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Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

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Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

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William Watts Ball papers, 1778-1952 and undated 31 Linear Feet — Approx. 26,000 Items

Newspaper editor and author. Collection houses personal and political correspondence, financial and business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed materials, account books, a diary, photographs, and scrapbooks, documenting William Watts Ball's activities as editor of several South Carolina newspapers, including The State and the News and Courier, both of Columbia. Topics referred to include American and South Carolina politics in the 20th century; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the Great Depression and the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and business and family matters. Correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Collection consists of personal and political correspondence, diaries, business papers, speeches, editorials, notes, printed matter, personal account books, memorandum books, photographic materials, and scrapbooks. The papers document a long period in Southern history, and reflect Ball's activities as editor of several newspapers, including The State, of Columbia, S.C., and the News and Courier, also of Columbia, S.C. The main group is concerned with national and South Carolina history for the first half of the 20th century. Topics referred to include American politics; the South Carolina textile industry; African Americans in the South; the depression and the F. D. Roosevelt administration; newspapers and the newspaper business; education in South Carolina; conditions and problems stemming from both World Wars; prohibition; states' rights; South Carolina social life and customs; Roman Catholicism in South Carolina; international issues; and general business and family matters.

A substantial portion of the papers consists of family correspondence containing information on school and college life; Hollywood in the 1930s and 1940s; social life and customs in Laurens, Charleston, and Columbia, South Carolina; and England, the Italian battlefront, and a journey across the Atlantic during World War II. Other letters come from editors, publishers, educators, politicians, financiers, and industrialists, principally from South Carolina, although some national figures are found. These correspondents include J. J. McSwain, D. C. Heyward, John Gary Evans, John Hays Hammond, M. F. Ansel, David D. Wallace, James C. Hemphill, Ambrose E. Gonzales, Thomas R. Waring, Nathaniel B. Dial, James F. Byrnes, Ulrich B. Phillips, Josephus Daniels, Bernard M. Baruch, Warrington Dawson, Ellison D. Smith, Max Fleischman, Nicholas Roosevelt, Wendell Willkie, Frederick H. Allen, and Archibald Rutledge.

Ball's financial papers, scattered throughout the collection, generally relate to real estate investments, stock holdings in textile mills, and the Depression as it affected his financial situation. A major part of the correspondence pertains to state and national politics. Letters discuss Tillmanism and Bleasism; the state primary system and election reform; state and national elections; opposition to the New Deal and the formation of the Southern Democratic Party; and other local, state, and national issues.

Material on race relations begins as early as 1916, but is particularly abundant from the 1930s onwards. Involved with the issue of states' rights versus federal control, the "Negro problem" includes the anti-lynching movement, enfranchisement and control of the African American vote, racial unrest, segregation, and other matters. The papers reveal Ball's interest in education, especially the development of schools of journalism, the expansion of the state-supported college system, the University of South Carolina, and the South Carolina School for the Deaf, Dumb, and Blind.

Other papers relate to Ball's editorship of various South Carolina newspapers, principally The State and the News and Courier, and to his publishing efforts. There is also material on the textile industry in South Carolina, labor unrest and unionization, prohibition, women's suffrage, the Great Depression, World Wars I and II, recollections by Ball and others of social life, customs and politics during the 1870s through the 1890s, the economic and industrial development of South Carolina, genealogy of the Watts and Ball families, and drafts and copies of speeches and editorials.

The photographic items include 34 black-and-white photographs (ca. 1840-1940), chiefly consisting of group and individual portraits of W. W. Ball's family, friends, and colleagues in journalism. There are several views of the Ball family's ancestral plantation home in Laurens, S.C. Volumes include family account books, 1911-1942, a memorandum book beginning in 1901; scrapbooks, 1893-1951; a digest of the military service of Frank Parker, 1894-1945; and Ball's diaries, 1916-1952.

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William MacGregor letters, 1899-1918 0.1 Linear Feet — 8 items

Sir William MacGregor (1846-1919) was governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria, between 1899-1904. Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

Correspondence sent to Sir William MacGregor primarily during his tenure as governor of Lagos Colony, Nigeria. One letter was written from Lagos in 1918. Topics include the new government when Northern Nigeria became a British protectorate, the West African Frontier Force, water sourcing, the rubber trade, and liquor traffic. All letters are signed and the majority are manuscript, except for two that are typed. Includes one black-and-white 6x10 cm photograph of an Nigerian family outside their hut.

There is one letter (1899 March 11) from Frederick Butler, a clerk in the Nigeria Department of the Colonial Office, writing that he is sending literature, including a report on the liquor traffic in West Africa. There are two letters (1899 August 6 and 1899 August 30) from John Balie Henderson, a leading engineer for the Queensland Water Supply Department, regarding water bores and the Great Artesian Basin. There are also two letters written by Sir Reginald Laurence Antrobus, crown agent for the colonies and a civil servant in the Colonial Office, one letter (1899 October 15) regarding the new Niger Administration and financial management, the other letter (1904 June 9) regarding a scandal, "the report that the acting Resident proposed to hoist the British flag in Ibadan is wholly untrue.... it seems undesirable to make too much of it." A letter (1900 April 26) from the Colonial Secretariat at Lagos deals largely with the liquor trade and describes movement of the West African Frontier Force. There is a letter (1901 April 21) from Sir Ralph Moor, the first high commissioner of the British Southern Nigeria Protectorate, regarding details of the rubber trade. The letter includes the photograph of a Nigerian family. Finally, there is a letter from the Chief Justice at Lagos, A. R. Gunnington, regarding the his unfair replacement.

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William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the Deep South, especially Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; other images were taken in Mexico, Central America, and France. Also includes Anderson's professional papers, fliers, and posters, chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the Deep South, particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among his earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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William Hillman Shockley photographs, 1896-1922 and undated, bulk 1897-1909 9.0 Linear Feet — 20 boxes; approximately 3224 items

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white photographs taken by W.H. (William Hillman) Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer between the years 1896 to 1909. Locations include China (including Manchuria); Korea; India; Japan; Australia; and Russia (including Siberia); London; Washington, D.C.; and San Francisco; as well as several other south Asian locations. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Formats include more than 2000 small vintage prints, over 400 modern prints, and over 400 nitrate film and glass plate negatives. Many of the photographs bear original captions. There are also some Shockley family photographs, correspondence (1905-1922), a notebook from India, and a few items of memorabilia. Arranged in series by geographical location and format. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains over 2200 black-and-white images taken by W.H. Shockley during his world travels as a mining engineer. Locations include China (including Manchuria), Korea, India, Japan, Australia, and Russia (including Siberia), between the years of 1897 and 1909. Subjects featured include local citizens and officials, and soldiers; Europeans (including businessmen, miners, diplomats, tourists, missionaries); indigenous peoples and their communities; mining operations (iron ore, gold, petroleum, and coal); ancient walls and forts; religious structures and art; street scenes; remote hamlets and camps; fields, rivers, mountains, geological formations, and other landscapes; domestic animals; and caravans and other forms of transportation, including railroads. There are many other work scenes in addition to mining settings. Other formats in the collection include negatives, modern photographic prints, correspondence, and a few artifacts and memorabilia. Shockley also documented his experiences in Russia, China, and other places in articles and presentations for the mining industry; some are available online (retrieved April 2016).

The bulk of the collection is made up of 2,227 vintage black-and-white contact prints measuring from 2 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches to 4x6 inches, many of which bear original captions in Shockley's hand. They are arranged in series by geographical location and date of travel. Accompanying these small prints is a small set of larger card-mounted photographs of Shockley family members, including Shockley's wife, May Bradford Shockley, and their young son William B. Shockley. There are also over 400 original nitrate film and glass plate negatives, some of which contain images not found elsewhere in the collection.

