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James Van Der Zee photographs, circa 1908-1935 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 42 photographic prints

Collection comprises 42 gelatin silver prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are also fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio. Subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats, a soldier, a female impersonator, a funerary portrait of a man in an open casket, Black Hebrews, Black Cross nurses, Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade, entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia, boxer Jack Johnson, and entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing a violin, circa 1930. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). An early portrait of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter was taken around 1908, in Lenox, Massachusetts, his birthplace. Average print size is roughly 10 3/4 x 12 inches. Two are original vintage prints; the rest are exhibit prints created mostly in the 1980s from original negatives. Some prints are signed; all are titled and dated on the verso. Several bear the GGG Studio stamp at the 272 Lenox Avenue address. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises forty gelatin silver exhibit prints and two vintage prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are fictionalized scenes and poses evoking hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, Harlem parades, a Baptist church building and its congregation, and a first-grade Harlem classroom. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing the violin, circa 1930. Other subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats; a 1923 soldier; the New York Black Giants baseball team; a female impersonator; a man in an open funeral casket with a superimposed poem extolling fatherhood; a group of African American Hebrews in front of the Moorish Zionist Temple; Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade; a Garveyite with his son; entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia in their "Dark Tower" salon with a large group of friends; boxer Jack Johnson; and a double exposure portrait of entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance; later images exhibit a certain optimism in spite of the looming Great Depression and its effects.

Prints are arranged in chronological order. The earliest images, from 1908, are of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter, probably taken in Lenox, Massachusetts, Van Der Zee's birthplace, and a blacksmith, probably taken in Virginia, where Van der Zee spent some time before moving to New York.

The exhibit prints were created from original negatives chiefly from 1981-1983, under the supervision of James Van Der Zee until his passing in 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Mussenden Van Der Zee. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from runs of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed by the photographer.

The majority of the prints measure 10 x 12 inches (sheet dimensions); image sizes range from 10 1/8 x 8 to 10 x 2 5/8 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs picture campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs depict campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

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Collection comprises a stannotype photograph showing five female suffragists standing in a row. One woman holds a banner from the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis, Mo. Another has a "Votes for Women" sticker on a suitcase at her feet.
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Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Todd Webb photographs, 1948-1979, bulk 1948-1951 1 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 prints

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, outdoor advertising, doorways, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, doorways, outdoor advertising, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Paper sizes are 8.5 x 11 and 11x14 inches. Image dimensions are noted for each print entry. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by an Italian soldier stationed in Ethiopia during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War and the subsequent Italian occupation of the region. The soldier is unidentified, but his name may be the one that is embossed on the lower right-hand corner of the album's leather cover. On the first page of the album is a postcard announcing the Italian troop's victorious entry into Addis Ababa. Comprises 133 black-and-white photographs, ranging in size from 2"x1" to 4.75"x6", of the A.O.I. (Africa Orientale Italiana). The photographs are divided into groups by city, and many have captions written in Italian. Cities and other locations mentioned include Axum, Scire, Gondar, Cheren, Asmara, Lake Tana, Adua, and Addis Ababa, among others. In addition to images of military maneuvers, there are photographs of social customs and conditions (markets, native buildings, hairdos, priests, pilgrims, ceremonies, families, etc.), wildlife, and landscapes.
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"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Charles L. Abernethy Sr. papers, 1713-1972, bulk 1907-1959 85 Linear Feet — 160 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 60,855 items

Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. (1872-1955) was a Democratic Congressman representing eastern North Carolina from 1922-1935. His professional papers consist chiefly of correspondence and records from his law practice and legal cases, with smaller amounts of writings and speeches, financial papers, printed materials, diaries, and some personal papers, including early deeds. There is also a large group of photographs, photo albums, and clippings scrapbooks chiefly documenting Abernethy's political career. One album from 1907 contains postcards of Beaufort, N.C.; another contains photographs of a three-month Congressional trip to Alaska, 1923, and includes images of President and Mrs. Harding and a diary transcript of the trip. Other items include some papers of his son, Charles Laban Abernethy, Jr., also a lawyer, and a volume of his poetry.

The collection principally comprises a large series of correspondence and legal records accumulated by North Carolina lawyer and politician Charles L. Abernethy, Sr. during his tenure as U.S. Congressman. There are papers relating to the senior Abernethy's law practice and business dealings in Beaufort and New Bern, N.C. (including legal papers concerning land development in Carteret County, Cape Lookout, and Horse Island maintained by both father and son).

Other materials include deeds and other early papers, political speeches, newspaper clippings and scrapbooks of Abernethy's political career, a diary, and the Abernethy coat-of-arms. There are also papers assembled by Abernethy's son, Charles L. Abernethy, Jr., a lawyer in his father's firm, and a volume of his poetry.

A lare group of photographs and albums includes a photograph album containing snapshots the elder Abernethy took during a congressional trip to Alaska for three months of 1923 (including photographs of President and Mrs. Harding), as well as a typescript of his diary from the trip; and an album containing postcards of Beaufort, N.C, in 1907, featuring a celebration of either the 200th anniversary of the town's founding or the opening of passenger and rail service to the town (or both).

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Collection comprises an original, 7 x 9-inch, black-and-white New York City press photograph, showing judges of the National Fashion Promotion Contest accepting entries from Irene Fogel, national president of Gamma Alpha Chi, the National Professional Advertising Fraternity for Women and sponsor of the contest. Judges pictured include Jack Mintz, treasurer of the New York Dress Institute; Bernice Fitz-Gibbon, advertising director of Gimbel Brothers; and Abbott Kimball, president of Abbott Kimball Advertising Agency. Photographer unknown. The following stamps are on the back of the photo: "NEA;ACME.”
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Collection comprises 43 3.5 x 2.5 black-and-white photographs of Dese, Ethiopia, primarily featuring groups of people and local infrastructure. The photographer is unknown. Images include native tribunals and prisoners, the nobility, Coptic priests, water bearers, processions, a local calvary unit, a slave, roads, houses, fountains, wells, a Coptic school, and the local market, among others. There are handwritten captions and dates (including Roman numerals for the Fascist year) in Italian on the backs of the majority of the photographs; a one-page English translation for the captions is provided.
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Haiti Tourist Bureau photographs, 1950-1955 0.2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 17 prints — 8x10 inches

Collection consists of seventeen glossy 8x10 inch black-and-white photographs of tourist destinations and activities in Haiti, marked on the versos with the associated name of the Haiti Tourist Bureau in New York City, established sometime around 1950. These images served as visual components for the island's 1950s tourism campaigns, and show white tourists in various posed scenes, visiting handicraft shops and outdoor markets, riding donkeys, enjoying the beach, and watching folkloric dances. There are also several views of the capital, Port-au-Prince, and smaller towns such as Cap-Haïtien, as well as resorts, beaches, town streets, and mountainsides. Noted Haitian photographer Edouard Peloux's name appears on a print signed "Ed. Peloux, 19-7-53." The rest are unsigned and undated. Several of the photographs appear in a 1955 publication, "A Guide to Haiti, Star of the Caribbean," also by the Haiti Tourist Bureau.
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Collection contains three volumes relating to the life and political career of George Meade Bowers, Congressional member for West Virginia, 1916-1923: a scrapbook (1898-1914) of clippings and a few other items concerning the United States Fish Commission, fish culture, the fishing industry, and politics and elections in West Virginia, with a few items relating to the Bowers family; a scrapbook of congratulatory telegrams sent after Bowers's 1916 election to Congress; and a photograph album from a 1917 visit to Hawaii by a congressional delegation, which included Bowers, containing gelatin silver photographs with views from the islands of Hawaii, Oahu, and Kauai, photographs of officials and Japanese and Hawaiian inhabitants, and an image of Queen Liliuokalani lying in state following her death November 11, 1917.

Collection contains three volumes belonging to George Meade Bowers, Republican politician and government official from West Virginia.

The photograph album, entitled "Photographs, Congressional Party in Hawaii, George Meade Bowers," contains 58 silver gelatin photographs. The album is undated, but the image content establishes its creation from 1916-1917. The delegation's visit in 1917 coincided with the death of Queen Liliuokalani on Nov. 11, 1917 and her funeral; the album includes a photograph of the Queen lying in state. Settings include the islands of Oahu, Hawaii, and Kauai, including Honolulu, Kona, Waimea, Kaimu, Makapuu, and Hilo. Scenes include Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (created a national park in 1916), the delegation, schoolchildren, Japanese, Hawaiians, public officials, and travel.

The scrapbook, also assembled by George Bowers, contains mostly clippings but also a small number of photographs, and dates from 1898-1914. They primarily concern his work as U.S. Commissioner of Fish and Fisheries, 1898-1913. There are a variety of clippings about Bowers, the Fish Commission, the International Fisheries Congress in 1908, oyster; lobsters, various kinds of fish, and the U.S. fishing industry. There are also numerous clipping about politics and elections in West Virginia. A few clippings concern the Bowers family.

The third album contains congratulatory telegrams for Bowers' 1916 election to Congress from the Second District of West Virginia. The telegrams include two from Theodore Roosevelt, one of which is substantive. There is one photograph in the back of the leather volume, of a campaign parade for Bowers.

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Album contains 51 albumen silver prints taken in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka); Bellary, India; Constantinople (Istanbul), and Egypt. A few images are from Nice, France, and Monte Carlo. The album bears no owner's name, but likely belonged to an individual in the British Army. On the first leaf is pasted a large coat of arms with a motto from the Isle of Man. The Sri Lanka images date from 1894-1895 and include: images from Colombo of military barracks, the hotel Mount Lavinia, Galle Face Green, the British Governor's palace; monsoon waves on a breakwater, polo grounds, and a racetrack; views from the town of Kandy and its lake; images from Trincomalee from an Officers Mess; and race scenes from Nuwara Eliya and Colombo. Views from Egypt show the Great Sphinx, streets in Cairo, and palaces in Alexandria. Images from Constantinople include street scenes, mosques, the port, and the arsenal, while those from India include servants with racehorses, and British men and servants at private residences. There are also images of the hospital ship "Spartan"; portraits of the B and C Companies, 4th Royal Warwickshire Regiment, Dublin, 1902, and the 1st Royal Warwicks in Bellary, India, 1899; a military camp "Marachah," possibly in Afghanistan; and images of military buildings in Sri Lanka. Many of the Sri Lanka images are credited to William H.L. Skeen, a commercial photographer based in Colombo and Kandy; several prints bear his studio's imprint, while others are unattributed but are probably his. The Middle Eastern views are all prints by commercial photographers: the Zangaki brothers (one print), Schroeder & (three prints) and Sebah & Joaillier (five prints). Many of the commercial prints are captioned in the negatives. Prints range in size from 8 3/4 x 11 to 5 3/4 x 8 inches; most are full-page sizes.

Bound photograph album contains 51 albumen silver prints dating from 1894-1901, taken in Ceylon (now Sri Lanka), Bellary, India, Constantinople (Istanbul), and Egypt. A few images are from Nice, France, and Monte Carlo. The album bears no owner's name, but likely belonged to an individual in the British Army. Many of the photographs are captioned. Prints range in size from 8 3/4 x 11 to 5 3/4 x 8 inches; most are full-page sizes.

Sri Lanka images predominate, many attributed to William Henry Louis Skeen, a well-known British-born studio photographer based in Sri Lanka; several prints bear his studio's imprint, while others are unmarked but are likely from his studio.

Images from Sri Lanka date from 1894-1895. Colombo views include: Galle Face Green (Colombo); infantry barracks shown from the front and back, with lake, hospital, polo ground and club house; Mount Lavinia Hotel, with infantry barracks room and officers quarters, 1895; and waves crashing over a breakwater during monsoon. Images from other locations include: a panorama of Kandy; Trincomalee from Officers Mess, 1895; Kandy with lake view and Trincomalee street; India rubber trees, Peredinaya Gardens, Kandy; Main Street, Pettah; "A.S.T." (probably the album's owner) in Ceylon, 1894; polo group, Ceylon 1894; Stewards Stand, Colombo Races, 1894; and Nuwara Eliya Races, 1894, "Comewell wins!"

Views of Egypt are from 1898 and include the Great Sphinx; Gizeh, palace of Prince Hussein Kamil Pacha; Alexandria, Palace Mehemed Ali; Alexandria, palace Ras-el-tin; photograph of a print titled, "Birds Eye View of the Battle of El-Teb"; "Old Cairo"; and a city street in Cairo. Views from Constantinople include the interior of Mosque Sainte Sophie; a street scene; panoramic view of the city and old port; view of the Golden Horn and arsenal; Mosque Hamidiye and Yildiz palace; and an Ottoman porter (studio portrait). The Middle Eastern views date from the mid-1890s and are all by commercial studios: the Zangaki brothers (one print), Schroeder & Cie, Zurich (three prints) and Sebah & Joaillier (five prints). Many of these are captioned in the negatives.

India images are dated later and include: the 1st Royal Warwicks, Bellary India, 1899; Indian servants with race horses; and Indian servants and staff outside private residence with two English men in suits. There are six total residential images, undated and without captions.

There are several commercial views from Europe: Nice, France: "Cascade du chateau" and an image from the Promenade des Anglais, 1901; and a view of a Monte Carlo theater, 1901.

Military images include: the hospital ship "Spartan," 1900; C Company of the 4th Royal Warwickshire Reg.t Dublin, 1902; B Company 4th Royal Warwickshire Reg.t Dublin, 1902; and a loosely inserted image captioned "Officers War. R. Peshawar" with names of officers recorded in pencil on verso. The final image is labeled "Camp Marachah," possibly in Afghanistan. Two smaller glossy copies of an image of men with well-bred horses in a desert landscape are laid in the closing pages.

On the first album leaf is pasted a coat of arms with the original Latin motto crossed out, and a different one written below in period ink, "Quocunque jeceris stabit", meaning "Whichever way you throw, it will stand," the motto for the coat of arms of the Isle of Man.

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Collection comprises 36 black-and-white photographs, varying in size from about 4x6 to 9.5x11, some with card-stock backing. The images mainly portray women at work, as textile and other industry workers; as scientists, medical professionals, and academics; and as participants in Communist Party education. There are also images that pertain to improvements in women's status, whether for minorities or workers in general. The majority of the photographs bear captions in both Chinese and English. Several have Hsinhua News Agency markings; beyond such markings, the photographer is unidentified. A few have sizing information for reproduction, and many were likely used in an exhibition on the status of women in modern China. Loosely organized according to amount within the following topics, based on the caption provided for the photograph: factory workers, professional women, Communist Party workers, commune and other workers, and minorities.
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History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated 16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Roundell Tristram Toke diaries and photographs from military service in China and Japan, 1900-1907 1.0 Linear Foot — 4 boxes — Approximately 150 items — Four diaries; leather case; approximately 145 photographs.

Collection comprises diaries and photographs by British officer Roundell Tristram Toke, documenting in detail his military service in China and Japan during the Boxer Rebellion and Russo-Japanese War, 1900 to 1907. The first diary is set in China; the other three in Japan. All four contain daily descriptions of weather, social and administrative activities, military engagements, rations, medical training, diplomacy, and other details, with some sketches of formations and drill patterns. The diaries are accompanied by approximately 145 photographs from China and Japan, with images of military camps, drills, equipment, engagements, destroyed areas, Russian war prisoners and their camps, towns, landscapes, harbors, a few social gatherings, and civilians. The collection also includes Toke's leather cigar case, inscribed on the inside with his postings with dates, beginning with Weihai, China, 1900.

Collection comprises autograph manuscript diaries and photographs of British officer Roundell Tristram Toke, during his service in China and Japan during the Boxer Rebellion and Russo-Japanese War, 1900 to 1907. The diaries contain daily descriptions of weather, social and administrative activities, regiment training and drills, military engagements, rations, Japanese prisoner of war camps for the Russians, medical training, foreign diplomacy, and other details. Some contain sketches of formations and drill patterns. The first diary, from 1900, describes service in China during the Boxer Rebellion, while the last three, January 1905-November 1907, detail his service in Japan as an attache` at the British Embassy in Tokyo and military consultant to the Japanese during and after the Russo-Japanese War.

Toke's diaries are accompanied by approximately 145 photographs: 40 unmounted larger albumen and 105 smaller silver gelatin prints. These images vividly document his time in China and Japan, showing military camps, officers, drills, engagements, landmark battle and burial sites such as 203 Metre Hill, Russian prisoners and their camp, towns, harbors, destroyed railroads and buildings, and Chinese and Japanese civilians. There are a few more personal photos of Western women, children, and men. A series of larger images from China depict the destruction and death caused by the conflict of 1900.

The collection includes Toke's leather cigar case, inscribed on the inside with his postings with dates, beginning with Wei-Hai-Wei in China, 1900.

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The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture was established in 1983 to share information about Africana and African-American culture with both the Duke and Durham communities. The collection contains materials regarding the general origins, development, and oversight of the Mary Lou Williams Center, as well as files related to programming hosted by, or sponsored by the Center. There are also a small number of files, mostly course materials, related to Leon Latimer Dunkley, Jr., who was the director of the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture from 1999-2005.

The Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture records contain materials regarding the general origins, development, and oversight of the Mary Lou Williams Center, as well as files related to programming hosted by, or sponsored by the Center, or at other black culture centers and in higher education in general. Among the materials are articles; plans; Board of Directors meeting minutes, agendas, and draft policies; event and exhibit flyers; black-and-white photographs; mailing and contact lists; correspondence, reports, and budgets; and reservations. Many of the events involve poetry or jazz. There are also a small number of files, mostly course planning materials, related to Leon Latimer Dunkley, Jr., was the director of the Mary Lou Williams Center for Black Culture from 1999-2005.

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The LeRoy T. Walker Africa News Service Archive is an extensive resource file assembled by ANS over the course of two decades in support of its news gathering efforts about Africa-related issues and U. S. foreign policy towards Africa. The collection spans the years from approximately 1960 to 1995, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1978 through 1994. Newspaper clippings, magazine articles, press releases, newsletters, brochures, and reports comprise the collection. Much of the material is gathered from mainstream media sources and government documentation in the United States, Europe, Africa, and other parts of the world. In addition, the collection includes significant resources from alternative, minority, and special interest presses world-wide that may be difficult to locate elsewhere. The archive contains scarce and difficult-to-locate materials such as numerous publications produced by non-governmental organizations and grass-roots/community groups that are/were involved in efforts related to independence movements, economic development, and human rights issues in Africa.

The archive is arranged in several series that provide a perspective on African politics and development from almost every country in the world. The heart of the archives is comprised of files about each African country. There are also significant files on U.S. politics and foreign policy and the United Nations. As ANS is located in North Carolina, there was a specific effort to document the activities and interests of North Carolinians as related to African issues. The archive encompasses a wide range of topics including agriculture, children, economics, education, health, history, politics, peace negotiations, social conditions, war, wildlife, and women. There are files on individuals, media organizations, political and cultural groups, corporations, and lobbyists. The collection documents the movement for African independence and economic development in the latter half of the twentieth century.

The archive is named in honor of LeRoy T. Walker, long-time supporter and honorary chair of the ANS Board of Directors. Mr. Walker is president-emeritus of the U. S. Olympic Committee and chancellor-emeritus of North Carolina Central University. A past president of The Athletic Congress, he has had a multi-faceted career in sports, physical education and educational administration; he has received numerous honors and honorary degrees. He has coached U. S. Olympic teams and trained and coached many African and American athletes. In the 1960s he served as director of programming and training for Africa at the Peace Corps in Washington, D.C.

Also transferred with the archive is a large number of Africa-related books, periodicals, and other printed materials. These items are being integrated and cataloged as part of Perkins Library's holdings on Africa and are identified in the on-line catalog by the (corporate) author entry: Africa News Service (Durham, N.C.) Archives.

The addition (9450 items, dated 1952-1993 and undated, bulk 1952-ca. 1980, 18.20 linear feet) contains resource files, newspaper clippings and other media, and periodicals, books, and pamphlets on various topics pertaining to South Africa and Southern Africa (especially Rhodesia and Zimbabwe). Topics include labor, industry, the economy, and foreign trade with South Africa; social conditions in South Africa including the state of Indian South Africans; and student, Christian, and other political movements against apartheid, including the National Union of South African Students and the University Christian Movement. Also includes 3 black-and-white photographs, and 3 microfiche. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Collection of African and African-American Documentation. (01-156)

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George Garland Allen papers, 1923-1983 0.5 Linear Feet — 19 Items

Businessman and Duke University alumnus. Collection of historical documents relating to the Duke family of Durham, North Carolina contains bound copy of poet Plato T. Durham's poem in memory of Angier B. Duke, AVE ATQUE VALE, FRATER!; album of photographs of James B. Duke's funeral; illuminated, leather-bound testimonials to Mr. Allen; album of the dedication of the Allen Plant; college diplomas from Duke, Furman, and Davidson; a manuscript of John W. Jenkins' JAMES B. DUKE, MASTER BUILDER; and a copy of GEORGE GARLAND ALLEN, A LIFE TO BE HONORED, written by Michael Durham and commissioned by Lucy Burwell Allen Fowlkes and Mary Garland Allen Gregg. Includes large photograph of James B. Duke and fellow directors of the Aluminum Company of America at Isle Maligne, July 14, 1925, and a large photograph of a Duke alumni dinner and dance in New York on December 6, 1935.

