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Collection

Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1932-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 28 photographic prints — 11x14 inches — Inscriptions: print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, titles, and dates assigned by former owners, and other notes. All are signed in ink by Siskind.

Aaron Siskind (1903-1991) was an American photographer and faculty member of the Chicago Institute of Design and Rhode Island School of Design. Collection consists of 28 black-and-white signed 11x14 inch prints, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1932 to 1940. The images originate from two projects by Siskind: "Harlem Document" and "The Most Crowded Block in the World." Subjects include African American men, women, and children at home and in the streets; scenes from the Apollo and New Lafayette theaters, a nightclub, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 28 black-and-white photographs by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1932 to 1941. The images form part of two of Siskind's early documentary projects: "Harlem Document," and "The Most Crowded Block in the World." Subjects include African American men, women, and children in their kitchens, bedrooms, living rooms, and outside on the streets of Harlem; there are also scenes from the Apollo and New Lafayette theaters, and scenes from a nightclub and a church; many images feature the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. These particular prints were created by Siskind from original negatives sometime before his death in 1991, possibly in the early 1980s. Some images have multiple copies in the collection.

Collection

Afghan Wars photographs, circa 1897 1.5 Linear Feet — 45 Items

Collection of black and white glossy photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Anglo-Afghan War most likely during the Mamund Valley hostilities of 1897. Prints are mounted on cardstock, and collection includes the portfolio in which they were originally housed. Most have captions with location or subject, either typed or hand-written; a few are dated 1897. Images feature British Army military camps, landscapes, and groups of officers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection of glossy black and white photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Afghan Wars, most likely in summer and fall 1897 during which there was a major outbreak of hostilities. The images consist of 24 8.125" x 5.75" prints, and 21 smaller 4.125" x 5.75" prints, all affixed to cardstock, three or four per page, often on both sides of the board. There is also a panoramic shot of the Tungai Pass made up of three sequenced prints. Pasted-down typed captions are also present for some images, while others carry handwritten captions; a few are dated 1897. The set was originally housed in an unmarked cloth and board portfolio, which has also been conserved. Resembling to some degree in subject matter the Afghanistan images of military photographer R. B. Holmes, the majority of the images in this collection depict British military camps and landscapes. The landscape views include the Mamund Valley, Tangi Pass, Agrah, Chakdara, Malakand, and Ambeyla Pass, and a few captions describe events taking place in that location. Military camps, many taken at a distance with fine detail, include Buner, Inayat Killa, Kindergali, and Malakand. A few scenes show bridges, including a boat bridge over the Indus. Some prints feature groups of officers in posed and casual scenarios, including one image of the First Royal West Kent Regiment. One image shows the gravesite of 2nd Lieutenant W. C. Browne-Clayton, dated Sept. 30, 1897, killed at the battle of Agrah. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection
Online
Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection
Online
Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection
Online
Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection
Online
Small bound album holding 34 black-and-white snapshots and one photographic postcard. The photographs document a close-knit group of African American soldiers of the U.S. Army's 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company in Munich, Germany, August 1945, during the last weeks of World War II. The snapshots are of individuals and groups in uniform, in casual settings; scenes include the men standing in line at mealtime, enjoying leisure time in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, and standing in front of a bombed-out building in Munich. Most have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and some comments. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Small photograph album (6x8 inches) housing 35 loosely mounted photographs of U.S. Army African American soldiers in Munich, Germany, August 1945. Comprises 34 black-and-white snapshots measuring approximately 2 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches, and one black-and-white photographic postcard portrait (3x5 inches) of a Corporal Jack Taylor, to whom the album may have belonged. The caption on the back of the postcard bears the name of the 3909th Quartermaster Truck Company. The only dates in the album are found on one page and refer to August 16-19th, 1945, but the other photographs may have been taken before or after this period.

The snapshots are of individuals and groups, and chiefly show the men enjoying some leisure time during the last months of World War II. Most of the images have handwritten captions with last names, nicknames, and commentary. Scenes include the men posing in their bathing suits in what appears to be an un-segregated pool facility, posing with Army trucks, standing in front of a bombed-out building (the only city scene), and waiting in line at mealtime. Among the last names are: Sergeant Carney, Sergeant Riley, Sergeant Ousley, "McKnight," Louis Allen, Sergeant Edward Johnson and Private Robert Johnson ("the fat boys"), First Sergeant Brown, "Mule" Crawford, Homer Magee, "Blind" Knight, J. Martin, Jenkins ("the jive man from New Jersey"), and Corporal Jack Taylor.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center of African and African American History at Duke University.

