of Fenton and his family (1860s); and modern copies of his own photographs (1850s). The Barthé papers consist of a draft biography by Mathews, and 134 photographs of his sculptures and other artwork, as well as early portraits of Barthé and his family, and were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture. Although Barthé had relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality. The collection also includes a large scrapbook for the year 1939 containing U.S. news stories and articles about the war and on Fascism in the U.S.

The papers of author and art historian Marcia M. Mathews comprise materials chiefly relating to two research projects: Mathew's search for material on Roger Fenton, a mid-19th century lawyer and early photographer; and an unpublished typescript and photographs relating to her research on African American sculptor Richmond Barthé. Other materials include a large war scrapbook for the year 1939 with many articles and clippings about Fascism in the U.S., and a biographical sketch of her career.

The Roger Fenton series consists chiefly of Mathews' research materials and sketches relating to Fenton, and correspondence (1940s-1950s) between Mathews and Fenton descendants. The series concludes with a group of a dozen photographs, including cartes-de-visite of his family and 20th century copies of Roger Fenton's 1850s photographs of the Crimean War, the south front of the Kremlin, three of Queen Victoria's children, and a landscape with a bridge. There is also a photograph and a photo of a sketch of Crimble Hall, the family seat in Rochdale, England.

Materials on Richmond Barthé consist of Marcia Mathews' unpublished typescript draft biography (circa 1975), covering Barthé's entire life and career up to age 75. Although he was known to have had a number of relationships with men over his lifetime, the biography appears to make no overt mention of his sexuality.

The 134 photographs in the Barthé series are chiefly black-and-white images of his most important sculptures and other artwork, with several early family portraits of Barthé, his mother, and stepfather (circa 1915, 1935, and circa 1940). Subjects of the sculptures are most frequently Black figure studies, including African characters; busts of well-known African Americans such as Booker T. Washington, Jimmie Daniels, Josephine Baker, and others; religious themes; and race-related themes, expressed in such works as "The awakening of Africa," "The wounded slave," and "Mother with lynched son," with its direct reference to Michelangelo's Pietà. He also lived in Jamaica and completed a number of Jamaican government commissions for statues of national heroes, coinage, and medallions. The Barthé papers were acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Joseph James Mathews papers, 1930-1976 4 Linear Feet — 10 boxes — Approximately 4,184 items

Chairman of the Emory History Department starting in 1948. Collection spans Joseph Mathews' career as a professor of European history at the University of Chattanooga, University of Mississippi, and Emory University. He served as historian in the armed forces during World War II; at the Naval Bureau of Ordnance and Ordnance Activities he directed and authored numerous studies and publications. His vitae is included in the collection. The papers primarily consist of Mathew's personal and professional correspondence. The personal letters include letters from his wife, Marcia M. Mathews, and reflect his professional interests and activities; the professional letters deal with personnel, budgets, curricula, and his service for the Southern Historical Association, among other topics. There are about three dozen wartime photos, and volumes of class rolls.

Collection spans Dr. Mathews' career as a professor of European history at the University of Chattanooga, University of Mississippi, and Emory University. His vitae is included in the collection. The collection holds primarily Mathew's personal and professional correspondence.

The personal letters to various people including his wife, Marcia M. Mathews, whose papers are also at the Rubenstein Library, reflect his professional interests and activities; the professional letters deal with personnel, budgets, curricula, and his service for the Southern Historical Association, among other topics.

There are about three dozen wartime photos, and volumes of class rolls. Photographs and political cartoons relate to World War II, the Zulu War, the United States Civil War, and conflict in Sudan.

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Spider Martin photographs, 1965, 1968 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 44 photographic prints

James "Spider" Martin was an Alabama photojournalist known for his work documenting the American Civil Rights Movement. Collection comprises 44 black-and-white photographs, mostly 8x10 or 11x14 inches, documenting the March 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches. Subjects include civil rights leaders and march participants Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph Abernathy, James Bevel, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis, Bob Mants, Amelia Boynton Robinson, and Hosea Williams, as well as marchers, protesters, counter protesters with signs and Confederate flags, local police, and federal troops. Locations include the Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma; downtown Selma; the Edmund Pettus Bridge (site of the "Bloody Sunday" violence against protesters on March 7, 1965); Highway 80; downtown Montgomery; and the State Capitol grounds in Montgomery. Three related images are of Alabama governor George C. Wallace speaking during the 1968 U.S. presidential campaign. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 44 black-and-white images taken by Alabama-born photo journalist Spider Martin, documenting in detail the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches. Subjects include civil rights leaders and march participants Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., speaking and marching; Ralph Abernathy; James Bevel; Coretta Scott King; John Lewis; Bob Mants; Amelia Boynton Robinson; and Hosea Williams. There are also images of marchers and protesters; counter protesters with signs and Confederate flags; musicians Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Harry Belafonte performing at the final rally in Montgomery; local and state police; and federal troops protecting the marchers. Many of these photographs became iconic images of the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

Locations include the Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma, downtown Selma, the Edmund Pettus Bridge (site of the "Bloody Sunday" violence against protesters on March 7, 1965), Highway 80 along which marchers walked, downtown Montgomery, and the State Capitol in Montgomery.

Additional related images are of Alamaba governor George C. Wallace speaking at rallies during his 1968 presidential campaign.

