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African American soldier's Vietnam War photograph album, circa 1965-1973

1.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 1 album
Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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William Clair Turner papers, circa 1960s-2013

18.5 Linear Feet
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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Duke Photography Faculty and Staff photographs, circa 1960s-2003

21 Linear Feet
The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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School of Forestry and Environmental Studies Subject Collection, circa 1960-1979

1 Linear Foot — 400 Items
In 1938, the School of Forestry at Duke was founded as the first graduate school of forestry in the South. In the 1970s, the school expanded its program to include a broad range of resource and environmental studies. In 1974/75, it became the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Collection contains memoranda, brochures, newspaper clippings, conference materials, annual reports, photographs and slides relating to the Duke School of Forestry and Environmental Studies from roughly 1960 through 1979.

Collection contains alumni newsletters, publications, technical papers, department brochures, conference programs, memoranda, annual reports, as well as documents relating to the proposed phasing out of the Forestry School in 1975 and resultant student protests. Also includes papers from the 1965 Tropical Forestry Symposium sponsored by the School of Forestry, black and white photographs of the arboretum, and color photos and slides of School's field days in 1977 and 1979. Removed photographs from albums and interleaved in folders for preservation.

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African American soldier's Korean War photograph album, circa 1950-1953

.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 2 items
Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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African American soldier's World War II photograph album of India, circa 1942-1945

0.2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 16 pages
Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Gjon Mili photographs, circa 1939-1949

0.25 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 20 prints — 20 prints
Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints of images taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Milin. Through new tecniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash which Mili developed at MIT, the black-and-white images, some of which were used by Life magazine, portray human locomotion and the movements of other physical phenomena such as cascading water, frozen in time. Human subjects include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of the photographer Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Mili. Using new techniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash that he developed at MIT, Mili created stop-action and multi-image frames portraying the movement of the human body (reminiscent of the more scientific locomotion studies of Étienne Jules Marey and Eadward Muybridge) and of objects such as an egg breaking in a pan, a jet from a siphon bottle, and a cascade of water. Human subjects in the collection include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera.

The prints range in size from 8x10 to 11x14 inches. Most are vintage prints, created from the 1930s to the 1940s; only one bears a date - 1943. A few are mounted on thin board, but the majority are unmounted paper prints. All are stamped with the photographer's name and "From the Richard Checani Collection." One print bears the stamp "Life Photo, to use" referring to Mili's work for the magazine. A few bear penciled captions such as "cartwheel" and "nude descending a staircase," and one penciled notation explains the genesis of the image: "Full frame (35 mm) shot by Wallace Kirkland, who was at my side, G [jon]." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Peter Sekaer photographs, circa 1937-1940

1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 15 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, sometimes including original photographer's numbers. Other markings sometimes include titles, locations, and dates assigned by former owners or the agency; and credit information.
Peter Sekaer (1901-1950) was a Danish-born American photographer. Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Sekaer from about 1937-1940, while working for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses. The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of fifteen black-and-white photographs taken by Danish-American photographer Peter Sekaer from about 1937 to 1940, who was working at the time for the U.S. National Housing Authority to document living conditions and public housing projects in various places in the U.S. Known locations include Louisville, Kentucky; New Orleans, Louisiana; Williamsburg, N.Y.; Nashville, Tennessee; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Austin, Texas. Individuals in the photographs include African Americans and other people of color, and White Americans; there are quite a few photographs of children playing. The focus is typically on urban and rural dwellings and yards in areas of poverty; there are also a few images of public housing projects, small businesses, and warehouses.

The gelatin silver print sizes range from 4 1/2 x 4 5/8 inches to 10 1/4 x 13 1/8 inches; some are mounted on board, the largest of which is 16 x 20 inches, but for the most part they are unmounted and 8 x 10 inches or smaller. Titles in this collection, if present, originate from the prints; if there is no title, a brief description has been provided by library staff.

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Peter Sekaer photographs, circa 1937-1940 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 15 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, sometimes including original photographer's numbers. Other markings sometimes include titles, locations, and dates assigned by former owners or the agency; and credit information.

Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941

1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 28 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, titles and dates assigned by former owners, and other notes.
Aaron Siskind (1903-1991) was an American photographer and faculty member of the Chicago Institute of Design and Rhode Island School of Design. Collection consists of 28 black-and-white signed prints by Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images form part of two projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," and feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 28 black-and-white photographs taken during the earliest years of Aaron Siskind's career, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in bedrooms, kitchens, and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on his work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Library staff assigned titles and original negative dates according to original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; some titles are not known. Titles assigned by a former collector, sometimes present on the back of the prints, are also given in a note field in the entry for each print.

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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 28 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, titles and dates assigned by former owners, and other notes.

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Ida Grady scrapbook, circa 1927-1930

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box
Nancy Ida Grady, a native of Asheville, N.C., graduated from Duke University's Woman's College in 1928. Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other assorted ephemera and memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

The scrapbook has been disassembled and foldered for preservation purposes. Detached clippings and assorted ephemera are housed in envelopes. Nitrate negatives are closed to use; digital scans are available with advance request.

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Michael Francis Blake photographs, circa 1912-1934 and undated

1.0 Linear Foot — 3 boxes — 243 items
Michael Francis Blake was one of Charleston, South Carolina's first African American studio photographers. The collection consists of 118 original photographs of African American men, women, and children, both singly and in family groups, most of them taken by Blake from the 1910s to his death in 1934. Formal studio poses predominate. Some prints are stamped with Blake's studio location in Charleston, S.C., though some formal images shot in the collection were taken in other locations, including out of doors. There are some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Formats comprise 91 photographic postcards and 28 black-and-white prints, many on cardstock mounts; there are also eight copy negatives. Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including a portrait of the photographer. Collection includes a complete set of copy prints and the original album from which most of the prints were removed and rehoused. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of 118 photographs of men, women, and children as single individuals, family groups, and other group shots. The great majority of the subjects are African American. The photographs represent the work of Michael Francis Blake, an African American photographer from Charleston, S.C., from the 1910s to his death in 1934; the majority were taken in his studio on #384 West Sumter Street. The location of photograph #28 has been identified as just outside of Blake's studio. Some of the photographs are stamped with Blake's name and studio addresses. However, not all of the photographs have been positively identified as having been taken by Blake.

The great majority of the photographs were originally housed in a photograph album entitled "Portraits of Members," also included in the collection, but have been rehoused for preservation purposes. Ninety-one of the photos are photographic postcards and the others are either mounted photographs or snapshots. The predominant style of the portraits is the formal studio pose, standing or seated. There are also some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Some photographs were taken outdoors in front of a backdrop and with props such as rugs, chairs and plants to recreate a "studio" portrait. Some have what appear to be shopping lists and other notations written on the backs, and a few have names, ages, and street addresses, presumably of the sitter.

Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including one portrait of the photographer, Michael Francis Blake.

The collection includes original prints, handling prints made from original negatives, and eight safety film copy negatives.

Each original print has been assigned a unique identifier. All but one have been digitized and are available online through the Duke Digital Collections.

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Paul Kwilecki photographs and papers, circa 1910-2008, bulk 1960-2008

42 Linear Feet — 54 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 2 oversize boxes — Approximately 9480 Items
Collection comprises over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, along with negatives, contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and printed material, totaling over 9000 items. Kwilecki's photographic work documents rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Subjects include local landscapes, tobacco workers, county fairs, hog slaughtering, cemeteries, churches, courthouses, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, shoppers, downtowns, and house porches and interiors. The themes of race relations and religious life predominate. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Significant correspondents in the manuscripts series include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection includes a small set of Vestal photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Paul Kwilecki Photographs and Papers span the whole of his career and include over 500 black-and-white photographic prints, negatives (chiefly safety but also some nitrate and glass plate), contact sheets, photographer's notes, journals, writings, speeches, correspondence related to photography, and other printed material, totaling over approximately 9000 items.