Several hundred modern 8x10 inch prints were made by a photo collector from Shockley's original negatives, chiefly of Russia and Siberia; some of these are unique images not found among the small original prints, including images of an upper-class family on an unidentified estate in England.

Non-photographic materials consist of Shockley's field notebook from India containing an index of photographs he took there; mica mineral samples from India; original envelopes and glass plate boxes; and a bound letterbook containing approximately 100 pieces of business correspondence and a few pieces of personal correspondence, dating from 1905 to 1922.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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William Hesketh Lever was the First Viscount Leverhulme, and founder of the international firm, Lever Brothers. This bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled Solomon Islands Views, and contains 98 black-and-white photographs, chiefly measuring 6x8 inches, that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations from about 1906-1910. Images include company buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants and dwellings, other cultivated crops, flora and fauna, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Notable persons found among the images include the Resident Commissioner of the Islands at the time, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers.

This handsomely bound photograph album belonging to Lord Leverhulme is entitled "Solomon Islands Views", and contains 98 black-and-white photographs that illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers Pacific plantations operations. Images include buildings, plantations at various stages of development, local inhabitants, and steamships. Among the place names listed are Rendova, Pepesala and Guadalcanal. Persons whose photographic portraits are found among the images are the Resident Commissioner of the Islands, missionary J.F. Goldie, and various Lever officers. The photographs illustrate the beginnings of the Lever Brothers' Pacific Plantations operations in the Solomon Islands. The views include buildings and other installations, coconut plantations in various stages of development, lumbering, native housing, local populace, local workers in various tasks, local and inter-island shipping, colonial and company officials, local chiefs, company and government headquarters, ocean steamships, steam powered agricultural equipment, copra, local flora and fauna, and the cultivation of peanuts, rubber, and sweet potatoes.

Place names listed for the photographs are: Rendova, West Bay, Erickson's Island, Pepesala, Guadalcanal, KayIan, Ufa, Banika, Tulagi, Gavatu, Lunga, Kokoon, Pampa, Kaukau, Aola, and Stanmore River. Persons in the photographs include: Charles Morris Woodford, Resident Commissioner of the Islands, 1896 to 1914, and Mrs. Woodford; Mrs. Tillotson, wife of Lord Leverhulme's nephew, John Lever Tillotson (d. 1915) who was his senior colleague on the board; Fred Wernham, an expert in tropical plantation work who was closely identified with developments in the Solomon Islands; Joseph Meek, who first journeyed to the Islands in 1905 to assess prospects there; Methodist missionary J. F. Goldie, translator of the Gospels of Matthew, Mark, and John into Roviana; and a number of others whose names can be found in the list of the pictures.

The black-and-white photographs, emulsion-paper prints, typically measure 6x8 inches in size. Several photographs are dated 1906, but most are undated. The buildings and headquarters of the company appear well developed. That suggests that 1906 is too early a date, since Mr. Meek's initial visit to the Solomons was in 1905. Most of the pictures probably date some years after 1906, but before 1914 when Commissioner Woodford left the islands. Other factors suggest that the dates range from 1906 to 1910.

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William Gedney photographs and papers, 1887, circa 1920, 1940-1998 and undated, bulk 1955-1989 115.0 Linear Feet — 336 boxes, 1 oversize folder — Approximately 66,800 items

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Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam. The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The breadth of these materials offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision. Additional perspectives on his life and work can be found in his many notebooks and journals; artwork; handmade books; correspondence files; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; audiocassettes; and teaching materials. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises the entirety of William Gedney's photographic career, beginning with his student years at Pratt Institute in the 1950s to his early death in 1989. The materials reveal Gedney's intense and meticulous dedication to his work, and his interest in street photography, portraiture, night photography, and the study of human nature. His earliest serious project was undertaken in Kentucky, where he stayed with a coal-miner's family for several weeks in 1964 and again in 1972. His work took him across the U.S. several times, with extensive photographic projects in Chicago, Detroit, Pennsylvania, South Dakota - particularly the Rosebud Sioux Indian Reservation, and southern and northern California. During these trips, as well as in New York City, he also photographed well-known composers. Fascinated by human group dynamics, he photographed parades, hippies and other street people, and crowds. He also traveled to Kolkata (Calcutta) and Varanasi (Benares), India, England, Ireland, Paris, and Amsterdam.

The collection offers roughly 76,000 unique images represented by the over 2000 contact sheets, with over 19,000 selected images in the form of work prints and 1466 exhibit-quality large prints. Other formats include slides, a complete set of master negatives, and personal snapshots. The availability of every format in the photographic process offers deep insights into Gedney's editorial process and artistic vision.

Additional perspectives come from his many notebooks and journals; artwork, including many sketches and drawings; handmade books and book project materials; correspondence files; memo books; financial, legal and medical records; memorabilia; and teaching materials, all described in fuller detail in this collection guide. Gedney's writings, in particular, provide extraordinary views into his life and work. Notebooks, memo books, travel diaries, and loose writings contain a compelling mix of personal entries, essays, poetry, quotations, expenses, travel notes, observations on slang, music and book lists, and clippings. Viewed as a whole, Gedney's professional and personal papers record his thoughts on photography, human behavior across continents, society and art, and on his own development as a photographer.

The large exhibit-quality prints, and the large groups of work prints from which they were selected, are arranged in series by bodies of work, in alphabetical order: Composers; England/Ireland; The Farm; India, subdivided into Benares and Calcutta; Night; Nudes; Paris; and United States, further divided into the subseries Kentucky, New York, San Francisco, and U.S Trips. The latter comprises his travels to other states such as Illinois, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Montana, and Tennessee. The contact sheets and negatives are described and listed under their own series.

To support himself, Gedney undertook commercial work. There is very early work for a bread company and other firms, and he then worked for Time-Life (and photographed office parties there) and other magazines. There are two larger, significant bodies of other commercial work: the earliest consists of portraits of deaf children and their teachers commissioned around 1958 by the St. Joseph's School for the Deaf. The second project, commissioned by the Social Security Administration in 1969, contains only photographic prints - portraits of rural inhabitants of Hays, Kansas (farmers, pensioners, and widows), and Federal employees. A published catalog is found in this series, listing other photographers involved in the projects. The Social Security Administration's archives hold Gedney's original negatives of this work. During the same period, Gedney visited a state mental hospital in Norton, Kansas and photographed a series of arresting portraits of the young people housed there. These bodies of work have not been published online for copyright and privacy reasons; however, the physical prints are open to onsite use.

For further descriptions of each of Gedney's major bodies of work, please follow the series links in the collection guide, keeping in mind that contact sheets, which offer the most complete set of images in thumbnail size, are represented by their own separate collection guide series.

Many of William Gedney's earliest images incorporate personally-significant locations and people. His first serious photographic study, undertaken in the 1950s, centered on his grandparents and their dairy farm in Norton Hill, New York. During this period, Gedney also photographed neighborhoods in his birthplace, Albany, and his hometown of Greenville. Later photographs of friends and family in New York (Arnold and Anita Lobel), San Francisco (Eric Hoffer and Lili Osborne), and Paris (photographer Raghubir Singh and wife Anne Henning) are found throughout the collection, as well as a few shots of his mentors Lee Friedlander and Diane Arbus. Self-portraits of Gedney show up frequently in the contact sheet images but there are no known larger images of the photographer.

Gedney was particularly drawn to human gatherings. He photographed people not only on Brooklyn's streets, but also at parties, car and flower shows, motorcycle rallies, body building exhibitions (where he also photographed Diane Arbus), and in bars and at Coney Island boardwalk and beaches. Early series include African American parades and gospel revivals. He continued to focus on crowds everywhere he traveled, particularly in large cities such as San Francisco (where he photographed Golden Gate gatherings in 1966-1967), Los Angeles, Chicago, London, and Paris, often turning his camera to young people and their street culture. In the 1960s he also documented organized labor rallies and migrant programs in Southern California (Cesar Chavez appears in several images), and in the 1970s, important marches and rallies for gay rights in California and New York.