All of the prints were created via the gelatin silver process by Spider Martin, chiefly from 1993-1999 and some in 1965. Many are signed, and some bear handwritten captions, titles, commentary, and other marks in the photographer's hand. The donor's inventory also provided titles as well as contextual captions.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Hugh Mangum photographs, circa 1890-1922 10 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 1141 items

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Hugh Mangum was a commercial portrait photographer from Durham, North Carolina. Collection comprises 937 glass plate negatives and printed black-and-white photographs taken by Hugh Mangum from about 1890 to 1922 as he traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia and in photography studios he and partners established in Durham, N.C., and Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. Localities known to have been visited by Mangum in N.C. include Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Reidsville, Lexington, Durham, and Greensboro; in Virginia, Christiansburg, Martinsville, East Radford, and Pulaski. The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of mostly unidentified women, children, and men, either in unidentified studio settings or outdoors. Most are white men and women, but there are also many African Americans and others who may be multi-racial. Hugh Mangum and his wife are present in several images. There are several street scenes identified as Radford, Virginia, as well as Warrenton (probably N.C.), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Some images feature houses, barns, mills, outdoor social gatherings, and animals. The last dated photograph in the collection is a mounted print of Mangum's body in an open casket, 1922. Of the photographic prints, there are 55 prints made from selected negatives, and 50 inkjet digital prints from a 2012 exhibit. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection dates from approximately 1890 through 1922, and comprises 937 glass plate negatives and a selection of black-and-white prints, of portraits and scenes taken by Hugh Mangum, a portrait photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. There is also a set of 25 exhibit prints and 25 smaller viewing prints from a 2012 Center for Documentary Studies exhibit curated by a Duke University student.

The images were taken as Mangum traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. He also likely took some of these images in the photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. Communities marked on a few of the plates include Warrenton (probably North Carolina rather than Virginia), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Localities known to have been visited by Mangum in N.C. include Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Reidsville, Lexington, Durham, and Greensboro; in Virginia, Martinsville, East Radford, and Pulaski. From an annotated trunk lid found in the collection it seems he also visited Texas but it is unknown if any of the images in the collection were taken there.

The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of local residents, although there are several town scenes with landmark buildings. There are women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors; the majority are white but there are many African Americans and people who may be multi-racial. There are buildings such as barns, mills, schools, and houses often present in outdoor group portraits, and dogs, chickens, cats, and horses appear. Sometimes the individual poses with a possession such as a bicycle or musical instrument. One image is of a train accident with a large group of bystanders.

Identification numbers are often stamped or written on the plate. The library staff has assigned unique numbers to each image and plate. There are multiple images of Hugh Mangum and the Mangum and Carden families; see the glass plate negative notes for more details. The last dated print in the collection is a mounted print of Mangum's body in an open casket, 1922.

Mangum photographs are distinctive for the level of comfort exhibited by his subjects in front of the camera. This ease in front of the camera is readily noted due to the large quantity of "penny picture camera" negatives in the collection that contain multiple images of numerous subjects. Often the first picture of a subject appears rather stiff and formal as in traditional nineteenth century photographs. In the second and subsequent pictures, the subject often visibly relaxes, assumes different poses, uses props, removes or adds a hat, and may smile broadly at the camera. This progressive transition in poses from formal to very informal is a hallmark of the Mangum collection. The collection may be of particular interest to researchers studying late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century fashion trends.

The glass plate negatives are closed to use, but researchers may use online digitized images which represent the entirety of the collection of negatives. In addition, the collection also makes available for research use original contact prints, contact sheets, one panoramic print, and print reproductions created for exhibition and other purposes.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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William MacGregor letters, 1899-1918 0.1 Linear Feet — 8 items

Sir William MacGregor (1846-1919) was governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria, between 1899-1904. Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

There is one letter (1899 March 11) from Frederick Butler, a clerk in the Nigeria Department of the Colonial Office, writing that he is sending literature, including a report on the liquor traffic in West Africa. There are two letters (1899 August 6 and 1899 August 30) from John Balie Henderson, a leading engineer for the Queensland Water Supply Department, regarding water bores and the Great Artesian Basin. There are also two letters written by Sir Reginald Laurence Antrobus, crown agent for the colonies and a civil servant in the Colonial Office, one letter (1899 October 15) regarding the new Niger Administration and financial management, the other letter (1904 June 9) regarding a scandal, "the report that the acting Resident proposed to hoist the British flag in Ibadan is wholly untrue.... it seems undesirable to make too much of it." A letter (1900 April 26) from the Colonial Secretariat at Lagos deals largely with the liquor trade and describes movement of the West African Frontier Force. There is a letter (1901 April 21) from Sir Ralph Moor, the first high commissioner of the British Southern Nigeria Protectorate, regarding details of the rubber trade. The letter includes the photograph of a Nigerian family. Finally, there is a letter from the Chief Justice at Lagos, A. R. Gunnington, regarding the his unfair replacement.

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Arthur H. Lyons papers, 1891-1933 3 Linear Feet — 15 Items

Collection comprises seven bound typescript volumes containing Lyons' daily accounts of his trips. There are postcards, brochures, and other materials related to his travel that were placed in the volumes. Destinations include Washington, D.C.; New York City; Boston; Nashville; Charleston, S.C.; Jacksonville, Fla.; the 1933 World's Fair in Chicago; the White Mountains; and the Adirondacks. Topics include destinations, the people he meets, hotels, train travel, and scenery. The collection also contains a postcard scrapbook; a pamphlet by James M. Gillis entitled, "The Ku-Klux Klan" (1922); and a bound typescript short story entitled "The Irony of Fate," which fictionalizes Lyons' father's participation in and life immediately after the Civil War. Includes 5 black-and-white photographs. (02-046)

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Civil Rights Movement and Wayside Theatre photographs, 1960s 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 18 prints

Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial dramatic performance, circa mid-1960s, found in the archives of the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia. The Civil Rights prints typically include detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of injured and jailed demonstrators, police, bombed-out churches, and portraits of activists Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street rent protest leader Willie Williams. All the prints except one measure roughly 8x10 inches. Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises 18 black-and-white photographs taken in the 1960s, assembled by a private collector and organized into two distinct groups: nine journalistic photographs documenting civil rights movement events, some credited to Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) photographers Cliff Vaughs, Danny Lyon, and Rufus Hinton, with others unattributed; and nine prints of an unidentified multi-racial staged production.