The bulk of the collection consists of Paul Kwilecki's prints and other photographic material documenting rural and small-town life in and around Bainbridge, Decatur County, Georgia, an undertaking he began as a self-taught photographer in 1960 and continued until his death in 2009. Although Kwilecki developed an interest in photography in the 1940s, only a very small portion of the images in the collection pre-date 1970.

The collection is organized into two major series: Photographic Materials, containing prints, contact sheets, and negatives, and a Manuscripts Series housing many files of correspondence, writings, and other personal papers.

While initially interested in photographing tobacco workers, Kwilecki turned his focus to other subjects, including county fairs, hog slaughtering times, cemeteries, churches, courtrooms, recreation on the Flint River, local industry, bus stations, shoppers, downtowns, house porches and interiors, and landscapes. Many of Kwilecki's subjects come from the African American community in Decatur County. Throughout the collection, the themes of race relations and religious life tend to predominate.

The Manuscripts Series (1967-2008) also provides an interpretation of life in Decatur County but also documents Kwilecki's photographic philosophy and practices. The correspondence and the journals, related to Kwilecki's work and career as a photographer, comprise the largest groupings. The series also contains Kwilecki's personal journals, dating from 1967-1969; Kwilecki's printing notes; news clippings; exhibition brochures; and a brief internet biography of Kwilecki. Many of Kwilecki's writings attempt to express in words the same topics he tried to illuminate through photography.

Additional manuscripts (14 boxes) and photographic materials were received in 2010 following Kwilecki's passing away. They include many folders of correspondence dating from 1971-2008, arranged in original order either chronologically or alphabetically by folder title. Significant correspondents include photographers Alex Harris and David Vestal; the collection also includes a small set of Vestal's photographic prints. Other files contain writings, clippings, and other items. The writings include journals from the 1970s; typed excerpts from early 20th century Georgia newspapers, some on racial incidents; drafts of Kwilecki's talks; and notes for the Decatur County photography publication (one folder). A few publications round out the last box in the collection.

The negatives are closed to use; contact sheets and prints offer alternate access to Kwilecki's images. Eleven nitrate large-format sheet negatives, dating from approximately the 1940s-1960s, are slated for digitization. Also included in the collection are several glass plate negatives by an unknown photographer dating perhaps from the 1910s.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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James Van Der Zee photographs, circa 1908-1935

.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 42 photographic prints
Collection comprises 42 gelatin silver prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are also fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio. Subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats, a soldier, a female impersonator, a funerary portrait of a man in an open casket, Black Hebrews, Black Cross nurses, Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade, entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia, boxer Jack Johnson, and entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing a violin, circa 1930. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). An early portrait of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter was taken around 1908, in Lenox, Massachusetts, his birthplace. Average print size is roughly 10 3/4 x 12 inches. Two are original vintage prints; the rest are exhibit prints created mostly in the 1980s from original negatives. Some prints are signed; all are titled and dated on the verso. Several bear the GGG Studio stamp at the 272 Lenox Avenue address. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises forty gelatin silver exhibit prints and two vintage prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are fictionalized scenes and poses evoking hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, Harlem parades, a Baptist church building and its congregation, and a first-grade Harlem classroom. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing the violin, circa 1930. Other subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats; a 1923 soldier; the New York Black Giants baseball team; a female impersonator; a man in an open funeral casket with a superimposed poem extolling fatherhood; a group of African American Hebrews in front of the Moorish Zionist Temple; Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade; a Garveyite with his son; entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia in their "Dark Tower" salon with a large group of friends; boxer Jack Johnson; and a double exposure portrait of entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance; later images exhibit a certain optimism in spite of the looming Great Depression and its effects.

Prints are arranged in chronological order. The earliest images, from 1908, are of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter, probably taken in Lenox, Massachusetts, Van Der Zee's birthplace, and a blacksmith, probably taken in Virginia, where Van der Zee spent some time before moving to New York.

The exhibit prints were created from original negatives chiefly from 1981-1983, under the supervision of James Van Der Zee until his passing in 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Mussenden Van Der Zee. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from runs of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed by the photographer.

The majority of the prints measure 10 x 12 inches (sheet dimensions); image sizes range from 10 1/8 x 8 to 10 x 2 5/8 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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William Hesketh Leverhulme Solomon Islands photograph album, circa 1906-1910

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 Volume
William Hesketh Lever was the First Viscount Leverhulme, and founder of the international firm, Lever Brothers. This bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled Solomon Islands Views, and contains 98 black-and-white photographs, chiefly measuring 6x8 inches, that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations from about 1906-1910. Images include company buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants and dwellings, other cultivated crops, flora and fauna, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Notable persons found among the images include the Resident Commissioner of the Islands at the time, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers.

This handsomely bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled "Solomon Islands Views", and contains 98 black-and-white photographs that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations. Images include buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Persons whose photographic portraits are found among the images are the Resident Commissioner of the Islands, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers. The photographs illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers' Pacific Plantations operations in the Solomon Islands. The views include buildings and other installations, coconut plantations in various stages of development, lumbering, native housing, local populace, local workers in various tasks, local and inter-island shipping, colonial and company officials, local chiefs, company and government headquarters, ocean steamships, steam powered agricultural equipment, copra, local flora and fauna, and the cultivation of peanuts, rubber, and sweet potatoes.

Place names listed for the photographs are: Rendova, West Bay, Erickson's Island, Pepesala, Guadalcanal, KayIan, Ufa, Banika, Tulagi, Gavatu, Lunga, Kokoon, Pampa, Kaukau, Aola, and Stanmore River. Persons in the photographs include: Charles Morris Woodford, Resident Commissioner of the Islands, 1896 to 1914, and Mrs. Woodford; Mrs. Tillotson, wife of Lord Leverhulme's nephew, John Lever Tillotson (d. 1915) who was his senior colleague on the board; Fred Wernham, an expert in tropical plantation work who was closely identified with developments in the Solomon Islands; Joseph Meek, who first journeyed to the Islands in 1905 to assess prospects there; Methodist missionary J. F. Goldie, translator of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and John into Roviana; and a number of others whose names can be found in the list of the pictures.

The black-and-white photographs, emulsion-paper prints, typically measure 6x8 inches in size. Several photographs are dated 1906, but most are undated. The buildings and headquarters of the company appear well developed. That suggests that 1906 is too early a date, since Mr. Meek's initial visit to the Solomons was in 1905. Most of the pictures probably date some years after 1906, but before 1914 when Commissioner Woodford left the islands. Other factors suggest that the dates range from 1906 to 1910.

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Photographs of women's college production of a Sanskrit drama, circa 1905

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 62 images on 14 card mounts
Set of 62 captioned black-and-white photographic prints mounted on 14 cardstock boards, documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯. The play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905, at a time when Indian dramas were popularized and produced by many women's colleges. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of cardstock mounts, and portray individual young female actors playing male and female roles, as well as tableaus with groups of actors. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props. Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75 to 8 x 13.75 inches, with the mounts measuring 9x14 inches. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Set of 62 mounted and captioned black-and-white photographic prints documenting an elaborate stage production of a well-known, classical Sanskrit drama, the S´akuntala¯; the play was probably produced at the Northfield Seminary for Young Ladies in Northfield, Massachusetts around 1905. The photographs are mounted on the front and back of 14 heavy card stock boards. The images range in size from range in size from 5.5 x 3.75" to 8 x 13.75", with the mounts measuring 9x14" with one exception measuring 10x16. There are a few near-duplicates among the images.