The photographic series also house a handful of large copy prints and contact sheets of Gedney images printed by photographers Margaret Sartor, Julie Stovall and others affiliated with the Duke University Center for Documentary Studies. Finally, there is also a cluster of late 1980s contact sheets and prints processed by Gedney's former student and close friend Peter Bellamy from rolls of film found among Gedney's belongings at his death.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Preferred source for image titles: titles as written by Gedney on the backs of photographic prints. Second preferred source: titles on index cards prepared by Gedney for individual best-quality prints. Third source: captions written by Gedney on contact sheets, describing photo sequences. When no title was found, library staff have used "No title known."

Folder- and group-level titles for work prints, negatives, and papers were devised by library staff in the 1990s and 2010s, and are noted as such when known. Many if not most of these were derived from Gedney's original folder labels and notes; in the absence of an original description, titles have been devised by library staff.

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William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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The Wayne P. Ellis Collection of Kodakiana spans the dates 1886 to 1989, and was created by Mr. Ellis over the period of nearly four decades. Whereas many photographic collectors concentrate on cameras and photographs, Ellis emphasized advertising and marketing material. As a consequence, the collection is especially rich in print advertisements for Eastman Kodak products that were published in general interest periodicals beginning in the late 19th century. More unusual items are the product catalogs, how-to manuals for both amateur and professional photographers, serial publications for salesmen and photographers, and a variety of marketing and promotional items. There are several scrapbooks of advertising materials with considerable marginalia. The collection also includes training manuals and other publications for Kodak employees. In addition, many items in the collection deal with various aspects of the corporate history of Eastman Kodak from its earliest years up to the mid-20th century.

The collection contains little or no correspondence. There are scattered groups of photographs throughout the collection, though they are few in number. Many are formal and casual black and white photographs of Kodak staff members. Others were used for promotional or sales activities.

Processing Note

Some of Mr. Ellis's material was in excellent order; other items were in greater disarray. The collection has been arranged, as far as practical, according to the type of material. The series names given to each category are as clear and descriptive as possible.

No items were removed from the collection except for some duplicates. Decisions were made early in the processing of this collection, however, to separate several titles for individual cataloging. Notable among these is the entire run of the early periodical Kodakery (v. 1-19, 1913-1932) as well as many issues of the variably titled Photographic Review and Photographic Digest, and several others. All of these titles are part of the Rare Book, Manuscript and Special Collections Library and may be located using that library's online catalog by searching "Wayne P. Ellis" as a keyword. The separation of items may cause some small inconvenience to users of the collection, but it has been deemed impractical to reverse the situation after the fact.

Mr. Ellis also contributed over 160 books on various aspects of advertising to the Duke University Libraries; the titles have been cataloged in the usual fashion as individual books, and are identified in the library catalog as being part of the Wayne P. Ellis collection.

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Walton family papers, 1730-1980 and undated, bulk 1890-1975 4.5 Linear Feet — 9 boxes; 2 oversize folders — Approximately 1700 items — Approximately 1700 items

The papers of the Walton family comprise journals and diaries; correspondence; writings; photographic materials; clippings; and printed material. Early items pertain to the Baker family of Hingham, Massachusetts, and letters document the Walton's courtship and early marriage. Papers from the 1920s to 1948 relate to Eleanore Walton's work with societies and clubs, and as a motion picture censor in Kansas City, Missouri. The larger Loring B. Walton Series documents Walton's student days, his service as a U.S. Army officer in the American Expeditionary Force in France and Germany, 1918-1919, and his lengthy correspondence with his mother, Eleanore, and with A. Goderic A. Hodges, a British Army officer. In addition there are a few letters from authors such as Wilmon Brewer, Count Sforza, Maurice Holleaux, and Anatole France, and a poem by Edmund Wilson. Walton's involvement with Duke University as a Romance Languages faculty member is also documented to a lesser degree. Photographs and negatives are of family member portraits, Princeton and Harvard campuses, 1920, Fort Douglas, Utah, also 1920, Hingham, Massachusetts, and unidentified subjects.

The Walton family papers date from 1730 to 1980, and comprise journals and diaries; incoming and outgoing correspondence; writings; postcards, photographs, albums and negatives; clippings; printed material; and genealogical information and history relating to Hingham, Massachusetts.

Small groups of early materials refer to the lives of Eleanore's father James Loring Baker and the history of Hingham, Massachusetts. Later correspondence documents the courtship and early marriage of Eleanore Coolidge Baker and George E. Walton; an 1896 diary recounts George Walton's trip to Florida by wagon. A larger series of papers and correspondence relates to Loring Baker Walton's student years, travel abroad, service in World War I, and his role as academic author and professor of Romance Languages at Duke University. Letters in this series also document Loring B. Walton's relationship with his mother Eleanore and her involvement in various societies, clubs, and employment as a film censor in Kansas City, Missouri.

Photographs, postcards, and negatives in the collection include portraits of family members; images of travel abroad in France and Hingham, Massachusetts, circa 1920s; Fort Douglas, Utah, 1920; and the campuses of Harvard and Princeton in 1920, and unidentified subjects.

Addition (03-053)(175 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1917-1968) comprises materials on Loring Baker Walton, and consists primarily of scholarly correspondence and materials concerning his work on Anatole France and other projects (1932-1968). Also includes his class notes from Harvard (1917-1918), and from his training and service with the American Expeditionary Forces during World War I.

Addition (08-184)(375 items, .4 lin. ft.; dated 1891-1980 and undated) contains primarily material related to Loring Baker Walton's background and service with the American Expeditionary Forces in World War I. Includes information regarding Walton family property settlements for land they owned in Germany that was damaged during WWII. There are also letters (1891-1951) for George E. and Eleanore C. Walton.

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Virginia Woolf was an English writer and publisher, and one of the foremost modernists of the twentieth century. Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

Collection contains a letter from Virginia Woolf to Quentin Bell. Topics include her cook's operation; distractions during the letter writing process, "How any woman with a family ever put pen to paper I cannot fathom;" how Vanessa Bell produced an old French lady to replace the cook; and relates the incident of lost keys to the [Gordon Square] flat. She informs Quentin that "We are now at Rodmell for Whitsun, and the Austrians are gliding over our heads like gulls. Yes, this is a fact. They have tents on the downs and prove that one can fly up and down Asheham Hill without an engine. As I never doubted it myself, I take little stock of it." This is in reference to very enthusiastic and popular Sussex gliding, or sail plane, club. After a bit of village business, she adds that the family cocker spaniel has had five pups and that "Julian [Bell, Quentin’s older brother] is coming to Charleston with a troupe next week." She also reports that the senior tutor of Kings College has been shot by one of his students. Woolf fills Quentin in on the further doings of the Keyneses, Roger Fry and his Aunt Vanessa with regard to a troublesome art show, from which Fry has resigned, and looks forward to each friend bringing her up to speed on the outcome. She tells Quentin that Vita Sackville-West's book is selling so well "that Leonard and I are hauling in money like pilchards from a net. We sell about 800 every day. The Edwardians it is called." Woolf asks her nephew if he is at his family's French retreat in Cassis, and asks for a letter from him describing his "life from the inside." In closing, she laments she hasn't actually said what she wanted to say, and that the "snap-snap of the typewriter frightens me as the snap of a turtle frightens fish. So good bye." Also contains a black-and-white photograph of Virginia Woolf and Quentin Bell, undated, but probably around 1930.