The Civil Rights prints typically feature detailed press captions on the backs, and include images of bombed-out churches, injured and jailed demonstrators, police, and portraits of activist Fannie Lou Hamer and Atlanta's Markham Street housing protest leader Willie Williams. Some prints also bear a SNCC photo credit stamp with the organization's Atlanta address.

The second group consists of two contact sheets and seven prints showing an unidentified multi-racial dramatic or musical performance perhaps staged by the Wayside Theatre in Middletown, Virginia, or may possibly be related to the Garrick Players in Washington, D.C. or to the Free Southern Theater founded by SNCC. The time period appears to be the early 1960s.

All the prints except one are roughly 8x10 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Gary Davis collection of Leon Levinstein photographs, 1950s-1970s 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 38 prints

Collection consists of 38 black-and-white photographs taken by Leon Levinstein from the 1950s to the 1970s. The images, usually taken at close range and at unusual angles, portray children, women, and men of all races and backgrounds - many of them marginalized - on New York City streets and on the beach. Locations include Harlem, Manhattan, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island. There are also photographs of people in Haiti. and a few from India and Mexico. Most of the unmounted gelatin silver prints measure approximately 11x14 inches, with several larger prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 38 black-and-white photographs taken by Leon Levinstein from the 1950s to the 1970s. The images, usually taken at close range and at unusual angles, portray children, women, and men of all races and backgrounds - many of them marginalized - on New York City streets and on the beach. Locations include Harlem, Manhattan, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island. There are also photographs of people in Haiti. and a few from India and Mexico. Only one scene, a piano in a room, has no people in it.

Levinstein deliberately left his images untitled and undated, thus most prints in this inventory are accompanied by content descriptions created by a collector or dealer, or, in a few cases, by library staff. Almost all the prints bear a photographer's stamp on the back and a few are signed by Levinstein. Most of the prints measure approximately 11x14 inches, with a few larger prints; in the dimensions given, height precedes width.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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William Hesketh Leverhulme Solomon Islands photograph album, circa 1906-1910 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 Volume

William Hesketh Lever was the First Viscount Leverhulme, and founder of the international firm, Lever Brothers. This bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled Solomon Islands Views, and contains 98 black-and-white photographs, chiefly measuring 6x8 inches, that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations from about 1906-1910. Images include company buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants and dwellings, other cultivated crops, flora and fauna, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Notable persons found among the images include the Resident Commissioner of the Islands at the time, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers.

This handsomely bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled "Solomon Islands Views", and contains 98 black-and-white photographs that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations. Images include buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Persons whose photographic portraits are found among the images are the Resident Commissioner of the Islands, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers. The photographs illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers' Pacific Plantations operations in the Solomon Islands. The views include buildings and other installations, coconut plantations in various stages of development, lumbering, native housing, local populace, local workers in various tasks, local and inter-island shipping, colonial and company officials, local chiefs, company and government headquarters, ocean steamships, steam powered agricultural equipment, copra, local flora and fauna, and the cultivation of peanuts, rubber, and sweet potatoes.

Place names listed for the photographs are: Rendova, West Bay, Erickson's Island, Pepesala, Guadalcanal, KayIan, Ufa, Banika, Tulagi, Gavatu, Lunga, Kokoon, Pampa, Kaukau, Aola, and Stanmore River. Persons in the photographs include: Charles Morris Woodford, Resident Commissioner of the Islands, 1896 to 1914, and Mrs. Woodford; Mrs. Tillotson, wife of Lord Leverhulme's nephew, John Lever Tillotson (d. 1915) who was his senior colleague on the board; Fred Wernham, an expert in tropical plantation work who was closely identified with developments in the Solomon Islands; Joseph Meek, who first journeyed to the Islands in 1905 to assess prospects there; Methodist missionary J. F. Goldie, translator of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and John into Roviana; and a number of others whose names can be found in the list of the pictures.

The black-and-white photographs, emulsion-paper prints, typically measure 6x8 inches in size. Several photographs are dated 1906, but most are undated. The buildings and headquarters of the company appear well developed. That suggests that 1906 is too early a date, since Mr. Meek's initial visit to the Solomons was in 1905. Most of the pictures probably date some years after 1906, but before 1914 when Commissioner Woodford left the islands. Other factors suggest that the dates range from 1906 to 1910.

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Josephine Napoleon Leary papers, 1875-1991 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — approximately 352 items

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The papers of Josephine Napoleon Leary contain financial and legal papers, correspondence, biographical materials, and photographs pertaining to the life and business ventures of African American businesswoman Josephine N. Leary and her daughter Clara Ryan. Records document her real estate and other business transactions the coastal town of Edenton, North Carolina, where they resided; the earliest deed dates back to 1875. There are also architectural and historical documents relating to Edenton. Photographs of Leary and Reeves family members date from 1895 to about 1935. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Josephine Leary papers chiefly comprise business papers relating to the properties she owned in Edenton, N.C., and to a barber shop operated by Leary and her husband; these records include deeds, the earliest of which dates to the 1870s; mortgage and estate papers; bank records; and bills and receipts. Other papers include correspondence to Leary, her daughter Clara C. Ryan, Clara's husband Noah Ryan, and Clara's son, Percy Reeves, as well as correspondence pertaining to legal matters and to Leary's estate.

A group of biographical and historical papers contain maps, pamphlets, and other information related to late 19th and early 20th century Edenton and to the Leary legacy. These date mostly from Leary's lifetime, but also include later secondary sources about Edenton and Leary. Included in this group are the original plans for the J.N. Leary building (1894) that still stands on Broad Street in downtown Edenton.

The collection is completed by a few undated writings by Leary, one of which seems to be a eulogy, and by a group of albumen and gelatin silver photographs of Leary and her family, including her daughter, her brother, an uncle, her grandson Percy Reeves, and his family.

