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Collection
Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

Collection

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

Collection

William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated 31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items

Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

Collection

William MacGregor letters, 1899-1918 0.1 Linear Feet — 8 items

Sir William MacGregor (1846-1919) was governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria, between 1899-1904. Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

There is one letter (1899 March 11) from Frederick Butler, a clerk in the Nigeria Department of the Colonial Office, writing that he is sending literature, including a report on the liquor traffic in West Africa. There are two letters (1899 August 6 and 1899 August 30) from John Balie Henderson, a leading engineer for the Queensland Water Supply Department, regarding water bores and the Great Artesian Basin. There are also two letters written by Sir Reginald Laurence Antrobus, crown agent for the colonies and a civil servant in the Colonial Office, one letter (1899 October 15) regarding the new Niger Administration and financial management, the other letter (1904 June 9) regarding a scandal, "the report that the acting Resident proposed to hoist the British flag in Ibadan is wholly untrue.... it seems undesirable to make too much of it." A letter (1900 April 26) from the Colonial Secretariat at Lagos deals largely with the liquor trade and describes movement of the West African Frontier Force. There is a letter (1901 April 21) from Sir Ralph Moor, the first high commissioner of the British Southern Nigeria Protectorate, regarding details of the rubber trade. The letter includes the photograph of a Nigerian family. Finally, there is a letter from the Chief Justice at Lagos, A. R. Gunnington, regarding the his unfair replacement.

Collection

William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the Deep South, especially Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; other images were taken in Mexico, Central America, and France. Also includes Anderson's professional papers, fliers, and posters, chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the Deep South, particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among his earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection

William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection
William Hesketh Lever was the First Viscount Leverhulme, and founder of the international firm, Lever Brothers. This bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled Solomon Islands Views, and contains 98 black-and-white photographs, chiefly measuring 6x8 inches, that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations from about 1906-1910. Images include company buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants and dwellings, other cultivated crops, flora and fauna, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Notable persons found among the images include the Resident Commissioner of the Islands at the time, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers.

This handsomely bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled "Solomon Islands Views", and contains 98 black-and-white photographs that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations. Images include buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Persons whose photographic portraits are found among the images are the Resident Commissioner of the Islands, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers. The photographs illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers' Pacific Plantations operations in the Solomon Islands. The views include buildings and other installations, coconut plantations in various stages of development, lumbering, native housing, local populace, local workers in various tasks, local and inter-island shipping, colonial and company officials, local chiefs, company and government headquarters, ocean steamships, steam powered agricultural equipment, copra, local flora and fauna, and the cultivation of peanuts, rubber, and sweet potatoes.

Place names listed for the photographs are: Rendova, West Bay, Erickson's Island, Pepesala, Guadalcanal, KayIan, Ufa, Banika, Tulagi, Gavatu, Lunga, Kokoon, Pampa, Kaukau, Aola, and Stanmore River. Persons in the photographs include: Charles Morris Woodford, Resident Commissioner of the Islands, 1896 to 1914, and Mrs. Woodford; Mrs. Tillotson, wife of Lord Leverhulme's nephew, John Lever Tillotson (d. 1915) who was his senior colleague on the board; Fred Wernham, an expert in tropical plantation work who was closely identified with developments in the Solomon Islands; Joseph Meek, who first journeyed to the Islands in 1905 to assess prospects there; Methodist missionary J. F. Goldie, translator of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and John into Roviana; and a number of others whose names can be found in the list of the pictures.

The black-and-white photographs, emulsion-paper prints, typically measure 6x8 inches in size. Several photographs are dated 1906, but most are undated. The buildings and headquarters of the company appear well developed. That suggests that 1906 is too early a date, since Mr. Meek's initial visit to the Solomons was in 1905. Most of the pictures probably date some years after 1906, but before 1914 when Commissioner Woodford left the islands. Other factors suggest that the dates range from 1906 to 1910.

Collection

William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

Online
Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

Collection
William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner's academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner's roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner's involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner's academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

Collection
Online

The Wayne P. Ellis Collection of Kodakiana spans the dates 1886 to 1989, and was created by Mr. Ellis over the period of nearly four decades. Whereas many photographic collectors concentrate on cameras and photographs, Ellis emphasized advertising and marketing material. As a consequence, the collection is especially rich in print advertisements for Eastman Kodak products that were published in general interest periodicals beginning in the late 19th century. More unusual items are the product catalogs, how-to manuals for both amateur and professional photographers, serial publications for salesmen and photographers, and a variety of marketing and promotional items. There are several scrapbooks of advertising materials with considerable marginalia. The collection also includes training manuals and other publications for Kodak employees. In addition, many items in the collection deal with various aspects of the corporate history of Eastman Kodak from its earliest years up to the mid-20th century.

The collection contains little or no correspondence. There are scattered groups of photographs throughout the collection, though they are few in number. Many are formal and casual black and white photographs of Kodak staff members. Others were used for promotional or sales activities.

Processing Note

Some of Mr. Ellis's material was in excellent order; other items were in greater disarray. The collection has been arranged, as far as practical, according to the type of material. The series names given to each category are as clear and descriptive as possible.

No items were removed from the collection except for some duplicates. Decisions were made early in the processing of this collection, however, to separate several titles for individual cataloging. Notable among these is the entire run of the early periodical Kodakery (v. 1-19, 1913-1932) as well as many issues of the variably titled Photographic Review and Photographic Digest, and several others. All of these titles are part of the Rare Book, Manuscript and Special Collections Library and may be located using that library's online catalog by searching "Wayne P. Ellis" as a keyword. The separation of items may cause some small inconvenience to users of the collection, but it has been deemed impractical to reverse the situation after the fact.

Mr. Ellis also contributed over 160 books on various aspects of advertising to the Duke University Libraries; the titles have been cataloged in the usual fashion as individual books, and are identified in the library catalog as being part of the Wayne P. Ellis collection.