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Vincent Cianni photographs, 1983-2012 21.5 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — 668 items

Vince Cianni is a documentary photographer based in Newburgh, New York. The Berlin series features photographs of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall, and the reunification of Germany in 1990. The Poughkeepsie Mall and the Providence House Men's Shelter series both document urban culture and decay in the 1980s. The Weddings Series contains photographs from weddings (including some transgender) from the mid-1980s. The Brooklyn project features images and recorded interviews from Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore, which relates to Hispanic American roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, mid-1990s. Cambodian kickboxing culture is explored in another set of photographs taken in 2004. The last series offers a set of oral history interviews of gays in the military, also related to a photobook by Cianni. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises photographs from six bodies of documentary work by Vince Cianni, New York-based photographer and author. Subjects focus chiefly on American culture, exploring wedding rituals, skateboarding and youth culture, urban decay, street photography, shopping mall society, men in shelters, and gays in the military. There is also a series on kickboxing in Cambodia, and a large set of oral history interviews with gay men and women in the U.S. military. Most of the prints are gelatin silver, but there are also some in color.

Accession 2007-0072 houses a series of 224 black-and-white photographs depicting roller blade and Hispanic American youth street culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, taken by Cianni during the 1990s and into 2001. Fifteen of the prints appear in Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side (2001); and 68 prints are unpublished. Photographs are captioned and signed on the back. Also included are photographs of urban life in the Bronx, NY; and from the baby shower (Queens, NY) and wedding (Fairborn, OH) of a young couple who appear in other images from this series. Finally, the series houses the maquette for Cianni's book (version 1, 2000), and the printer's dummy (versions 2-3, 2001-2004).

Accession 2007-0200 contains 65 black-and-white prints and photographic collages of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Berlin, 1990. Prints range from 8x10 to 16x24 and are captioned and signed on back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0048 contains prints from the Poughkeepsie Mall Series (Poughkeepsie, NY, 1980s) and the Providence House Men's Shelter Series (Newburgh, NY, 1983). Forty-four black-and-white photographic prints: one 5 5/8 x 8 ½; one 5 7/8 x9; and forty-two 11x14 prints. Poughkeepsie Mall series: twenty-two 11x14 prints, 1980s. The images depict youth culture, African American culture, and urban decay.

Accession 2008-0300 contains 184 prints of weddings, including some transexual weddings, taken by Cianni during the 1980s. This series includes Cianni's MFA project, Wedding Rituals, a group of twenty-four 20x24 prints and one 16x20 print. Photographs in this series are in both color and black-and-white; many are captioned and signed on the back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0303 contains an additional 23 8x10 duotone and gelatin silver prints from Cianni's book We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side. These prints include portraits and other images of Hispanic American youth roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York during the mid-1990s.

Accession 2009-0243 houses forty-two black-and-white photographs of Muay Thai style of kickboxing competition in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 2004: thirty-six 8x10 prints and six 16x20 prints.

Accession 2010-0187 includes forty-seven 8x10 black-and-white prints from the We Skate Hardcore series. The gelatin silver prints are signed on verso and date 1995-2003, with bulk dates 1995-1997.

In addition, the collection contains digital video, stills, and image scans, and oral history recordings, all relating to his documentary photobooks We skate hardcore and Gays in the military. Original media formats are closed to use. Most files have been mounted to the library server; for access, please contact the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.

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United Cigarette Machine Company records, 1887-1955 and undated 40 Linear Feet — Approx. 12,000 Items

Lynchburg, Virginia manufacturing company specializing in cigarette machine and car parts; plants were located in the U.S. and Germany. The bulk of the United Cigarette Machine Company collection, dating from 1887-1955, consists of thousands of brownprints ("Van Dyke photoprints") and blueprints related to the various cigarette machines and parts manufactured by the company. These include the Universal, U-K, Improved Bonsack (designed by James Bonsack), and Heckendorn cigarette machines; materials from the 1920s also pertain to the manufacturing of Buick, Dodge, and Chevrolet auto parts. Other files contain black-and-white photographs of products, and company catalogs. Additional material includes contracts, legal papers, appraisals, audits, patent lists, tax reports, and minutes documenting company operations and finances. The center of operations was located in Lynchburg, Virginia; the company also owned manufacturing plants in Germany. A few materials are in French and German.

The bulk of the United Cigarette Machine Company collection, dating from 1887-1955, consists of thousands of brownprints ("Van Dyke photoprints") and blueprints related to the various cigarette machines and parts manufactured by the company. These include the Universal, U-K, Improved Bonsack (invented by James A. Bonsack), and Heckendorn cigarette machines; materials from the 1920s also pertain to the manufacturing of Buick, Dodge, and Chevrolet auto parts. Other files contain black-and-white photographs of products, and company catalogs. Additional material includes contracts, legal papers, appraisals, audits, patent lists, tax reports, and minutes documenting company operations and finances. The center of operations was located in Lynchburg, Virginia; the company also owned manufacturing plants in Germany. A few materials are in French and German. The United Cigarette Machine Company's main factory in Lynchburg was built in 1907, at the crossing of the Southern Railway main line and the Lynchburg & Durham Railroad line.

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Tom Rankin photographs and papers, 1977-2016 33.5 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 film reels — Approximately 13,650 items — 33.5 linear feet; approximately 13,640 items

Tom Rankin is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, folklorist, professor of art and documentary studies, and former director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Photographs from the South focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region, as well as portraits of individuals, including portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown, and Southern landscapes. An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes. Finished prints range from 8x11 inch contact prints to 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 large-format prints. Supporting materials include manuscripts, publications files, and two films, all deriving from Rankin's career and art practice. Includes a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work of Tom Rankin in this collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Southern photographs were taken from 1980 to 2007, and focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region; these prints form the largest series, "Sacred Space." Another body of work features portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown. A third body of work, "Portraits from the American South," offers views of Southern people, cultures, and landscapes in both color and black-and-white.

An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes.

Print sizes range from 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches, with many housed in window mats. Along with these prints, there are also 8x11 inch black-and-white matted contact prints. All titles were created by the photographer.

Selected photographs from this collection have been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and other locations. A selection of Rankin's photographs was published in a book, Sacred Space: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta (1993).

Supporting materials in this collection include a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of work from the Sacred Space series, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta," as well as paper records related to his career and art practice, including book publications and book layouts. Also in the collection are two motion films, Dance Like a River (1985), directed by Barry Dorfeld and Tom Rankin, and Four Women Artists (1977), directed by Bill Ferris.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Todd Webb photographs, 1948-1979, bulk 1948-1951 1 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 prints

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, outdoor advertising, doorways, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, doorways, outdoor advertising, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Paper sizes are 8.5 x 11 and 11x14 inches. Image dimensions are noted for each print entry. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Thomas Cripps papers, 1839-2009 and undated bulk 1940s-2009 98 Linear Feet — Approximately 62,475 Items

Retired professor of history at Morgan State University, scholar of the history of African Americans in the motion picture industry, prolific author of books and articles on the subject, and script writer. The papers of Thomas Cripps date from 1839 to 2009, and are arranged into three divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, the largest group. Taken as a whole, the films, movie stills, research files, and publication files document Cripps's investigations into representations of racial and ethnic stereotypes in popular culture, particularly in film, but also touch on other issues such as gender in popular culture, portrayal of race in Nazi Germany, and the social dimensions of African American life in the U.S. during the 20th century. Other materials stem from college-level courses taught by Cripps on these same topics, and include many of the visual resources he used in his classes. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Thomas Cripps collection dates from approximately 1839 to 2009, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1940-2009, and is arranged into three main divisions: films, photographic stills of African American actors and productions, and professional papers, which is the largest group of the three (closed pending processing). The materials as a whole can be used to study a variety of themes and subjects: racial or ethnic stereotypes in popular culture (chiefly African American, but also Jewish, Irish, and Asian); American and European television culture, broadcasting, and advertising; African American artists; African American film-makers, most notably Oscar Micheaux; U.S. political and social events in the 20th century, including the Depression and the Civil Rights Movement; educational institutions for African Americans; and the teaching of African American history in U.S. higher education. There are significant research materials on Nazi Germany propaganda and the portrayal of race in the party's films.