The images feature portraits of costumed female actors playing male and female roles, as well as groups of actors and several long shots of the stage, in which the curtains, scenery, and part of an orchestra pit can also be seen. The images vividly capture the actors' expressions and gestures, and portray detailed Oriental costumes and props (these argue against it being Smith College's 1904 production, as it was reported as using Americanized costumes and music). Most of the handwritten ink captions name the characters depicted, and many also list quotes from the particular act or scene. One image features a scenic view of Northfield Seminary from across the Connecticut River, with small white tents visible on the lawns to the left; the play may have been produced at Northfield during a summer conference. One of the school's alumna, Ruth St. Denis, was an important modern dancer who popularized Oriental dances and dramas; she appeared in Sakuntala in 1905, perhaps giving the impetus to a staging of the play at Northfield Seminary.

The card stock mounts, with their associated images, are arranged in their original order based on the negative numbers visible in each still image: 1-31, 33-38, and 40-62, with numbers 32, 39, and 59 absent. The view of the campus is unnumbered.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

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Alvin T. Parnell photographs of Durham, North Carolina, circa 1898-1986, bulk 1910-1960

1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 183 items — 2 boxes; 183 items
Alvin T. Parnell was a commercial photographer based in Durham, N.C. Collection chiefly consists of 167 black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority, chiefly taken by Parnell from 1920 through the 1950s, are views of downtown streets, commercial and industrial buildings, churches, and infrastructure, especially transportation. Many sites are related to the tobacco manufacturing businesses based in Durham. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. Other images range widely and include a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, a minstrel band, a cart advertising Bull Durham tobacco, and tobacco fields with posed workers, white and African American. In addition, there are portraits of prominent Durham individuals and families. Formats include 85 vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, chiefly 8x10 inches, 82 contact prints, and 12 safety negatives. Includes an information folder with 1986 obituary and collection information.

Collection comprises 167 early to mid-20th century black-and-white photographs of the city and people of Durham, North Carolina. The majority of the images were taken by Alvin T. Parnell, a commercial photographer with a studio in downtown Durham, from about 1920 to 1950; prints from 1898 to 1919 likely were from the Cole-Holladay studio, which Parnell took over around 1920. Formats include a few vintage mounted albumen and gelatin silver prints, unmounted vintage and modern gelatin silver prints, and small contact prints made from original nitrate negatives. There are also twelve safety film negatives present, from which some copy prints were made. Includes an information folder with Parnell's 1986 obituary and collection information.

The largest group of photographs, taken from the late 1910s through the early 1950s, features views of Durham's growing downtown, often commissioned by Parnell's business and City Hall clients. In the background of the many street scenes one can see the progression of small storefront businesses that made up life on Main Street in a 20th century Southern Piedmont city. Given Durham's role as a birthplace for the post-Civil War tobacco manufacturing industry, it is not surprising that there are numerous photographs of buildings and industrial sites belonging to American Tobacco, Blackwell Tobacco, and Liggett Myers. Parnell also photographed buses, trolleys, and other scenes for an early Durham power and transportation company, Durham Public Services.

Other images focus on people, and range widely in subject matter: men posed at a Trinity College (later Duke University) reunion, war veterans at gatherings, fraternities, children on a playground, and a minstrel band. A few are of African American tobacco workers posed in the field and female factory workers ending their shift. There are also portraits of prominent individuals and families: an elderly Bennehan Cameron with family members; John Ruffin Green (one of Durham's earliest tobacco entrepreneurs); Washington Duke and sons with associates at a barbeque; the Rosenstein family (optometrists from New York who came to Durham in 1904); William Umstead (U.S. Senator from northern Durham County); and various police chiefs and businessmen. There are also a few portraits of women, some with captions and some unidentified.

There are also twelve safety film negatives in the collection, sized 8x10 and 4x5 inches, from which a selection of copy prints were made after the collection was acquired. A few have no existing prints – these are noted in the collection guide.

In addition to photographs in this collection, some if not most of the earlier images of Durham in the Durham Chamber of Commerce collection in the Rubenstein Library are likely to have been taken by Parnell. His work is also likely to be found in other collections related to Durham residents containing photographs.

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Afghan Wars photographs, circa 1897

1.5 Linear Feet — 45 Items
Collection of black and white glossy photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Anglo-Afghan War most likely during the Mamund Valley hostilities of 1897. Prints are mounted on cardstock, and collection includes the portfolio in which they were originally housed. Most have captions with location or subject, either typed or hand-written; a few are dated 1897. Images feature British Army military camps, landscapes, and groups of officers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection of glossy black and white photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Afghan Wars, most likely in summer and fall 1897 during which there was a major outbreak of hostilities. The images consist of 24 8.125" x 5.75" prints, and 21 smaller 4.125" x 5.75" prints, all affixed to cardstock, three or four per page, often on both sides of the board. There is also a panoramic shot of the Tungai Pass made up of three sequenced prints. Pasted-down typed captions are also present for some images, while others carry handwritten captions; a few are dated 1897. The set was originally housed in an unmarked cloth and board portfolio, which has also been conserved. Resembling to some degree in subject matter the Afghanistan images of military photographer R. B. Holmes, the majority of the images in this collection depict British military camps and landscapes. The landscape views include the Mamund Valley, Tangi Pass, Agrah, Chakdara, Malakand, and Ambeyla Pass, and a few captions describe events taking place in that location. Military camps, many taken at a distance with fine detail, include Buner, Inayat Killa, Kindergali, and Malakand. A few scenes show bridges, including a boat bridge over the Indus. Some prints feature groups of officers in posed and casual scenarios, including one image of the First Royal West Kent Regiment. One image shows the gravesite of 2nd Lieutenant W. C. Browne-Clayton, dated Sept. 30, 1897, killed at the battle of Agrah. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Irvin Family papers, circa 1890s-2016

10.25 Linear Feet — 23 boxes; 2 oversize folders — approximately 5150 Items
Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; materials, including photographs and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas, kept by Frank and Dona Irvin, relating to their early life near Houston, and documenting aspects of African American history in that area; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; family photographs; videos; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection consists largely of correspondence between historian Nell Irvin Painter and her parents (1969-2003), documenting various stages of their lives, travels, and Painter's scholarly career. Also includes writings by or about Nell Painter, including reviews of her work; copies and reviews of Dona Irvin's writings; documents related to Frank and Dona's education and careers; Frank irvin's diary (2000-2003); legal papers; and other items.

Photographs also form an important part of the collection. Along with papers and records, Frank and Dona Irvin kept early photos and tintypes (circa 1890s-1910s) of African Americans in Victoria, Texas; together, these materials speak to their early life near Houston, and document aspects of African American history in that area. There are also family photographs from later decades (1930s-1980s).

For preservation purposes, original audiovisual media are closed to use; copies may be available on request.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Irvin Family papers, circa 1890s-2016 10.25 Linear Feet — 23 boxes; 2 oversize folders — approximately 5150 Items

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Hugh Mangum photographs, circa 1890-1922

10 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 1141 items
Hugh Mangum was a commercial portrait photographer from Durham, North Carolina. Collection contains 937 glass plate negatives and printed black-and-white photographs taken by Mangum from about 1890 to 1922 as he traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia and in photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of residents in those areas - women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors. The majority are white men and women, but there are also many African Americans. Some people have been identified; Mangum and his wife are present in several images. There are several street scenes from Radford, as well as Warrenton (probably N.C.), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Of the photographic prints, there are 55 prints made from selected negatives, and 50 inkjet digital prints from a 2012 exhibit. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Hugh Mangum Photographs collection dates from approximately 1890 through 1922, and contains 937 glass plate negatives and a selection of black-and-white prints, of portraits and scenes taken by Hugh Mangum, a portrait photographer based in Durham, North Carolina. There is also a set of 25 exhibit prints and 25 smaller viewing prints from a 2012 Center for Documentary Studies exhibit curated by a Duke University student.

The images were taken as Mangum traveled a rail circuit through North Carolina, Virginia, and West Virginia. He also likely took some of these images in the photography studios he and partners established in Roanoke, Pulaski, and East Radford, Virginia. Communities marked on a few of the plates include Warrenton (probably North Carolina rather than Virginia), and Christiansburg, Virginia. Localities known to have been visited by Mangum in N.C. include Winston-Salem, High Point, Raleigh, Reidsville, Lexington, Durham, and Greensboro; in Virginia, Martinsville, East Radford, and Pulaski. From an annotated trunk lid found in the collection it seems he also visited Texas but it is unknown if any of the images in the collection were taken there.