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Shane Lavalette photographs, 2010-2011 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 25 prints — 20x24 inches

The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were assigned by the photographer. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Most were taken outdoors, but there are a few interior shots.

Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were created by the photographer.

In addition to Lavalette's photographic body of work, the Rubenstein Library also holds copies of the companion photo book, One Sun, One Shadow. The images are also available to view through the photographer's website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Rick Lang photographs of Florida and other Southern states, 1985-2016 12 Linear Feet — 13 boxes — 229 photographic prints; 258 contact sheets; approximately 3100 negatives; approximately 40 printed items — 6.0 Gigabytes — 1 thumbdrive — 105 files (104 .psd, 1 .pdf)

Rick Lang was a photographer and faculty member at the Creadlé School of Art, Winter Park, Florida. Collection comprises 229 black-and-white photographs documenting the American South, particularly Florida and Louisiana, with an emphasis on roadside advertising and signs, small businesses, and weathered buildings. There are also a few images from New Mexico and Arizona. Print sizes range from 11x14 to 20x24 inches. Accompanying the prints are 104 digital image files and one pdf, over 3000 negatives, and 258 contact sheets. In addition there are print materials chiefly associated with Lang's solo and group exhibits, including three photobooks, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 229 large-format black-and-white photographs by Rick Lang, taken from 1990 to 2013, documenting the communities and landscapes in Florida and other states of the American South, particularly Lousiana, with an emphasis on roadside advertising and signs, weathered buildings, and small businesses. There are also a few images from New Mexico and Arizona. Also includes 104 digital image files selected by the photographer, and one .pdf inventory.

Prints were created by Lang using gelatin silver or pigmented inkjet processes. Print sizes include 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches.

Accompanying the prints is a set of over 3000 negatives and 258 contact sheets, offering many additional images that are not present in the large-format prints series. Film negatives are closed to use; for more information on access, contact the Rubenstein Library.

The collection is completed by a small amount of printed materials chiefly associated with Lang's solo and group exhibits. Includes three photobooks and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013.

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Bettye Lane photographs, 1959-2007, bulk 1970s-1980s 2.5 Linear Feet — 947 items

Photojournalist who documented the women's movement and associated human rights issues since the 1960s. The photographs in the collection date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken by Lane in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes photographs of Bettye Lane and her original inventory sheets. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Bettye Lane photographs date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes a folder of photographs of Bettye Lane spanning her career.

The photographs are arranged into three series, Events, People, and Subjects, with subdivisions in alphabetical order, and the prints within in date or alphabetical order. The original order as assembled by Lane is for the most part intact, with folder titles deriving from the original headings. Included in each folder are her original annotated inventory sheets, which include dates, photo identification codes, and titles.

Almost all the prints are unmounted black-and-white gelatin silver process prints, with some color photographs scattered throughout, and a few digital prints from the 2000s. The larger prints all have detailed information on the backs, many giving names of individuals present, details on the events, and contextual notes. There are also a few photocopies scattered throughout. There are some duplicate images or cropped versions. The most typical sizes are 8x10 and 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches, with some snapshots found in a few folders.

There is some overlap with Bettye Lane images in other U.S. institutional collections, noted below, but many of the images at Duke University are unique.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Paul Kwilecki photographs and papers, circa 1910-2008, bulk 1960-2008 42 Linear Feet — 54 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 2 oversize boxes — Approximately 9480 Items

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Collection comprises over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, along with negatives, contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and printed material, totaling over 9000 items. Kwilecki's photographic work documents rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Subjects include local landscapes, tobacco workers, county fairs, hog slaughtering, cemeteries, churches, courthouses, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, shoppers, downtowns, and house porches and interiors. The themes of race relations and religious life predominate. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Significant correspondents in the manuscripts series include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection includes a small set of Vestal photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Paul Kwilecki Photographs and Papers span the whole of his career and include over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, negatives (chiefly safety but also some nitrate and glass plate), contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and other printed material, totaling over approximately 9000 items.

The bulk of the collection consists of Paul Kwilecki's prints and other photographic material documenting rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Although Kwilecki developed an interest in photography in the 1940s, only a very small portion of the images in the collection pre-date 1970.

The collection is organized into two major series: Photographic Materials, containing prints, contact sheets, and negatives, and a Manuscripts Series housing many files of correspondence, writings, and other personal papers.

While initially interested in photographing tobacco workers, Kwilecki turned his focus to other subjects, including county fairs, hog slaughtering times, cemeteries, churches, courtrooms, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, bus stations, shoppers, downtowns, house porches and interiors, and landscapes. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Throughout the collection, the themes of race relations and religious life tend to predominate.

The Manuscripts Series (1967-2008) also provides an interpretation of life in Decatur County but also documents Kwilecki's photographic philosophy and practices. The correspondence and the journals, related to Kwilecki's work and career as a photographer, comprise the largest groupings. The series also contains Kwilecki's personal journals, dating from 1967-1969; Kwilecki's printing notes; news clippings; exhibition brochures; and a brief internet biography of Kwilecki. Many of Kwilecki's writings attempt to express in words the same topics he tried to illuminate through photography.

Additional manuscripts (14 boxes) and photographic materials were received in 2010 following Kwilecki's passing away. They include many folders of correspondence dating from 1971-2008, arranged in original order either chronologically or alphabetically by folder title. Significant correspondents include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection also includes a small set of Vestal's photographic prints. Other files contain writings, clippings, and other items. The writings include journals from the 1970s; typed excerpts from early 20th century Georgia newspapers, some on racial incidents; drafts of Kwilecki's talks; and notes for the Decatur County photography publication (one folder). A few publications round out the last box in the collection.