Collection of historical documents relating to the Duke family of Durham, North Carolina contains bound copy of poet Plato T. Durham's poem in memory of Angier B. Duke, AVE ATQUE VALE, FRATER!; album of photographs of James B. Duke's funeral; illuminated, leather-bound testimonials to Mr. Allen; album of the dedication of the Allen Plant; college diplomas from Duke, Furman, and Davidson; a manuscript of John W. Jenkins' JAMES B. DUKE, MASTER BUILDER; and a copy of GEORGE GARLAND ALLEN, A LIFE TO BE HONORED, written by Michael Durham and commissioned by Lucy Burwell Allen Fowlkes and Mary Garland Allen Gregg. Includes large photograph of James B. Duke and fellow directors of the Aluminum Company of America at Isle Maligne, July 14, 1925, and a large photograph of a Duke alumni dinner and dance in New York on December 6, 1935.

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Mariette Pathy Allen photographs and papers, 1968-2003 8.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 931 Items

Documentary photographer based in New York City. Collection contains five portfolios of Allen's work, dating from the 1960s to 2003, totaling 131 color and black and white prints that document aspects of human sexuality, gender identity, the connections between people and art, and the social life of people in Philadelphia and New Jersey suburbs and beaches. The prints are arranged into these series: Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them; The Woman Who Lives Inside: Portraits of Men as Women; NJ/PA 1968; People and Art; and the Gender Frontier. A final series consists of a group of papers and publications by and about Allen. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection contains five portfolios of Allen's work, dating from the 1960s to 2003, totaling 131 prints that document aspects of human sexuality, gender identity, the connections between people and art, and the social life of people in Philadelphia and New Jersey suburbs and beaches. The first series, Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them contains eleven 15.5 x 23 inch color prints mounted on 24x31 inch mat board. These photographs are from the book of the same title published in 1990 that documents crossdressers in everyday life. The second series, The Woman Who Lives Inside: Portraits of Men as Women, is a portfolio of 16 gelatin silver and 15 color prints. The third is entitled NJ/PA 1968, containing 28 black and white, 16x20, gelatin silver prints. Images include people at the New Jersey beaches, east coast suburbs, and Philadelphia. A fourth series consists of 30 16x20 gelatin silver prints entitled People and Art, shot between 1968 and 2000. Photographs include artists at work, people looking at art, the Venice Bienniale 1999, Paris, London, and Budapest. Finally, the fifth series consists of 31 color and black and white prints from Allen's 2004 book, The Gender Frontier, documenting transgender and transsexual people in relationships, at conferences and political rallies, and undergoing corrective surgeries. This series also includes many portraits of different transgender people. Two CD-Rs of Allen's images are also included in the Papers Series, which also houses printed materials, brochures, and articles that include photographs by Allen. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth was a vocational guidance service organization originally created under the leadership of Orie Latham Hatcher as the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (1914-1921), and later known as the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (1921-1937). Disbanded in 1963. The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth and its predecessors. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives. The records document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Additional subjects addressed in the papers and photographs include economic conditions throughout the South; migration patterns from U.S. rural regions to cities; Appalachian culture, including crafts and music; community life in the South; and employment for African Americans. The collection includes 42 matted platinum prints of rural citizens and scenes in Kentucky taken in the 1930s by noted photographer Doris Ulmann, and include a portrait of her assistant and folklorist, John Jacob Niles.

The records of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY) span the years 1887 to 1963, although the bulk of the collection begins in 1914 with the creation of the organization and ends in 1946 with the death of founder and president, Orie Latham Hatcher. Additional records for the Alliance from 1947 to 1963 can be found in the Amber Arthun Warburton papers, also located in the Rubenstein Library.

The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for AGRY and its predecessors, the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (VBVW) and the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (SWEA), and document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives.

Early materials in the Correspondence, Administrative Files, and Clippings and Press Releases series document the Bureau's projects, such as the speaker's bureau and the scholarship program, as well as the Bureau's relationship with other women's organizations such as the Virginia Association of Colleges and Schools for Girls, Southern Collegiate Women (later the American Association of University Women), the National Federation of Business and Professional Women Clubs (BPW), and the National Council of Women.

Strong ties were developed between the Bureau and these organizations during its formative years: Hatcher chaired national and local committees in most of these organizations, and early correspondence and administrative files center on her work with these organizations particularly concerning educational standards and vocational training in women's colleges. In these early records it is often unclear which of these activities were officially adopted by the Bureau or if they were solely Hatcher's activities.

The AGRY's activities documented in the Branch Files Series include benefits, forums, exhibits, and festivals. The New York Branch sponsored several opera benefits to help raise funds during the 1920s. The Rural Mountain Festival, sponsored by the Richmond Branch, was held in 1938. In 1932, the Alliance commissioned noted New York portrait photographer, Doris Ulmann, to photograph rural youth and other individuals in Kentucky. The photographs were subsequently exhibited by several of the branches and were used to promote discussion of vocational issues and the work of the Alliance. Forty-two of these original platinum prints are located in the Photographic Materials Series.

Organizational changes reflected modifications in the organization's goals. Although SWEA continued many of the projects started by the Virginia Bureau, emphasis shifted away from lobbying efforts aimed to open new careers for women and more towards research on women's occupational trends and model guidance counseling programs based on that research. Correspondence during the early 1920s contains letters from faculty and administrators from women's colleges throughout the Northeast and South which describe various approaches (or lack thereof) to providing vocational guidance to students. Administrative files contain information on surveys and on a vocational guidance course for college women which was developed at Goucher College under the auspices of SWEA and tested at Duke University (then Trinity College) and the College of William and Mary. The Publications and Clippings and Press Releases series also contain considerable information regarding Alliance research and activities during this time.

During the mid to late 1920s, SWEA sponsored several research projects through its Rural Guidance Project which examined vocational trends of rural girls in North Carolina and Virginia. While the Correspondence and Administrative Files series document how the projects were organized, the comprehensive data collected during these projects is extant only in resulting SWEA publications such as Rural Girls in the City for Work and the unpublished manuscript "Fifty Rural High School Girls."

Alliance projects in the late 1920s and 1930s consisted of experimental and demonstration guidance programs in rural schools. These projects were located at the Konnarock Training School (Virginia), elementary schools in Albemarle Co., Virginia, Farm Life School (Craven Co., N.C.), and elementary and secondary schools in Breathitt Co., Kentucky, among others. Each of these demonstration projects also resulted in substantial Alliance publications which in most cases represent the bulk of extant documentation of each project. The Photographic Materials series contains many snapshots taken in these various communities, although most are of poor quality and unidentified; there are also negatives in this series. Additional information may also appear scattered throughout Correspondence, Clippings, and Administrative Files series.

The Breathitt County Project Files Series, provides the most comprehensive documentation of the demonstration project which grew to become the Alliance's main research activity from about 1934 to 1942. The project encompassed a wide range of activities including data collection on students' home life, teacher training workshops, vocational guidance programming through the county's Planning Council, and a visit by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1938. Particularly noteworthy in these materials are the extensive raw data files consisting of approximately 2500 autobiographical surveys of students. Additional files contain charts of data compilations and teacher reports which identify trends in students' educational behavior. Photographs of Breathitt County schools, students, and home life, chiefly taken by noted photographer Doris Ullman, are contained in the Photographic Materials Series.

SWEA and AGRY's emphasis on research and dissemination of information was reflected in the increase of published materials produced by the organization. Much of this material is contained in the Publications Series. Clippings of book reviews document the wide-spread acceptance of these publications in a newly emerging field. Several unpublished manuscripts resulting from Alliance research projects are extant in the Writings and Speeches Series and include "Occupations for Educated Women in Durham, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina" (1926), a bound copy of "Fifty Rural High School Girls'' (1930), and final drafts of "When Our Young Folks Come Home to the Smaller Communities" (1945).

Another strategy for publicizing the work of the Alliance was through local and national radio broadcasts. Shows were broadcast from Richmond, New York, and Washington, D.C., and gave information on specific occupations and discussed vocational guidance issues. Broadcast scripts contained in the Writings and Speeches Series feature youths interviewing each other and Orie Hatcher about career goals, a dialogue between Eleanor Roosevelt and Hatcher on the future of rural youth (1938), and a presentation by Amelia Earhart on women in aviation (1931).

The Correspondence, Clippings and Press Releases, and Subject Files series demonstrate the Alliance's shift away from relationships with women's organizations in the late 1920s and towards guidance and educational organizations such as the American Council for Guidance and Personnel Associations (CGPA), National Vocational Guidance Association (NVGA), National Occupational Conference (NOC), National Education Association (NEA), and the U.S. Department of Education in the 1930s. In many of these organizations, Hatcher chaired committees on rural youth, and representatives from these groups served on AGRY's Board of Trustees.

Numerous regional and national conference activities are reflected in the Conference Files Series, with a complete set of conference proceedings and findings contained in the Publications Series. Information on pre-1930s conferences is slim, but additional information on all conferences can be gleaned from the Correspondence and Clippings and Press Releases series. Copies of papers delivered by Alliance members and others are located in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Materials dating past Hatcher's tenure in the Alliance consist mainly of routine administrative correspondence. A more complete set of AGRY organizational records dating from 1947-1963 is located in the papers of Amber Arthun Warburton, her successor. These records continue several series started in the AGRY records such as executive board minutes, publications, project files, and correspondence.

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The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

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Rob Amberg photographs and papers, 1975-2009 15 Linear Feet — 457 Items

The photographs and papers of documentarian Rob Amberg span the years 1975-2009. The gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints in the collection represent three bodies of work: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture. Amberg focuses primarily on the social life and customs of the rural South, especially in the mountains of his home state of North Carolina. Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century. Amberg's papers account for the rest of the collection and are organized into five series: Correspondence, Printed Materials, Subject Files, and Writings and Research, and Audio. Acquired as part of the Archives of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Rob Amberg Photographs and Papers span the years 1975-2009. The photographs consist of 8x10 and 11x14 inch gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints. Amberg's focus as a photographer is primarily the social customs of the rural South, especially in his home state of North Carolina. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century.

The collection is arranged into three project series: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress ; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture.

Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. Many of Amberg's images in this last series were funded by the Rural Advancement Fund to document the rural Carolinas, and by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. Captions and numbering are taken from original notes on the back of each print. Series are arranged in alphabetical order by title of project.

Amberg's papers are organized into five series. The Correspondence Series contains incoming messages regarding exhibits and the publication of Amberg's books as well as photographic work in other published materials.

The Printed Material Series consists of publications which include or feature his images. Publications in the series are both national and local, including The New York Times and Harper's.

Amberg worked and contributed to a number of non-profit organizations dealing with farm worker's rights and other social issues. Collections of materials relating to these non-profits are housed in the Subject Files Series. Printed materials in this series include annual reports and publications by each organization. Most of the materials include photography work by Amberg.

Included in Amberg's papers is the Writings and Research Series. Content includes multiple versions of the manuscripts to The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress and Sodom Laurel Album, a publisher's draft of Quartet: Four North Carolina Photographers, a number of interview transcripts, and other writings by Amberg and others.

The final grouping in the collection is the Audio Series which includes a piece entitled Interstate 26 produced by Leda Hartman and a copy of the musical recording which accompanies Sodom Laurel Album.

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The American Catalin Corporation was founded in New York, N.Y., in 1927; it developed the light-colored, transparent, filler-free Bakelite resin in a wide range of colors. Bakelite is the first synthetic plastic, developed by Dr. Leo Baekeland between 1907 and 1909. American Catalin Corporation used its form of the resin for costume jewelry, fashion accessories, radios, and other products. By 1942, the company suspended its manufacture of jewelry and cast items to concentrate on wartime production. After the war, petroleum-based plastics gained favor. Collection comprises a salesman's sample book in a black leather album used to provide a visual guide for the company's products. The album contains primarily 34 black-and-white 8x10 photographs (8 photographs are laid in, all but two are linen backed, those not laid-in are stamped on the back with "Johnston & Tunick Commercial Photographers"), as well as 17 typeset pages containing inter-office memos, sales tips, information regarding the company's competition, and customer testimonials. Several of the memos are written to the attention of D. J. Kelly, who was the salesman for whom the sample book was prepared. There is also a two-page key to the main group of 19 photographs, identifying the Bakelite products in each photograph, as well as the item's final producer. Seven of the laid-in photographs show the corporation's factory, including three of factory workers on the job. The American Catalin Corporation was founded in New York, N.Y., in 1927; it developed the light-colored, transparent, filler-free Bakelite resin in a wide range of colors. Bakelite is the first synthetic plastic, developed by Dr. Leo Baekeland between 1907 and 1909. American Catalin Corporation used its form of the resin for costume jewelry, fashion accessories, radios, and other products. By 1942, the company suspended its manufacture of jewelry and cast items to concentrate on wartime production. After the war, petroleum-based plastics gained favor.

Collection comprises a salesman's sample book in a black leather album used to provide a visual guide for the company's products. The album contains primarily 34 black-and-white 8x10 photographs (8 photographs are laid in, all but two are linen backed, those not laid-in are stamped on the back with "Johnston & Tunick Commercial Photographers"), as well as 17 typeset pages containing inter-office memos, sales tips, information regarding the company's competition, and customer testimonials. Several of the memos are written to the attention of D. J. Kelly, who was the salesman for whom the sample book was prepared. There is also a two-page key to the main group of 19 photographs, identifying the Bakelite products in each photograph, as well as the item's final producer. Seven of the laid-in photographs show the corporation's factory, including three of factory workers on the job.

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Primarily records of the American Economic Review, (Accession 2001-0118) specifically journal office files consisting of correspondence, manuscript, book review, and referee files (1969-1998). There are also records for the organization (1886-1984) and for its Committee on the Status of Women in the Economics Profession (CSWEP 1972-1993), including histories, reports, minutes, statistics, as well as membership, account, conference, board member, miscellaneous, and newsletter or editorial office files. Some CSWEP material is also present as 371 machine-readable records. There is a small set of journal office records for the Journal of Economic Literature (1975, 1984-1994 and undated). In addition, there are 50 black-and-white photographs of former association presidents, a 39"x10" black-and-white group photograph taken at an unidentified meeting, 48 rolls of microfilm from the various journals (mostly AER), 63 microfiche of Journal of Economic Literature correspondence ([1968]-1980), and 7 reel-to-reel audiotapes.

Addition (2001-0082) (4000 items, 9.6 linear feet; dated 1998-1999) includes records for the American Economic Review, including correspondence and referee files for rejected and withdrawn articles (1998), accepted articles (1999), and papers and proceedings (1999).

Addition (2002-0215) (21000 items, 33.4 linear feet; dated 1999-2001) contains records for the American Economic Review, including editorial correspondence, referee reports, and manuscripts for rejected articles (1999-2000) and accepted articles (March-December 2001) and papers and proceedings (2000-2001). Also includes 37 electronic documents on one floppy disk.

The collection consists of 15 additional accessions dating from 2003 to 2008 with over 200 additional boxes. These additions have not been processed, but are available for research with permission from the American Economic Association. Please consult the Preliminary Description of Unprocessed Collection (below) for details.

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Jesse Pyrant Andrews photographs and oral histories, 1973-2020 10.2 Linear Feet — 16 boxes — 257 prints; 79 CD-ROMs — 38.8 Gigabytes — 158 audio files — 79 .wav format files (35.6 gigabytes); 79 .mp3 format use copy files (3.2 gigabytes) — Original negative identifiers and titles assigned by the photographer have been retained. The original identifier on the back of each print typically comprises codes for the body of work, negative file, and negative number. There are a few unnumbered prints. In the case of untitled works, descriptions in brackets have been supplied by library staff. Each print also has been given a Rubenstein Library identifier. Most of the photographs were printed by Andrews in his darkroom from the early 2000s to 2020.

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Jesse Pyrant Andrews (b. 1949) is an American photographer based in rural southern Virginia. Collection comprises 257 black-and-white photographs and 39 oral interviews by Jesse Pyrant Andrews documenting rural and small-town life in the Piedmont plateau of central southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Major themes center on the landscapes and people of the region; tobacco cultivation; the lives of farmers, war veterans and laid-off workers; local architecture and historic sites; traditional crafts and music; and new patterns of economics and society in rural Virginia. The materials also include a Vietnam War veterans manuscript memoir and numerous oral histories of veterans. Additional projects include documentary narrative about the southern Virginia Carter-Wooding families; views from an Amtrak train; and street scenes and portraits taken in New York City, California, and Massachusetts. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 257 black-and-white photographs and 39 oral interview recordings by Jesse Pyrant Andrews documenting rural and small-town life in the Piedmont plateau of central southern Virginia and northern North Carolina. Most of the images are portraits of farming families, immigrant workers, former textile workers, war veterans, musicians, and other local people, with scenes from homesteads, small towns, farms, and grave sites. Major themes include tobacco cultivation; the lives of war veterans and laid-off workers; regional architecture and historic sites; and traditional activities such as music-making, making handmade firearms, and working with leather. Together, the images and interviews speak to enormous changes in this rural Piedmont region as it transitions into the 21st century.

Three bodies of work whose images are found in the Portraits and Virginia series are referred to by Andrews as the Veterans, Vietnam, and Carter-Wooding Projects. The first two document the lives and struggles of U.S. veterans of World War II and the Vietnam and Gulf wars, and includes many audio interviews. The second project, also accompanied by several oral histories, documents two Halifax County, Virginia families, the Carters and Woodings, and their rural property which dates back to an 18th-century Huguenot land grant. The materials also include a Vietnam War manuscript memoir.

Additional photo projects in the collection document the lives of former textile workers (also accompanied by oral histories); a trip on an Amtrak train; and street life and people in New York City, California, and Massachusetts.

Most of the photographs are accompanied by captions written by the photographer, commenting on the individuals, their life experiences, and aspects of local culture and society.

Photographs from the series documenting tobacco farming, "13-Month Crop," were selected for a 2002 exhibit of Andrews' work hosted by the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

A large selection of photographs in this collection has been digitized and is available online as part of the Duke Digital Collections.

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Afghan Wars photographs, circa 1897 1.5 Linear Feet — 45 Items

Collection of black and white glossy photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Anglo-Afghan War most likely during the Mamund Valley hostilities of 1897. Prints are mounted on cardstock, and collection includes the portfolio in which they were originally housed. Most have captions with location or subject, either typed or hand-written; a few are dated 1897. Images feature British Army military camps, landscapes, and groups of officers. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection of glossy black and white photographic prints of Afghanistan, taken by an anonymous photographer during the Afghan Wars, most likely in summer and fall 1897 during which there was a major outbreak of hostilities. The images consist of 24 8.125" x 5.75" prints, and 21 smaller 4.125" x 5.75" prints, all affixed to cardstock, three or four per page, often on both sides of the board. There is also a panoramic shot of the Tungai Pass made up of three sequenced prints. Pasted-down typed captions are also present for some images, while others carry handwritten captions; a few are dated 1897. The set was originally housed in an unmarked cloth and board portfolio, which has also been conserved. Resembling to some degree in subject matter the Afghanistan images of military photographer R. B. Holmes, the majority of the images in this collection depict British military camps and landscapes. The landscape views include the Mamund Valley, Tangi Pass, Agrah, Chakdara, Malakand, and Ambeyla Pass, and a few captions describe events taking place in that location. Military camps, many taken at a distance with fine detail, include Buner, Inayat Killa, Kindergali, and Malakand. A few scenes show bridges, including a boat bridge over the Indus. Some prints feature groups of officers in posed and casual scenarios, including one image of the First Royal West Kent Regiment. One image shows the gravesite of 2nd Lieutenant W. C. Browne-Clayton, dated Sept. 30, 1897, killed at the battle of Agrah. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Alen MacWeeney photographs, 1962-1986, bulk 1965 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 14 prints — The prints all measure approximately 13x18 inches; image sizes vary and are given in the inventory. All sizes given are rounded up to the nearest 1/8 of an inch.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals and families, as well as some of animals, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes. The prints measure 13x18 inches. A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images along with others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises fourteen black-and-white inkjet prints of photographs taken in Ireland by Alen MacWeeney, chiefly in 1965. Locations include counties Donegal, Galway, Kerry, Limerick, and Sligo, and the city of Dublin. Portraits of individuals, including an old man in a field, a Benedictine monk, a woman in a doorway, and a farming family, coexist with depopulated, dramatic landscapes.

The black-and-white inkjet prints are printed on uncoated textured art paper, and measure 13x18 inches. Image sizes range from 6 1/8 x 10 1/4 to 11 1/2 x 10 1/4 inches.

A photobook titled UNDER THE INFLUENCE (2011) which includes these images and others, accompanied by excerpts of poetry by William B. Yeats, is also held by the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jess T. Dugan photographs, 2006-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 58 prints — 58 prints

Collection comprises two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan. The first comprises 40 large color digital photographs of transgender and non-conforming people over the age of fifty, living throughout the United States. The portraits are of single individuals as well as couples, and were chiefly taken in outdoor and street locations. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum prepared for a major move and renovation. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke Unviversity.

Collection consists of two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan.

The first, entitled "To Survive on this Shore," comprises 40 large color inkjet photographs of transgender and gender non-conforming people over the age of 50, living throughout the United States. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." They portray single individuals as well as couples, chiefly in outdoor settings such as parks and streets. All images measure roughly 15 x 20 inches. The interviews conducted for the project are not included in this collection. For this work, Dugan received the 2017 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Women Documentarians.