Collection

Alen MacWeeney photographs, 1962-1986, bulk 1965 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 14 prints — The prints all measure approximately 13x18 inches; image sizes vary and are given in the inventory. All sizes given are rounded up to the nearest 1/8 of an inch.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals and families, as well as some of animals, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes. The prints measure 13x18 inches. A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images along with others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals, including an old man in a field, a Benedictine monk, a woman in a doorway, and a farming family, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes.

The black-and-white inkjet prints are printed on uncoated textured art paper, and measure 13x18 inches. Image sizes range from 6 1/8 x 10 1/4 to 11 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches.

A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images and others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection

Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

Online
Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; subjects in other documentary projects include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy going about his day, tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina, and views of the art-filled interiors of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document collaborations with other photographers and writers, including Gertrude Duby Blom and E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his career at Duke University as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's exchanges with other photographers, friends, and professionals, but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Collection

Allan H. Gilbert papers, 1926-1976 12.56 Linear Feet — 11,525 Items

Manuscripts, research files, correspondence, approximately 1287 black-and-white photographs and photostats of documents from various repositories and used in his research, and 3 reels of microfilm. Subjects of the research files and manuscripts include: Dante, Machiavelli, Milton, Jonson, and Aristotle (his POETICS).

Addition (2007-0141; 400 items, 0.5 lin. ft.) contains index files documenting the Gilbert's book collection. Many of these books are now in the collection at the Rare Book, Manuscript and Sepcial Collections Library at Duke University.

Collection
The Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth was a vocational guidance service organization originally created under the leadership of Orie Latham Hatcher as the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (1914-1921), and later known as the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (1921-1937). Disbanded in 1963. The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth and its predecessors. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives. The records document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Additional subjects addressed in the papers and photographs include economic conditions throughout the South; migration patterns from U.S. rural regions to cities; Appalachian culture, including crafts and music; community life in the South; and employment for African Americans. The collection includes 42 matted platinum prints of rural citizens and scenes in Kentucky taken in the 1930s by noted photographer Doris Ulmann, and include a portrait of her assistant and folklorist, John Jacob Niles.

The records of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY) span the years 1887 to 1963, although the bulk of the collection begins in 1914 with the creation of the organization and ends in 1946 with the death of founder and president, Orie Latham Hatcher. Additional records for the Alliance from 1947 to 1963 can be found in the Amber Arthun Warburton papers, also located in the Rubenstein Library.

The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for AGRY and its predecessors, the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (VBVW) and the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (SWEA), and document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives.

Early materials in the Correspondence, Administrative Files, and Clippings and Press Releases series document the Bureau's projects, such as the speaker's bureau and the scholarship program, as well as the Bureau's relationship with other women's organizations such as the Virginia Association of Colleges and Schools for Girls, Southern Collegiate Women (later the American Association of University Women), the National Federation of Business and Professional Women Clubs (BPW), and the National Council of Women.

Strong ties were developed between the Bureau and these organizations during its formative years: Hatcher chaired national and local committees in most of these organizations, and early correspondence and administrative files center on her work with these organizations particularly concerning educational standards and vocational training in women's colleges. In these early records it is often unclear which of these activities were officially adopted by the Bureau or if they were solely Hatcher's activities.

The AGRY's activities documented in the Branch Files Series include benefits, forums, exhibits, and festivals. The New York Branch sponsored several opera benefits to help raise funds during the 1920s. The Rural Mountain Festival, sponsored by the Richmond Branch, was held in 1938. In 1932, the Alliance commissioned noted New York portrait photographer, Doris Ulmann, to photograph rural youth and other individuals in Kentucky. The photographs were subsequently exhibited by several of the branches and were used to promote discussion of vocational issues and the work of the Alliance. Forty-two of these original platinum prints are located in the Photographic Materials Series.