The images are chiefly individual and group portraits of local residents, although there are several town scenes with landmark buildings. There are women, children, and men, either in a studio setting or outdoors; the majority are white but there are many African Americans. There are buildings such as barns, schools, and houses often present in the group portraits, and in many cases there are dogs, chickens, cats, and horses. Sometimes the individual poses with a possession such as a bicycle or musical instrument. One image is of a train accident with a large group of bystanders. Often numbers are stamped or written on the plate. The library staff has assigned unique numbers to each image and plate. There are multiple images of Hugh Mangum and the Mangum and Carden families; see the glass plate negative notes below for more details. The last dated print in the collection is a mounted print of Mangum's body in an open casket, 1922.

Mangum photographs are distinctive for the level of comfort exhibited by his subjects in front of the camera. This ease in front of the camera is readily noted due to the large quantity of "penny picture camera" negatives in the collection that contain multiple images of numerous subjects. Often the first picture of a subject appears rather stiff and formal as in traditional nineteenth century photographs. In the second and subsequent pictures, the subject often visibly relaxes, assumes different poses, uses props, removes or adds a hat, and may smile broadly at the camera. This progressive transition in poses from formal to very informal is a hallmark of the Mangum collection. The collection may be of particular interest to researchers studying late-nineteenth and early-twentieth-century fashion trends.

The glass plate negatives are closed to use, but researchers may use online digitized images which represent the entirety of the collection of negatives. In addition, the collection also makes available for research use original contact prints, contact sheets, one panoramic print, and print reproductions created for exhibition and other purposes.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Hugh Mangum photographs, circa 1890-1922 10 Linear Feet — 38 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 1141 items

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Garrett Orr papers, circa 1873-1994, bulk 1890s-1914, 1935-1965

18.5 Linear Feet — 11,000 Items

The Garrett Orr Papers document the artistic output and personal files of advertising executive Garrett Orr. Although the collection spans the years circa 1873 to 1994, the bulk of the materials fall within two main periods: the 1890s to 1914, comprising a photographic collection of old poster images; and 1930 to 1965, which approximates the span of Orr's professional life. The collection includes the original drawings, water colors and paintings produced by Orr as designs for the outdoor advertising campaigns of a wide variety of products such as Gillette razors, Ipana toothpaste (Bristol-Myers), Lucky Strikes and Viceroy cigarettes (Brown & Williamson), Mazola corn oil (Corn Products Refining Company), Seagram beverages, Verney fabrics, and White Rose tea. Also included are folders of photographs, slides and negatives of Orr's advertising work for approximately 550 companies (with index). In addition, a collection of almost 200 large-format negatives and photographs document images of 19th- and early 20th-century posters for plays, musicals, minstrel shows, circuses, and hotels. A large set of clippings files contain published examples of the work of over 100 graphic artists and illustrators contemporary with Orr, including Floyd Davis, Ronald McLeod, George Petty, Howard Scott, Ben Stahl, Jon Whitcomb, and J. Walter Wilkinson. The collection is organized into five series--the General Files Series; the Artists and Illustrators Series; the Product Files Series; the Other Photographic Materials Series; and the Sketches Series. Large-format items from the Artists and Illustrators Series and Sketches Series have been relocated to Oversize Materials.

Closely related collections held by the Rubenstein Library include: the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Poster Designs; the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Slide Library; the Duplex Advertising Company Billboard Images and Records; the Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements; the R.C. Maxwell Co. Records; the Howard Scott Papers; and the John Paver Papers.

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Fannie B. Rosser papers, circa 1860s-1973, 2012, bulk 1920s-1973

1 Linear Foot — 750 Items
Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs document the personal relationships and professional activities of Rosser, a successful single African American businesswoman. Correspondence, 1920s-1940s, pertains to Rosser's business ventures in regard to the management of her rental property in Lynchburg, Virginia, and Durham, North Carolina; personal loans made to family and friends during the Depression; and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Later correspondence centers around her relationships with her foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, and Rosser's niece, June. A folder of printed materials includes news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries, and a 2012 publication about Fannie Rosser's foster daughter, Mattie Burton Meyers, active in the NAACP in Fresno, California. Family photographs date back to about the 1860s and include an early ambrotype, cabinet cards, and snapshots of Rosser and her friends in the 1920s and her daughter's family in Fresno, Calif., in the 1960s.

The papers of Fannie B. Rosser document the personal and professional life of a black businesswoman within a fiscally sound African American community in Durham, N.C. Correspondence, legal and financial papers, printed materials, and photographs reflect both her business activities and her relationships with close friends and family members from the turn of the century to the 1970s.

The bulk of the correspondence until the 1950s pertains to Rosser's business ventures, including maintenance of her property, personal loans made to family and friends, and her investments in government stocks and bonds. Letters from her lifelong friend and business partner, Virginia Randolf of Lynchburg, Va., document the process of maintaining Rosser's rental property over the course of thirty years. They highlight, among other things, the apparent ghettoization of the neighborhood in which her houses were situated, and Randolf's personal and financial response to that process.

Friends and family members often deferred financial matters to Rosser, a careful and respected business woman, and were often dependent on her for monetary support. The correspondence illustrates Rosser's financial acumen and demonstrates the extent to which her personal relationships and business activities overlapped. Of particular interest is an exchange with the Wilhoite's, a couple to whom she loaned $1000, during the Depression. Their correspondence illustrates the personal nature of her business dealings and the difficulties Rosser had in balancing finances and friendships.

Later correspondence centers around Rosser's relationships with her foster daughter Mattie Burton Meyers and niece June. There are scattered references to the political climate of the 1960s, and correspondence from Mattie mentions her work with the NAACP. Also, in the printed materials there is a 2012 published biography of Mattie written by her granddaughter Sharon Revis-Green.

The printed materials consist of materials such as news clippings on both family events and local politics, church programs, and obituaries. A large series of financial and legal papers, 1895-1969, provide extensive detail on Rosser's investments, insurance policies, and legal activities. Many of these documents are associated with firms such as the North Carolina Mutual Life Insurance Company, where Rosser was employed.

The photographs in the collection date back to the early 1860s and are mostly individual portraits and group photographs of African American family members and friends. An unidentified ambrotype of an African American woman dated prior to the Civil War indicates that the family might have been free.

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Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale prints and photographs, circa 1840-1949 and undated

1 Linear Foot — 60 Items
Howard Atwood Kelly was a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia; he served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. Among his interests was the life of Florence Nightingale and her memorialization through images. The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, professor, author, and collector of medical memorabilia. The collection comprises 60 images and other memorializations associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs (some of which are albumens), lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, and postcards; in addition, there are photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Almost all the images are mounted on cardstock boards. Portrayals of Nightingale span her adult lifetime; there are images of her during her early career as a nurse in Britain, and providing nursing care for wounded soldiers in Turkey during the Crimean War. There are also images of her birth and death places. Also included are one piece of popular sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions also accompany many of the images. Arranged in rough chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

The Howard Kelly Collection of Florence Nightingale Prints and Photographs represents the collecting efforts of Howard Atwood Kelly, a surgeon, gynecologist, professor, author, collector of medical memorabilia, and founder of the Kensington Hospital in Philadelphia. He served as the first professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Johns Hopkins Hospital and School of Medicine. The collection is composed of images and memorials associated with Florence Nightingale, 19th century nurse, author, and sanitation and healthcare reformer. Image formats include engravings, photographs, lithographs, mezzo tints, prints, postcards, and photographic and slide reproductions of drawings, lithographs, engravings, crayon drawings, paintings, and sculptures. Unless otherwise noted, all images are in black and white. Almost all are mounted on cardstock boards. The images depict Florence Nightingale throughout her adult life; some also portray monuments to Nightingale, and geographical locations associated with her birth, death, and nursing career, including her activities in Scutari (Istanbul) tending to wounded soldiers, the peak of her popularization in the media of the time. Also included are one piece of sheet music (1857) and typed explanatory notes. Reproductions in slide and photograph format accompany many of the images. Arranged chiefly in chronological order by date of publication or creation. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Joseph John Spengler papers, [ca. 1896]-1987

111.8 Linear Feet — 60,387 Items

Chiefly correspondence, printed material, critiques of publications, bibliographies, class notes, and other papers relating to his career, publications, and affiliation with different economics associations (26,378 items, 52.7 linear feet; dated 1928-1987). Some are photocopies of Spengler's correspondence with William Richard Allen. The collection also includes manuscripts of some of his works, information concerning Duke University's administrative policies and staff, reprints of published articles relating to his career, and a charcoal portrait. (1-9-87, 88-010, 93-180, 00-213) No container lists exist for these accessions.