The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum and its employees prepared for a major move and renovation. The prints form a 2011 limited-edition portfolio and are housed in a custom hinged portfolio box with accompanying textual narrative.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The Center for Documentary Studies was established at Duke University in Durham, N.C. for the study of the documentary process. The collection contains 51 black-and-white and color photographs, chiefly 11x14 and 16x20 inches, that were selected by CDS staff from portfolios published in DoubleTake magazine or by DoubleTake books from 1995 to 1997, and were exhibited at the CDS galleries. Many of the images were taken in the southern United States, but there are also scenes from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, and from countries such as Mexico, Vietnam and Ireland. Some images are dated as early as 1906 and 1940. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection contains 51 black-and-white and color photographs that were selected by Center for Documentary Studies staff from portfolios published in DoubleTake magazine or by DoubleTake books from 1995 to 1997; they were were exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies, Duke University galleries.

Many of the images were taken in the southern United States, but there are also scenes from California, Illinois, Massachusetts, and Pennsylvania, and from countries such as Mexico, Vietnam and Ireland.

The prints range widely in size from 8x10 to 20x24 inches, but the most typical sizes are 11x14 and 16x20 inches. Black-and-white gelatin silver prints predominate, with some color prints present.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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R. B. Holmes photographs, 1910-1926 and undated 7.6 Linear Feet — 208 items

The images in the collection were taken by British photographer R. B. (Randolph Bezzant) Holmes and possibly others from his studio who traveled with him. Holmes was the owner of the R. B. Holmes & Co. photography studio in Peshawar, Pakistan. Of the 208 prints in the collection, one hundred two are loose, 11.5 x 9.5" black-and-white photographic prints of Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan. The remaining 106 prints are mounted in three commercial albums whose subjects range widely, from Afghan War-period images of the Khyber Pass, Landi Khana, Ali Musjid, and the Kabul River; to pastoral scenes around Nowshera, street scenes in Peshawar city, and panoramic views of the Peshawar Valley, to views from India, including the Jhelum and Liddar valleys, Srinagar, lower Himals, Harabal waterfall, Shalimar, and the Taj Mahal in Agra, to images of Waziristan and the Khyber railway. The sizes of the mounted prints range from 8.25"x5.75" to 11.25"x9", along with some panoramic prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Of the 208 prints in the collection, one hundred two are loose, 11.5 x 9.5" black-and-white photographic prints of Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan. The majority of these detailed images were taken during the end of the Anglo-Afghan war in 1919 and depict large British military camps and vast landscapes, sometimes with camel caravans or military convoys. Some scenes show the remains of villages, military features such as towers, and religious structures. There are portraits of individuals, including camel drivers, a sniper, a female spinner, a young woman dressed in traditional wear, and various groups. The landscape views include the Khyber Pass, Tanai Gorge, Kabul River, Khargali Ridge, Dal Lake, Nanga Parbat, and the Sikkim Himalaya. Military camp views, many in panoramic scale with fine detail, include Landi Khana, Dakka Plain, and Landi Kotal.

The remaining 106 prints are mounted in three commercial albums whose subjects range widely, from Afghan War-period images of the Khyber Pass, Landi Khana, Ali Musjid, and the Kabul River; to pastoral scenes around Nowshera, street scenes in Peshawar city, and panoramic views of the Peshawar Valley, to views from India, including the Jhelum and Liddar valleys, Srinagar, lower Himals, Harabal waterfall, Shalimar, and the Taj Mahal in Agra, to images of Waziristan and the Khyber railway. The sizes of the mounted prints range from 8.25"x5.75" to 11.25"x9", along with some panoramic prints. There are 12 gelatin silver prints. The images of Waziristan (Box 6) are out of copyright. There are also several photographs from the Diwan and Mela Ram studios in the Waziristan images. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Henry Horenstein photographs, 1970-2013 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — 153 prints

Collection comprises 153 black-and-white and color prints selected from projects by photographer Henry Horenstein. Subjects in this collection range widely: appearing in the images are members of Horenstein's family; beachgoers in Cuba; blues and country musicians and their fans; the human body seen in extreme close-ups; racing jockeys, horses, and gamblers; burlesque and drag performers; and street scenes, storefronts, theaters, highways, and nightlife in various places. Locations include Havana, Los Angeles, Louisiana, Maryland, Massachusetts, Missouri, New York, Tennessee, Texas, and Venezuela. "Wesorts" refers to unique mixed-race communities in central Maryland whose residents refer to themselves as "we sorts." Formats include chromogenic, pigment inkjet (giclee), and gelatin silver prints, in sizes ranging from 8x10 to 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 153 black-and-white and color prints from portfolios by photographer Henry Horenstein, taken from 1970 to 2013 over the course of his long career. Subjects range widely, with some emphasis in the collection on images of entertainment and music culture: country and blues musicians, including Nathan Abshire, Loretta Lynn, Del McCoury, Dolly Parton, Stringbean, and Doc Watson, the venues where they perform, and their fans; street musicians, honky tonk bands and barroom dancers and drinkers; and drag and burlesque performers in Los Angeles, New York City, and Caracas and Buenos Aires, Venezuela.

"Wesorts" refers to a project to document small, unique mixed-race communities in and near Marbury, Maryland; the term is said to have been coined from the phrase used by residents to refer to themselves, "we sorts of people."

Other images include early portraits of Horenstein's family and friends; life on the El Malecón waterfront in Havana, Cuba; a highway in Louisiana; a historic theater in Branson, Missouri; close-up images of the human body; and behind the scenes in horse racing, including horses in action and at rest, grooms, owners, bettors, and jockeys, one of whom is Steve Cauthen.

The prints come in sizes ranging from roughly 8x10 to 20x24 inches. Photographic formats include chromogenic, pigment inkjet (giclee), and gelatin silver darkroom prints; they are often marked with edition numbers, printing dates, and other information.

With only a few exceptions, the images in this collection have been published by Horenstein in photobooks throughout his career. They have been exhibited widely and are held in the collections of museums, galleries, and other institutions.

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André Kertész photographs, 1919-1984 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 31 photographic prints — 8x10 and 11x14 inches

Collection of 31 black-and-white photographs by André Kertész provides a sampling of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through 1984, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris (1920-1984), and several each from Budapest and New York City. There are also two female nude studies from his 1930s series "Distortions," two still lifes, and several landscapes. The majority of the gelatin silver prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. On the backs are various markings, including dates and identifying marks by Kertész and others, with many bearing a Kertész estate stamp. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 31 black-and-white prints by noted photographer André Kertész provides a portfolio representing the full range of his compositional styles and topical interests. Taken from 1919 through the 1980s, the end years of his career, the images chiefly feature street scenes from Paris in the 1920s and 1930s and 1980s, with a few street scenes from Budapest (1919 and 1920), and a handful from New York City from his later years in that city, with one from 1939. There are two photographs from the 1930s series "Distortions," featuring female nudes with distortion effects. Several images include cats and dogs. There are a handful of landscapes with no known location, and two still lifes.

The majority of the prints are sized 8x10 inches, with four measuring 11x14 inches. They bear various markings on the backs, including crop marks, dates, and identifying marks by Kertész and others. All but five are marked with the Kertész estate stamp; several bear the photographer's stamp.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Gjon Mili photographs, circa 1939-1949 0.25 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 20 prints — 20 prints

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints of images taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Milin. Through new tecniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash which Mili developed at MIT, the black-and-white images, some of which were used by Life magazine, portray human locomotion and the movements of other physical phenomena such as cascading water, frozen in time. Human subjects include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of the photographer Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Mili. Using new techniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash that he developed at MIT, Mili created stop-action and multi-image frames portraying the movement of the human body (reminiscent of the more scientific locomotion studies of Étienne Jules Marey and Eadward Muybridge) and of objects such as an egg breaking in a pan, a jet from a siphon bottle, and a cascade of water. Human subjects in the collection include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera.

The prints range in size from 8x10 to 11x14 inches. Most are vintage prints, created from the 1930s to the 1940s; only one bears a date - 1943. A few are mounted on thin board, but the majority are unmounted paper prints. All are stamped with the photographer's name and "From the Richard Checani Collection." One print bears the stamp "Life Photo, to use" referring to Mili's work for the magazine. A few bear penciled captions such as "cartwheel" and "nude descending a staircase," and one penciled notation explains the genesis of the image: "Full frame (35 mm) shot by Wallace Kirkland, who was at my side, G [jon]." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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"Phone Home Durham" exhibit prints, 2012-2015 and undated 2 Linear Feet — 3 boxes; 85 13x19 inch inkjue prints; 43 manuscript items

Collection comprises 85 13x19 inch photographic prints and other documents related to the exhibit, "Phone Home Durham, 2015." The images were all taken by 50 residents of Durham County, North Carolina, chiefly with mobile phones but also with handheld cameras, and are mostly color digital prints, with a few black-and-white prints. The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. The exhibit prints are accompanied by exhibit guides and other publicity related to the 2015 exhibition, several photographers' statements, and the original exhibit proposal by Duke University professor and photographer Tom Rankin. The exhibit was co-curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange, and Jim Lee. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection comprises 85 13x19 inch inkjet prints of photographs, chiefly in color, taken by 50 photographers from Durham County, North Carolina. The images were selected from submissions to the Center for Documentary Studies in response to a call for "images of Durham County [N.C.] taken with mobile phone cameras or other hand held devices." The size of the actual image on the 13x19 print varies and can be as small as 4x6 inches.

The photographers focused on urban settings, although there are a few rural images taken in Durham County. The images reflect society and customs in 21st century Durham, with subject content including protests relating to race issues, street scenes, graffiti, abandoned houses, local shops and businesses, industrial buildings, and a few landscapes with trees and sunsets. Locations include the Durham History Hub, Museum of Life and Science, Duke University, Liberty Cafe, Taqueria Gonzales, Geer Street, Eno River State Park, Ellerbee Creek bridge, Pelican Snoballs, Catsburg Store, the beaver pond off of Avondale Drive, Compare Foods, Durham Central Park, Cocoa Cinnamon coffee shop, Durham County Detention Facility, West Chapel Hill Street bridge, Beyu Cafe, the Durham Bulls ballpark, the 40th Centerfest, El Vaquero Western Wear Shop, 21c Museum Hotel, and the Scrap Exchange.

The exhibit was guest curated by Aaron Canipe, Alexa Dilworth, Jeremy Lange and Jim Lee and displayed in different rotations at the Power Plant Gallery at the American Tobacco Campus from May 29, 2015 to August 22, 2015.

The photographic prints are accompanied by five exhibit guides arranged by dates of exhibition, with thumbnails of each image, the photographer's name, and captions or additional information. Other documents are a flyer explaining request for submissions, a Durham County Library program flyer, and photographers' statements about their images. Also located here is the proposal for the exhibit written by Tom Rankin, documentary photographer and Director of the Master of Fine Arts Program at Duke University.

The following photographers are represented in the collection: D.L. Anderson, Kristina Baker, Daniele Berman, Eric Boven, Michaela Brooks, Aaron Canipe, Mario Chen, Christina Chia, Ira Christmas, Olisa Corcoran, Diane Davis, Wilfred Drath, B.J. Fusaro, Roman Gabriel, Alexa Gerend, Cynthia Gurganus, Izzy (Isaac) Hart, Jim Haverkamp, Warren Hicks, Juliet Jensen, Jim Kellough, Frank Konhaus, Stephanie Leathers, Ryan Mason, Mark Maya, Eleanor Mills, Jesse Moore, John Moses, Callistus Ndemo, Michael Palko, Bill Pope, Courtney Reid-Eaton, Julie Rhodes, Jacqueline Rimmler, Emily Rush, Katherine Scott, Adelle Smith, Amanda Smith, Daniel Smith, Lisa Sorg, Jennifer Stratton, Gina Streaty, Amanda Stricklett, Dawn Surratt, Lynda-Marie Taurasi, Aiyana Torres, Cait Ushpol, Ross Wade, Carin Walsh, and Josh Zaslow.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Glenn Scarboro photographs, 1962-1976 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 168 items — 168 items

This collection of 166 black-and-white inkjet 13x19 inch photographs by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, the photographer's hometown, while other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York. The street scenes in Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents, small businesses, houses, and churches; rural themes include horse shows. county fairs, and country landscapes. There is also a series of family portraits taken in the 1960s. Collection includes one handmade photobook by Scarboro containing eleven photographs and handwritten text. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection of 166 13x19 inch black-and-white inkjet prints by Glenn Scarboro explores through street photography, landscapes, and portraits the social life and culture of southern Virginia in the 1960s and 1970s. About half of the photographs were taken in Danville, a small town with industries linked to tobacco, railroads, and textile mills, and the artist's hometown. Other images were taken in Richmond, Blacksburg, Roanoke, and other towns of the region. A dozen or so photographs were taken in other states such as Georgia and North Carolina, and there are a few from Rhode Island and New York.

The street scenes of Danville and other towns include images of white and African American residents of all ages and backgrounds, chiefly from the 1960s; small businesses; people and their cars; house exteriors and interiors; churches; and outdoor advertising and logos. One photograph is of the house of free black craftsman Thomas Day, in Milton, NC.

Rural themes include portraits of country people, barns and tobacco warehouses, livestock, and rural landscapes, with a large series of images particular focused on southern Virginia horse shows and county fairs.

There are no photographs of the social protests and political activities that took place in small towns such as Danville at that time, but the street photographs do speak to social culture and conditions in southern Virginia during the 1960s, and some, as the photographer notes, allude to the sense of social disruption and alienation in small-town Southern society.

The series ends with a series of portraits, chiefly of Scarboro and his immediate family, taken in the 1960s. One portrait of Scarboro in New York City was taken by photographer, instructor, and friend Emmet Gowin.

The collection also includes a 15-page handmade artist's book by Scarboro containing eleven black-and-white photographs taken in 1963 and printed from original negatives in 1965. The book was assembled in 1972 and is number six of a limited edition of seven, and features a unique cover with a pen-and-ink drawing.

A print inventory created by the photographer contains additional biographical narrative and commentary, and is available in the first box. The photographs are arranged in original order as received.

From the artist's statement: "There was a photograph in The Family of Man made by Jerry Cooke (originally published in Life magazine) of a woman sitting quite forlorn on a bench in a very dark place that gave no clues as to time, place, person or situation...which are the four psychiatric attributes of reality. She was alone. The quote under the photograph read, 'I am alone with the beating of my heart.' (Lui Chi) Making photographs in the streets of my hometown in the 60/70s calmed the beating of my unsettled heart and gave a face to the feelings of social alienation endemic to that time. Danville streets were the places of my earliest identity. In the process of becoming a close observer of ordinary life…I had become an artist.

Anxiety is always at the edge of identity."

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 28 photographic prints — Print versos are marked with legacy identifiers, titles and dates assigned by former owners, and other notes.

Aaron Siskind (1903-1991) was an American photographer and faculty member of the Chicago Institute of Design and Rhode Island School of Design. Collection consists of 28 black-and-white signed prints by Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images form part of two projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," and feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 28 black-and-white photographs taken during the earliest years of Aaron Siskind's career, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in bedrooms, kitchens, and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on his work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection, resulting in 23 unique images represented by 28 prints. Library staff assigned titles and original negative dates according to original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; some titles are not known. Titles assigned by a former collector, sometimes present on the back of the prints, are also given in a note field in the entry for each print.

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ARLIS/SE was founded in 1974 as a chapter within the Southern Region of the Art Libraries Society of North America. The collection includes chapter correspondence, bylaws, annual reports, membership lists, photographs, conference materials, LoPresti Awards (for excellence in art publication), and financial records. Scattered throughout are materials and correspondence related to the national organization. There are 20 electronic files on one floppy disk that have been migrated to the electronic records server. There are 20 black-and-white photographs and two transparencies.

The collection includes chapter correspondence, bylaws, annual reports, membership lists, photographs, conference materials, LoPresti Awards (for excellence in art publication), and financial records. Scattered throughout are materials and correspondence related to the national organization. There are 20 electronic files on one floppy disk that have been migrated to the electronic records server. There are 20 black-and-white photographs and two transparencies.

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Frank Baker (1910-1999) was a faculty member at Duke University in history, an expert on Wesleyan Methodism, and a rare book and manuscripts collector. The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its worldwide expansion up to the 20th century. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family. Collection also includes correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism: Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride. Other materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, photographs, and memorabilia. Topics covered by the materials include the life and training of Methodist clergy; the religious life of women; biography and portraiture of Methodists; spirituality; Protestantism in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

The Frank Baker Collection of Wesleyana and British Methodism, 1536-1996 and undated, comprises a vast range of original correspondence, writings, local histories, printed items, engravings, and many other manuscript materials that date from the earliest years of Methodism to its expansion throughout the British Empire during the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. The collection includes the correspondence of two of the most important founders of Methodism, John and Charles Wesley, as well as correspondence from members of the Wesley family, including Samuel Wesley, Sr. (1662-1735), Sarah (Gwynne) Wesley (1726-1822) and the Gwynne family, and the children of Charles and Sarah Wesley: Charles Wesley, Junior (1757-1834), Sarah (Sally) Wesley (1759-1828), and Samuel Wesley (1766-1837).

Additionally, correspondence from many of the key figures in 18th and 19th century history of British Methodism greatly extends the collection's breadth of coverage. Among others, these groups of correspondence include Joseph Benson, Jabez Bunting, Adam Clarke, Thomas Coke, James Everett, John Fletcher, Mary (Bosanquet) Fletcher, Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, Elizabeth (Ritchie) Mortimer, George Osborn, Hester Ann Rogers, Richard Tabraham, and Thomas Wride.

The collection materials cover many topics, including: the life and training of clergy women correspondence and diaries; the religious life of women; biography; portraiture; spiritual topics; Protestantism as depicted in art; and the debate between Arminianism and Calvinism in the early church. Organizational history in the collection covers several branches of the 18th and 19th century church, including Wesleyan Methodism, Primitive Methodism, missions, and missionary societies.

Formats of materials include church records and registers, account books, autograph albums, broadsides (notices), circular letters, engravings, maps, sermons, scrapbooks, class tickets, photographs, photocopies of original manuscripts, memorabilia, and realia.

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William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated 31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items

Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

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Petra Barth photographs, 2006-2020; 2006-ongoing 14.0 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — 421 prints — 65.12 Gigabytes — 728 digital files

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Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints in darkroom and inkjet formats, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, Barth's images document cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, through landscape and portraiture. Series include images from Central and South American countries to the Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; portraits of migrants and images of migrant services at Arizona/Mexico border stations; images from the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; images of Syrian refugees and others in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Collection consists of 421 black-and-white prints, darkroom and digital, 726 associated digital image and project files, and two digital videos by photographer Petra Barth. Arranged by project, the photographs document the cultures, politics, environments, and crises in countries all over the world, and her interest in portraiture. Series include The Americas, whose images range from Central and South American countries to Caribbean countries of Haiti and the Bahamas; migrants and migrant services at the Arizona/Mexico border; the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and residents in nearby areas in the Ukraine; scenes in Jerusalem and the West Bank; refugees in Jordan camps; and portraits of military veterans of the Bosnia-Herzegovina War, in the city of Sarajevo. In addition to many portraits of individuals and families, there are also landscapes.

Areas represented in The Americas series include Bolivia; Patagonia, Argentina; the Bahamas; Foz do Iguaçu and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; El Salvador; Guatemala; Martissant, Cité Soleil, and Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Nicaragua; Ciudad del Este, Paraguay; and Cusco, Peru. Includes images of people working, cooking, minding children, participating in local festivals, traveling, and playing. Several portraits feature people in traditional dress. The largest group of images was taken in Haiti, where Barth returned following the 2010 earthquake. These photographs include scenes of people among the rubble in Martissant and Port-au-Prince, as well as some portraits of hospital patients. The Americas series images are arranged alphabetically by country.

The two short digital videos were taken by Barth in South America and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Marion Belanger photographs, 2001-2012 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints — 25 black-and-white and 48 color digital inkjet prints

Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments. Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The digital inkjet prints in both series measure 13 or 13 1/2 x16 inches. Both projects were published as photobooks (2009 and 2012, respectively). Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 25 black-and-white and 48 color photographs taken from 2001 to 2012 by Marion Belanger, documenting the intersection of natural and human-built environments.

Belanger's series "Everglades," taken in Florida between 2001-2004, presents black-and-white images of wildlife and natural landscapes affected by the impacts of tourism, agriculture, migrant worker housing, construction, and activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Army. This series was also published in 2009 as Everglades: Outside and Within.