The thirty-seven films found in the Films Series consist of film shorts, clips from feature films, newsreels, "Soundies," and television commercials, and were collected by Cripps for their portrayals of African Americans, performance by African Americans, or production by African Americans from the turn of the century into the late 1960s 1970s. He also collected filmic materials reflecting other racial and ethnic stereotypes, as seen in the Ethnic Films reel. There are viewing copies for all films.

The Still Photographs Series consists of hundreds of publicity stills and other images taken from U.S. and British feature films featuring African American actors from the silent film era through the 1970s. Many entries, which have been retained from the original envelope labels, carry titles from individual films, but other prints were arranged by Cripps into topical categories such as "Black Athletes," "Jungle Pix," "Silent Films," and "Exotic Primitives."

Cripps's professional papers, a very large group, are closed to access pending processing. They are currently loosely arranged into these series: Correspondence, Dissertation and Research, Morgan State University, Other Papers and AV Materials, Subject Files, and Writings. Beyond the topics discussed above, the materials also document grant proposals written by Cripps; his early dissertation work; coursework in a variety of settings; and his many publication projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Thomas Chapin papers, 1870s-1999, bulk 1979-1999 84.9 Linear Feet — 28,117 Items

The collection (100 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1979-1998) contains audio cassettes and compositions by Thomas Chapin, as well as clippings, programs, memorial messages, and other items about him. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of audio cassettes before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-355)

The addition to the collection (60 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1981-1999) includes published materials on Chapin or featuring his music. There are publicity materials; scrapbook items, such as programs or clippings; articles about Chapin from the internet and elsewhere; copies of original scores; compact discs; phonograph records; genealogical information, and other biographical information about him and his trio. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of sound recordings before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-0467)

The addition to the collection (15300 items, 29.40 linear feet; dated 1870s-1998, bulk 1980-1997) comprises primarily correspondence; financial records; scrapbooks, graphic materials (98 color photographs, 1 color slide, 6 black-and-white photographs, 24 black-and-white negatives, 17 contact sheets, 1 print, 1 watercolor, and 2 chalk drawings), posters, and other materials detailing Chapin's musical career, especially performances of the Chapin Trio; notebooks and appointment books; and musical scores by Chapin and others. Also includes recordings on 17 reel-to-reel tapes, 8 CDs, and 5 audiocassette tapes of performances by Chapin and others; 3 electronic computer files; and 24 small musical instruments of plastic and metal. (01-0157)

The addition (2002-0281 and 2003-0125; 12,657 items, 50.5 linear feet) consists primarily of studio and demo recordings of Chapin's music on audiocassette, vinyl, and reel-to-reel tape. Also contains a number of collages by Chapin, documenting another of his forms of expression; personal items, especially photographs and correspondence, reflecting his close relationships with family and friends; videos and film reels of recording sessions, tours, and other events, including Chapin's memorial service; sheet music and music books; clothing and hats; 3 hand instruments; performance posters; and business items.

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Takey Crist papers, 1944-2002 and undated 64.6 Linear Feet — 21,903 Items

Accession 2002-149(778 items, 22.0 linear feet; dated 1971-2001) contains files of abortion, pregnancy, and hysterectomy malpractice cases in which Crist served as a consultant or codefendant along with the Crist Clinic. There is also printed material on reproductive topics. Also includes 2 VHS videocassettes; 6 color slides; 30 black-and-white and 2 color photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition 2003-007 (67 items, 7.3 linear ft.; undated) is composed of 16mm films used by "Crist Clinic Audio Visuals" in health education programs (undated). The clinic also offered the films for sale or rent to educators, students, doctors, parents, and others. The majority of the films focus on sex education for children and teenagers. Topics include puberty and menstruation, sex and sexuality, sexual orientation, lifestyle choices, and sexually transmitted diseases. Other topics include abortion; pregnancy and childbirth; infant care and nutrition; marriage and parenting; and drug and alcohol abuse.

Addition 2003-118 is comprised of materials related to the issue of abortion and the anti-abortion movement, and consists primarily of documents pertaining to lawsuits involving Dr. Crist as a litigant or witness, including correspondence, transcripts, depositions, photographs, and other legal papers (1975-1993). Also contains files on organizations including the National Abortion Federation and NARAL (1982-2002 and undated); subject files; research material assembled by Dr. Crist, including publications; correspondence; and newspaper clippings.

Addition 2004-098 (10,158 items, 16.7 lin. ft.; dated 1962-1980s, bulk 1962-1972) comprises personal and professional correspondence and subject files (1960s-early 1970s) documenting Crist's medical training, internship, residency, and then his position as Assistant Professor at UNC Chapel Hill, especially his involvement in increased access to therapeutic abortions and health services; the development of abortion techniques; and sex and contraceptive education on and off campus. Also includes writings and speeches; patient notes (redacted); grant, research, and conference files; and printed materials, including clippings, articles, and pamphlets. Some anti-abortion materials in boxes 3-5 contain graphic imagery.

Addition 2006-098 (400 items, 0.8 lin. ft.; dated 1944-1978) consists of personal files, including medical licenses and report cards; abortion series files, 1971-2000, including general correspondence, correspondence concerning the National Organization of Women and the National Coalition of Abortion Providers; newsletters; printed material about the ordinance lawsuit; photographs of demonstrators, 1985; and subject files, 1960-1972, created while at UNC including files about conferences, homosexuality, consultation work for family planning, studies conducted while at UNC Medical School, speaking engagements on sex education; and Health Education Clinic finances. Interfiled in existing collection.

Addition 2007-043 (13,125 items, 21.0 linear feet) contains subject files that chronicle the history of the Crist Clinic from the opening of the clinic in 1973 to the early 21st century. The majority of the files contain Takey Crist's clippings on medical topics and issues relating to sex education and women's health care. Many files also refer to issues of significance for physicians running a private clinic.

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Collection comprises 5 black-and-white gelatin silver developing-out paper photographs taken by SNCC representatives from the Atlanta, Georgia, regional office. One photograph is uncredited, the others were photographed by Joffré T. Clarke, Bob Fletcher, and Tom Wakayama. They are undated, but probably were taken during the 1960s. Subjects in the images are all African-American, and include an elderly woman picking cotton, a young boy drawing with crayons, a little girl in a group watching others, a man slaughtering hogs, and a group building a house.
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The records of the Durham, N.C. organization Student Action with Farmworkers comprise: administrative and event files; correspondence; reports, articles, and other publications; student project files; outreach and teaching materials; photographs, artwork, and scrapbooks; audio and video recordings; and materials related to labor organizing and protests across the U.S. Hundreds of student-led projects document through interviews, essays, photographs, videos, and other materials the lives of migrant farmworkers and their working conditions, mostly in NC but also in SC. Major themes in the collection include: history, working conditions, and abuses of migrant farmworkers in the U.S.; education and outreach efforts; housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development for migrant youth; grassroots theater; labor organizing and boycotts; and service learning. Materials are in English and Spanish. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

Founded in 1992 in Durham, North Carolina, Student Action with Farmworkers (SAF) is a non-profit organization whose mission is to bring students and farmworkers together to learn about each other's lives, share resources and skills, improve conditions for farmworkers, and build diverse coalitions working for social change. The SAF records comprise: correspondence; meeting agendas; student projects; reports, articles, and other publications; event files; teaching materials; photos; scrapbooks; ephemera; and other documentation of SAF's programs. Materials relate more widely to immigrant and migrant worker issues, service learning, labor organizing, and protests and boycotts across the U.S.