Addition #93-294 (34,009 items, 59.1 linear feet; dated [ca. 1896]-[ca. 1976], bulk 1914-1960) contains primarily business and Spengler and Kress family correspondence, especially between Dot and Joe ([ca. 1919]-[ca. 1976]). Also includes manuscripts for Dot's genealogical novel, Family Saga in America ([ca. 1930s]) and Joe's work, Life in America; as well as Dot's journals and diaries (1924-1939, 1969). There are Christmas cards, postcards, and newspaper clippings; photographs of family and friends, including 2 tintypes, 32 cartes-de-visite, 1 color and 91 black-and-white prints, and 76 healthy nitrate negatives; and lace knitted by Dot's grandmother.

Also includes 6 photograph albums kept by Dot, two of which contain pictures taken by her with a brownie camera in and of Piqua, OH (1914-1919). The other albums contain photographs and memorabilia depicting Dot's life as a college student at Miami University, OH (1919-1921); and two showing views of the Spengler's homes, friends, and life in Tuscon, AZ, Tampa, FL (1930-1938), and Durham, NC and Duke University (1932-1940). The latter also records the 1938 Duke University faculty baseball team.

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Virginia Woolf letter and photograph, around 1930

0.1 Linear Feet — 2 items
Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

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Photograph of suffragists, approximately 1918

0.9 Linear Feet — 1 item
Collection comprises a stannotype photograph showing five female suffragists standing in a row. One woman holds a banner from the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis, Mo. Another has a "Votes for Women" sticker on a suitcase at her feet.
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F. Vester photographs of the Holy Land, approximately 1900

0.7 Linear Feet — 1 box — 1 volume
Collection comprises a photograph album with 38 albumen photographs (6 x 4.25 inches) pasted on sheets of thick cardboard. The album's binding features decorated wood with a Jerusalem cross. The back of the binding is marked "Jerusalem" in English and Hebrew. Photographs are numbered and feature subtitles in English and French. Photographic subjects in Jerusalem include: exterior and interior of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre and several stations of the cross, the Wailing Wall, Via Dolorosa, various gates of Jerusalem, Mosque of Omar, Tomb of the Kings, Garden of Gethsemane, and Mount of Olives. Among the images of Palestine are: Jaffa, Tomb of Rachel, Bethlehem, Hebron, Tomb of Lazarus, Jericho, Dead Sea, the River Jordan, and the Tower of David and Hippicus. There is also a photograph of two women at a mill. All but two of the photographs are signed with the American Colony mark.
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Ralph Gibson photographs, 2019

2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 208 prints — 8 x 11 1/2 inches (188); 17 x 22 inches (20)
Ralph Gibson is an American photographer based in New York, N.Y. Collection consists of 208 photographs taken by Gibson in 2019 for his photobook, Sacred Land: Israel before and after time(2020). In addition to the 188 small single-image printer's proof prints, there are 20 large diptych prints, in which juxtaposed color and black-and-white images explore the nature of Israel and surrounding regions of Galilee, Jordan, and Palestine, through contemporary and ancient landscapes, architecture, city and country scenes, and portraits of a wide variety of people. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 188 individually printed 8 1/2 x 11 inch printer's proofs and 20 17 x 22 inch print diptychs by photographer Ralph Gibson, from his book Sacred Land: Israel before and after time, published in 2020 by Lustrum Press.

As a project, "Sacred Land" offers a portrait of Israel and the surrounding regions, including Palestine, Jordan, and Galilee, which juxtaposes past and contemporary experience through the narrative device of the diptych. Subjects include landscapes, rural and city life, found objects, architecture, antiquities, and portraits of a wide variety of people.

The untitled archival pigment inkjet prints are signed and dated by the photographer, and the printer's proofs are marked on the versos with the page numbers where the images appear in the photobook.

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Ralph Gibson photographs, 2019 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 208 prints — 8 x 11 1/2 inches (188); 17 x 22 inches (20)

Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2019

22.5 Linear Feet — 5 upright boxes; 1 record carton; 25 flat boxes; 2 shoeboxes; 2 oversize folders — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files
Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of the students' multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Subjects include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written These and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, and identity; and abstract constructs.

Some authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; not all graduates of the MFA EDA program submitted their work for inclusion in this archive.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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"Phone Home Durham" exhibit prints, 2012-2015 and undated

2 Linear Feet — 3 boxes; 85 13x19 inch inkjue prints; 43 manuscript items
Collection comprises 85 13x19 inch photographic prints and other documents related to the exhibit, "Phone Home Durham, 2015." The images were all taken by 50 residents of Durham County, North Carolina, chiefly with mobile phones but also with handheld cameras, and are mostly color digital prints, with a few black-and-white prints. The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. The exhibit prints are accompanied by exhibit guides and other publicity related to the 2015 exhibition, several photographers' statements, and the original exhibit proposal by Duke University professor and photographer Tom Rankin. The exhibit was co-curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange, and Jim Lee. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection comprises 85 13x19 inch inkjet prints of photographs, chiefly in color, taken by 50 photographers from Durham County, North Carolina. The images were selected from submissions to the Center for Documentary Studies in response to a call for "images of Durham County [N.C.] taken with mobile phone cameras or other hand held devices." The size of the actual image on the 13x19 print varies and can be as small as 4x6 inches.

The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. Locations include the Durham History Hub, Museum of Life and Science, Duke University, Liberty Cafe, Taqueria Gonzales, Geer Street, Eno River State Park, Ellerbee Creek bridge, Pelican Snoballs, Catsburg Store, the beaver pond off of Avondale Drive, Compare Foods, Durham Central Park, Cocoa Cinnamon coffee shop, Durham County Detention Facility, West Chapel Hill Street bridge, Beyu Cafe, the Durham Bulls ballpark, the 40th Centerfest, El Vaquero Western Wear Shop, 21c Museum Hotel, and the Scrap Exchange.

The exhibit was guest curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange and Jim Lee and displayed in different rotations at the Power Plant Gallery at the American Tobacco Campus from May 29, 2015 to August 22, 2015.

The photographic prints are accompanied by five exhibit guides arranged by dates of exhibition, with thumbnails of each image, the photographer's name, and captions or additional information. Other documents are a flyer explaining request for submissions, a Durham County Library program flyer, and photographers' statements about their images. Also located here is the proposal for the exhibit written by Tom Rankin, documentary photographer and Director of the Master of Fine Arts Program at Duke University.