Her portfolio "Rift/Fault," shot between 2006-2012, documents zones in California and Iceland where the San Andreas Fault and the Mid-Atlantic Rift exist - visibly or invisibly - alongside human environments; subjects in this series include housing developments, monitoring stations, geologic features and landscapes, coastal roads, and geothermal structures such as greenhouses. The images were shot in color and are suffused with pale tonalities. Prints measure 13 1/2 x16 inches. Also published as a photobook in 2012, available in the library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Max Belcher photographs, 1969-1998 10 Linear Feet — 48 boxes — 1425 Items

The photographs and printed materials in this collection date from 1969 to 1998, and document the work of Max Belcher, American-born photographer. The collection is organized into two series: Printed Materials and Photography. The Printed Materials Series consists of publicity, exhibit literature, and other materials related to Belcher's work as a photographer. The much larger Photography Series includes 1,027 contact sheets (860 black-and-white, 167 color), 381 photographs (239 black-and-white, 142 color), and five color fine prints spanning nearly three decades of Belcher's professional work as a photographer. This series is divided into eleven project-based subseries, which have been arranged chronologically by the start date of each project. Within each subseries, contact sheets precede photographs,and black-and-white work precedes color. Individual items in the photography series bear specific technical and identifying information, usually marked by Belcher on the backs of contact sheets and photographs. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Helen Smith Bevington papers, 1918-2001 9.75 Linear Feet — 3422 Items

Family and personal papers, primarily Bevington's personal and professional correspondence (1931-2001), which includes letters from Ray Bradbury (1976-1993); typescripts of diary entries (1959-1989); 22 heavily annotated books of modern poetry, and research notes. There are also correspondence and professional records for Bevington's husband, Merle. Other items include one color and 9 black-and-white photographs, a scrapbook, passports, geneology information/records, awards, newspaper clippings, class records, and unpublished manuscripts.

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Feminist and author. The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection. Multiple additions have been added since the collection was processed; these are represented at the end of this finding aid.

The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection.

The Writings Series is central to the collection, and is correspondingly substantial, comprising over half of the papers. It includes drafts, research, correspondence and publicity related to such novels as Small Victories, Upstate, Matron of Honor, and Straight Man, her memoir Passion and Prejudice, the writing and production of the plays The Awakening and The Death of Henry Flagler as well as poetry and many short, personal essays. The Poetry Series consists of individual poems, while compendiums of poetry are in the Writings Series. Many of Bingham's writings (including poems, novels, short stories, plays and essays) exist as electronic files and are available to researchers. These files are listed in the Poetry and the Writings Series. The Diaries and Notebooks Series contains material spanning her entire life -- from her adolescence in Louisville, Kentucky in the 1940s to her experiences living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and contain many ideas for writings and references to the process of writing. The Correspondence Series also spans the same period of time, and contains family correspondence spanning many decades, as well as literary and personal correspondence between Bingham and such well-known authors, activists and artists as Judy Chicago and Gloria Steinem. The smaller Speeches Series houses writings by Bingham for public engagements, and in addition to contributing to a portrait of Bingham as a writer, documents her explication of feminist issues relating to women in the corporate world, in publishing, and women in history.

Bingham, born into a prominent Louisville, Ky. family that owned The Louisville Courier-Journal, worked for the newspaper as book page editor, 1982-1985. She also took an active seat on the board of the Bingham Enterprises, which was responsible for The Courier-Journal and other media corporations in the Louisville area. Bingham's desire to sell her shares in the stock in the newspaper resulted in the sale of The Courier-Journal in 1986. The Bingham family and the break-up of the Bingham Enterprises were the subject of at least four books ( The Binghams of Louisville, House of Dreams, The Patriarch and Bingham's Passion and Prejudice) and much media attention. Materials concerning this aspect of Bingham's life can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers Series and Subject Files Series. Audiovisual materials in the Audiotapes and Videotapes Series document aspects of Bingham's career and life through interviews and other events.

NOTE: This collection also contains numerous additions that have not been processed. For descriptions of later additions, please see below or consult the library's online catalog.

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In 1996, Bitch: Feminst Response to Pop Culture was created by Lisa Jervis, Benjamin Shaykin, and Andi Zeisler. After having a hard time finding critiques of sexism in pop culture in magazines and self published zines, they decided to make their own. Their goals are to write about sexism in pop culture, propose alternatives, and promote pop products that are pro-woman and pro-feminism. Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Chiefly production records for magazine issues, including drafts and edited copy for articles, laser printer and resin-coated paper page layouts, and color proofs. Includes editorial correspondence, research files, meeting notes, promotional and subscription material, audio cassette and mini-cassette tapes, VHS tape, mini-disks, color and black-and-white photographs, negatives, and color transparencies. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Primarily correspondence between Roma Blackburn and literary personages, including former students of her husband, William Maxwell Blackburn, professor at Duke University. Also includes poem by Rose Styron, clippings about the poet Elizabeth Bishop, and a program from Bishop's memorial service. One volume, Heart and Home: A Memoir, was written by Mrs. Blackburn. Correspondence includes: letters and postcards from Elizabeth Bishop discussing travels, intellectual life, and literary interests; letters from William Styron discussing fund-raising in memory of Professor William Blackburn for the Duke University Capital Campaign for the Arts and Sciences; letters from Alice Methfessel, close friend of Elizabeth Bishop; and letters from Professor Blackburn's former students Sean Devereaux, Guy Davenport, and Josephine Humphreys Hutcheson. (1964-1984) (46 items) (.2 linear feet)

This addition (218 items, 1942-1985) includes letters to Blackburn from Reynolds Price and Wallace Fowlie and others regarding invitations, travel plans, news, and condolences; material related to the William Blackburn Fund; correspondence from Blackburn's summers in Magog; a story by Max Steele; 23 manuscript pages of Blackburn's autobiography; copies of tributes to William Blackburn from William Styron and Max Steele as well as statistics on the number of students he taught; and photographs (61 black-and-white prints, 4 color prints, 1 color slide, and 2 black-and-white negatives) of Tennessee Williams, Fred Chappell, William Styron, Sean Devereaux, Wallace Fowlie, and William Blackburn as well as other family members. An unidentified audio tape is included. (.6 linear feet) (acc#01-0036)

Addition (2012-0038) (0.4 lin. ft., 300 items) includes personal correspondence to Roma Blackburn from family members and others, clippings and photographs of William Blackburn, and a recording of William Styron reading from Lie Down in Darkness. Also included are writings and notes by William Blackburn mostly relating to his W.B. Yeats research.

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Blackwell family papers, 1845-1976 and undated 1.6 Linear Feet — 136 items

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to Blackwell family members from other family members; including Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

Collection contains primarily correspondence and printed materials. There are also three unidentified and undated black-and-white photographs, along with a few items representing the Livingston family, including a genealogy developed by Helen Thomas Blackwell. The correspondence contains mostly routine letters to from other family members to Alice Stone Blackwell, Anna M. Blackwell, Elizabeth Blackwell, Emma Blackwell, Helen Blackwell, Henry B. Blackwell, and Lucy Stone. There are also several postcards mailed to the Woman's Journal regarding subscriptions, address changes and other matters related to publication, or the editor's business acquaintances. There are several printed materials written by Blackwell authors, including "Philosophy of Re-Incarnation" by Anna Blackwell, and "Medicine & Morality," "Scientific Method in Biology," and “Erroneous Method in Medical Education" by Elizabeth Blackwell. However, the series primarily features printed items that were maintained in the Blackwell family library. Also contains a corrected typescript (1940s) of Ishbel Ross' Life of Elizabeth Blackwell along with notes from 1958 on the Elizabeth Blackwell award at Smith College.

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Michael Francis Blake photographs, circa 1912-1934 1.0 Linear Foot — 3 boxes — 243 items

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Michael Francis Blake was one of Charleston, South Carolina's first African American studio photographers. Collection consists of 118 photographs, mostly studio portraits taken by Michael Francis Blake from about 1912 to 1934, with some outdoor settings. There is also a full set of copy prints. The great majority of the subjects appear to be African American; however, there are also individuals who are multi-racial, and possibly white and Asian. Formats comprise 91 photographic postcards and 28 black-and-white prints, many on card mounts but some in the form of more casual snapshots; there are also eight copy negatives. A few of the photographs may be taken by others. Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including a portrait of the photographer. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of 118 photographs of men, women, and children as single individuals, family groups, and other group shots. There is also a full set of copy prints (preferred for access) and eight copy negatives. The great majority of the subjects appear to be African American; however, there are individuals who are multi-racial, and possibly white and Asian. The photographs were taken by Michael Francis Blake, an African American photographer from Charleston, South Carolina, from about 1912 to 1934, mostly in his studio at 384 West Sumter Street. There are a few that may have been taken by another indiviual. Some of the photographs are stamped with Blake's name and studio addresses.

The majority of the photographs were originally housed in a photograph album entitled "Portraits of Members," also included in the collection, but have been rehoused for preservation purposes. Ninety-one of the photos are photographic postcards and the others are either mounted photographs or snapshots. The predominant style is the formal studio portrait, standing or seated. There are also some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Some portraits were taken outdoors in front of a backdrop with props such as rugs, chairs and plants to recreate a studio setting. Others were taken on the street; the location of photograph #28 has been identified as just outside of Blake's studio. Some have what appear to be shopping lists and other notations written on the backs, and a few have names, ages, and street addresses, presumably of the sitter or their household.

Through existing captions and public input, thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including the photographer, Michael Francis Blake, who appears in one portrait.

Each original print has been assigned a unique institutional identifier. All but one have been digitized and are available online through the Duke Digital Collections website.

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Louise Hortense Branscomb was a physician from Birmingham, Alabama, who was also heavily involved in community work and with the United Methodist Church. Her papers include diaries, medical notebooks, correspondence, and photographs documenting her and her family's activities during the twentieth century.

This collection includes Dr. Louise Branscomb's diaries, notebooks, correspondence, photographs, and personal papers relating to her medical career and civic service in Birmingham during the twentieth century. There is also a significant amount of material related to the Branscomb family, including correspondence and clippings from Louise's parents and siblings.

Dr. Branscomb's diaries and notebooks comprise the largest portion of the collection; they are held within the Bound Volumes Series. Her earliest diaries date from age thirteen, and continue off and on throughout her life. Along with personal diaries, Branscomb kept travel diaries documenting her various trips, including her World War II travels, Korea, China, India, Europe, Russia, Africa, and South America. Another notable portion of Volumes Series are Branscomb's medical notebooks, which she used as indices to assist her diagnoses and treatment of various illnesses. She also kept logs of her surgeries and baby deliveries. Along with Branscomb's diaries, the Volumes Series includes diaries and ledgers kept by her father, L.C. Branscomb, and her mother, Minnie Branscomb. L.C. Branscomb's notebooks log his sermons, baptisms, and travels, as well as his personal and family expenses.

The Correspondence Series has been arranged in loose chronological order, with some isolated events foldered separately. This includes courtship letters between Louise Branscomb's parents, L.C. and Minnie, as well as condolences following L.C. Branscomb's accident and death in 1930. The majority of the series are incoming letters to the Branscomb family, with only a small number of letters written by Louise.

The Family History Series is sorted by family member, including materials from Louise's parents, L.C. Branscomb and Minnie McGehee Branscomb, as well as some of her siblings: Harvie Branscomb, Richard Edwin Branscomb, Lamar Branscomb, Alline Branscomb, Emily Branscomb, Elizabeth Branscomb, Lewis Branscomb, as well as other relatives. The series also contains assorted ephemera collected by the family, including Confederate money and news clippings.

Louise Branscomb's Personal Papers Series documents her range of activities, including her travels, her medical practice, her work with the United Methodist Church, and her philanthropy to institutions like Birmingham Southern College. The series includes drafts of her speeches and writings, as well as clippings referencing her and her work. Some clippings collected by Branscomb include her annotations or reflections on the subject or event, often dating from later in her life.

The Photographs Series includes informal snapshots of the Branscomb family and their friends, as well as formal portraits of Louise Branscomb. This series also contains her various identification and membership cards.

Finally, the Oral History Series contains four audio cassettes containing an oral history conducted between September and October of 1985 in Birmingham, Ala., when Martha E. King interviewed Dr. Branscomb on behalf of the Women's Division Oral History Project for the United Methodist Church's General Board of Global Ministries. There is also correspondence, biographical information about Dr. Branscomb, as well as detailed descriptions of and an index for the interview. However, no transcript of the interview is available. Interview topics include family, education, missionary work, women's issues in the church, race relations, and Branscomb's representing the church on her travels to Africa.

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Eric Breitenbach photographs of Florida, 1987-1989 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box; 10 item — 8 photographic prints; 2 copies of printed catalog

Collection consists of eight black-and-white photographic prints, most of which were taken as part of Breitenbach's work for his Florida Documentary Project, and two copies of the project's exhibit catalog. The gelatin silver prints measure 14 1/8 x 16 7/8 inches, and are almost all portraits of the many types of people living in Florida and the recreation they enjoy or the significant objects and other people in their lives. Individuals include teenagers, college students, deer hunters, Haitian families and other immigrants; and retirees. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of eight black-and-white photographic prints, most of which were taken as part of Breitenbach's work for his Florida Documentary Project, and two copies of the project's exhibit catalog. The gelatin silver prints measure 14 1/8 x 16 7/8 inches, and are almost all portraits of the many types of people living in Florida and the recreation they enjoy or the significant objects and other people in their lives. Individuals include teenagers, college students, deer hunters, Haitian families and other immigrants; and retirees. The prints are all signed, with title, location, and date written on the backs. The catalog includes reproductions of project photographs, with image titles, locations, and dates; a list of planned exhibits; and a summary and timeline of the project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Born in Union, Maine, John Emory Bryant (1836-1900) was an abolitionist, teacher, Union officer with the 8th Maine Volunteers, agent of the Freedmen's Bureau, newspaper editor and publisher, lawyer, and Republican politician in Georgia. The collection includes letters, journals, scrapbooks, writings, speeches, and printed materials related to the lives of John Emory Bryant (JEB), his wife Emma Spaulding Bryant, their daughter Emma Alice Zeller and her husband Julius Zeller and their descendants, and William Anderson Pledger who was a Republican contemporary of JEB. The bulk of the collection falls into four main divisions: the early years in Maine (1851-1860), during the American-Civil War (1861-1865), during Reconstruction in Georgia, and the later years in New York (1888-1900). Some of the materials are not original and are copies or typescripts. Of note are materials regarding Georgian Republican politics; conditions for Radical Republicans and African-Americans during Reconstruction, including correspondence with Henry McNeal Turner; historical views about the differences between the North and the South; Ku Klux Klan activity in Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; and a particularly passionate exchange between Emma Spaulding Bryant and her husband regarding her visits to a doctor about "uterine difficulties" (these 10 letters from Emma Bryant have been digitized and are available online).

The collection includes letters, journals, scrapbooks, writings, speeches, and printed materials related to the lives of John Emory Bryant (JEB), his wife Emma Spaulding Bryant, their daughter Emma Alice Zeller and her husband Julius Zeller and their descendants, and William Anderson Pledger who was a Republican contemporary of JEB. The bulk of the collection falls into four main divisions: the early years in Maine (1851-1860), during the American-Civil War (1861-1865), during Reconstruction in Georgia and after (1865-1887), and the later years in New York (1888-1900). Some of the materials are not original and are copies or typescripts. Of note are materials regarding Georgian Republican politics; conditions for Radical Republicans and African-Americans during Reconstruction, including correspondence with Henry McNeal Turner; historical views about the differences between the North and the South; Ku Klux Klan activity in Georgia, Florida, and Alabama; and a particularly passionate exchange between Emma Spaulding Bryant and her husband regarding her visits to a doctor about "uterine difficulties." These 10 letters from Emma Bryant have been digitized and are available online at: https://library.duke.edu/specialcollections/scriptorium/bryant/

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Bullock family papers, 1784-1940s and undated 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — Approximately 1200 items — Approximately 1200 items

Papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC. The bulk is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; religious life; the Spanish-American War; and the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston and the siege of Petersburg. Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876.

Collection houses the papers of several generations of a family of southern Virginia and central North Carolina, including Williamsboro, Granville County (now Vance), and southern Virginia. Fourteen photographs added at a later date represent bi-racial descendants of this family who lived in Nutbush and Manson, NC.

The bulk of the collection is comprised of correspondence, 1820-1920, between John and William H. Bullock, a second John Bullock and his wife, Susan M. (Cobb) Bullock, their sons and daughters, and other children and grandchildren. Topics include family relationships and genealogy; illnesses and deaths; farming; slaves and tenants (including some lists of slave names); campus life at the University of North Carolina, 1850s; plantation management; market prices, 1850s-1860s; secessionist and Union sentiments in Granville County; and religious life. Of interest are 46 letters relating to the Civil War in North Carolina and Virginia, with details on camp life, troop movements, and the Battle of Kinston in 1862 and the siege of Petersburg in late 1864. A few letters are send from Johnson Island, Ohio, and a few give some details on the final months of the war in North Carolina.

Volumes include two ledgers, a travel diary, 1848, from a business trip to Tennessee, and Susan Bullock's diary, 1869-1871. Also included are legal and financial papers dating from 1784-1876, and assorted other papers, including a list of about 40 slave names from 1857, and medical receipts and accounts.

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"Bill" Burk, retired, botany librarian at the John N. Couch Biology Library, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

Collection comprises three folders of letters written to Burk by botanist Sherwin Carlquist. The majority of the letters are accompanied by examples of Carlquist's black-and-white 8"x10" landscape photographs, including seven photographic prints on enlarging paper, as well as scanned copies printed on a laser printer. There are also advertisements for Carlquist's books of landscape photographs featuring male nudes. The letters are most often general holiday greetings Carlquist mailed to all his friends, usually annotated with specific notes to Burk; others are personal letters to Burk. Carlquist's letters mainly provide information regarding the accompanying photographs and his artistic approach to photography, especially the male nudes; there is additional commentary on the history of botany; his writing, publication, and research projects; the work of other scientists; and his personal life. Other topics include gay fiction and culture, the challenges of being gay in academe, and circumcision. Books mentioned include: HAWAII, OUTSIDERS, COMPARATIVE WOOD ANATOMY, TARWEEDS AND SILVERSWORDS, THE NATURAL MALE, MAN/NATURE, NATURAL MANSCAPES, MEN IN NATURE, UNCUT, and NATURAL OBJECTS.

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BUST Magazine records, 1993-2015 43.2 Linear Feet — 29625 Items

Debbie Stoller and Marcelle Karp began producing BUST, a third-wave feminist women's magazine, in New York, N.Y., in 1993 as a photocopied zine. Collection documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 and 20-86 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material (Girls, Fashions, The Shit, etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2001-0009) (1500 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1993-1998) documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material ("Girls,""Fashions,""The Shit," etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items, including color (9) and black-and-white photographs (6), original black-and-white ink drawings, and color prints (23), as well as color slides (12).

Accession (2009-0082) (24 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2007) consists of production binders for issues 20-43 of BUST magazine, published from summer 2002 through spring 2007. Each binder contains a copy of the published issue, as well as tabbed sections for each portion of the issue, including features, columns, regulars, sex files, and guides.

Accession (2010-0101) (7875 items; 10.5 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2006) includes production binders, files from the creative director, and files from the Art Department.

Accession (2013-0184) (10125 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2011) consists of production binders for issues 44-71, published from 2008-2011.

Accession (2015-0040) (1400 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 2010-2013) consists of production files for issues 64-73, production binders for issues 72-86, and 13 Syquest discs from issues 4-9.

Accession (2015-0097) (1700 items, 4 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2012) consists of production files for issues 10-50, Creative Director Laurie Henzel's notebooks, and graphic materials including original art, color and black and white photographs and color layouts.

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The papers consist of correspondence from Jay B. Hubbell and John Olin Eidson. The Eidson letters (5 items) discuss the upcoming program of the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association of America and suggest Richard Armour as the featured speaker. The letters are arranged chronologically.

Accession (1992-0127) (20,000 items, 30.0 lin. ft.) includes correspondence, research and teaching notes, writings, student offprints, card files, photostats, materials relating to the Center for Editions of American Authors, files relating to American Literature, printed matter, clippings, and other miscellaneous items. Correspondence includes letters from Jay B. Hubbell and John O. Eidson; the latter concern the American Literature Section of the Modern Language Association.

Accession (2002-0104), dated 1858-2000 (1251 items; 6.8 linear feet) primarily comprises materials related to writings by Cady and his former student Thomas F. O'Donnell regarding author, editor, and critic William Dean (W.D.) Howells. In 2000, Cady edited and wrote an introduction to a volume of Howells' poetry entitled Pebbles, Monochromes, and Other Modern Poems, 1891-1916, and his collection holds various drafts of this work as well as correspondence between Cady and his publishers concerning the book's publication. Also included is material written by or collected by Cady or O'Donnell while editing or writing other books and articles regarding Howells' poetry; and original correspondence from Howells to his publishers.

Accession (2010-0083) (300 items; 7.5 lin. ft.) includes books by and about William Dean Howells, most with annotations by Edwin Cady and Harry H. Clark, as well as materials (first proofs, drafts, and other Howells publications) that were used by Cady in the preparation of Howells' complete works. Books date from approximately 1881-1981; manuscript materials date from approximately 1879-1992.

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Morrie Camhi photographs, 1960s-2012 and undated 12 Linear Feet — Approx. 800 Items

Documentary photographer and instructor based in Petaluma, California; died in 1999. Collection features 167 black-and-white prints of documentary photographer Camhi's work on five projects: ADVantage, a series of portraits of individuals who have written personal want ads; Espejo and Farmworkers, which explore Mexican American labor activism and the lives of undocumented immigrants; Jews of Greece, portraits of Jewish people living in various places in Greece; and The Prison Experience, which documents inmates,their families, and staff of the California State Prison at Vacaville and their answers to the question Camhi posed to them about what they would like people to know about life in prisons. The gelatin silver prints range in size from 8.5x13.5 to 10.25x13.25 inches; most are in 16x20 inch mats. The collection of prints is accompanied by approximately five hundred original negatives and slides, many featuring Camhi's own family as well as several photographic projects not represented in the prints series. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection features 167 black-and-white prints of documentary photographer Camhi's work on five projects, two of which are inter-related: "ADVantage," a series of intimate portraits in their homes of individuals who have written personal want ads; "Espejo" and "Farmworkers," which explore the dimensions of Mexican American activism and the lives of undocumented farmworkers; Jews of Greece, a study of individual Jews living in various places in Greece; and "The Prison Experience," which documents the lives and concerns of prisoners in a California State Prison at Vacaville and their answers to the question Camhi posed to them about what they would like people to know about the prison experience. The gelatin silver prints range in size from 8.5x13.5 to 10.25x13.25 inches, with many in 16x20 inch mats.

