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Photojournalist who documented the women's movement and associated human rights issues since the 1960s. The photographs in the collection date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken by Lane in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes photographs of Bettye Lane and her original inventory sheets. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Bettye Lane photographs date from 1959 to 2007, with the bulk taken in the 1970s and 1980s. Subjects focus largely on events and individuals. Events include consciousness raising groups, planning meetings, and local women's conferences. Large events include Equal Rights Amendment demonstrations, and International Women's Year and National Organization for Women conferences and marches, in major cities such as New York City, Washington D.C., Mexico City, and Houston. Other events folders document Pro-Choice rallies and protests addressing harassment, sexism, and violence towards women. Another large series documents women involved in the movement, from feminist leaders to event attendees and coordinators. Subject folder photographs are of women at work, women athletes, men for women's rights, and events relating to daycare, feminist slogans and signs, lesbian rights, opposition, women of color, sexist images, and sexual health. Smaller sets of images document protests against war, pornography, and nuclear power. The collection also includes a folder of photographs of Bettye Lane spanning her career.

The photographs are arranged into three series, Events, People, and Subjects, with subdivisions in alphabetical order, and the prints within in date or alphabetical order. The original order as assembled by Lane is for the most part intact, with folder titles deriving from the original headings. Included in each folder are her original annotated inventory sheets, which include dates, photo identification codes, and titles.

Almost all the prints are unmounted black-and-white gelatin silver process prints, with some color photographs scattered throughout, and a few digital prints from the 2000s. The larger prints all have detailed information on the backs, many giving names of individuals present, details on the events, and contextual notes. There are also a few photocopies scattered throughout. There are some duplicate images or cropped versions. The most typical sizes are 8x10 and 6 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches, with some snapshots found in a few folders.

There is some overlap with Bettye Lane images in other U.S. institutional collections, noted below, but many of the images at Duke University are unique.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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Emma Goldman was an anarchist known for her political activism, writing, and speeches. She played a pivotal role in the development of anarchist political philosophy in North America and Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs. The Emma Goldman papers are part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection.

The Emma Goldman papers feature over 300 letters, primarily written by Emma Goldman, although other anarchists, activists, and thinkers are represented as authors, including Alexander Berkman, Eugene Debs, Harry Kelly, Alexander Shapiro, and the Socialist Party of New England. Many of the letter recipients are unnamed (as "Comrade"), but the majority of the letters were directed to Thomas H. Keell, an English compositor and editor for the anarchist periodical Freedom, in London. Letter topics most often center around requests made of Keell in support of various writing projects as well as speaking engagements and organizing work completed in Europe, the United States, and Canada, but also touch on visa constraints for Goldman and Berkman, the state of the anarchist movement in various countries, the lack of support for anarchist publications, as well as general position statements, especially in regard to Soviet Russia and the Spanish Civil War. There are also papers related to various prominent anarchists. These include typescript drafts of four articles and letters by anarchists; nine handwritten articles on anarchist themes written in Italian by Errico Malatesta; publications; press releases; ephemera, including tickets, brochures, solicitation letters, handbills and flyers; a contract and room layout for speaking engagements; Thomas H. Keell's list of works on anarchism; newspaper clippings; and six black-and-white photographs.

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Hannah L. Schmitt was a camper at Michigamme girls camp in Michigamme, Mich., in the Upper Peninsula. Schmitt was born in Toledo, Ohio. Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing.

Collection comprises a cloth-bound photograph album maintained by Schmitt when she attended Camp Michigamme, beginning in 1920. The album contains 243 black-and-white photographs, most measuring 4x2.5 inches. Images document camp life, and show Hannah and other young women living in tents, canoeing, swimming, playing sports, cleaning, entertaining themselves, reading and relaxing. Places visited mentioned are Baldy, Pequaming, Sand Island, and Flat Island. Almost all of the images have captions written by Schmitt; several of them were later inked in color. There is also a photograph of the Hebard's Mill at Pequaming, Michigan, the mill that Ford Motor Company purchased in 1923. Photographs on several pages in the back of the album are of Schmitt family members, and were taken outside of the camp. A number of the images were developed by a Michigan company named "Forster's-Calumet." In addition to the photographs, the album contains some manuscript items, including notes, poetry, a Western Union Telegram (regarding Schmitt's relationship with a West Point Cadet), along with a 7-page story that represents each camper and staff member as clouds at dawn.

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The collection consists largely of professional papers including subject and research files, correspondence, and writings. Materials pertain to Hulka's involvement in the education, promotion, innovation, and application of women's and reproductive health. Specific topics include laparoscopy, abortion rights, contraception, professional organizations, medical procedures, and educational materials. The collection also includes examples of medical instruments (some of which were developed and patented by Hulka), especially a variety of international IUDs and other forms of contraception including the eponymous "Hulka clip." Also contains drawings and photographs of surgical procedures; educational and presentation slides; blueprints of medical instruments; and correspondence and essays provided by colleagues and students. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Josephine Napoleon Leary papers, 1875-1991 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — approximately 352 items

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The papers of Josephine Napoleon Leary contain financial and legal papers, correspondence, biographical materials, and photographs pertaining to the life and business ventures of African American businesswoman Josephine N. Leary and her daughter Clara Ryan. Records document her real estate and other business transactions the coastal town of Edenton, North Carolina, where they resided; the earliest deed dates back to 1875. There are also architectural and historical documents relating to Edenton. Photographs of Leary and Reeves family members date from 1895 to about 1935. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The Josephine Leary papers chiefly comprise business papers relating to the properties she owned in Edenton, N.C., and to a barber shop operated by Leary and her husband; these records include deeds, the earliest of which dates to the 1870s; mortgage and estate papers; bank records; and bills and receipts. Other papers include correspondence to Leary, her daughter Clara C. Ryan, Clara's husband Noah Ryan, and Clara's son, Percy Reeves, as well as correspondence pertaining to legal matters and to Leary's estate.

A group of biographical and historical papers contain maps, pamphlets, and other information related to late 19th and early 20th century Edenton and to the Leary legacy. These date mostly from Leary's lifetime, but also include later secondary sources about Edenton and Leary. Included in this group are the original plans for the J.N. Leary building (1894) that still stands on Broad Street in downtown Edenton.

The collection is completed by a few undated writings by Leary, one of which seems to be a eulogy, and by a group of albumen and gelatin silver photographs of Leary and her family, including her daughter, her brother, an uncle, her grandson Percy Reeves, and his family.

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Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs picture campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs depict campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

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The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.