The following photographers are represented in the collection: D.L. Anderson, Kristina Baker, Daniele Berman, Eric Boven, Michaela Brooks, Aaron Canipe, Mario Chen, Christina Chia, Ira Christmas, Olisa Corcoran, Diane Davis, Wilfred Drath, B.J. Fusaro, Roman Gabriel, Alexa Gerend, Cynthia Gurganus, Izzy (Isaac) Hart, Jim Haverkamp, Warren Hicks, Juliet Jensen, Jim Kellough, Frank Konhaus, Stephanie Leathers, Ryan Mason, Mark Maya, Eleanor Mills, Jesse Moore, John Moses, Callistus Ndemo, Michael Palko, Bill Pope, Courtney Reid-Eaton, Julie Rhodes, Jacqueline Rimmler, Emily Rush, Katherine Scott, Adelle Smith, Amanda Smith, Daniel Smith, Lisa Sorg, Jennifer Stratton, Gina Streaty, Amanda Stricklett, Dawn Surratt, Lynda-Marie Taurasi, Aiyana Torres, Cait Ushpol, Ross Wade, Carin Walsh, and Josh Zaslow.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Shane Lavalette photographs, 2010-2011

1.5 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 25 prints — 20x24 inches
The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were assigned by the photographer. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Most were taken outdoors, but there are a few interior shots.

Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were created by the photographer.

In addition to Lavalette's photographic body of work, the Rubenstein Library also holds copies of the companion photo book, One Sun, One Shadow. The images are also available to view through the photographer's website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing

14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files
Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints in darkroom and inkjet formats, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, Barth's images document cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, through landscape and portraiture. Series include images from Central and South American countries to the Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; portraits of migrants and images of migrant services at Arizona/Mexico border stations; images from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; images of Syrian refugees and others in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints, darkroom and digital, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, the photographs document the cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, and her interest in portraiture. Series include The Americas, whose images range from Central and South American countries to Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; migrants and migrant services at the Arizona/Mexico border; the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; refugees in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War, in the city of Sarajevo. In addition to many portraits of individuals and families, there are also landscapes.

Areas represented in The Americas series include Bolivia; Patagonia, Argentina; the Bahamas; Foz do Iguaçu and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; El Salvador; Guatemala; Martissant, Cité Soleil, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Nicaragua; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Cusco, Peru. Includes images of people working, cooking, minding children, participating in local festivals, traveling, and playing. Several portraits feature people in traditional dress. The largest group of images was taken in Haiti, where Barth returned following the 2010 earthquake. These photographs include scenes of people among the rubble in Martissant and Port-au-Prince, as well as some portraits of hospital patients. The Americas series images are arranged alphabetically by country.

The two short digital videos were taken by Barth in South America and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing 14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files

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Jess T. Dugan photographs, 2006-2017

3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 58 prints — 58 prints
Collection comprises two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan. The first comprises 40 large color digital photographs of transgender and non-conforming people over the age of fifty, living throughout the United States. The portraits are of single individuals as well as couples, and were chiefly taken in outdoor and street locations. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum prepared for a major move and renovation. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke Unviversity.

Collection consists of two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan.

The first, entitled "To Survive on this Shore," comprises 40 large color inkjet photographs of transgender and gender non-conforming people over the age of 50, living throughout the United States. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." They portray single individuals as well as couples, chiefly in outdoor settings such as parks and streets. All images measure roughly 15 x 20 inches. The interviews conducted for the project are not included in this collection. For this work, Dugan received the 2017 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Women Documentarians.

The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum and its employees prepared for a major move and renovation. The prints form a 2011 limited-edition portfolio and are housed in a custom hinged portfolio box with accompanying textual narrative.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Lewis Hine Fellowship photographs collection, 2003-2008

2.5 Linear Feet — 157 Items
The Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) is administered by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University to support documentary photographers who address humanitarian issues in the U.S. and abroad. The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection represents a selection of images from the documentary projects of six LHDFP fellows: Alex Fattal, Maital Guttman, Kate Joyce, Elena Rue, Amanda van Scoyoc, and Lucy Wilson. The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations (South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Ethiopia), as well as Boston, Massachusetts. They show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). In addition to photographic prints, there are also some documents relating to the projects, and DVDs of the photographers' documentary work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection spans the years 2003-2008 and consists of selected images from the documentary collections of six of the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) fellows in the following locations: Alex Fattal (South Africa); Maital Guttman (South Africa); Kate Joyce (South Africa); Elena Rue (Ethiopia); Amanda van Scoyoc (Boston, Mass.); and Lucy Wilson (Zimbabwe). The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged and displaced families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations, as well as people in the communities of Chelsea and Boston, Massachusetts. Images show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). Several series reveal the after-effects of displacement and social conditions in post-apartheid South Africa (Kwazulu-Natal and Bloemfontein). Two of the photographers' projects also include black-and-white images taken by the children and their families, along with quotes from those individuals regarding the images.

The collection consists of 147 color and black-and-white unmatted prints, ranging in size from 6.5x10 inches to 13x20 inches. There are also 4 DVDs containing both still- and moving-image documentaries with text and audio interviews. Several of the projects include paper copies of the introductions to the bodies of work, as well as full captions for the photographs. Many of the photographs are also available as digital images currently mounted on the LHDFP section of the CDS website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Danny Wilcox Frazier photographs, 2003-2006

3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 25 items
Collection comprises twenty-five black and white gelatin silver 16x20 inch exhibit prints, representing a larger body of work on contemporary Iowa rural culture. The images portray a changing Midwest of vanishing towns and transformed landscapes. Scenes include cemeteries, slaughterhouses, farms, abandoned grain elevators, and fields. Individuals inhabiting the scenes include young people at leisure, fishermen on the Mississippi, hunters in fields, veterans on Memorial Day, Amish families, as well as more recent arrivals to Iowa, Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews at prayer and migrant workers in the fields and at home. The prints are housed in exhibit mats. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five black-and-white gelatin silver 16x20 inch exhibit prints, representing a larger body of work by Danny Wilcox Frazier on contemporary Iowa rural culture. The images portray a changing Midwest of vanishing towns and transformed landscapes. Scenes include cemeteries, slaughterhouses, farms, abandoned grain elevators, and fields. Individuals inhapbiting the scenes include young people at leisure, fishermen on the Mississippi, hunters in fields, veterans on Memorial Day, Amish families, as well as more recent arrivals to Iowa, Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews at prayer and migrant workers in the fields and at home. The prints are arranged in exhibit number order, and are housed in hinged window mats.

The prints were featured in an exhibit entitled "Driftless: Photographs from Iowa" at Duke University in 2007. The term "Driftless" refers to a geological area of the Midwest untouched by glaciers. A recording of the artist's talk is available through the online exhibit.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Marion Belanger photographs, 2001-2012

2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints
Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments. Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The digital inkjet prints in both series measure 13 or 13 1/2 x16 inches. Both projects were published as photobooks (2009 and 2012, respectively). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments.

Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents black-and-white images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. This series was also published in 2009 as Everglades: Outside and Within.

Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The images were shot in color and are suffused with pale tonalities. Prints measure 13 1/2 x16 inches. Also published as a photobook in 2012, available in the library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Marion Belanger photographs, 2001-2012 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints

Bill Burk collection of letters and photographs from Sherwin Carlquist, 1997-2017

0.2 Linear Feet
"Bill" Burk, retired, botany librarian at the John N. Couch Biology Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

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Bitch: Feminist Response to Pop Culture records, 1996-2008

11.5 Linear Feet — 6000 Items
In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Steven B. Smith "Photographs of the suburban West" exhibit prints, 1995-2005

3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 1 CD-ROM, 26 prints — 27 prints; 1 CD-ROM
Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch black-and-white matted digital prints used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch matted black-and-white digital prints exhibited at Duke University and used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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BUST Magazine records, 1993-2015

43.2 Linear Feet — 29625 Items
Debbie Stoller and Marcelle Karp began producing BUST, a third-wave feminist women's magazine, in New York, N.Y., in 1993 as a photocopied zine. Collection documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 and 20-86 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material (Girls, Fashions, The Shit, etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2001-0009) (1500 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1993-1998) documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material ("Girls,""Fashions,""The Shit," etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items, including color (9) and black-and-white photographs (6), original black-and-white ink drawings, and color prints (23), as well as color slides (12).