The collection of prints is accompanied by over 500 original negatives and slides, many featuring Camhi's own family. The negatives and slides also contain images associated with other photographic projects not represented in the prints series, including "Roadside Attraction" and "Haiku."

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Thomas Chapin papers, 1870s-1999, bulk 1979-1999 84.9 Linear Feet — 28,117 Items

The collection (100 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1979-1998) contains audio cassettes and compositions by Thomas Chapin, as well as clippings, programs, memorial messages, and other items about him. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of audio cassettes before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-355)

The addition to the collection (60 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1981-1999) includes published materials on Chapin or featuring his music. There are publicity materials; scrapbook items, such as programs or clippings; articles about Chapin from the internet and elsewhere; copies of original scores; compact discs; phonograph records; genealogical information, and other biographical information about him and his trio. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of sound recordings before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-0467)

The addition to the collection (15300 items, 29.40 linear feet; dated 1870s-1998, bulk 1980-1997) comprises primarily correspondence; financial records; scrapbooks, graphic materials (98 color photographs, 1 color slide, 6 black-and-white photographs, 24 black-and-white negatives, 17 contact sheets, 1 print, 1 watercolor, and 2 chalk drawings), posters, and other materials detailing Chapin's musical career, especially performances of the Chapin Trio; notebooks and appointment books; and musical scores by Chapin and others. Also includes recordings on 17 reel-to-reel tapes, 8 CDs, and 5 audiocassette tapes of performances by Chapin and others; 3 electronic computer files; and 24 small musical instruments of plastic and metal. (01-0157)

The addition (2002-0281 and 2003-0125; 12,657 items, 50.5 linear feet) consists primarily of studio and demo recordings of Chapin's music on audiocassette, vinyl, and reel-to-reel tape. Also contains a number of collages by Chapin, documenting another of his forms of expression; personal items, especially photographs and correspondence, reflecting his close relationships with family and friends; videos and film reels of recording sessions, tours, and other events, including Chapin's memorial service; sheet music and music books; clothing and hats; 3 hand instruments; performance posters; and business items.

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Fred Chappell papers, 1944-2019 and undated 158 Linear Feet — 5.9 Gigabytes

The fully processed portion of the Fred Chappell Papers spans the dates 1960-1997, with the bulk being dated after 1970. There are several additions covering the years 1998 through 2015. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Chappell and other authors; printed material (primarily serials containing stories, poems, and articles by Chappell but also clippings); legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; and other material. Documents relate to Chappell's personal life and career, both as a student and writer at Duke University, where he studied under well-known creative writing teacher William Blackburn, and as a writer and professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). The collection documents the entire length and breadth of Chappell's multifaceted career, beginning with the years just after he completed his undergraduate studies at Duke and started his first novel at the urging of Hiram Haydn, an editor to whom Blackburn had introduced him. Letters, manuscripts, and notebooks provide insight into Chappell's developing literary career, his academic activities at UNC-G, and his growing involvement with a large network of writers, including a number of his former students. Many prominent American authors, especially Southern ones, are represented in the collection. Among the most frequent correspondents are Kelly Cherry, Grace DiSanto, George Garrett, Marianne Gingher, Dana Gioia, Donald Hall, Heather Ross Miller, Robert Morgan, Eve Shelnutt, and Dabney Stuart. Notebooks, manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, and printed material document the development of Chappell's career across all the genres in which he writes. Supporting material in non-print media, including photographs and audio and video cassettes of readings, document public aspects of his career.

The Correspondence Series, arranged chronologically in Incoming and Outgoing subseries, discloses the range of Chappell's interests and activities in the literary community. The letters not only provide a portrait of his development as a poet and novelist but also demonstrate his active roles in supporting the careers of other writers and promoting the literary community. These latter activities are documented by his numerous affirmative responses to a broad range of requests to read drafts of works-in-progress, write recommendations for other writers for grants and awards, write reviews and provide blurbs for new publications, serve as the judge of contests, speak at conferences and workshops, and serve in various advisory and editorial capacities for literary journals. The correspondence also provides much information about his teaching career and his legacy of students who develop successful careers of their own, such as Cherry, Miller, Morgan, and Shelnutt. The bulk of the outgoing correspondence dates to 1990 or after, when, at the request of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Chappell began retaining copies of all outgoing correspondence.

The Writings by Chappell Series is divided into subseries by genres with the exception of one subseries based on format, the Notebooks Subseries. Since Chappell writes with relatively few hand corrections on any particular stage of his work, the development of an individual work is often apparent only by comparing various complete drafts in manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs. The notebooks are particularly valuable in this regard, providing what often appear to be the earliest versions of works. The notebooks also indicate the facility with which Chappell moves from one genre to another, as most of them are not devoted to a single work or genre but rather include poems, stories, novel fragments, essays, reviews, translations, and drafts of correspondence following one after the other. This versatility is further reflected by the Printed Materials Series, which contains extensive serials with Chappell's publications in multiple genres, especially fiction, poetry, and reviews. At the end of this series, the Clippings Subseries documents his public and critical reception with copies of reviews and essays about his work and publicity about it.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a variety of flyers, leaflets, newsletters, and examples of fan mail that further demonstrate his literary career. Prominent here are such items as the proofs for a 1990 symposium about his poetry and newsletters of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. It also contains two small subseries of audio and video cassettes of readings, interviews, and work by other authors.

The Writings by Others Series contains manuscripts from well-known contemporary writers, ex-students, and aspiring writers seeking advice. Chappell's reactions to the manuscripts are written on many of them, often as the first draft of a letter or requested recommendation. Most writers are represented by only one or two items, but Cherry and Shelnutt are both represented by more than a dozen pieces that, together with their frequent correspondence, outline the development of their respective careers.

Later additions to the collection include incoming and outgoing correspondence, drafts and writings of Chappell's poetry, honors and awards, and printed materials and publications featuring Chappell or his work. Most accessions include bound volumes as well as writings and manuscripts by other authors or poets. There are also some oversize materials, audiovisual materials, clippings, and photographs. These additions have been loosely sorted but have not been incorporated physically or intellectually into the originally processed collection. Please consult Research Services with questions about using these materials.

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J. H. Chappell collection, 1922-1927, 1967 4.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; one pamphlet binder

J. H. Chappell graduated from Duke University in 1926 and was a college athlete. The collection includes Trinity College and Duke University memorabilia, student notebooks, correspondence, photographs and corresponding nitrate negatives, and other materials collected by Chappell during his years at Trinity College during its transition to Duke University. The memorabilia and ephemera include class grade reports, athletics events fliers, pins, banners and pennants, and Durham-specific advertising.

J.H. Chappell's papers relate to his time as a student at Trinity College and Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, 1922-1927, and include student notebooks, letters, photographs, and memorabilia, and other materials. One box includes a few Trinity College banners and pennants as well as pennants believed to be associated with Trinity Park High School. Of particular note is a pennant for the Hesperian Literary Society. Also included are Chappell's letters earned in athletics.

Ephemeral items include Chappell's admission card, class schedule cards for his four years, his membership certificate for the Order of the Tombs, grade reports, event fliers and programs, athletics memorabilia including ticket booklets and schedules, and Durham-specific business cards and advertisements.

There are photographs and negatives of Trinity/Duke athletes (football, baseball and track) as well as students playing in the snow on what is now East Campus. There is a 1925 panoramic photograph of the Duke University student body and faculty as well as of company c. 13th engineers at Fort Humphreys, Virginia (1927) in addition to a mounted photograph of a baseball team. The players are not in uniform but a few are wearing caps with a "D" on them. The negatives, most of them nitrate cellulose film, are closed to use; corresponding prints are in the collection.

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Charles Leonard Van Noppen (1869-1935) was a publisher, editor, and author, from Greensboro, N.C. The collection contains letters and papers, mostly relating to the projected extension of Samuel A'Court Ashe's book, Biographical history of North Carolina from colonial times to the present (1908-1925). Collection also contains 356 black-and-white photographs and engravings, almost exclusively 19th century portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

This collection contains 250 brief unpublished biographical sketches of prominent North Carolinians prepared for use in a projected extension of Samuel A. Ashe's, "Biographical History of North Carolina From Colonial Times to the Present." Other papers in the collection include printed forms returned by persons from whom biographical information had been requested, reviews of Ashe's Biographical History of North Carolina, an album entitled "Platinotypes of English Cathedrals", published in London by Eyre & Spottiswode as well as personal letters and papers of Van Noppen. The collection also includes 356 black and white photographs and engravings almost exclusively 19th Centruy portraits of prominent male North Carolinians.

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The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his MFA thesis project on religious experience in the U.S. The photographs are primarily black-and-white prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches. The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C.; tornado survivors in South Dakota; an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and sheep rancher Judith Fae "Pachy" Burns in Montana. Some of his documentary work also includes oral history interviews. There are also several recordings of interviews with Chatterley, where he speaks about his work as a documentary photographer, and a book by Barbara Lau containing his photographs of Cambodian immigrants. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographs of Cedric N. Chatterley span the years 1983-2013, and were created throughout his career as a documentary photographer, beginning with his Master in Fine Arts thesis project, "Ambivalent Ecstasies/Converging Energies," on American religious experience. The photographs are primarily black-and-white gelatin silver prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 18x24 inches.

The most prominent themes in Chatterley's work are labor, community, and religious expression. He has photographed chicken slaughterhouse workers in Maine; Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, a project undertaken with Barbara Lau of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University; David "Honeyboy" Edwards and other Southern blues musicians in Mississippi and on tour; a substance abusers' rehabilitation community in Durham, N.C., also with Barbara Lau; tornado survivors in South Dakota who rebuilt their town over a period of ten years; Holy Land USA, an abandoned religious theme park in Connecticut; and a woman sheep rancher's work during lambing season in Montana. Some of the images were taken with Chatterley's hand-built cameras.

A final series consists of materials relating to Barbara Lau's book, From Cambodia to Greensboro, documenting Cambodian immigrants in North Carolina, that includes images taken by Chatterley, and a set of recorded interviews from 2008 in which Chatterley speaks about his career as a documentary photographer. The cassettes have been converted to digital files and use copies are available for access. Original recordings are closed to use.

Series are arranged in chronological order; prints are numbered and captioned by the photographer.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Vincent Cianni photographs, 1983-2012 21.5 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — 668 items

Vince Cianni is a documentary photographer based in Newburgh, New York. The Berlin series features photographs of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall, and the reunification of Germany in 1990. The Poughkeepsie Mall and the Providence House Men's Shelter series both document urban culture and decay in the 1980s. The Weddings Series contains photographs from weddings (including some transgender) from the mid-1980s. The Brooklyn project features images and recorded interviews from Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore, which relates to Hispanic American roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, mid-1990s. Cambodian kickboxing culture is explored in another set of photographs taken in 2004. The last series offers a set of oral history interviews of gays in the military, also related to a photobook by Cianni. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises photographs from six bodies of documentary work by Vince Cianni, New York-based photographer and author. Subjects focus chiefly on American culture, exploring wedding rituals, skateboarding and youth culture, urban decay, street photography, shopping mall society, men in shelters, and gays in the military. There is also a series on kickboxing in Cambodia, and a large set of oral history interviews with gay men and women in the U.S. military. Most of the prints are gelatin silver, but there are also some in color.

Accession 2007-0072 houses a series of 224 black-and-white photographs depicting roller blade and Hispanic American youth street culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, taken by Cianni during the 1990s and into 2001. Fifteen of the prints appear in Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side (2001); and 68 prints are unpublished. Photographs are captioned and signed on the back. Also included are photographs of urban life in the Bronx, NY; and from the baby shower (Queens, NY) and wedding (Fairborn, OH) of a young couple who appear in other images from this series. Finally, the series houses the maquette for Cianni's book (version 1, 2000), and the printer's dummy (versions 2-3, 2001-2004).

Accession 2007-0200 contains 65 black-and-white prints and photographic collages of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Berlin, 1990. Prints range from 8x10 to 16x24 and are captioned and signed on back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0048 contains prints from the Poughkeepsie Mall Series (Poughkeepsie, NY, 1980s) and the Providence House Men's Shelter Series (Newburgh, NY, 1983). Forty-four black-and-white photographic prints: one 5 5/8 x 8 ½; one 5 7/8 x9; and forty-two 11x14 prints. Poughkeepsie Mall series: twenty-two 11x14 prints, 1980s. The images depict youth culture, African American culture, and urban decay.

Accession 2008-0300 contains 184 prints of weddings, including some transexual weddings, taken by Cianni during the 1980s. This series includes Cianni's MFA project, Wedding Rituals, a group of twenty-four 20x24 prints and one 16x20 print. Photographs in this series are in both color and black-and-white; many are captioned and signed on the back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0303 contains an additional 23 8x10 duotone and gelatin silver prints from Cianni's book We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side. These prints include portraits and other images of Hispanic American youth roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York during the mid-1990s.

Accession 2009-0243 houses forty-two black-and-white photographs of Muay Thai style of kickboxing competition in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 2004: thirty-six 8x10 prints and six 16x20 prints.

Accession 2010-0187 includes forty-seven 8x10 black-and-white prints from the We Skate Hardcore series. The gelatin silver prints are signed on verso and date 1995-2003, with bulk dates 1995-1997.

In addition, the collection contains digital video, stills, and image scans, and oral history recordings, all relating to his documentary photobooks We skate hardcore and Gays in the military. Original media formats are closed to use. Most files have been mounted to the library server; for access, please contact the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Cochrane Family papers, 1777-1957 and undated 5.5 Linear Feet — 4125 Items

Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane served in the British Navy from 1839-1886, where he fought in the Anglo-Chinese war and rose to the rank of admiral. He was also instrumental in administering the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company during its early years. His brother, Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was also active in the Royal Navy from 1847-1873, participating in the British campaign to suppress the slave trade in West Africa during the 1860s. He was also a landowner and landlord of the Redcastle Estate in County Donegal, Ireland, and served in his later years as High Sheriff for County Donegal. The collection contains correspondence, legal and financial documents, notes and writings, notebooks and diaries, clippings, printed books and pamphlets, photographs, maps, charts, diagrams and technical drawings pertaining to the lives and careers of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro and Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane, and to the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company. The papers span the years 1777-1957, with the bulk of the collection being dated from 1850-1905, and document the naval careers of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane and Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane, the role of the Cochrane family as landlords in Western Ulster, and the development of the colonial asphalt industry in Trinidad during the 19th century.

The Cochrane Family Papers span the years 1777-1957, with the bulk of the papers being dated between 1850 and 1905. The collection consists of correspondence; legal and financial documents; personal, naval, and technical notes and other writings; notebooks, diaries, and almanacs; clippings and other saved print material; and photographs, maps, charts, drawings, diagrams, and other visual materials preserved by the Cochranes. The majority of these documents pertain to two members of the Cochrane family: the brothers Admiral Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane and Admiral Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane. The bulk of the papers deal with three principal subject areas: the naval careers of the brothers; family matters and finances, particularly the finances of their Redcastle Estate in County Donegal, Ireland; and business papers and correspondence relating to the family estates and the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Company, established by Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, and continued by his son Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane. The collection is particularly rich in documenting the beginnings of the asphalt industry in Trinidad and land-use issues in Ireland during the 19th century. In addition, Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was stationed off the coast of West Africa during much of the 1850s and 1860s, and the collection contains a number of documents relating to the British attempts during that time to suppress the African slave trade, an effort in which Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane was active. The collection is divided into three series, the Family Papers Series, the Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series, and the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Series, each of which are divided into subseries by format. This division retains the original division of the collection, but researchers should be aware that there is significant crossover between the subject areas of the Family Papers Series and the Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series, and those interested in one of these series should be aware that there may be pertinent material in the other.

The Family Papers Series, the largest of the three, documents two main subject areas: the naval careers of Ernest Grey Lambton and Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, and the family finances relating to the Redcastle estate. The former of these is documented primarily in the Correspondence subseries and the Notes and Writings Subseries, while the latter is most heavily represented in the Legal and Financial Documents Subseries, which contains a number of rental and account books pertaining to the Cochrane and Doherty family estates in Ireland. The Cochranes were all active inventors, and the Legal and Financial Documents Subseries also includes patent forms for a number of inventions, including means of laying telegraph wire and ships' boilers and propulsion. The Notebooks and Diaries Subseries is comprised primarily of bound volumes of writings by Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, documenting his daily activity and travels, although it does contain two notebooks used by Thomas Cochrane for surveying during his travels in the 1850s and an Irish Land Commission notebook belonging to Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane as well. The two remaining subseries, Print Materials and Visual Materials and Artifacts, are much smaller in size, and contain materials pertaining to both brothers, and to the family more generally.

The Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane Series contains material accessioned separately from the rest of the collection, which documents Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane's naval life and activities off the Western coast of Africa; his correspondence with Richard Doherty (whose daughter he later married) about financial and estate matters in County Donegal; and his time spent as a landlord in County Donegal, where he became High Sheriff and a member of the Grand Jury after retiring from the navy. The Correspondence Subseries contains Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane's correspondence with Samuel W. Blackwall of Sierra Leone; Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane; Thomas Barnes Cochrane; Richard Doherty; and others. Of the other subseries, the Legal and Financial Documents and Visual Materials subseries relate primarily to his life in County Donegal, while the Notebooks and Diaries and Notes and Writings subseries deal more extensively with his earlier naval career and time in West Africa. This series was kept separate from the Family Papers Series to preserve the original order of the documents. As should be clear from this description, however, many of the subject areas of this series overlap with those of the Family Papers Series, and researchers interested in the naval career of Ernest Grey Lambton Cochrane or the Cochranes' role as landlords in Northern Ireland should also consult that series.

Finally, the Trinidad Lake Asphalt Series documents the Cochrane family's involvement in the early asphalt industry in Trinidad. The vast majority of the papers included here are those of Arthur Auckland Leopold Pedro Cochrane, who took over the job of overseeing the Cochrane properties and interests in Trinidad after he was invalided during the China wars. However, there are also materials of Thomas Cochrane, 10th Earl of Dundonald, pertaining to the company. To be found here are business correspondence pertaining to the export of asphalt and bitumen from Trinidad, shipping arrangements, experiments conducted on the potential uses of bitumen from Pitch Lake, and other matters related to the establishment and operation of the business; notes relating to experiments conducted, and to the climate and area; legal documents establishing the company and documenting the extent of the Belle Vue, Mon Plaisir and Esperance Estates in Trinidad; maps and plans of these estates and of Pitch Lake; and two printed volumes and other miscellaneous items pertaining to Trinidad. The material contained in this series should be of interest to those researching the development and early stages of the asphalt industry, and to those interested in colonial business, finance, and resource use during the 19th century.

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Thomas Cripps papers, 1839-2009 and undated bulk 1940s-2009 98 Linear Feet — Approximately 62,475 Items

Retired professor of history at Morgan State University, scholar of the history of African Americans in the motion picture industry, prolific author of books and articles on the subject, and script writer. The papers of Thomas Cripps date from 1839 to 2009, and are arranged into three divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, the largest group. Taken as a whole, the films, movie stills, research files, and publication files document Cripps's investigations into representations of racial and ethnic stereotypes in popular culture, particularly in film, but also touch on other issues such as gender in popular culture, portrayal of race in Nazi Germany, and the social dimensions of African American life in the U.S. during the 20th century. Other materials stem from college-level courses taught by Cripps on these same topics, and include many of the visual resources he used in his classes. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Thomas Cripps collection dates from approximately 1839 to 2009, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1940-2009, and is arranged into three main divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, which is the largest group of the three (closed pending processing). The materials as a whole can be used to study a variety of themes and subjects: racial or ethnic stereotypes in popular culture (chiefly African American, but also Jewish, Irish, and Asian); American and European television culture, broadcasting, and advertising; African American artists; African American film-makers, most notably Oscar Micheaux; U.S. political and social events in the 20th century, including the Depression and the Civil Rights Movement; educational institutions for African Americans; and the teaching of African American history in U.S. higher education. There are significant research materials on Nazi Germany propaganda and the portrayal of race in the party's films.

The thirty-seven films found in the Films Series consist of film shorts, clips from feature films, newsreels, "Soundies," and television commercials, and were collected by Cripps for their portrayals of African Americans, performance by African Americans, or production by African Americans from the turn of the century into the late 1960s 1970s. He also collected filmic materials reflecting other racial and ethnic stereotypes, as seen in the Ethnic Films reel. There are viewing copies for all films.

The Still Photographs Series consists of hundreds of publicity stills and other images taken from U.S. and British feature films featuring African American actors from the silent film era through the 1970s. Many entries, which have been retained from the original envelope labels, carry titles from individual films, but other prints were arranged by Cripps into topical categories such as "Black Athletes," "Jungle Pix," "Silent Films," and "Exotic Primitives."