The negatives are closed to use; contact sheets and prints offer alternate access to Kwilecki's images. Eleven nitrate large-format sheet negatives, dating from approximately the 1940s-1960s, are slated for digitization. Also included in the collection are several glass plate negatives by an unknown photographer dating perhaps from the 1910s.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Juanita Morris Kreps papers, 1921-2001 and undated 41.1 Linear Feet — Approximately 19,925 Items

Juanita Morris Kreps was born January 11, 1921, in Lynch (Harlan Co.), Kentucky. She was Professor of Economics at Duke University (1958-1977), where she held the James B. Duke professorship (1972-1977), also serving as Dean of the Woman's College (1969-1972) and University Vice President (1973-1977). She then was appointed U.S. Secretary of Commerce in 1977 for the Carter Administration and served for two years. Kreps's papers span the years 1921-2001, and contain incoming and outgoing correspondence (1968-1979), many speech drafts (1967-1997), twenty photograph albums, fifteen scrapbooks, 692 color and 595 black-and-white loose photographs, and over 100 negatives. There are also briefing books, reports, notes, minutes, appointee recommendations, speech drafts, and other documents relating to Kreps's cabinet-level work. The audience for her speeches included university students as well as alumni and women's organizations; speech topics focus on education for women, the value of women's work, age and gender in economics and economic markets, and leisure and economic growth. Other correspondence documents Kreps's career positions, some more fully than others, including Secretary of Commerce; Duke University Dean of the Woman's College, especially relating to the merger of the Woman's College and Trinity College; Public Director of the New York Stock Exchange Board; and Women's Research and Education Institute Board of Directors. Photograph albums and scrapbooks detail visits to the USSR, China, and Japan and contain clippings regarding her cabinet position.

The Juanita Kreps Papers span the years 1921-2001, mainly documenting Kreps's career as an economist, academic administrator, and U.S. Secretary of Commerce for the Carter administration. The two series holding the majority of the materials, the Secretary of Commerce and Speeches Series, concern her service in the political and public spheres respectively. The Secretary of Commerce Series is arranged in the following seven subseries: Appointment Books and Calendars, Appointment and Confirmation Process, Correspondence, Notes, Subject Files, Scrapbooks, and Photographs. Photograph albums and scrapbooks detail visits to the USSR, China, and Japan and contain clippings regarding her cabinet position. There are also separate series for correspondence and appointment books that fall outside the scope of the Secretary of Commerce period. The second largest series in the collection, the Speeches Series contain drafts, frequently annotated and accompanied by other material, of Kreps's lectures, speeches, and remarks on occasions such as academic conferences, university commencements, various other university events, and corporate executive board meetings. The subjects are broadly based and reflect her interests in economics, especially in aging and older workers, women's social conditions and education, the value of women's labor, women in the corporate world, and work and leisure issues. Speeches given after her tenure as Secretary of Commerce also cover broader issues about globalization and domestic and international economic policy.

Albeit small, the Correspondence Series spans several decades and documents Kreps's exchanges with academics and scholars, the local and federal governments, and lobbyist groups. Other correspondence documents Kreps's career positions, some more fully than others, including Secretary of Commerce; Duke University Dean of the Woman's College, especially relating to the merger of the Woman's College and Trinity College; Public Director of the New York Stock Exchange Board; Women's Research and Education Institute Board of Directors; and Carter Presidential Center fundraiser. The Appointment Books and Calendars Series records Kreps's busy schedule of events and engagements, and the Publications Series holds her contributions to academic journals, government publications, and books. The Visual Material Series houses images that date from her childhood through her long career; photos taken during her cabinet position are found in the Secretary of Commerce series. Other Files Series contains materials that fall out of the above series, such as teaching materials and publicity clippings.

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Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale prints and photographs, circa 1840-1949 and undated 1 Linear Foot — 60 Items

Howard Atwood Kelly was a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia; he served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. Among his interests was the life of Florence Nightingale and her memorialization through images. The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, professor, author, and collector of medical memorabilia. The collection comprises 60 images and other memorializations associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs (some of which are albumens), lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, and postcards; in addition, there are photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Almost all the images are mounted on cardstock boards. Portrayals of Nightingale span her adult lifetime; there are images of her during her early career as a nurse in Britain, and providing nursing care for wounded soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. There are also images of her birth and death places. Also included are one piece of popular sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions also accompany many of the images. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia. He served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. The collection is composed of images and memorials associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse, author, and sanitation and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs, lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, postcards, and photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Unless otherwise noted, all images are in black and white. Almost all are mounted on cardstock boards. The images depict Florence Nightingale throughout her adult life; some also portray monuments to Nightingale, and geographical locations associated with her birth, death, and nursing career, including her activities in Scutari (Istanbul) tending to wounded soldiers, the peak of her popularization in the media of the time. Also included are one piece of sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions in slide and photograph format accompany many of the images. Arranged chiefly in chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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J. Walter Thompson Company. Iconographic collection, 1848-2005 and undated 90 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The Iconographic Collection spans the years 1848-2005 with the bulk of materials dating between 1940 and 1985, and includes black-and-white and color photographs, negatives, slides, contact sheets, photograph albums, and microfiche. It is an artificial collection created to document the facilities, key events, advertising highlights and corporate culture of the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT). Domestic and international offices are included, with the New York, Chicago and London offices being the most heavily represented. Key executives include James Walter Thompson, Stanley and Helen Landsdowne Resor, Don Johnston, Dan Seymour, Norm Strouse, and E.G. Wilson. Client advertising includes Ford, Kodak, Chesebrough-Pond's, Lever Brothers (Unilever), and Warner-Lambert. Notable photographers whose work appears in the collection include Fabian Bachrach, Ralph Bartholomew, Cecil Beaton, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Philippe Halsman, Horst P. Horst, George Hurrell, Yousuf Karsh, Baron Adolf de Meyer, Bill Ray, Jean Raeburn, Edward Steichen, Thomas Veres, Brett Weston and Dorothy Wilding. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Iconographic Collection spans the years 1848-2005 with the bulk of materials dating between 1940 and 1985, and includes black-and-white and color photographs, negatives, slides, contact sheets, photograph albums, and microfiche. It is an artificial collection created to document the facilities, key events, advertising highlights and corporate culture of the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT). Domestic and international offices are included, with the New York, Chicago and London offices being the most heavily represented. Key executives include James Walter Thompson, Stanley and Helen Landsdowne Resor, Don Johnston, Dan Seymour, Norm Strouse, and E.G. Wilson. Client advertising includes Ford, Kodak, Chesebrough-Pond's, Lever Brothers (Unilever), and Warner-Lambert. Notable photographers whose work appears in the collection include Fabian Bachrach, Ralph Bartholomew, Cecil Beaton, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Philippe Halsman, Horst P. Horst, George Hurrell, Yousuf Karsh, Baron Adolf de Meyer, Bill Ray, Jean Raeburn, Edward Steichen, Thomas Veres, Brett Weston and Dorothy Wilding.