The largest series (63 boxes) contains hundreds of individual SAF student projects directed by college-age students and interns as well as farmworker and migrant youths. Materials also include administrative files, many of which house intern applications. Project files typically contain recorded interviews, often with transcripts; essays; notebooks; artwork; poetry; audio and video recordings; theater materials; and photographs in analaog and digital formats. Some photograph albums and collages are also found here. Most of the projects took place in North Carolina but also in South Carolina. Umbrella programs include Into the Fields (ITF) and Levante. Major themes involve worker education, housing, health, and pesticide safety; leadership development; and grassroots theater as a tool for teaching and activism. Materials are in English and Spanish. Many other materials on SAF projects are found in the Administrative Series.

The large Administrative Files Series contains organizational records created or compiled by SAF staff and are organized in subseries for SAF projects, fundraising, general administrative files, organizations, and resource files (articles, fliers, and other publications).

The Printed Material Series contains Student Action with Farmworkers publications, SAF press coverage, student papers and theses, some children's books, and farmworker-related reports, articles, newsletters, data sheets, resource directories, and alerts from around the world.

The Joan Preiss Papers Series contains records related to an activist and long-time collaborator of SAF. Comprises a variety of printed materials, primarily articles and newsletters, as well as correspondence, protest ephemera, promotional material for unions and activist organizations, meeting notes, student papers, and photographs. The materials relate to migrants and farmworkers both in North Carolina and throughout the United States.

Finally, the Ephemera and Artifacts Series contains items such as posters, t-shirts, stickers, and buttons related to Burger King, Subway, Gallo, and Mt. Olive boycotts and protests. Some materials relate to protests and boycotts in other regions such as Florida and Western states. Also contains SAF publicity ephemera, and props and other materials from the Levante activist theater group.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Lithography company founded in Cincinnati, Ohio, in about 1847. The Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements span the years 1910 through 1954, documenting much of the company's printed poster advertising work from that era. All images are black and white. The core of the collection, the Image Files Series, consists of around 1000 8x10 photographs ("A" images) of advertising designs, and a similar number of smaller printed cards (approx. 5x7 to 5x8, "B" images) of outdoor advertisement designs. The images are accompanied by three different Access Files to be used to browse the collection. These files are in the form of image photocopies ( "job tickets" ) and catalog cards. Most images are of poster (billboard or transit card) designs, but there are also some photographs of tabletop display advertising, window cards and other point-of-purchase displays. The collection documents advertising during a time when transportation was changing in America, and the automobile was gaining in popularity. Billboards began to replace smaller posters, accommodating a more mobile public. It was then that Strobridge turned from its emphasis on circus and theater posters (not represented in the collection) to billboard ads for mass-produced products. Many different products are featured, but perhaps the two most prominent and well-represented campaigns are those for Camel cigarettes and Palmolive soaps. The images form a valuable reference collection of advertising designs, relevant for researchers from a variety of disciplines including commercial artwork, advertising history and design, and popular culture. The collection documents outdoor advertising design during the first part of the twentieth century for what were mostly national brands. Numerous examples are from the era of hand-drawn and painted designs, often signed by artists including Norman Rockwell, Howard Scott, and Dr. Seuss (see his designs for the product Flit). Rarely, an artist is listed on the back of the image. Later designs from the 1940s and 1950s include photographic images, often peppered with celebrity likenesses including John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, and Charlton Heston. Many of the celebrity advertisements promoted tobacco products. Some designs are clearly war-era, such as advertisements depicting a 1943 female factory worker, or one from Schlitz (1942) mentioning war bonds.

The Strobridge Lithographing Company Advertisements span the years 1910 through 1954, documenting much of the company's printed poster advertising work from that era. All images are black and white. The core of the collection, the Image Files Series, consists of around 1000 8x10 photographs ("A" images) of advertising designs, and a similar number of smaller printed cards (approx. 5x7 to 5x8, "B" images) of outdoor advertisement designs. The images are accompanied by three different Access Files to be used to browse the collection. These files are in the form of image photocopies ("job tickets") and catalog cards. Most images are of poster (billboard or transit card) designs, but there are also some photographs of tabletop display advertising, window cards and other point-of-purchase displays. The collection documents advertising during a time when transportation was changing in America, and the automobile was gaining in popularity. Billboards began to replace smaller posters, accommodating a more mobile public. It was then that Strobridge turned from its emphasis on circus and theater posters (not represented in the collection) to billboard ads for mass-produced products. Many different products are featured, but perhaps the two most prominent and well-represented campaigns are those for Camel cigarettes and Palmolive soaps. The images form a valuable reference collection of advertising designs, relevant for researchers from a variety of disciplines including commercial artwork, advertising history and design, and popular culture.

The collection documents outdoor advertising design during the first part of the twentieth century for what were mostly national brands. Numerous examples are from the era of hand-drawn and painted designs, often signed by artists including Norman Rockwell, Howard Scott, and Dr. Seuss (see his designs for the product Flit). Rarely, an artist is listed on the back of the image. Later designs from the 1940s and 1950s include photographic images, often peppered with celebrity likenesses including John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara, and Charlton Heston. Many of the celebrity advertisements promoted tobacco products. Some designs are clearly war-era, such as advertisements depicting a 1943 female factory worker, or one from Schlitz (1942) mentioning war bonds.

The first series, the Access Files, can be used to browse the collection and narrow a search for an individual advertisement before moving on to the Image Files themselves. Items in the Image Files are labeled with an "A" or a "B" indication. The "A" group holds the larger 8x10 photographs and the "B" group contains smaller images (primarily 5x7 and 5x8) printed on cards. There is some duplication between the "A" and "B" groups. The "A" images contain advertisements from the 1910s through the 1950s, and the "B" advertisements were created mainly in the 1920s and 1930s. All point-of-purchase advertising is in the "A" group. There is often indication of the size poster the design was made into (e.g. 24-sheet), a design or perhaps job number (e.g. Camel No. 93), and a title (e.g. "Perfect" for a Camel advertisement with the text "Perfect Taste"). Most designs are presumed to have been created and published by Strobridge, but there are some images stamped "W. J. Rankin Corp." Some images show billboards as they were posted; some of these show the nameplate of the outdoor advertising company that owned the billboard structures.

The name of the collection is seen on folders and sometimes elsewhere as the "Strobridge Lithography Company," but the materials themselves as well as other documentation reveal the name to be "Strobridge Lithographing Company" at the time when most of this collection was created. Almost all advertisements are in English, presumably for posting in the U.S., but a few, such as Spur cigarette advertisements, are in Spanish.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include a number of other outdoor advertising collections, such as the Outdoor Advertising Slide Library, the John Paver Papers, the John Browning Papers, the Duplex Advertising Co. Records, the H.E. Fisk Collection of War Effort Mobilization Campaigns, the Outdoor Advertising Association of America Records, the Outdoor Advertising Poster Design Collection, the Garrett Orr Papers, the R.C. Maxwell Company Records, the Howard Scott Papers, and the John E. Brennan Outdoor Advertising Survey Reports. There are also numerous published items from the era of this collection which provide even more context for the designs.