Cripps's professional papers, a very large group, are closed to access pending processing. They are currently loosely arranged into these series: Correspondence, Dissertation and Research, Morgan State University, Other Papers and AV Materials, Subject Files, and Writings. Beyond the topics discussed above, the materials also document grant proposals written by Cripps; his early dissertation work; coursework in a variety of settings; and his many publication projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Takey Crist papers, 1944-2002 and undated 64.6 Linear Feet — 21,903 Items

Accession 2002-149(778 items, 22.0 linear feet; dated 1971-2001) contains files of abortion, pregnancy, and hysterectomy malpractice cases in which Crist served as a consultant or codefendant along with the Crist Clinic. There is also printed material on reproductive topics. Also includes 2 VHS videocassettes; 6 color slides; 30 black-and-white and 2 color photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition 2003-007 (67 items, 7.3 linear ft.; undated) is composed of 16mm films used by "Crist Clinic Audio Visuals" in health education programs (undated). The clinic also offered the films for sale or rent to educators, students, doctors, parents, and others. The majority of the films focus on sex education for children and teenagers. Topics include puberty and menstruation, sex and sexuality, sexual orientation, lifestyle choices, and sexually transmitted diseases. Other topics include abortion; pregnancy and childbirth; infant care and nutrition; marriage and parenting; and drug and alcohol abuse.

Addition 2003-118 is comprised of materials related to the issue of abortion and the anti-abortion movement, and consists primarily of documents pertaining to lawsuits involving Dr. Crist as a litigant or witness, including correspondence, transcripts, depositions, photographs, and other legal papers (1975-1993). Also contains files on organizations including the National Abortion Federation and NARAL (1982-2002 and undated); subject files; research material assembled by Dr. Crist, including publications; correspondence; and newspaper clippings.

Addition 2004-098 (10,158 items, 16.7 lin. ft.; dated 1962-1980s, bulk 1962-1972) comprises personal and professional correspondence and subject files (1960s-early 1970s) documenting Crist's medical training, internship, residency, and then his position as Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill, especially his involvement in increased access to therapeutic abortions and health services; the development of abortion techniques; and sex and contraceptive education on and off campus. Also includes writings and speeches; patient notes (redacted); grant, research, and conference files; and printed materials, including clippings, articles, and pamphlets. Some anti-abortion materials in boxes 3-5 contain graphic imagery.

Addition 2006-098 (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1944-1978) consists of personal files, including medical licenses and report cards; abortion series files, 1971-2000, including general correspondence, correspondence concerning the National Organization of Women and the National Coalition of Abortion Providers; newsletters; printed material about the ordinance lawsuit; photographs of demonstrators, 1985; and subject files, 1960-1972, created while at UNC including files about conferences, homosexuality, consultation work for family planning, studies conducted while at UNC Medical School, speaking engagements on sex education; and Health Education Clinic finances. Interfiled in existing collection.

Addition 2007-043 (13,125 items, 21.0 linear feet) contains subject files that chronicle the history of the Crist Clinic from the opening of the clinic in 1973 to the early 21st century. The majority of the files contain Takey Crist's clippings on medical topics and issues relating to sex education and women's health care. Many files also refer to issues of significance for physicians running a private clinic.

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Earl Garfield Cunningham (1911-1983) was an African American U.S. Army Lieutenant who served with the 371st Infantry in Italy from October 1944 to the end of 1945. While in Italy, he participated in the campaigns of North Apennines and Po Valley. collection includes 12 scrapbook pages containing more than 150 amateur corner-mounted photographs taken primarily in Italy, together with postcards of Italian sights; military appointment certificates and news clippings; military records; military awards including the Bronze Star Medal; and additional photographs that collectively document the military career and experiences of African American soldier Earl G. Cunningham. Locations documented in Garfield's photographs include Genova, Pisa, Viareggio, Massa, Pietrasanta, and Savona, Images include city streets, rural landscapes, coastal views, damaged buildings and destroyed tanks, Italian citizens, American soldiers, and partisan cemeteries. Many of the photographs have brief captions. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

The collection includes awards, service records, scrapbook pages, and photographs that collectively document the military career and experiences of African American U.S. Army Lieutenant Earl G. Cunningham. The Scrapbook series contains more than 150 amateur photographs corner-mounted on 12 loose pages that were formerly part of a large scrapbook. The photographs, chiefly 2x3 inches, capture scenes in Allied-occupied Italy, often with Cunningham or his fellow African American soldiers in the foreground. Subjects include city streets, rural landscapes, coastal views, damaged buildings and destroyed tanks, mounds of rubble, Italian citizens, American soldiers, and partisan cemeteries. Brief, handwritten captions identify colleagues or locations including Pisa, Viareggio, Pietrasanta, Massa, Genoa, and Savona. The first few pages in the scrapbook include certificates of appointment demonstrating Cunningham's rise in the military from 1941-1943, along with photographs taken at Camp Williams near Lehi, Utah before his service in Italy.

The remainder of the collection is divided into the following series: Military Awards, Military Records, and Photographs. Military awards and records include transcripts of service, discharge papers, a copy of Cunningham's marriage certificate from Maryland, and a Bronze Star medal. The loose photographs include his portrait and a series of black-and-white commercial photographic postcards from Genova and other cities in Italy, postmarked 1945, with one containing a message to his wife.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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David Cutrell photographs, 1969-1977 and undated 0.5 Linear Feet — Approx. 335 items

American-born missionary and photographer who lived in Haiti during the 1970s. The black and white and color images in the David Cutrell Photographs portray life in the village of La Hatte Cadet in Haiti in the 1970s. Missionary David Cutrell lived in La Hatte Cadet and documented daily life with a Roliflex camera. Images include landscapes, portraits and snapshots of everyday life including family groups, children, adults, gardening, livestock, house repair, market day, and religious ceremonies and artifacts. Collection includes negatives, contact sheets, prints, and 35mm and 2" color slides. Arranged in order by format and roll number. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

The black and white and color images in the David Cutrell Photographs portray life in the village of La Hatte Cadet in Haiti in the 1970s. Missionary David Cutrell lived in La Hatte Cadet and documented daily life with a Roliflex camera. Images include landscapes, portraits and snapshots of everyday life including family groups, children, adults, dwellings, villages, gardening, livestock, house repair, market day, and religious ceremonies and artifacts. Collection includes negatives, contact sheets, prints, and 35mm and 2" color slides. Arranged in order by format and roll number. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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The Archives document the history of Benton & Bowles advertisements; the merger of the D'Arcy MacManus Masius and Benton & Bowles companies; the early careers of William Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles; employee training, recruitment, and management; corporate publications; and marketing research. Includes material from three companies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles, Benton & Bowles, and D'Arcy MacManus Masius. Specific formats include memoranda; correspondence; reports; corporate publications, such as house organs, research reports, manuals, credentials, and employee reference material; press releases and a press book; speeches; clippings; photographs in color and black-and-white, and negatives; films and DVDs of advertisements; book manuscripts; audio tapes; financial papers; and a scrapbook. Clients represented in the Advertisements Series include the Procter & Gamble Company, General Foods Corporation, Allied Chemical Corporation, Avco Corporation, Colgate Palmolive Co., Florida Citrus Commission, International Business Machines Corporation, and West Point Pepperell. The unprocessed addition (554 items, dated ca. 1950s-1980s) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History. (01-103).

The D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B) Archives consists of advertising agency records spanning the years 1929 to 1995. The bulk of the material dates from the 1950s to the mid-1980s. The Archives includes material that documents aspects of three advertising agencies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B), Benton & Bowles (B&B), and D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius (D-MM).

The Archives as a whole provides a comprehensive overview of Benton & Bowles advertisements (1932-1995) and commercials (1950s-1980s), primarily those created by the agency's New York office. Other major topics include the advertising careers of William B. Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles by Gordon Webber and Frank Smith; television programs created by B&B in the 1950s; aspects of employee training, recruitment, and management; and marketing research. The Archives also documents the merger of the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency with Benton & Bowles to form DMB&B in 1985. There is very little information in the Archives about the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency prior to the merger. Also, material about Benton & Bowles offices other than New York is limited, and found mostly in B&B house organs.

The D'Arcy-MacManus Masius Files comprise a very small amount of materials in the Archives. Although the D'Arcy agency had its roots in 1906, the Items gathered here date only from 1972-1985, mainly 1981 to 1985. They consist of corporate publications, notes, and clippings. The 75th Anniversary edition of "Between Us" contains an overview of the history of D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius, especially of the D'Arcy Advertising Company, and its clients. Profiles, a resource book, provides information on all of the divisions of the D'Arcy -MacManus Masius Worldwide group of advertising agencies.

The Benton and Bowles Files are by far the largest part of the Archives. They include primarily print advertisements (the largest series in the Archives), but also over 500 films, significant documents relating to the work of the agency, photographs, and corporate publications. The Benton & Bowles Files span the years 1929 to 1985, although most of the material dates from 1950s and after. Item types in the collection include internal memoranda; reports; speeches; printed material (manuals, leaflets, pamphlets, and house organs); photographs; research notes; credentials; employee training material; press releases and clippings; book manuscripts; audio tapes of oral history interviews; and financial papers. The Benton & Bowles Files provide documentation of the history of print and television advertising; television programming; the history of the B&B agency and its corporate culture; corporate communications; marketing research; and advertising executives.

The earliest Items in the B&B Files are two small bank books recording account activity of the fledgling agency from 1929 to 1935 and copies of William ("Billie") Benton's long letters to his mother, 1929-1938, in which he confides details of his new advertising agency as well as family matters. A small number of other Items date from the 1930s and 1940s and illustrate isolated aspects of the agency's business in that period.

Long series of various agency house organs begin in 1947 and provide the most complete and continuous views of Benton & Bowles, its clients, advertising campaigns, personnel, and various offices in the U.S. and abroad.

The Advertisements Series is the largest section of the Archives and contains comprehensive files of print advertising campaigns developed mainly by Benton & Bowles from 1932-1980. The series includes primarily proofs, along with some tearsheets, of consumer and trade advertisements, most from U.S. magazines and newspapers. Files for a few clients include unusual material, such as packaging or client newsletters. Most of the advertisements were removed from large scrapbooks into which B&B employees had pasted them; many have suffered glue damage, but they remain an invaluable source for studying the development of a number of advertising campaigns over long periods of time. Longtime clients of B&B included Procter & Gamble and General Foods, among many others. Neither the Advertisements Series nor any other part of the Archives contains substantial documentation of the creative processes behind the advertisements and advertising campaigns.

For additional information about the Advertisements Series, see the data collection sheets in the Information Folders about the DMB&B Archives. The data collection sheets provide notes about: languages, other than English, used in the advertisements; countries, other than the United States, for which advertisements were produced; the use of celebrities in the advertisements; themes or social and political issues that can be studied in the advertisements; and the use of comic illustrations. The data collection sheets also note the existence of collateral literature for certain advertising campaigns. The Information Folders also contain a list of Benton & Bowles clients and the dates of agency-client relationships.

The Audiovisual Series (RESTRICTED) contains over 500 reels of 16mm film varying in lengths from 200' to 1600'. The majority of the films are compilations of commercials created mainly by Benton & Bowles for many different clients. Also included are several dozen reels of vintage television programs (shows created or sponsored by B&B), several stockholders' meetings, speeches, new business presentations, and outtakes. At the time of this writing, most of the films have not been viewed in their entirety, indexed, or reformatted. However, a selection of films has been reformatted for research use.

Addition (accession #2001-0103) (554 items, 7.5 linear ft.; dated [ca. 1950s]-[1980s]) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Viewing of commercials is restricted until videocassette use copies are made. For a container list, contact Research Services.

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International history of photography collection, 1885-1951 3 Linear Feet — 3 boxes — 11 prints — 11 Items

Collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints are intended to represent major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries. Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, the United States, and Mexico: Eugène Atget (printed by Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, and urban streetscapes. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The International History of Photography collection dates from 1885-1951 and comprises eleven vintage photographic prints by individuals considered to be master photographers. The prints in this collection were acquired and assembled by the Rubenstein library staff, in part to provide students the opportunity to view and study original works from the world's foremost photographers as well as to learn about the major formats, techniques, and genres of the 19th and 20th centuries.

Photographers whose prints are in the collection hail from Europe, Mexico, and the United States: Eugène Atget (printed by American photographer Berenice Abbot), Henri Cartier-Bresson, Alvin Langdon Coburn, Manuel Alvarez Bravo, F. Holland Day, Peter Henry Emerson, Lewis Hine, Aaron Siskind, Ralph Steiner, Alfred Stieglitz, and Minor White. The print by Eugène Atget, "Flower Man," was printed by well-known American photographer Berenice Abbot, who purchased part of Atget's negative archive in 1928.

Formats range from photogravures to gelatin silver prints, with the latter predominating; all are black-and-white and are matted. Subjects include rural landscapes, individual and group portraits, architecture, and urban streetscapes. The prints are sized from 4.5 x 6.5 inches to approximately 9.5 x 13.5 inches, and are all matted.

Researchers must wear gloves when handling the prints. Prints should always be picked up and supported with two hands. The prints cannot be removed from the mats, but researchers may open the window mat to see the full print. The Archive of Documentary Arts Curator must be consulted prior to any display of the photographs.

Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Dr. Robert Edward Dawson (1918-2008) was an African American ophthalmologist and citizen of Durham (Durham County), North Carolina. This collection primarily documents Dawson's professional and civic responsibilities, both local and national. Materials include meeting agendas and packets; reports; memoranda; correspondence, speeches, and writiings. The collection details Dawson's medical practices, teaching, and board memberships at Lincoln Community Health Center, Lincoln Hospital, and Durham County General Hospital/Durham County Hospital Corporation. It also documents his lengthy and high-level involvement with Meharry Medical College and the National Medical Association, as well as a wide array of other organizations and institutions. Personal materials involve Dawson's military service, memorabilia, his documentation for building his house, and his retirement.The collection also contains black and white and color photographs as well as negatives, mostly of family members. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

This collection primarily documents Dawson's professional and civic responsibilities, both local and national. Materials include meeting agendas and packets; reports; memoranda; correspondence, speeches, and writiings. The collection details Dawson's medical practices, teaching, and board memberships at Lincoln Community Health Center, Lincoln Hospital, and Durham County General Hospital/Durham County Hospital Corporation. It also documents his lengthy and high-level involvement with Meharry Medical College and the National Medical Association, as well as a wide array of other organizations and institutions. Personal materials involve Dawson's military service, memorabilia, his documentation for building his house, and his retirement.The collection also contains black and white and color photographs as well as negatives and one tintype, mostly of family members.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 654 boxes — 654 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to the 2010s, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Duke University Progress Pictures collection, 1925-1932 3.5 Linear Feet — approximately 1000 Items

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These photographs were taken during the initial construction of Duke University, 1925-1932. There is one set of pictures for East Campus and two sets for West, and modern copy prints and copy negatives of some images. The collection includes approximately 1000 mounted images in two bound sets (copy 1 and copy 2), along several file folders of mounted and unmounted prints.

There is one set of pictures for East Campus and two sets for West, and modern copy prints and copy negatives of some images. One set of the West Campus images (#2) is not accessioned. The other (#1) was received from the estate of W.F. Lee, likely a son of Arthur C. Lee who was the chief engineer for the construction. It is the more complete set (A93-73: five volumes + 25 unbound prints).

Most of the prints are numbered and dated on the front in white ink, and many for West Campus have a number, date, and description of the verso. Some of the prints were made into glass slides; these slides are in the Frank Clyde Brown Papers.

The collection includes approximately 1000 mounted images in two bound sets (copy 1 and copy 2), along several file folders of mounted and unmounted prints. The images range in date from 1925-1932.

The work of at least three photographers is represented in the Progress Pictures. For the East Campus photos, there are prints having the same base number with an A or B suffix, but which were taken on different dates. Some are marked on the verso "from Ramsey Studio, Durham, N.C." and others "Whitney's Camera Craft Shop, 106 1/2 E. Main St., Durham". The "A" and "B" designations are not consistent, and we cannot say that Ramsey was photographer "A and Whitney "B". Ramsey's work predominates in the early photographs and Whitney's in the later. Whitney's work is also represented in the West Campus pictures.

Also in the West Campus mounted prints are pictures marked "C.W. Richardson, Photographer, Duke University" or "Richardson's Photo Service…" According to the Bulletin of Duke University, volume 24, no.7a "The first twenty years" a C.W. Richardson was a member of the staff of the medical art and illustration division, which was started in 1933 (p. 44) and which included photographers. There are also unmounted numbered and unnumbered prints taken by Richardson. Some of these prints are marked News Service or Alumni Affairs. Some mounted West Campus prints are not credited, or if they were stamped by the photographer, the stamp has been covered by the mounting linen. Among the unmounted numbered and unnumbered prints, some are stamped News Service or Alumni Affairs.

The Progress Pictures are offered in jpeg format but are also available as high resolution .tif files.

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The Duke Endowment was established by James Buchanan Duke as a perpetual charitable trust in 1924, with the following types of beneficiaries, mainly residing in North Carolina and South Carolina: non-profit hospitals and child care institutions; educational institutions; and rural churches of the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (now the United Methodist Church). The Duke Endowment Archives span the years 1902 to 2006, with the bulk of the material dating from 1925 through 2006. The collection documents the administration of the corpus of the trust and the charitable contributions made to the categories of recipients named in the Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Endowment. The majority of the records are arranged into series that reflect the organization of the institution, including the Board of Trustees, Treasurer's Office, Controller's Office, Investment Office, Education Division and Committee on Communications, Health Care and Child Care Divisions, and Rural Church Division. Smaller series, documenting such other activities as record-keeping, publications, and history of The Endowment, include: Central Files, Oral History Project, Trust Under Will, Publications, Miscellaneous, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. The collection consists of the following types of materials: correspondence; minutes of meetings; financial records; applications for assistance from hospitals, child care institutions, and churches; statistics; publications; oral history tapes and transcripts; architectural drawings and blueprints; photographs; audio cassettes; and miscellaneous records and papers. The geographic focus is primarily North Carolina and South Carolina.

The Duke Endowment Archives span the years 1902 to 2018, although the bulk of the material dates from 1925 through 2006. The collection consists of correspondence; minutes of meetings; financial records; applications for assistance from hospitals, child care institutions, and churches; statistics; publications; oral history tapes and transcripts; architectural drawings and blueprints; photographs; audio cassettes; and miscellaneous records and papers. The collection documents the administration of the corpus of the trust and the charitable contributions made to the categories of recipients named in the Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Duke Endowment. Records are arranged to reflect the responsibilities and operations of the Endowment's trustees, officers, and divisions, with major series including: the Board of Trustees, Treasurer's Office, Controller's Office, Investment Office, Education Division and Committee on Communications, Health Care and Child Care Divisions, and Rural Church Division. Smaller series, documenting such other activities as record-keeping, publications, and the Endowment's history, include: Central Files, Oral History Project, Trust Under Will, Publications, Miscellaneous, Photographic Materials, and Audiovisual Materials. Subject areas represented in the collection include: the history of foundations, hospital and child care demographics and other statistics, rural church buildings and activities, the construction of Duke University, and the life of James Buchanan Duke. The geographic focus is primarily North Carolina and South Carolina.

When James Buchanan Duke established The Duke Endowment as a perpetual charitable trust in 1924, he formalized a tradition of philanthropy that he and other members of the Duke family had practiced for many years, especially with regard to Duke University (formerly Trinity College). The life of James B. Duke, including his philanthropic interests, is documented in the Oral History Project Series (RESTRICTED) and Miscellaneous Series (RESTRICTED), and, to a lesser extent, the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series' (RESTRICTED) Feasibility Study and Rural Church Division Series (RESTRICTED), Correspondence Subseries. The 100th Anniversary of James B. Duke's birth and interest in Mr. Duke's home in Charlotte, N.C., are documented in the Miscellaneous Series.

The Indenture and Deed of Trust establishing The Duke Endowment delineates the type of beneficiaries eligible for its support. These include non-profit hospitals and child care institutions; educational institutions; and rural churches of the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South (now the United Methodist Church), including retired ministers and widows and orphans of deceased ministers. Beneficiaries usually reside within North Carolina and South Carolina, i.e., generally the areas served by the water power facilities established by Mr. Duke, although under certain conditions other states may be served. The textile mills served by hydroelectric power were of special interest to Mr. Duke. A statistical study of cotton mills that he requested is in the Miscellaneous Series. The Indenture and Deed of Trust specifies that hospitals and child care institutions for Whites and African Americans should be supported. The Duke Endowment provides technical assistance as well as funding. Specific educational institutions were named in the Indenture: Davidson College, Davidson, N.C.; Duke University, Durham, N.C.; Furman University, Greenville, S.C.; and Johnson C. Smith University, Charlotte, N.C.

For the original corpus of The Endowment, James B. Duke assigned shares of stock from Duke Power Company, British-American Tobacco Company, R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, George W. Helme Company, Republic Cotton Mills, and Judson Mills. The Indenture stipulates how income and capital from the corpus should be managed and includes specific directives for handling the stock of Duke Power Company. Continuous records for the financial management of the assets of The Duke Endowment are in the Treasurer's Office (RESTRICTED), Controller's Office (RESTRICTED), and Investment Office Series (RESTRICTED). The volumes in the Controller's Office Series include records of payments made and management of the corpus as well as The Endowment's general operating expenses, such as salaries, rents, furniture, and supplies. The Investment Office Series contains records pertaining to companies in which The Duke Endowment invested. The Treasurer's Office Series includes an historical overview of The Endowment's expenditures and includes the minutes of the Finance Committee, which was established in 1975. The Treasurer's Office Series includes Beneficiary Information System reports, which provide geographic breakdowns of payments to institutions from the inception of The Duke Endowment to the present, and a summary that lists each institution or beneficiary group and how it used funds from The Endowment. The Treasurer's Office and Investment Office records do not reflect the overall financial management of The Duke Endowment.