Accession (2009-0082) (24 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2007) consists of production binders for issues 20-43 of BUST magazine, published from summer 2002 through spring 2007. Each binder contains a copy of the published issue, as well as tabbed sections for each portion of the issue, including features, columns, regulars, sex files, and guides.

Accession (2010-0101) (7875 items; 10.5 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2006) includes production binders, files from the creative director, and files from the Art Department.

Accession (2013-0184) (10125 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2011) consists of production binders for issues 44-71, published from 2008-2011.

Accession (2015-0040) (1400 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 2010-2013) consists of production files for issues 64-73, production binders for issues 72-86, and 13 Syquest discs from issues 4-9.

Accession (2015-0097) (1700 items, 4 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2012) consists of production files for issues 10-50, Creative Director Laurie Henzel's notebooks, and graphic materials including original art, color and black and white photographs and color layouts.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2018

118.5 Linear Feet — 106.0 lin. ft.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

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Chris Johnson farmworker photographs, 1990s

1.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes
Collection comprises 124 black-and-white digital photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 124 black-and-white photographic prints taken by North Carolina photographer Chris Johnson, portraying North Carolina farmworkers and migrant laborers in work settings as well as in their field camps and homes, many of which are revealed as dilapidated and unsanitary. Several series document labor organization and protests, including a five-year strike protesting working conditions for Mount Olive Pickle company workers. Other subjects in the images include the children and families of the farmworkers; volunteer teachers and organizers, some of whom are from the organization Student Action with Farmworkers; tobacco and Christmas tree growing in North Carolina; and street scenes from the border crossing areas of Brownsville, Texas and Matamoros, Mexico.

The prints measure 13x19 inches and are unmatted.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Roland Alston family papers, 1990-1991 and undated

.6 Linear Feet
The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

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Peter Goin photographs, 1987-2006 and undated

8.0 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — Approximately 1451 items
Collection consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The images depict altered and artificial landscapes featuring beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers, prescribed burns and reforestation sites, zoos, an abandoned town, and other places. They were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, Tennessee, and Nevada. The project resulted in a book, Humanature (1996) and an exhibit. Image formats include 16x20 inch exhibit-quality color prints, accompanied by negatives, black-and-white work prints, and book illustration prints. Research, correspondence, and other publication materials are also included in the collection. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

Collection chiefly consists of photographs by Peter Goin on the theme of the interactions and the connections between people and the natural world, and the way people manage, perceive, and represent "nature." The exhibit-quality color prints (16x20 inches) and black-and-white work prints (chiefly 8x10) feature images taken Goin from 1991-1992 while he was Artist-In-Residence at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. They depict altered and artificial landscapes such as beaches, canals, farm fields, rivers and dams, managed forests, a scale model of a river, zoos, an abandoned town (Ellenton, S.C.), and other places. In these settings, people can be seen replanting trees, building ditches, hunting, or simply surveying their surroundings. Other formats include negatives, two slides, and book illustration prints. The collection also includes research, correspondence, publicity, and other materials deriving from the book Humanature.

The images were shot in various locations, predominantly in North and South Carolina and Virginia, but also in Alabama, Georgia, central Florida, Arizona, California, and Tennessee. Locations in North Carolina include Durham, the NC Zoological Park, Duke Forest, the Carnivore Preservation Trust, Outer Banks beaches, the Chatooga and Nantahala Rivers, and the Appalachian mountains near Highlands. There is also one image from Nevada. A selection was published in Goin's book, Humanature, published by University of Texas Press in 1996, and the project also generated a traveling exhibit of the same name.

A group of copy prints included in the collection were used illustrate Goin's book. These are historic images from the 1930s through the 1980s, many taken to document the work of state-run programs. As with Goin’s own work, they also show human-altered landscapes such as reforestation sites, canals, beach erosion replanting sites, and others. A few images appear to be from the 1950s and are of schoolchildren in Aiken, South Carolina. Other locations include Durham, N.C.’s Duke Forest, the Colorado River, beaches, and western deserts.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

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Eric Breitenbach photographs of Florida, 1987-1989

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 10 item — 8 photographic prints; 2 copies of printed catalog
Collection consists of eight black-and-white photographic prints, most of which were taken as part of Breitenbach's work for his Florida Documentary Project, and two copies of the project's exhibit catalog. The gelatin silver prints measure 14 1/8 x 16 7/8 inches, and are almost all portraits of the many types of people living in Florida and the recreation they enjoy or the significant objects and other people in their lives. Individuals include teenagers, college students, deer hunters, Haitian families and other immigrants; and retirees. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of eight black-and-white photographic prints, most of which were taken as part of Breitenbach's work for his Florida Documentary Project, and two copies of the project's exhibit catalog. The gelatin silver prints measure 14 1/8 x 16 7/8 inches, and are almost all portraits of the many types of people living in Florida and the recreation they enjoy or the significant objects and other people in their lives. Individuals include teenagers, college students, deer hunters, Haitian families and other immigrants; and retirees. The prints are all signed, with title, location, and date written on the backs. The catalog includes reproductions of project photographs, with image titles, locations, and dates; a list of planned exhibits; and a summary and timeline of the project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Rick Lang photographs of Florida and other Southern states, 1985-2013

12 Linear Feet — 13 boxes — 229 photographic prints; 258 contact sheets; approximately 3100 negatives; approximately 40 printed items; 130 digital files
Photographer and faculty member at the Creadlé School of Art, Winter Park, Florida. Collection comprises 229 large-format black-and-white photographs by Rick Lang, documenting the communities and landscapes of the American South, with an emphasis on roadside signs, small businesses, and weathered buildings. While the majority of the images were taken in Florida, there also many taken in other states throughout the South, particularly in Louisiana. There are also a few from New Mexico and Arizona. Photographic processes include gelatin silver and pigmented inkjet prints. Print sizes are chiefly 11x14, 13x19, and 16x20 inches, and were printed and signed by the photographer. Accompanying the prints are approximately 3100 negatives and 258 contact sheets linked by unique identification numbers. In addition there is a small amount of print materials chiefly associated with his solo and group exhibits, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Also includes digital files of images. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains 229 black-and-white gelatin silver or inkjet large-format prints by photographer Rick Lang, documenting the communities and landscapes of Florida and other Southern states; there are also a few images taken in New Mexico and Arizona. Prints are typically sized 11x14, 13x19, and 16x20 inches, and are signed and printed by Lang. About half are housed in 16x20 and 20x24 inch window mats. The prints are arranged in number sequence as assigned by Lang; the negatives and contact sheets are linked by contact sheet numbers which are noted in each print entry in this collection guide.

Lang's work focuses chiefly on scenes of weathered buildings and businesses - stores, motels, bars, alligator farms, and tourist shops - along the back roads of the South; there are also many photographs of signs and graffiti. Few if any people are present. Among the exceptions is a sequence of images of protesters in Florida demonstrating against censorship and other issues.

Accompanying the prints is a full set of negatives and contact sheets, with many additional images that are not present in the large-format series. There is also a small amount of printed materials chiefly associated with his solo and group exhibits, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Three photograph books offer images not present in this collection of people in the Florida communities where Lang lived and worked. Also includes digital files of about 111 selected images.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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James Ware Pitts photographs, 1984-1998

0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 5 prints — 5 prints
Collection comprises five 4x5 inch matted black-and-white palladium contact prints, featuring abandoned or run-down manmade structures in the natural landscape. Locations include the Southwest (Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona) and the Olympic Pensinsula. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.
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Cedric N. Chatterley photographs, 1983-2013 and undated

15 Linear Feet — 29 boxes
The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his MFA thesis project on religious experience in the U.S. The photographs are primarily black-and-white prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches. The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C.; tornado survivors in South Dakota; an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and sheep rancher Judith Fae "Pachy" Burns in Montana. Some of his documentary work also includes oral history interviews. There are also several recordings of interviews with Chatterley, where he speaks about his work as a documentary photographer, and a book by Barbara Lau containing his photographs of Cambodian immigrants. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his Master in Fine Arts thesis project, "Ambivalent Ecstasies/Converging Energies," on American religious experience. The photographs are primarily black-and-white gelatin silver prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches.