Restrictions on Access: Reproduction-quality copies of Pond's Advertising Photographs may not be produced for non-JWT users.

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Chris Johnson farmworker photographs, 1990s 1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white digital photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico.

The prints measure 13x19 inches and are unmatted.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Henry Heyliger photograph album of occupied Japan, 1947 .3 Linear Feet — 1 box — 3 items

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Collection comprises an accordion-bound photograph album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger, named numerous times in the album. Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to a few formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing African American soldiers marching, working at the base, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. There are two U.S. photographs, showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, and an Atlantic City postcard. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises a 9 1/4 x 13 inch accordion-bound album containing 158 black-and-white and a few color photographs, belonging to African American soldier Henry Heyliger. His name is found in the album in photograph captions, in an inscription to him on another soldier's portrait, and on a postcard addressed to him.

Most of the photographs document the 610th Port Company based in Yokohama, Japan, 1947, and many are labeled with soldier's names and some locations. In addition to formal portraits, there are many snapshots showing the men around base, marching, working, relaxing, and posing with Japanese women. One image shows a few U.S. soldiers, including Heyliger, visiting and eating with the family household of a young Japanese man, possibly a worker at the base. A large group photograph shows 18 members of the 120th Tng (Training?) Company and Regiment. Also found laid in is a newspaper clipping. A few of the pages are separated from the original bindings.

Included in the album are two snapshots taken in the U.S., showing African Americans enjoying Hamid Pier beach in Atlantic City, as well as an Atlantic City color postcard addressed to Henry Heyliger at a military base in San Francisco (crossed out, with Los Angeles military address added), from "Doris," who is probably the Doris Hensley in a photograph mounted on the same page as a larger color hand-tinted) photograph of Henry Heyliger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Daniel A. Collins papers, 1942-1986 and undated 0.2 Linear Feet — Approximately 100 Items

Dr. Daniel Collins was a dentist from South Carolina, and the first African American on the faculty of the School of Dental Science at the University of California at San Francisco. The Daniel A. Collins Papers span the years 1946-1986 and document aspects of the career and life of Collins, politically active Bay Area resident. The collection consists of a few items of correspondence; newspaper clippings about personal friends and family members; copies of his transcripts from UC Berkeley; materials on the history of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, and other documents. The papers also house a folder of records from the Cocoa Merchants' Association of America in which Collins was involved through his import business, Beacol Enterprises, Ltd., for which there are also a few records. Photographs from trips to Indonesia and Africa complete the collection. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The Daniel A. Collins Papers span the years 1946-1986 and document aspects of the career and life of Collins, politically active Bay Area resident and the first African American on the faculty of the School of Dental Science at the University of California, San Francisco. The collection is arranged alphabetically by folder title or format group, and consists of a few items of correspondence; newspaper clippings about personal friends and family members; copies of his transcripts from Berkeley; materials on the history of Meharry Medical College in Nashville, Tennessee, Collins' 1981 honors program from the Bay Area Urban League, and a few other miscellaneous documents. The collection also houses records from 1956-1961 from the Cocoa Merchants' Association of America in which Collins was involved through his import business, Beacol Enterprises, Ltd., for which there are also a few records. Color snapshots from his 1978 trip to Indonesia and black and white professional photographs taken from his 1960s trips to Africa complete the collection. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Press photographs of Hartford, Connecticut Black Caucus protests and meetings, 1967 September-October 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 50 photographic prints — Print sizes: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches; image sizes vary.

The Hartford Times was a daily newspaper for Hartford, Connecticut. Collection consists of 50 black-and-white press photographs taken by Hartford Times staff of Black Caucus protests and marches in Fall 1967, and associated community meetings. Subjects include Black Caucus members, African American residents, student protesters, state and city officials, police, religious leaders, and the press. Protest images show Black Caucus members marching through Hartford and gathering in the State Capitol Building and in Bushnell Park. Individuals highlighted in the images are: John Barber; Boce W. Barlow, Jr.; Rev. Collin Bennett; Lewis Fox; George B. Kinsella; Rev. Robert A. Moody; Robert Morris; and Wilber Smith. Acquired as part of the John Hope Center for African and African American History and Culture, and the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 50 black-and-white press photographs taken by Hartford Times reporters of Black Caucus protests in Hartford, Connecticut in September and October, 1967, and associated community meetings. Individuals featured in the images include Black Caucus members, African American citizens of the North End, other Black and White activists, student protesters, state and city officials, police, religious leaders, and the press.

About a quarter of the prints are of protest images, and show Black Caucus leaders and members marching peacefully through Hartford and gathering in the State Capitol Building and in Bushnell Park with college student supporters. Images of meetings show speakers as well as the audiences.