The first members of the Board of Trustees of The Duke Endowment--Nanaline H. Duke, George G. Allen, William R. Perkins, William B. Bell, Anthony J. Drexel Biddle, Walter C. Parker, Alexander H. Sands, Jr., William S. Lee, Charles I. Burkholder, Norman A. Cocke, Edward C. Marshall, and Bennette C. Geer--were named in the Indenture as parties of the second part. As stipulated by the Indenture, the trustees were required to meet at least ten times a year and the minutes of the meetings were to be recorded. The minutes are located in the Board of Trustees Series (RESTRICTED). Miscellaneous papers and pictures of some trustees, especially of Watson S. Rankin, a physician, who was also head of the Hospital and Child Care Divisions for many years, are in the Miscellaneous Series. Rankin was an early proponent of rural hospitals as a way to make health care available to greater numbers of citizens. The related correspondence of Graham L. Davis, assistant to Watson S. Rankin, is in the Health Care and Child Care Division Series (RESTRICTED), Health Care Subseries. The Publications Series includes material by or about several trustees.

The Indenture directed the trustees to expend funds for the establishment of Duke University. Designated by Mr. Duke "as one of the principal objects of this trust," a percentage of The Duke Endowment's corpus was to be applied annually for its support. Duke Construction Company was organized by the Board of Trustees to build the university (now known as the West Campus). The architect Horace Trumbauer designed the campus buildings and plant, and the landscape was designed by Olmstead Brothers. Financial records for the construction of Duke University, including the operation of Duke Construction Company, are in the Controller's Office Series (RESTRICTED) and architectural drawings for the buildings, campus plot, and landscaping are in the Miscellaneous Series. Documentation of The Endowment's support of the other educational institutions named in the Indenture, including disbursements and income generated, is in the volumes in the Controller's Office Series.

Non-profit hospitals receive support from The Duke Endowment for free days of care for individuals unable to pay the costs of hospitalization. If all the funds designated for free days of care are not spent in any given year, excess funds may be used for support of hospital construction, maintenance, and equipment. Medical education is also supported, and technical assistance for administrative functions is provided through published manuals. A similar arrangement was established for societies, agencies, or institutions that cared for orphans and half-orphans. The Health Care and Child Care Divisions, Central Files (RESTRICTED), and Publications Series provide detailed documentation for institutions and programs that receive assistance from The Duke Endowment.

The history of hospital services and statistics for the types of admissions in North Carolina and South Carolina, especially rural areas, can be studied in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Health Care Division Subseries [NOTE: Formerly known as the Hospital and Child Care Divisions Series and the Hospital Division Subseries, respectively]. The applications from individual hospitals, as well as summaries and statistics that group institutions into comparable categories, provide important documentation about the various types of hospitals and their clients in North Carolina and South Carolina, including hospitals' economic statuses, physical plants, and in-patient and out-patient demographics. Most of the earlier statistics include breakdowns for the number of African American and White patients served and their medical profiles.

The history of institutional child care in North Carolina and South Carolina is documented in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Child Care Division Subseries. The Child Care Division applications for assistance describe the individual institutions that request support from The Duke Endowment. The applications include information about the physical plant, administration and financial status, population statistics, and the physical care and education of children. The summaries use the information in the applications for assistance and group it by type of institution, e.g., religious, community, county, state, more than 150 beds, under 151 beds with farms, White, African American, etc.

Minutes in the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series, Health Care and Child Care Committee Subseries document some discussions of how funds would be allocated by The Duke Endowment. The published Annual Reports of the Hospital and Child Care Divisions include substantial statistical information and summary reports about specific institutions served during the year. These reports, located in the Publications Series, are a useful place to begin research about hospital and child care. Reports for these divisions are also in the Year Books.

Between 1915 and 1924, Mr. Duke made systematic contributions to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for churches in the North Carolina and Western North Carolina conferences. His contributions were first administered through the Board of Missions of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. In 1920 Trinity College began to administer the funds. The Church Architect Program files in the Rural Church Division Series (RESTRICTED), Miscellaneous Subseries reflect another arrangement between Duke University and the Rural Church Division. The creation of The Duke Endowment established a formal trust to continue similar support for building and operating rural churches, income for superannuated ministers, and widows and orphans of deceased ministers. The records of the Rural Church Series, Building Grant Files and Church Maintenance Files Subseries document the assistance that individual churches received to build, maintain, and operate churches. Many of these records include oversize blueprints or architectural drawings. There are also records for special projects and other activities supported by The Duke Endowment. The Correspondence Subseries includes information about the concerns of specific churches as well as Methodism and religion in general. Area economic conditions were often described in the correspondence.

The Education Division and the Committee on Communications are currently responsible for publications produced by The Duke Endowment. The Publications Series is a useful starting place for information about The Endowment's activities for a given year or for a historical overview of the foundation. Publications, especially the Annual Reports and Year Books, provide information about the trustees and staff; changes in the organization of The Duke Endowment; and summary information about various divisions, including financial distributions and income, statistics, and specific programs and activities supported by The Endowment at various institutions. Additional publications are in the Miscellaneous Series. Daily operations of The Duke Endowment are documented in the General Correspondence in the Central Files Series. Some general history about The Endowment is located in the Miscellaneous Series, including a signed copy of the Indenture and anniversary celebrations of the 1930s, 1960s, 1970s, and 1990s.

The Oral History Project Series (RESTRICTED), a project initiated in 1963, records the reminiscences of people who were knowledgeable about Duke University, the Duke family, and North Carolina and the region in general. The interviews were conducted by Frank W. Rounds of the Oral History Project of Columbia University. The correspondence includes outlines of the names of interviewees and the subjects they were to discuss.

Two groups of non-print materials and of oversize materials complete the collection. The Photographic Materials Series (RESTRICTED) contains approximately 200 photographs relating mainly to the Rural Church Division Series, especially the Committees on Church Architecture, and to the Miscellaneous Series. Several audio cassette recordings in the Audiovisual Materials Series (RESTRICTED) document miscellaneous meetings and addresses pertaining to the Health Care and Child Care Divisions Series. Although series from throughout the collection are represented in the Oversize Materials (RESTRICTED), this group is particularly rich in blueprints and other architectural drawings that support related materials in the Miscellaneous Series and in the Rural Church Division Series, Building Grant Files Subseries.

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The Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) is administered by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University to support documentary photographers who address humanitarian issues in the U.S. and abroad. The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection represents a selection of images from the documentary projects of six LHDFP fellows: Alex Fattal, Maital Guttman, Kate Joyce, Elena Rue, Amanda van Scoyoc, and Lucy Wilson. The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations (South Africa, Zimbabwe, and Ethiopia), as well as Boston, Massachusetts. They show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). In addition to photographic prints, there are also some documents relating to the projects, and DVDs of the photographers' documentary work. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Lewis Hine Fellowship Photographs Collection spans the years 2003-2008 and consists of selected images from the documentary collections of six of the Lewis Hine Documentary Fellows Program (LHDFP) fellows in the following locations: Alex Fattal (South Africa); Maital Guttman (South Africa); Kate Joyce (South Africa); Elena Rue (Ethiopia); Amanda van Scoyoc (Boston, Mass.); and Lucy Wilson (Zimbabwe). The photographic images and videos in the collection depict home and community life of disadvantaged and displaced families and children in several sub-Saharan African nations, as well as people in the communities of Chelsea and Boston, Massachusetts. Images show everyday life and activities, such as children playing and completing chores, mothers cooking meals, disabled children going to school, household living conditions, and impoverished orphans and HIV-positive children in their familial situations, as well as funerals and school presentations (among other community events). Several series reveal the after-effects of displacement and social conditions in post-apartheid South Africa (Kwazulu-Natal and Bloemfontein). Two of the photographers' projects also include black-and-white images taken by the children and their families, along with quotes from those individuals regarding the images.

The collection consists of 147 color and black-and-white unmatted prints, ranging in size from 6.5x10 inches to 13x20 inches. There are also 4 DVDs containing both still- and moving-image documentaries with text and audio interviews. Several of the projects include paper copies of the introductions to the bodies of work, as well as full captions for the photographs. Many of the photographs are also available as digital images currently mounted on the LHDFP section of the CDS website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Documentary photographer and writer based in western North Carolina. Collection contains 16 gelatin silver prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album book that the Center for Documentary Studies turned into a traveling exhibit. Also includes 32 prints displayed in the Allen Building exhibition. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection consists of 2 series, each holding prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album, first published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2002. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

The 16 gelatin silver prints in the Traveling Exhibit series were used in a 2003 traveling exhibit created by the Center for Documentary Studies. The series includes images of Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco planters and workers, and scenes from Madison County, North Carolina.

The 32 Allen Building Exhibit prints were used in an exhibition at Duke University's Allen Building. They include both 11x14 and 16x20 gelatin silver prints. Scenes include Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco workers, cemeteries, and folk arts.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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North Carolina Self-Portrait Photography collection, 1930-1996 8 Linear Feet — Approximately 2000 Items

The North Carolina Self-Portrait Photography Collection includes copy negatives, contact sheets, prints, information sheets, agreements, and voice recordings created as part of the North Carolina Self-Portrait Project, undertaken to build an archive of images and other materials documenting the experiences of African American families in the South. The photographs were assembled by requesting copy photographs from African American families primarily in North Carolina, but a few locations in Mississippi were also included. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The North Carolina Self-Portrait Collection, 1993-2000, contains paper documents, audio cassettes, contact sheets, slides, negatives, and photographs, all relating to the work of the NCSP project. To build the collection of images of African Americans in the South, project staff visited African American families primarilyy in North Carolina locales, but also in Mississippi, and requested copies of original family photographs created from 1900 to 1990, giving back quality reproductions to the families for their own collections.

The collection is particularly rich in materials related to the private and professional lives of African Americans living in the South during the first half of the 20th century. The images contain subjects typical to family photograph albums, including: candid and formal portraits, weddings, anniversaries, award ceremonies, school pictures, athletic teams, vacations, leisure activities, and other aspects of domestic life. In addition, many of the families whose photographs were copied were active members of religious and social organizations. Some of the distinct and more heavily represented organizations are the Arabian Shriners, New Bern Isiserettes, Eastern Stars, Young Men's Institute in Asheville, the A.M.E. Church, as well as employees of the NC Mutual Insurance Co. The North Carolina portion of this project was primarily conducted in the geographic locations of New Bern, James City, Durham, Asheville, and Southern Pines.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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South Africa documentary photographs collection, 1940s-circa 2013, bulk 1960-2013 45.0 Linear Feet — 49 boxes; approximately 1133 items

Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid, from about the 1940s to 2013, with most dating after 1960. Arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris, Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a series of work by Jeeva Rajgopaul. Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images portray political rallies; protests; forced removals; funerals; social gatherings such as dances and concerts; work and domestic life; the life of the elderly, the migrants, and the impoverished; and labor organizing and strikes. There are many portraits of individuals of all races and classes, well-known activists and politicians, as well as countless ordinary South African citizens. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle. There is a small amount of printed material, as well as a selection of digital image files and a digital audio file of an exhibit talk. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid from about the 1940s to 2007, with most dating after 1960. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle.

The prints are arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris and Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a separate but related series of work by photographer Jeeva Rajgopaul. Each project resulted in an exhibit and four of them produced books (one is only available in online form). The series and the work of each photographer are described in full in this collection guide.

Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images document events such as rallies, protests, forced removals, funerals, social gatherings and leisure pursuits, violence between Africans, and labor strikes and meetings. There are also many portraits of individuals and families: migrant workers, farm laborers, HIV positive individuals, affluent South Africans, domestic workers, protesters, and well-known activists and politicians of all races and parties.

The images take the form of black-and-white and color prints, chiefly gelatin silver and pigmented inkjet prints, with most measuring approximately 11x14 to 16x20 inches. There is a small amount of printed material documenting the Cordoned Heart exhibit, as well as selected digital image files, and a digital audio file of exhibit opening remarks.

Among the photographers in this collection are several whose individual bodies of work are also held at Duke: David Goldblatt, Cedric Nunn, and Paul Weinberg. Details regarding all the photographers are found in a biographical section in this collection guide.

Aquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Known photographers whose work is represented in this collection are: Paul Alberts (1946- ); Joseph Alphers (1949- ); Omar Badsha (1945- ); Rodney Barnett (1943-2000); Michael Barry (1954- ); Bee Berman (1949- ); Arthur Bolton; Basil Breakey; Julian Cobbing (1944- ); Michael Davies (1955- ); Gille de Vlieg (1940- ); Anne Fischer (1915-1986); David Goldblatt (1930- ); Jenny Gordon (1955- ); Paul Grendon (1954- ); George Hallett (1942- ); Dave Hartman; David Hemson; Steve Hilton-Barber (1962-2002); Lucky Sipho Khoza (circa 1965-1998); Paul Konings (1958- ); Lesley Lawson (1952- ); Chris Ledechowski (1956- ); Rashid Lombard (1951- ); Ben Maclennan (1956- ); William Matlala (1957- ); Jimi Matthews (1955- ); Roger Meintjies (1963- ); Gideon Mendel (1959- ); Eric Miller; Santu Mofokeng (1956- ); Daniel Morolong (1928-2012); Themba Nkosi; Cedric Nunn (1957- ); Billy Paddock; Berney Perez (1948- ); Myron Peters (1954- ); Lindeka Qampi (1969- ); Chris Qwazi; Jeeva Rajgopaul (1952- ); Wendy Schwegmann (1954- ); Guy Tillim (1962- ); Zubeida Vallie; Paul Weinberg (1956- ); Graeme Williams (1961- ); Jansje Wissema (1920-1975); and Giséle Wulfsohn (1957- ). There are also prints from an unknown photographer collected by photographer and film-maker Angus Gibson.

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Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts collection, 2012-2020 27.5 Linear Feet — 37 boxes; 1 oversize folder — 784.5 Gigabytes — Electronic files

The Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Art degree program at Duke University has been awarded since 2013. Collection contains masters theses submitted by graduates of the program. Written theses formats include typescripts, handmade books, zines, digital video, and audio files. Creative theses portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts such as boxes; printed photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of objects, multi-media performances, and exhibits. Subjects range widely: they include U.S. and Southern cultures; world cultures; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; themes of social justice, memory, and identity; women and spirituality; and abstract constructs. Other countries and regions represented include China, Vietnam, and the Middle East. Submission of work to the archival project is voluntary. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains masters theses submitted each year by graduates of Duke University's Master of Fine Arts in Experimental and Documentary Arts program (MFA/EDA), beginning with 2015.

The collection is arranged by program year, then in two groups, Written Theses and Creative Theses. Written theses exist in both analog and electronic form; many include handmade books, digital video, or audio files. Creative portfolios include three-dimensional artwork or artifacts; photobooks; color and black-and-white photographic prints in varying sizes; digital still images; digital film, audio, and video; and images and film of multi-media performances and exhibit installations. Artifacts are sometimes part of the project, including one large magic lantern apparatus.

Themes range widely, and include U.S. and Southern cultures; cultures around the world; street photography; environmental narratives and documentaries; city and rural communities; social justice, memory, segregation, and identity; and abstract constructs. Most projects are based in the United States, but some are centered on Middle Eastern, Southeast Asian or Chinese history and culture.

Most authors have contributed both creative and written theses; others have elected to contribute only one or the other. Not all authors have both written and creative theses. Participation in the archival project is voluntary; therefore this archive represents the graduates of the MFA EDA program who submitted their work for inclusion.

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In 1938, the School of Forestry at Duke was founded as the first graduate school of forestry in the South. In the 1970s, the school expanded its program to include a broad range of resource and environmental studies. In 1974/75, it became the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Collection contains memoranda, brochures, newspaper clippings, conference materials, annual reports, photographs and slides relating to the Duke School of Forestry and Environmental Studies from roughly 1960 through 1979.

Collection contains alumni newsletters, publications, technical papers, department brochures, conference programs, memoranda, annual reports, as well as documents relating to the proposed phasing out of the Forestry School in 1975 and resultant student protests. Also includes papers from the 1965 Tropical Forestry Symposium sponsored by the School of Forestry, black and white photographs of the arboretum, and color photos and slides of School's field days in 1977 and 1979. Removed photographs from albums and interleaved in folders for preservation.

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The Duke University Office of Cultural Affairs was created in 1969 as part of the Division of Student Affairs and existed until 1993, when, as part of a reorganization of the Division, it was superceded by the Office of University Life. The Office of Cultural Affairs Records, 1931-2002 (bulk 1958-2002), consist of budgets and financial reports; calendars; contracts; correspondence; meeting minutes; printed materials; black-and-white, color, and 35mm photographs; and videocassettes, audiocassettes, and digital audio tapes. Materials primarily span the years of the OCA's official existence, 1969-1993, but also contain earlier materials about its first director, Ella Fountain Pratt, and later records created by the Office of University Life. Arranged in five series: Subject Files, which provide a broad overview of the OCA's activities, including early correspondence between Duke University and the American Dance Festival, which moved to Duke in 1977; the Chamber Arts Society, a group that promoted chamber music performance in Durham and surrounding areas; the Duke Artists Series, a concert series that began in 1930 and came under the oversight of OCA upon its creation in 1969; the Summer Session, programming for which also became one of the OCA's primary responsibilities; and the Triangle Dance Guild, a group independent of Duke that coordinated with the OCA to promote dance performance on campus and in Durham and surrounding areas from 1976-1984.

The Office of Cultural Affairs Records, 1931-2002 (bulk 1958-2002), consist of budgets and financial reports, calendars, contracts, correspondence, meeting minutes, photographs, and printed materials that document the Office's administration and scheduling of concerts and other performing arts events, arts festivals, and certain performance venues and buildings on the campus of Duke University. The majority of these records span the years of the OCA's official existence, 1969-1993; but there are also older materials that stem from the earlier Duke career of the OCA's initial director, Ella Fountain Pratt, as well as later records created under the Office of University Life, which superceded the OCA in 1993. Audiovisual material in the collection include more than 500 black-and-white, color, and 35mm photographs; additionally, there are several videocassettes, audiocassettes, and digital audio tapes. The collection is arranged in five series beginning with the most general, Subject Files, followed in alphabetical order by four smaller and more specific series that document the history of various concert series or arts organizations.

The Subject Files are not only the largest series but also give the broadest overview of the OCA's activities. Several large folder groups exist within the series, including one that contains early correspondence and negotiations between Duke University and the American Dance Festival, which moved to Duke in 1977. The series also contains correspondence and other records that span Pratt's entire career at Duke, from the late 1950s through her retirement in 1984. The next four series document the history of various concert series or artistic groups that were either administrated by or collaborated with the OCA. The first and largest of these series is the Chamber Arts Society. Founded in 1945 to promote chamber music performance in Durham , this group eventually came under the aegis of Duke University and the Office of Cultural Affairs in 1975. Although files here tell a little of that early history, they primarily document some fifteen years of concerts on campus from the mid-1980s through 2002. Following this are the records of the Duke Artists Series, a concert series that began in 1930. When the OCA was created in 1969, management and oversight of the Duke Artists Series was made one of its primary responsibilities. The files here mainly document several seasons of concerts in the late 1980s and late 1990s. Much like the Duke Artists Series, cultural programming for the University's Summer Session Series also became a primary responsibility of the OCA upon its creation. This series covers more than forty years of summer session history, including programming that continued under the Office of University Life. The final series contains the history of the Triangle Dance Guild. Independent of Duke, this group existed from 1976-1984 and coordinated with the OCA to promote dance performance on campus and in Durham and other local venues.

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University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.

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The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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The Wayne P. Ellis Collection of Kodakiana spans the dates 1886 to 1989, and was created by Mr. Ellis over the period of nearly four decades. Whereas many photographic collectors concentrate on cameras and photographs, Ellis emphasized advertising and marketing material. As a consequence, the collection is especially rich in print advertisements for Eastman Kodak products that were published in general interest periodicals beginning in the late 19th century. More unusual items are the product catalogs, how-to manuals for both amateur and professional photographers, serial publications for salesmen and photographers, and a variety of marketing and promotional items. There are several scrapbooks of advertising materials with considerable marginalia. The collection also includes training manuals and other publications for Kodak employees. In addition, many items in the collection deal with various aspects of the corporate history of Eastman Kodak from its earliest years up to the mid-20th century.

The collection contains little or no correspondence. There are scattered groups of photographs throughout the collection, though they are few in number. Many are formal and casual black and white photographs of Kodak staff members. Others were used for promotional or sales activities.

Processing Note

Some of Mr. Ellis's material was in excellent order; other items were in greater disarray. The collection has been arranged, as far as practical, according to the type of material. The series names given to each category are as clear and descriptive as possible.