The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, a project undertaken with Barbara Lau of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C., also with Barbara Lau; tornado survivors in South Dakota who rebuilt their town over a period of ten years; Holy Land USA, an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and a woman sheep rancher's work during lambing season in Montana. Some of the images were taken with Chatterley's hand-built cameras.

A final series consists of materials relating to Barbara Lau's book, From Cambodia to Greensboro, documenting Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, that includes images taken by Chatterley, and a set of recorded interviews from 2008 in which Chatterley speaks about his career as a documentary photographer. The cassettes have been converted to digital files and use copies are available for access. Original recordings are closed to use.

Series are arranged in chronological order; prints are numbered and captioned by the photographer.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Vincent Cianni photographs, 1983-2012

21.5 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — 668 items
Vince Cianni is a documentary photographer based in Newburgh, New York. The Berlin series features photographs of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall, and the reunification of Germany in 1990. The Poughkeepsie Mall and the Providence House Men's Shelter series both document urban culture and decay in the 1980s. The Weddings Series contains photographs from weddings (including some transgender) from the mid-1980s. The Brooklyn project features images and recorded interviews from Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore, which relates to Hispanic American roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, mid-1990s. Cambodian kickboxing culture is explored in another set of photographs taken in 2004. The last series offers a set of oral history interviews of gays in the military, also related to a photobook by Cianni. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises photographs from six bodies of documentary work by Vince Cianni, New York-based photographer and author. Subjects focus chiefly on American culture, exploring wedding rituals, skateboarding and youth culture, urban decay, street photography, shopping mall society, men in shelters, and gays in the military. There is also a series on kickboxing in Cambodia, and a large set of oral history interviews with gay men and women in the U.S. military. Most of the prints are gelatin silver, but there are also some in color.

Accession 2007-0072 houses a series of 224 black-and-white photographs depicting roller blade and Hispanic American youth street culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, taken by Cianni during the 1990s and into 2001. Fifteen of the prints appear in Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side (2001); and 68 prints are unpublished. Photographs are captioned and signed on the back. Also included are photographs of urban life in the Bronx, NY; and from the baby shower (Queens, NY) and wedding (Fairborn, OH) of a young couple who appear in other images from this series. Finally, the series houses the maquette for Cianni's book (version 1, 2000), and the printer's dummy (versions 2-3, 2001-2004).

Accession 2007-0200 contains 65 black-and-white prints and photographic collages of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Berlin, 1990. Prints range from 8x10 to 16x24 and are captioned and signed on back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0048 contains prints from the Poughkeepsie Mall Series (Poughkeepsie, NY, 1980s) and the Providence House Men's Shelter Series (Newburgh, NY, 1983). Forty-four black-and-white photographic prints: one 5 5/8 x 8 ½; one 5 7/8 x9; and forty-two 11x14 prints. Poughkeepsie Mall series: twenty-two 11x14 prints, 1980s. The images depict youth culture, African American culture, and urban decay.

Accession 2008-0300 contains 184 prints of weddings, including some transexual weddings, taken by Cianni during the 1980s. This series includes Cianni's MFA project, Wedding Rituals, a group of twenty-four 20x24 prints and one 16x20 print. Photographs in this series are in both color and black-and-white; many are captioned and signed on the back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0303 contains an additional 23 8x10 duotone and gelatin silver prints from Cianni's book We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side. These prints include portraits and other images of Hispanic American youth roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York during the mid-1990s.

Accession 2009-0243 houses forty-two black-and-white photographs of Muay Thai style of kickboxing competition in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 2004: thirty-six 8x10 prints and six 16x20 prints.

Accession 2010-0187 includes forty-seven 8x10 black-and-white prints from the We Skate Hardcore series. The gelatin silver prints are signed on verso and date 1995-2003, with bulk dates 1995-1997.

In addition, the collection contains digital video, stills, and image scans, and oral history recordings, all relating to his documentary photobooks We skate hardcore and Gays in the military. Original media formats are closed to use. Most files have been mounted to the library server; for access, please contact the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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North Carolina Poverty Project records, 1983-2004 and undated (bulk 1986-1997)

30.1 Linear Feet — 19,182 Items

Primarily consists of Executive Board and Sector and Advisory Groups correspondence, memoranda, and meeting records; financial and planning documents, including grant applications; and workshop, seminar, and presentation materials that document the organization's activities to raise awareness of and promote action on the causes of poverty in N.C. Also includes correspondence, memoranda, reports, and other writings by the executive director, J. Gordon Chamberlin; telephone logs and appointment books; various printed material concerning poverty in NC; 11 audio and 15 videocassettes; 134 black-and-white and 10 color prints; 10 color negatives; and 8 data cartridge tapes. (02-234)

The 2006 addition (2006-0055)(600 items, 1.3 lin. ft.; dated 1986-2004) contains correspondence, meeting records, publications, and other documents generated by the North Carolina Poverty Project and the Poverty Coalition. Also included is an oversize 7 panel Poverty Display.

The 2007 addition (2007-0023)(3300 items, 4.4 lin. ft.; dated 1982-2003) contains documents related to the executive board including correspondence, financial documents, and planning documents; tax information; documents related to conferences and business trips; photocopies and clippings of articles related to poverty from the New York Times and other newspapers (1986-2001); and lists of library holdings of poverty books at Southeastern universities.

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Americans For Immigrant Justice records, 1982-2020; 1982-ongoing

103 Linear Feet — 23625 Items
Americans for Immigrant Justice (formerly Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center [FIAC]) is a not-for-profit legal assistance organization dedicated to protecting and promoting the basic human rights of immigrants of all nationalities. The Americans for Immigrant Justice records span the years of 1980-2017. The collection contains project files and correspondence regarding immigrant detention policy and conditions in the state of Florida, particularly concerning the Haitian community; legal documents regarding the same, including restricted and confidential legal files; and audiovisual material produced by or for AIJ. The bulk of materials are organized by subject and detention facility.

The Americans for Immigrant Justice (AIJ) records, formerly the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC), span the years of 1980-2017. This collection contains extensive documentation of the events and crises surrounding asylum, deportation, detention and abuses that took place within Florida detention centers from the years 1980 to 2017, as well as documentation regarding issues of repatriation. It records the efforts of AIJ to advocate on behalf of immigrant and refugee populations, mainly in Florida, during this time. The majority of material in this collection deals with Haitians seeking asylum in the U.S., but also includes major material on Cuban and Central American refugees, then minor files on Chinese, Middle Eastern, and other immigrant populations. Many files focus on Cheryl Little's work with child refugees and detainees and their asylum claims, and on discrimination against female immigrants. Files also include material on interdiction at sea and related court documents, government immigration policy pre- and post-9/11, documentation on hunger strikes at various facilities, material related to the Haitian Boat crises, and documentation of raids on immigrant populations. The detention facilities of particular concern in this collection include Guantanamo, Krome, and Turner Guilford Knight correctional facilities, as well as Florida's county jails.

The collection contains legal documents related to the activity of AIJ, including affidavits of detainees held in Florida facilities, and other court documents, such as court pleadings and briefings; reports on facility conditions; correspondence, including correspondence between detainees and their families, letters from concerned citizens, and formal correspondence between AIJ and other organizations and officials; case studies and reports on immigration and refugee crises, and reports of abuses and conditions in Florida detention facilities; FBI interviews with detainees; related articles and speeches; restricted material, including medical records; and promotional and educational videos produced by or for AIJ, documentary footage of missions and events, and press conference and news footage.

The series in this collection include the Detention Series, the Immigrant and Refugees Series, the Restricted Series, the General Organizational Records Series, the Audiovisual Series and the Photographic Materials Series. The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Detention Series and the Immigrant and Refugees Series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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