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Steven B. Smith "Photographs of the suburban West" exhibit prints, 1995-2005 3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes, 1 CD-ROM, 26 prints — 27 prints; 1 CD-ROM

Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch black-and-white matted digital prints used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection contains twenty-six 16x20 inch matted black-and-white digital prints exhibited at Duke University and used in Smith's book, THE WEATHER AND A PLACE TO LIVE: PHOTOGRAPHS OF THE SUBURBAN WEST, published by Duke University Press (2005). Subjects include tract housing in the West, construction sites, and other suburban landscapes that convey the impact of humans on the Western environment. His work received the First Book Prize for Photography by the Honickman Foundation and the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection also includes CD of artist talk given by Steven Smith at the 2005 exhibit opening, "Steven Smith: Photographs of the Suburban West." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Spider Martin photographs, 1965, 1968 1 Linear Foot — 2 boxes — 44 photographic prints

James "Spider" Martin was an Alabama photojournalist known for his work documenting the American Civil Rights Movement. Collection comprises 44 black-and-white photographs, mostly 8x10 or 11x14 inches, documenting the March 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches. Subjects include civil rights leaders and march participants Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Ralph Abernathy, James Bevel, Coretta Scott King, John Lewis, Bob Mants, Amelia Boynton Robinson, and Hosea Williams, as well as marchers, protesters, counter protesters with signs and Confederate flags, local police, and federal troops. Locations include the Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma; downtown Selma; the Edmund Pettus Bridge (site of the "Bloody Sunday" violence against protesters on March 7, 1965); Highway 80; downtown Montgomery; and the State Capitol grounds in Montgomery. Three related images are of Alabama governor George C. Wallace speaking during the 1968 U.S. presidential campaign. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 44 black-and-white images taken by Alabama-born photo journalist Spider Martin, documenting in detail the 1965 Selma to Montgomery voting rights marches. Subjects include civil rights leaders and march participants Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., speaking and marching; Ralph Abernathy; James Bevel; Coretta Scott King; John Lewis; Bob Mants; Amelia Boynton Robinson; and Hosea Williams. There are also images of marchers and protesters; counter protesters with signs and Confederate flags; musicians Peter, Paul, and Mary, and Harry Belafonte performing at the final rally in Montgomery; local and state police; and federal troops protecting the marchers. Many of these photographs became iconic images of the civil rights movement of the 1960s.

Locations include the Brown Chapel A.M.E. Church in Selma, downtown Selma, the Edmund Pettus Bridge (site of the "Bloody Sunday" violence against protesters on March 7, 1965), Highway 80 along which marchers walked, downtown Montgomery, and the State Capitol in Montgomery.

Additional related images are of Alamaba governor George C. Wallace speaking at rallies during his 1968 presidential campaign.

All of the prints were created via the gelatin silver process by Spider Martin, chiefly from 1993-1999 and some in 1965. Many are signed, and some bear handwritten captions, titles, commentary, and other marks in the photographer's hand. The donor's inventory also provided titles as well as contextual captions.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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South Africa documentary photographs collection, 1940s-circa 2013, bulk 1960-2013 45.0 Linear Feet — 49 boxes; approximately 1133 items

Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid, from about the 1940s to 2013, with most dating after 1960. Arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris, Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a series of work by Jeeva Rajgopaul. Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images portray political rallies; protests; forced removals; funerals; social gatherings such as dances and concerts; work and domestic life; the life of the elderly, the migrants, and the impoverished; and labor organizing and strikes. There are many portraits of individuals of all races and classes, well-known activists and politicians, as well as countless ordinary South African citizens. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle. There is a small amount of printed material, as well as a selection of digital image files and a digital audio file of an exhibit talk. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of over 1100 black-and-white and color exhibit prints representing the work of over 50 South African photographers who documented conditions during and after apartheid from about the 1940s to 2007, with most dating after 1960. Many of the photographers were members of Afrapix, a collective photography agency engaged in documenting the anti-apartheid struggle.

The prints are arranged in five series representing projects curated by documentary photographers Alex Harris and Paul Weinberg, and others: Beyond the Barricades, The Cordoned Heart, Then and Now, Underexposed, and The Other Camera. There is also a separate but related series of work by photographer Jeeva Rajgopaul. Each project resulted in an exhibit and four of them produced books (one is only available in online form). The series and the work of each photographer are described in full in this collection guide.

Set in rural and urban South Africa, the images document events such as rallies, protests, forced removals, funerals, social gatherings and leisure pursuits, violence between Africans, and labor strikes and meetings. There are also many portraits of individuals and families: migrant workers, farm laborers, HIV positive individuals, affluent South Africans, domestic workers, protesters, and well-known activists and politicians of all races and parties.

The images take the form of black-and-white and color prints, chiefly gelatin silver and pigmented inkjet prints, with most measuring approximately 11x14 to 16x20 inches. There is a small amount of printed material documenting the Cordoned Heart exhibit, as well as selected digital image files, and a digital audio file of exhibit opening remarks.

Among the photographers in this collection are several whose individual bodies of work are also held at Duke: David Goldblatt, Cedric Nunn, and Paul Weinberg. Details regarding all the photographers are found in a biographical section in this collection guide.

Aquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Known photographers whose work is represented in this collection are: Paul Alberts (1946- ); Joseph Alphers (1949- ); Omar Badsha (1945- ); Rodney Barnett (1943-2000); Michael Barry (1954- ); Bee Berman (1949- ); Arthur Bolton; Basil Breakey; Julian Cobbing (1944- ); Michael Davies (1955- ); Gille de Vlieg (1940- ); Anne Fischer (1915-1986); David Goldblatt (1930- ); Jenny Gordon (1955- ); Paul Grendon (1954- ); George Hallett (1942- ); Dave Hartman; David Hemson; Steve Hilton-Barber (1962-2002); Lucky Sipho Khoza (circa 1965-1998); Paul Konings (1958- ); Lesley Lawson (1952- ); Chris Ledechowski (1956- ); Rashid Lombard (1951- ); Ben Maclennan (1956- ); William Matlala (1957- ); Jimi Matthews (1955- ); Roger Meintjies (1963- ); Gideon Mendel (1959- ); Eric Miller; Santu Mofokeng (1956- ); Daniel Morolong (1928-2012); Themba Nkosi; Cedric Nunn (1957- ); Billy Paddock; Berney Perez (1948- ); Myron Peters (1954- ); Lindeka Qampi (1969- ); Chris Qwazi; Jeeva Rajgopaul (1952- ); Wendy Schwegmann (1954- ); Guy Tillim (1962- ); Zubeida Vallie; Paul Weinberg (1956- ); Graeme Williams (1961- ); Jansje Wissema (1920-1975); and Giséle Wulfsohn (1957- ). There are also prints from an unknown photographer collected by photographer and film-maker Angus Gibson.

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This collection (20,700 items, 35.5 linear feet, 1937-1984, bulk 1970-1984) includes office files and correspondence, and records from various organizations, such as the Young Social Democrats and the Youth Institute for Peace in the Middle East. Of note are some materials on prominent socialists, including Eugene Debs, Norman Thomas, and Carl Gershman. There are also important periodicals and special publications from 1937-1968 documenting American labor history, the Jim Crow Era, and civil rights issues in the 1960s. (96-104)

Addition (39,851 items, 66.4 linear feet, 1950-1994, bulk 1980-1994) includes correspondence with local chapters; organizational files on Young Social Democrats clubs, benefits, national conventions, fund raising, the yearly Eugene V. Debs Award dinners, and membership (including membership cards); subject files on people (including Bayard Rustin), other leftist organizations (especially Socialist International), labor unions, and countries and regions (including South Africa, Poland, Spain, the Soviet Union, and Latin America); and publications and newspapers related to socialism. Material also includes 108 electronic computer files that have been migrated to the Special Collections server; 2 cloth banners and 3 plaques/awards; 351 black-and-white photographs; 8 color prints; 4 videocassettes; 243 audio cassette tapes; 2 digital audio tapes; and 4 phonograph records. (01-0079)

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Shane Lavalette photographs, 2010-2011 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 25 prints — 20x24 inches

The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were assigned by the photographer. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The 25 photographs in this collection belong to a body of work entitled "One Sun, One Shadow", which was commissioned by the High Museum of Art in Atlanta for the 2012 exhibition "Picturing the South". They were all taken in the American South from 2010 to 2011, and explore Lavalette's connection to the South through landscapes, people, and music traditions. Most were taken outdoors, but there are a few interior shots.