Among the individuals highlighted in the images are: John Barber, Black Caucus spokesperson; Boce Barlow, Jr., first Black State Judge and State Senator; Collin Bennett, Black City Council member; Lewis Fox, local attorney and Board of Education member; George B. Kinsella, Hartford's mayor; Rev. Robert A. Moody, a Black Baptist minister and community activist; Robert Morris, Black Caucus spokesperson; and Wilber G. Smith, Black attorney, civil rights activist and, later, State Senator. Many other state and city officials are also present in the meeting images.

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William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the Deep South, especially Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; other images were taken in Mexico, Central America, and France. Also includes Anderson's professional papers, fliers, and posters, chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the Deep South, particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among his earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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African American soldier's World War II photograph album of Munich, Germany, 1945 August 1 item — 1 box — 1 volume; 35 photograph

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Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

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African American soldier's Korean War photograph album, circa 1950-1953 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 2 items

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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Charles Davis Jameson papers, photographs and photograph albums, 1887-1919 and undated 7.3 Linear Feet

Charles Davis Jameson was an American civil engineer who lived and worked on railroads in China with the Perkin Syndicate between 1895-1918. The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan. There are seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are also 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

The papers include two letters Jameson wrote to his mother; four diaries, one of which was unused; a 60-page commonplace book mainly filled with handwritten copies of published poetry, and four Japanese lithotints. The rest of the papers comprise eight typescript or published engineering reports authored by Jameson and others on Chinese projects, in English and a few in Chinese, along with two versions of Jameson's typescript description of a trip to Shanxi and Hunan.

There are also seventeen photograph albums, dated 1898 and undated, featuring 1255 black-and-white photographs ranging in size from 2.25 to 5.75 inches. There are albumen and gelatin silver prints. One of the albums is a commercial Japanese album that features hand-tinted photographs. Two albums focus on Shanxi province; three others focus on Beijing. Subjects include waterways and boats, landscapes, groups of Chinese or Westerners, engineering projects, street scenes, rural life, caravans, portraits, missionaries, houses for Westerners, farming and rice crops, and temples and other buildings. Five photographs in photograph album 2 are duplicates of photographs in the William Hillman Shockley photographs collection.

There are 5 loose photographs, four black-and-white, and one tinted, ranging in size from 8 x 4.5 inches to 11.5 x 9.5 inches. Three photographs of international locations, including Fingall's Cave, Scotland; a temple in Agra, India, and a scene of Geneva, Switzerland, are all mounted. The subjects of the other two photographs are a Chinese waterway with three boats, and a courtyard with a Western man being waited on by a Chinese servant. An additional five black-and-white photographs feature a Chinese man as an archer, holding a stone, and a wielding a kwan dao. These photographs are generally 6 x 8.25 inches and are mounted on 10 x 12.25-inch card stock.

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Renée Jacobs photographs, 1979-2015 15 Linear Feet — 16 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Renée Jacobs is a documentary photographer and photojournalist whose project, "Slow Burn," documents the abandonment of Centralia, Pennsylvania due to an underground coal mine fire in the mid-1980s. Her archive includes negatives, contact sheets, gelatin silver work prints and exhibit prints, digital inkjet prints, and publication materials deriving from the project. There are also oral history interviews on audiocassette with residents of Centralia, as well as some correspondence, a 1979 federal government report on Centralia, and color photographs and negatives taken by another photographer who visited the town in 1987. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection contains Renée Jacobs' archive of her project Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennslyvania. Slow Burn, first published in 1986 by University of Pennsylvania Press, chronicles Centralia’s demise from an underground coal mine fire and depicts a singular epic event in Pennsylvania history, representing the confluence of environmental, scientific, bureaucratic, and emotional tragedies. As an award winning photojournalist, Jacobs moved into a house in Centralia’s impact zone in 1983 to document, in photographs and interviews, the end stages of the tiny anthracite coal town’s unsuccessful fight to resolve the intractable problems that began with the mine fire in 1962 and culminated in the razing of the town by the federal government.

Photographer Shelby Lee Adams has written of the project stating:

"Where once there was familiarity with open doors and trusting hearts, in a community that could be your home anywhere in America, an invisible cancer grew. It’s the unseen, slow-moving nature of this underground burning that took Centralia apart. The human spirit doesn’t want to believe, see, or hear what can destroy our sanctified special places in the world. Renée Jacobs faithfully and compassionately documents in pictures and words the confusion, uncertainty, and fighting spirit of Centralia’s residents—and the painful destruction and relocation of the residents of this little Pennsylvania town. Slow Burn is a compelling story about—and for—all of us.”

The archive consist of more than 200 rolls of 35mm black and white film, the accompanying contact sheets, more than 1,000 silver gelatin work prints, contemporaneous news articles, oral history interviews and vintage exhibition prints. Additionally, the archives include maquettes for the original 1986 book and the 2010 re-issue, as well as prints with printer’s notations.

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Irvin Family papers, circa 1890s-2016 10.25 Linear Feet — 23 boxes; 2 oversize folders — approximately 5150 Items

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; materials, including photographs and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas, kept by Frank and Dona Irvin, relating to their early life near Houston, and documenting aspects of African American history in that area; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; family photographs; videos; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items.

Photographs also form an important part of the collection. Along with papers and records, Frank and Dona Irvin kept early photos and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas; together, these materials speak to their early life near Houston, and document aspects of African American history in that area. There are also family photographs from later decades (1930s-1980s).

For preservation purposes, original audiovisual media are closed to use; copies may be available on request.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

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Hypes family papers, 1700s-2010 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 1 pamphlet binder — Approximately 2250 Items

Materials from the branch of the Hypes family that descended from Henry Hypes of Xenia, Ohio: Samuel Henry Hypes (1826-1916); his son, William Findlay Hypes; his grandson, Samuel Loomis Hypes; and his great-grandson, William P. Hypes. Collection includes a wide range of material from the Hypes family, particularly William Findlay Hypes, Samuel Loomis Hypes, and William P. Hypes. William Findlay Hypes' materials highlight his career at Marshall Fields and Co. of Chicago and his service as President of the Y.M.C.A. of Chicago, with emphasis on his family's world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. in 1924-1925. Hundreds of postcards and photographs collected by the family are contained in the papers, including images from India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, Europe, Egypt, and many more places, most unlabeled. Some material from Samuel Loomis Hypes' army service during World War I is also included, the most noteworthy being 24 black and white photographs featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States, including photographs of African American soldiers. Materials from William P. Hypes relate to his work with the Y.M.C.A. in the mid-twentieth century. The family's research into their genealogy and family history, unidentified family photographs, and smaller amounts of correspondence and material from other family members are also included.