Organizational changes reflected modifications in the organization's goals. Although SWEA continued many of the projects started by the Virginia Bureau, emphasis shifted away from lobbying efforts aimed to open new careers for women and more towards research on women's occupational trends and model guidance counseling programs based on that research. Correspondence during the early 1920s contains letters from faculty and administrators from women's colleges throughout the Northeast and South which describe various approaches (or lack thereof) to providing vocational guidance to students. Administrative files contain information on surveys and on a vocational guidance course for college women which was developed at Goucher College under the auspices of SWEA and tested at Duke University (then Trinity College) and the College of William and Mary. The Publications and Clippings and Press Releases series also contain considerable information regarding Alliance research and activities during this time.

During the mid to late 1920s, SWEA sponsored several research projects through its Rural Guidance Project which examined vocational trends of rural girls in North Carolina and Virginia. While the Correspondence and Administrative Files series document how the projects were organized, the comprehensive data collected during these projects is extant only in resulting SWEA publications such as Rural Girls in the City for Work and the unpublished manuscript "Fifty Rural High School Girls."

Alliance projects in the late 1920s and 1930s consisted of experimental and demonstration guidance programs in rural schools. These projects were located at the Konnarock Training School (Virginia), elementary schools in Albemarle Co., Virginia, Farm Life School (Craven Co., N.C.), and elementary and secondary schools in Breathitt Co., Kentucky, among others. Each of these demonstration projects also resulted in substantial Alliance publications which in most cases represent the bulk of extant documentation of each project. The Photographic Materials series contains many snapshots taken in these various communities, although most are of poor quality and unidentified; there are also negatives in this series. Additional information may also appear scattered throughout Correspondence, Clippings, and Administrative Files series.

The Breathitt County Project Files Series, provides the most comprehensive documentation of the demonstration project which grew to become the Alliance's main research activity from about 1934 to 1942. The project encompassed a wide range of activities including data collection on students' home life, teacher training workshops, vocational guidance programming through the county's Planning Council, and a visit by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1938. Particularly noteworthy in these materials are the extensive raw data files consisting of approximately 2500 autobiographical surveys of students. Additional files contain charts of data compilations and teacher reports which identify trends in students' educational behavior. Photographs of Breathitt County schools, students, and home life, chiefly taken by noted photographer Doris Ullman, are contained in the Photographic Materials Series.

SWEA and AGRY's emphasis on research and dissemination of information was reflected in the increase of published materials produced by the organization. Much of this material is contained in the Publications Series. Clippings of book reviews document the wide-spread acceptance of these publications in a newly emerging field. Several unpublished manuscripts resulting from Alliance research projects are extant in the Writings and Speeches Series and include "Occupations for Educated Women in Durham, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina" (1926), a bound copy of "Fifty Rural High School Girls'' (1930), and final drafts of "When Our Young Folks Come Home to the Smaller Communities" (1945).

Another strategy for publicizing the work of the Alliance was through local and national radio broadcasts. Shows were broadcast from Richmond, New York, and Washington, D.C., and gave information on specific occupations and discussed vocational guidance issues. Broadcast scripts contained in the Writings and Speeches Series feature youths interviewing each other and Orie Hatcher about career goals, a dialogue between Eleanor Roosevelt and Hatcher on the future of rural youth (1938), and a presentation by Amelia Earhart on women in aviation (1931).

The Correspondence, Clippings and Press Releases, and Subject Files series demonstrate the Alliance's shift away from relationships with women's organizations in the late 1920s and towards guidance and educational organizations such as the American Council for Guidance and Personnel Associations (CGPA), National Vocational Guidance Association (NVGA), National Occupational Conference (NOC), National Education Association (NEA), and the U.S. Department of Education in the 1930s. In many of these organizations, Hatcher chaired committees on rural youth, and representatives from these groups served on AGRY's Board of Trustees.

Numerous regional and national conference activities are reflected in the Conference Files Series, with a complete set of conference proceedings and findings contained in the Publications Series. Information on pre-1930s conferences is slim, but additional information on all conferences can be gleaned from the Correspondence and Clippings and Press Releases series. Copies of papers delivered by Alliance members and others are located in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Materials dating past Hatcher's tenure in the Alliance consist mainly of routine administrative correspondence. A more complete set of AGRY organizational records dating from 1947-1963 is located in the papers of Amber Arthun Warburton, her successor. These records continue several series started in the AGRY records such as executive board minutes, publications, project files, and correspondence.