No items were removed from the collection except for some duplicates. Decisions were made early in the processing of this collection, however, to separate several titles for individual cataloging. Notable among these is the entire run of the early periodical Kodakery (v. 1-19, 1913-1932) as well as many issues of the variably titled Photographic Review and Photographic Digest, and several others. All of these titles are part of the Rare Book, Manuscript and Special Collections Library and may be located using that library's online catalog by searching "Wayne P. Ellis" as a keyword. The separation of items may cause some small inconvenience to users of the collection, but it has been deemed impractical to reverse the situation after the fact.

Mr. Ellis also contributed over 160 books on various aspects of advertising to the Duke University Libraries; the titles have been cataloged in the usual fashion as individual books, and are identified in the library catalog as being part of the Wayne P. Ellis collection.

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Jesse Harrison Epperson papers, 1915-1959 .25 Linear Feet — 1 box

Dr. J.H. Epperson (1889-1958) was a resident of Durham, N.C. and director of the Durham County Public Health Department. Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to his life and career. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings center around Durham public health and sanitation history in the early 20th century, including efforts to combat communicable diseases such as tuberculosis and venereal disease in both white and African American populations. Includes 19 black-and-white photographs, mostly local news photographs, among which are 1920s views of downtown Durham, N.C.; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915; portraits of nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and a 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial women.

Collection comprises correspondence, clippings, and photographs relating to the life and career of Dr. J. H. Epperson, from his appointment in 1915 to the newly-formed Durham, N.C. Department of Health to his death in 1958. Subjects in the many photocopied news clippings (1915-1958) center around Durham public health and sanitation history, including efforts by Epperson and his staff to establish regulations for the safe production of milk, and to combat typhus, polio, tuberculosis, venereal disease, and other infectious diseases among both white and African American populations in early 20th century Durham City and County.

The correspondence chiefly consists of a few congratulatory exchanges between Epperson and Wilburt C. Davidson, Dean of the Duke University Medical School, where Epperson held a teaching position, and condolence letters to Epperson's widow. There is also one personal letter written by Epperson to his daughter and son-in-law.

Also in the collection are 19 black-and-white photographs (1915-1958), chiefly 8x10 inch Durham Herald-Sun press photographs, whose subjects include early views of Durham, N.C., 1920s; interiors of the new Health Department laboratory in 1915 with Epperson and staff; portraits of Epperson in his offices and at meetings; nurses and other staff, several of whom are people of color; and meeting and conference attendees, including a group attending a conference on preventing venereal disease. A nursing staff member who appears in several photographs with Epperson is an Elizabeth O'Kelly. Of note is a large 1920s group photograph of twenty local midwives, chiefly African American or multiracial, standing with Epperson and several staff on a flight of steps outside the Durham County Courthouse, where the Health Department was located.

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Frank Espada photographs and papers, 1946-2010, bulk 1964-2000 56.2 Linear Feet — 76 boxes; 3 oversize folders — approximately 14,500 items

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Frank Espada was a political activist and documentary photographer of Puerto Rican extraction based in New York and California. His photographic archives comprise thousands of black-and-white photographs and negatives and related materials concerning Espada's lifelong work documenting the Puerto Rican diaspora, civil and economic rights movements, indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco. The Puerto Rican Diaspora project also includes over 150 oral history recordings. The Civil Rights series documents voter registration and school desegregation rallies in New York City, 1964-1970, as well as housing and anti-poverty movements, primarily in California. Photographic subjects encompass Puerto Ricans, African Americans, and indigenous peoples, as well as whites and racially mixed people. The professional papers include files related to activism, research and writings, exhibits, teaching, and publicity. The earliest dated item is a 1946 essay by Espada, "What democracy means to me." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Frank Espada's photographic archives comprise thousands of photographic prints, contact sheets, and negatives, as well as professional papers, spanning the length of Frank Espada's career as a photographer and community activist from the mid-1950s through 2010. The materials document the Puerto Rican diaspora; indigenous Chamorro communities in Micronesia, primarily in Guam, Tinian, and Saipan; drug abuse prevention programs and HIV/AIDS outreach in San Francisco; and civil rights, education, and anti-poverty and housing rights movements, primarily in New York City and San Francisco. Photographic subjects include Puerto Ricans, African Americans, and indigenous peoples, as well as whites and racially mixed people.

A large series of professional papers provides supporting documentation of his life and work as a photographer, activist, community organizer, and teacher. The earliest dated item, an essay Espada wrote in 1946, "What democracy means to me," is found in this series, which contains files on Espada's activism; research topics; photography and exhibits; a few videocassettes; syllabi and notes from his photography courses at U.C. Berkeley; awards and memorabilia; and publicity.

The largest body of materials, which numbers over 12,000 items and includes photographs as well as manuscripts and over 100 recorded oral interviews (digitized use copies available), derives from Espada's grant-funded work documenting Puerto Rican communities across the U.S. and in Puerto Rico, 1979-1981.

Another significant group of materials derives from Espada's activism on behalf of voter registration and school desegregation in New York City from 1962-1970, and later in California in support of anti-poverty, HIV/AIDS, drug abuse prevention and outreach, and housing rights.

Each of the photographic project series includes finished prints ranging in size from 8x10 to 24x30 inches; contact sheets and work prints; and negatives, which are housed in a separate series and are closed to use.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Frank Fernekes (1872-1953) was a commercial photographer with an interest in circus and Wild West themes; he was born and resided in New York until sometime before 1927, then moved permanently to Hollywood, California and was active through the 1940s. Collection contains photographs and postcards chiefly dating from the 1910s through the 1930s, with a few from the 1940s. All of the photographs are black-and-white and were taken by photographer Frank Fernekes. They feature a set of views of El Paso, Texas, in 1915, which include several images of African Americans and inhabitants probably of Mexican descent; a large set of images of California circus performers, actors and performers in Western-themed costumes, and Native Americans in costumes and traditional dress; and a large souvenir photograph with Fernekes taken at McLoed's Happy Hollow amusement park in Arkansas, circa 1923. The collection also includes a set of color souvenir postcards with early 20th century Western-themed illustrations of cowboys and cowgirls, and a few black-and-white postcards relating to Buffalo Bill Cody, a Yuma Indian band from Arizona, and other Western themes.

Collection contains photographs and postcards, chiefly dating from the 1910s through the 1930s, with a few from the 1940s, all assembled or taken by photographer Frank Fernekes. The first folder consists of 15 small contact prints taken in El Paso, Texas in 1915, probably by Fernekes, including views of the city from a higher vantage point, close-ups of buildings and streets, railroad tracks and bridges, and close-up views of what appear to be families and individuals of Mexican descent and their houses. One street scene includes many African American men congregating in front of a building. The snapshots measure about 3x5 inches, and were printed sometime in the 1970s from the original nitrate negatives, which were then discarded from the collection.

A second folder in this group contains 40 snapshots, chiefly taken in Hollywood and Los Angeles, California from 1925-1948. The earliest images were taken in New York City. The only dated image is labeled 1925, and is captioned "Chief Manabozho," who was a Native American actor on Broadway and in Wild West shows. This image is hand-colored and includes Fernekes's NYC address on the back, which is struck out and amended with the year 1927 and his California address. The two undated images show Chief Wanabozho again, and Frank Fernekes shaking hands with a person in Native American costume in front of the Coney Island Luna Fun House, which often held Wild West-themed shows.

The largest set of snapshots in the second folder are of parades in Venice, Los Angeles, and Hollywood, California, chiefly in the 1930s, focusing on individuals in Western or Native American costume; staff and performers at the Cole Bro. and Clyde Beatty Circus, and the Barnes Circus, sometimes featuring Frank Fernekes posing alongside (19302-1940s); and Native Americans in popular culture-inspired costumes and in traditional dress, posting in groups and individually. Named individuals include Hubert Honanie, a well-known Kachina artist in Pasadena, in Native American costume; Joe and Oscar Cody, who were Native American extras early in their film careers (shooting bows and arrows in civilian clothing), circa 1938; Montie Montana (Owen Harlan Mickel, a rodeo star who resided in California, 1948; "Miss Bluebird," a young Native American in costume, taken at the "All-Indian Picnic in Sycamore Grove Park, Los Angeles," 1942, and the Woody Hanley Cowboy Band, 1946. Many of the Native Americans and other individuals may be actors - there was a studio lot adjacent to Sycamore Grove Park. The photographs in this group typically measure 3 1/2 x 5 7/8 inches, and many are captioned, often including the stamped address of Frank Fernekes's photography studio in Hollywood, California.

The second group consists of 11 souvenir postcards, part of a fold-out set probably dating from the 1920s featuring color reproductions of images dating from 1908. Images depict cowboys, cowgirls, and scenes from the "Wild West" as rendered in American popular culture at the turn of the 20th century. There is a lone color postcard of "The only one-tribe Indian band in the West," which is a group shot of a Yuma brass band from about 1930 published by Harry Hertz. There is also an empty souvenir envelope that once contained souvenir postcards from the Buffalo Bill Wild West show, undated; a black-and-white Burlington Route postcard with an image of the Buffalo Bill Museum in Cody, Wyoming, undated; and a black-and-white postcard with "The Fall of the Bronco Buster, Walton's Views, Roswell N.M., Pecos Valley Drug Co.," from the 1920s.

The collection is rounded out by a large decorative cardstock mount, printed sometime between 1908 and 1923, featuring on one side an image of McLeod from Happy Hollow, a well-known photographer who founded this popular amusement park in Hot Springs, Arkansas; the image is accompanied by a publicity verse. The single 6.75x9.25 inch black-and-white photographic print that was apparently once mounted on the other side of this card frame shows a group of men and women, some astride donkeys, posting for the camera. The man on the far right is Frank Fernekes, dating the image closer to 1923.

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Azel Hull Fish lantern slide lecture sets and photographs, 1890s-1940s 9 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — approximately 2300 items

The chief component consists of roughly 2000 lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

The chief component consists of a large collection of lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group and number roughly 2000. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

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Americans for Immigrant Justice (formerly Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center [FIAC]) is a not-for-profit legal assistance organization dedicated to protecting and promoting the basic human rights of immigrants of all nationalities. The Americans for Immigrant Justice records span the years of 1980-2017. The collection contains project files and correspondence regarding immigrant detention policy and conditions in the state of Florida, particularly concerning the Haitian community; legal documents regarding the same, including restricted and confidential legal files; and audiovisual material produced by or for AIJ. The bulk of materials are organized by subject and detention facility.

The Americans for Immigrant Justice (AIJ) records, formerly the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC), span the years of 1980-2017. This collection contains extensive documentation of the events and crises surrounding asylum, deportation, detention and abuses that took place within Florida detention centers from the years 1980 to 2017, as well as documentation regarding issues of repatriation. It records the efforts of AIJ to advocate on behalf of immigrant and refugee populations, mainly in Florida, during this time. The majority of material in this collection deals with Haitians seeking asylum in the U.S., but also includes major material on Cuban and Central American refugees, then minor files on Chinese, Middle Eastern, and other immigrant populations. Many files focus on Cheryl Little's work with child refugees and detainees and their asylum claims, and on discrimination against female immigrants. Files also include material on interdiction at sea and related court documents, government immigration policy pre- and post-9/11, documentation on hunger strikes at various facilities, material related to the Haitian Boat crises, and documentation of raids on immigrant populations. The detention facilities of particular concern in this collection include Guantanamo, Krome, and Turner Guilford Knight correctional facilities, as well as Florida's county jails.

The collection contains legal documents related to the activity of AIJ, including affidavits of detainees held in Florida facilities, and other court documents, such as court pleadings and briefings; reports on facility conditions; correspondence, including correspondence between detainees and their families, letters from concerned citizens, and formal correspondence between AIJ and other organizations and officials; case studies and reports on immigration and refugee crises, and reports of abuses and conditions in Florida detention facilities; FBI interviews with detainees; related articles and speeches; restricted material, including medical records; and promotional and educational videos produced by or for AIJ, documentary footage of missions and events, and press conference and news footage.

The series in this collection include the Detention Series, the Immigrant and Refugees Series, the Restricted Series, the General Organizational Records Series, the Audiovisual Series and the Photographic Materials Series. The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Detention Series and the Immigrant and Refugees Series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Danny Wilcox Frazier photographs, 2003-2006 3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; 25 items

Collection comprises twenty-five black and white gelatin silver 16x20 inch exhibit prints, representing a larger body of work on contemporary Iowa rural culture. The images portray a changing Midwest of vanishing towns and transformed landscapes. Scenes include cemeteries, slaughterhouses, farms, abandoned grain elevators, and fields. Individuals inhabiting the scenes include young people at leisure, fishermen on the Mississippi, hunters in fields, veterans on Memorial Day, Amish families, as well as more recent arrivals to Iowa, Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews at prayer and migrant workers in the fields and at home. The prints are housed in exhibit mats. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five black-and-white gelatin silver 16x20 inch exhibit prints, representing a larger body of work by Danny Wilcox Frazier on contemporary Iowa rural culture. The images portray a changing Midwest of vanishing towns and transformed landscapes. Scenes include cemeteries, slaughterhouses, farms, abandoned grain elevators, and fields. Individuals inhapbiting the scenes include young people at leisure, fishermen on the Mississippi, hunters in fields, veterans on Memorial Day, Amish families, as well as more recent arrivals to Iowa, Lubavitcher Hasidic Jews at prayer and migrant workers in the fields and at home. The prints are arranged in exhibit number order, and are housed in hinged window mats.

The prints were featured in an exhibit entitled "Driftless: Photographs from Iowa" at Duke University in 2007. The term "Driftless" refers to a geological area of the Midwest untouched by glaciers. A recording of the artist's talk is available through the online exhibit.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection consists of 60 small black-and-white photographs dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, belonging to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist and activist who traveled extensively and lived in West Africa, where most if not all of these images originated. The majority of the images are portraits of Amy Ashwood Garvey's many male and female acquaintances in Africa, who include female friends, politicians, heads of states, lawyers, and students. Other subjects include locales and native inhabitants of Nigeria and other unidentified places; gatherings such as meetings, a funeral, and a public hanging; and street and market scenes. Although there are photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, the majority are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s. The travel snapshots are likely to have been taken by Amy Ashwood Garvey, but there are images that were sent to her by individuals as mementos, and some images of her taken by another unidentified person. Acquired by the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Dating roughly from the 1930s to the 1950s, this collection of 60 small black-and-white photographs belonged to Amy Ashwood Garvey, feminist, activist for African and African American human rights, and first wife of Marcus Garvey. Most of the travel snapshots were likely to have been taken by her, but there are several that were clearly sent to her by individuals, and some that feature Amy Ashwood Garvey and were taken by another person. Although there are some photographs with inscriptions, names, and descriptions of the scenes, most are unlabeled; the few dates that appear are from the late 1940s.

Almost if not all the photographs were taken in Africa, where Garvey traveled and lived after her divorce with Marcus Garvey in 1922. Other locations may include Ghana and Benin. Personal subjects include portraits, candid and formal, of the many male and female friends and acquaintances of Amy Ashwood Garvey, including politicians and heads of state; and native inhabitants, including a portrait of a tribal chief with two women, probably his wives. Most are in Western dress, but some are in traditional clothing. Amy Ashwood Garvey appears in at least three of the prints, and there is a portrait of the President of Liberia, William Tubman, with whom she had a serious long-term relationship. Other images include street and market scenes; school groups; a parade, meetings and ceremonial visits; a public hanging; a funeral gathering; and views of river landings, probably the River Niger.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

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Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

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Ralph Gibson photographs, 2019 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 208 prints — 8 x 11 1/2 inches (188); 17 x 22 inches (20)

Ralph Gibson is an American photographer based in New York, N.Y. Collection consists of 208 photographs taken by Gibson in 2019 for his photobook, Sacred Land: Israel before and after time(2020). In addition to the 188 small single-image printer's proof prints, there are 20 large diptych prints, in which juxtaposed color and black-and-white images explore the nature of Israel and surrounding regions of Galilee, Jordan, and Palestine, through contemporary and ancient landscapes, architecture, city and country scenes, and portraits of a wide variety of people. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 188 individually printed 8 1/2 x 11 inch printer's proofs and 20 17 x 22 inch print diptychs by photographer Ralph Gibson, from his book Sacred Land: Israel before and after time, published in 2020 by Lustrum Press.

As a project, "Sacred Land" offers a portrait of Israel and the surrounding regions, including Palestine, Jordan, and Galilee, which juxtaposes past and contemporary experience through the narrative device of the diptych. Subjects include landscapes, rural and city life, found objects, architecture, antiquities, and portraits of a wide variety of people.

The untitled archival pigment inkjet prints are signed and dated by the photographer, and the printer's proofs are marked on the versos with the page numbers where the images appear in the photobook.

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Allan H. Gilbert papers, 1926-1976 12.56 Linear Feet — 11,525 Items

Manuscripts, research files, correspondence, approximately 1287 black-and-white photographs and photostats of documents from various repositories and used in his research, and 3 reels of microfilm. Subjects of the research files and manuscripts include: Dante, Machiavelli, Milton, Jonson, and Aristotle (his POETICS).

Addition (2007-0141; 400 items, 0.5 lin. ft.) contains index files documenting the Gilbert's book collection. Many of these books are now in the collection at the Rare Book, Manuscript and Sepcial Collections Library at Duke University.

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Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes papers, 1811-1990s and undated, bulk 1905-1981, bulk 1905-1981 6.2 Linear Feet — 11 boxes — Approximately 4650 items — 4650 Items

Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original research materials. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape in North Carolina entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines. Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography

The Clarence Louis Frank Gohdes Papers date from 1811 to the 1990s, with the bulk of the collection dating from 1905 to 1981. Collection consists of research materials, correspondence, writings, clippings and other printed materials, and a few photographs, mainly from the latter half of Gohdes's career. The earliest date (1811) refers to reproductions of original materials used in his research. Correspondence with other American Literature teachers and authors, combined with other materials relating to Gohdes's institutional and organizational affiliations, in particular with Duke University, the Modern Language Association (MLA), and the journal AMERICAN LITERATURE, comprise the most substantive aspects of this collection. They provide insight into the bureaucratic and institutional exigencies of American literary scholarship in the early and mid-twentieth century. Noted authors and scholars of the time whose letters and other writings are in the collection include Alexander Blackburn, Oscar Cargill, Lewis Chase, Robert Elias, Norman Foerster, Arthur Rubin, Arthur Quinn, and Upton Sinclair. Original manuscripts by Gohdes, inscribed reprints of writings by his colleagues, and materials relating to many major British and American literary figures, make up the rest of the collection. There is substantial material on Edgar Allen Poe and American humor. The collection also includes papers documenting Gohdes's research and writing for his last book project, a history of the muscadine grape entitled Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines.

The Gohdes Papers are divided into seven series: Biographical Data, Correspondence, Author Files, Subject Files, Writings and Speeches, Scuppernong , and Clippings.

The Biographical Data Series briefly sketches the major events of Gohdes's life. It consists of only a few items, including a one-page sketch by Gohdes of his career's highlights, and photocopies of Gohdes's obituaries. Further biographical information, especially pertaining to Gohdes's academic life, can be culled from materials in the Correspondence Series.

The Correspondence Series contains letters exchanged with university administrators, publishers, colleagues, librarians, and literary figures. The series is divided into four subseries, American Literature , Lewis Chase, Duke University, and General. The bulk of the correspondence concerns professional and academic affairs, such as appointments, editorships, research and reviews, and publishing. Included are exchanges between Gohdes and Duke University administrators about English Department and American Literature affairs, as well as between Gohdes and contemporary literary critics about the study of American literature. There are also several documents that illuminate Gohdes's political affiliations and social concerns.

Materials on approximately fifty authors, largely major British and American writers, are in the Author Files Series and were originally gathered by Gohdes and his colleague, Lewis Chase. The folders contain a variety of information on the represented authors, in an equally varied mix of formats: clippings, notes, lectures, student papers, photographs, and reproductions or photocopies of original writing.

Included in the Subject Files Series are materials relating to several projects and interests which engaged Gohdes during his career. These include: bibliographies, poetry, travel narratives and the American West, and the United Nations' Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)/American Literature Section's Best American Books List. The bibliographies collected in this series reflect Gohdes's interest in this genre, as he participated in and edited many such projects throughout his career.

The Writings and Speeches Series contains manuscript and printed materials in two subseries: Writings by Gohdes and Writings by Others. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries includes manuscripts of short stories, poetry, and academic essays, as well as notes and notecards. The manuscripts also contain folders pertaining to unfinished projects and writings. The Writings by Gohdes Subseries also contains several folders of printed materials, consisting of reprints and reproductions of as well as advertising and promotional materials for Gohdes's published writings. This subseries consists almost entirely of reprints that are inscribed to Gohdes by the authors.

Materials relating to the writing and research of Gohdes's last published book, Scuppernong, North Carolina's Grape and Its Wines, are in the Scuppernong Series. Three subseries make up this series: Correspondence, Research and Notes, and Publication Materials. Correspondence plus photocopied articles and essays about the grape and agricultural production form the bulk of the series. Also included are Gohdes's many notes and notecards, as well as reviews and materials relating to the book's publication.

The Clippings Series contains the few clippings that are not housed in the Author Files Series. These clippings mostly consist of articles relating to literary figures.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the records of American Literature and the Modern Language Association's American Literature Section, as well as the papers of many of Gohdes's colleagues, such as Jay B. Hubbell and Arlin Turner.

Processing Note:

Roman numerals and transcribed titles taken from the original folders have been appended to certain folders, such as the Contemporary Poetry Selections.

Acquired as part of the Jay B. Hubbell Center for American Literary Historiography at Duke University.