There is a wide range of material from the Hypes family's many generations present in this collection. Some early material exists from Henry Hypes, including an inventory of his property upon his death, and some correspondence from relatives. Other early materials include family photographs, which are largely unlabeled and undated but include formats such as tintypes, a daguerreotype, cartes de visite, negatives, and others.

The Hypes' attempts to reconstruct their family tree resulted in several letters between extended family members and distant cousins, as well as genealogical maps and notes, dating from the early to mid-twentieth century.

The majority of the collection dates from William Findlay Hypes and his family. W.F. Hypes' materials include correspondence and clippings about his career with Marshall Fields and Co., as well as news coverage of his world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. from 1924 to 1925. The collection also contains photographic prints, negatives, and postcards from this trip, featuring images from India, China, Japan, Egypt, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Europe, and other unidentified places. The photographs are largely gelatin silver prints, and many have silvering. The majority of photographs are amateur shots presumably taken by the Hypes family. However, there are several sets of images which were clearly purchased by W.F. Hypes or other family members as travel souvenirs, including a set from India taken by H.R. Ferger and a set from Taormina, Italy. These all appear to date from the early 1900s. Many types of postcards are present, including real photo postcards and tinted color postcards. Several postcard books were purchased as souvenirs. Most postcards have been sorted by location; real photo postcards have also been sleeved to better protect the images. Real photo postcard locations include Norway, Manila, China, Japan, and a set from the Canadian Rockies.

An earlier trip to Europe and the Middle East by W.F. Hypes and his wife is described in letters between them and their daughter Muriel. This trip appears to have been taken in May and June, 1910. Since most of the collection's photographs are undated, some could date from this trip instead of the world tour trip from 1924-1925.

One part of the collection is closed to researchers: there is a small amount of nitrate and safety negatives. These appear to be taken by W.F. Hypes, and include family photographs, scenes from Jamaica, and scenes of a tiger hunt during the Hypes' Y.M.C.A. tour. The tiger hunt images are available as prints in the photographs portion of the materials. All negatives are closed to researchers.

Along with the extensive amount of photographs and postcards, W.F. Hypes' portion of the papers includes souvenir booklets and other collectibles from his travels. Also present are materials from the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, including a set of tickets as well as a stock certificate. Hypes' political leanings can be inferred from a Republican National Convention ticket for the 1904 election, as well as a small, movable medal that spins and denounces William Jennings Bryan.

Another noteworthy part of the collection comes from Samuel Loomis Hypes, W.F. Hypes' son, who served as a captain in the U.S. Army's 803rd Pioneer Infantry during World War I. This portion of the papers contains 24 black-and-white photographs (18? June-19 July 1919) featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States. Photographs often have captions in white ink. There are six crowd scenes in Paris and outside Versailles before and after the signing of the treaty. However, the majority of the photographs follow the movement of ships and troops out of Brest Navy yard, including the USS Imperator and the USS Philippine. There are group photos of the 803rd's officers and one photograph of a German submarine. Among the 4,000 troops aboard the Philippine were many African American soldiers, and there are photographs of these men playing in the 803rd's regimental band and of a boxing match they held during the voyage, as well as other photos. The collection also contains two postcards showing group photographs of soldiers [officers?] taken at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916 - probably at the large World War I military training camp there.

Other materials from Samuel Loomis Hypes include his officer's record book, honorary discharge following the war, as well as clippings about Sugar Hollow, a North Carolina development begun by Hypes and his wife in the 1950s.

Finally, the collection also includes several files from William P. Hypes, an officer in the Y.M.C.A. in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from his work towards the Y.M.C.A. World Action program.

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Josephine Humphreys papers, 1946-1993 and undated 27.7 Linear Feet — 11,900 Items

The collection documents Humphreys' professional life as an author. It contains correspondence between Humphreys and other writers and editors; business contracts with Viking Press and others for her publications and for movie rights; handwritten and typed manuscripts and proofs for her books Dreams of Sleep, Rich in Love, and Fireman's Fair, as well as typescripts of works by other authors (including Robb Forman Dew and Louise Erdrich); reviews of her own work as well as reviews written by Humphreys of others' works; and information detailing her speaking engagements and interviews. In addition, the collection contains clippings of reviews and interviews, photographs and negatives (16 black-and-white, 4 color, and 23 negatives); audiotapes from a "Women in Literature" series in which Humphreys participated; and 10 electronic files of book manuscripts, especially Dreams of Sleep, originally on computer disks and now migrated to the electronic records server. Also included are books inscribed to Humphreys and seven scrapbooks containing additional correspondence regarding her work as well as reviews.

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Jaroslav Hulka papers, 1922-2003 and undated (bulk 1968-2000) 36.5 Linear Feet — 15465 Items

The collection consists largely of professional papers including subject and research files, correspondence, and writings. Materials pertain to Hulka's involvement in the education, promotion, innovation, and application of women's and reproductive health. Specific topics include laparoscopy, abortion rights, contraception, professional organizations, medical procedures, and educational materials. The collection also includes examples of medical instruments (some of which were developed and patented by Hulka), especially a variety of international IUDs and other forms of contraception including the eponymous "Hulka clip." Also contains drawings and photographs of surgical procedures; educational and presentation slides; blueprints of medical instruments; and correspondence and essays provided by colleagues and students. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.