Though the majority of the 20x24 inch inkjet prints are in color, there are also five black-and-white prints. Titles for each print were created by the photographer.

In addition to Lavalette's photographic body of work, the Rubenstein Library also holds copies of the companion photo book, One Sun, One Shadow. The images are also available to view through the photographer's website.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection consists of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materials reflecting the philanthropic, financial, cultural and social activities of the Semans family and other wealthy families in North Carolina and New York. A major focus is the interrelationship of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent families. Additionally, the papers document the roles of Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect women in politics and childcare issues during the early 20th century.

The papers of the Semans family span the years 1878 to 2008. The collection consists of four large sub-collections: the Mary Duke Biddle Family Papers, the James H. Semans Family Papers, the James H. and Mary D.B.T. Semans Family Papers, and the Elizabeth Lucina Gotham Family Papers. There are also series for films, oversize materials, and later additions.

Through files of correspondence, financial papers, legal papers, writings and speeches, scrapbooks, photographs, films, audio tapes, and other materialsThe collection reflects the philanthropic, financial, cultural, and social activities of the Semans family. Major areas of focus are the personal and social relationships of the Semans family with the Biddle, Duke, and Trent, and other wealthy families from North Carolina, New York, and elsewhere. Additionally, the papers document the roles Mary Duke Biddle, James H. Semans, and Mary Duke Biddle Trent Semans have taken in the development and support of arts and educational programs throughout North Carolina. To a lesser degree, the papers reflect on women in politics and childcare during the early twentieth century.

Individuals represented include Mary Duke Biddle (daughter of Benjamin Duke), Anthony Joseph Drexel Biddle, Nicholas Benjamin Duke Biddle, Angier Biddle Duke, Angier Buchanan Duke, Benjamin Newton Duke, Sarah Pearson Angier Duke, Elizabeth Lucina Gotham, and Josiah Charles Trent as well as other members of the Duke, Biddle, Trent, and Semans families. Political, arts, and educational leaders are also represented.

Subject areas represented include: families in the late 19th and 20th centuries; the arts in North Carolina and other cities; charities, particularly in North Carolina; childcare and women in nursing; The Duke Endowment; Duke University and other universities and colleges; the North Carolina School of the Arts; education; genealogy of the four families; personal finances; philanthropy; the history of Durham, NC, and its politics and social life; vocational rehabilitation; and the Methodist church, particularly in NC.

The 25 16mm film reels in the collection are chiefly children's cartoons from the 1930s-1940s, but there are also wartime newsreels and a few films for adults, some as early as 1916-1917, and some travel film. Audio tapes consist chiefly of personal family recordings, a set of memoirs dictated onto cassettes in 1977 by Mary D.B.T. Semans, and music performances.

Some portions of the collection are restricted or closed to use; please consult this collection guide for details before coming to use these materials.

For additional collections of Duke family papers, see the Washington Duke Papers, the Benjamin Newton Duke Papers, and the James B. Duke Papers. For further information on the contributions of the Duke family to Duke University, contact the Duke University Archives.

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In 1938, the School of Forestry at Duke was founded as the first graduate school of forestry in the South. In the 1970s, the school expanded its program to include a broad range of resource and environmental studies. In 1974/75, it became the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Collection contains memoranda, brochures, newspaper clippings, conference materials, annual reports, photographs and slides relating to the Duke School of Forestry and Environmental Studies from roughly 1960 through 1979.

Collection contains alumni newsletters, publications, technical papers, department brochures, conference programs, memoranda, annual reports, as well as documents relating to the proposed phasing out of the Forestry School in 1975 and resultant student protests. Also includes papers from the 1965 Tropical Forestry Symposium sponsored by the School of Forestry, black and white photographs of the arboretum, and color photos and slides of School's field days in 1977 and 1979. Removed photographs from albums and interleaved in folders for preservation.

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Sarabande Books records, 1992-2018 118.5 Linear Feet — 106.0 lin. ft.

This collection (accession #2000-0306) (4150 items, dated 1992-1996) documents the founding of the company. Many files mention editor and president Sarah Gorham and include start-up files, correspondence and author files, marketing materials, financial records, and other materials generated by the press. Also includes Gorham's memoir written during the first days of the press; files on prizes offered by the press (the Mary McCarthy Prize for short fiction and the Kathryn A. Morthon Prize for poetry); correspondence with authors Jane Mead, Lee Martin, Richard Frost, Sharon Bryan, Laura Jenson, Medbh McGuckian, and Liliana Ursu; and correspondence with Sallie Bingham about the formation of the press. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Addition (2001-0022) (2911 items, 4.4 linear feet; dated 1996-1997) continues to document the company's activities. Materials include correspondence files; author files; sales and marketing files; 24 color and 4 black-and-white photographs; 11 electronic (computer) files; and material relating to Sarabande's non-profit operations from 1996 to 1997. Much of the correspondence tracks letters to and from Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham. Authors represented include Dick Allen, Brian Griffin, Sharon Solwitz, Belle Waring, and Baron Wormser.

Addition (2002-0062) (2260 items, 6.3 linear feet; dated 1996-1998) comprises primarily author binders, files, and correspondence (1996-1998); and marketing and sales records, including examples of advertisements and reviews (1998). Also includes correspondence between Sallie Bingham and Sarah Gorham (1998); poetry and fiction galleys; documents related to the press' nonprofit activities, including 2 audio cassette tapes and paper records documenting board meetings (1998); 2 color and 10 black-and-white photographs and 1 black-and-white negative; and 18 electronic (computer) files originally received on one 3.5" diskette. Authors represented include Cathleen Hagenston, James Kimbrell, Stefanie Marlis, Shara McCallum, Jean Valentine, and Kate Walbert.

Addition (2003-0021) (2,300 items, 5.30 linear feet; dated 1995-2002) consists largely of author files (1997-2000) and printed material comprising journals and review publications (1998-1999). Also includes office correspondence (1995-2002); sales analyses, grant proposals, and marketing files (1996-2001); and documents related to conferences and events, special projects, board meetings, and nonprofit activities.

Addition (2004-0018) (4000 items, 6.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2001) includes author binders and files, correspondence, financial and marketing archives, and manuscript galleys. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2005-0019) (3695 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2000-2001) primarily comprises authors' binders, including incoming and outgoing correspondence, as well as typescript drafts and galleys. Also includes reviews, press releases, and advertisements; notes from sales conferences and board meetings; consortium sales analyses; a non-profit activity file; and organizational materials for Sarabande-in-Education, a website program for college students and teachers. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2006-0025) (3,750 items, 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2002) comprises correspondence, drafts, galleys, marketing and biographical files, contracts, press releases, and book reviews. This accession is closed to researchers.

Addition (2007-0041) (6,000 items, 9.2 lin. ft.; dated 1996-2003) contains autographed books, authors' files, manuscripts, the contents of author binders, marketing files, board meeting files, nonprofit activitiy files, Lila Wallace materials, sales kits, a Writer's Almanac CD, and a Sallie Bingham rehearsal tape for Short Fiction Series.

Addition (2008-0028) (4,500 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 2004-2005) contains author files, correspondence, marketing files and galleys for books published in 2004-2005. Also included are 2 CDR's of the Writer's Almanac.

Addition (2009-0092) (8325 items; 11.1 lin. ft.; dated 1998-2009) includes administrative files, book reviews, press releases, author files and correspondence, and manuscripts and drafts from authors published by Sarabande.

Addition (2010-0028) (9000 items; 12.0 lin. ft.; dated 2001-2010) includes administrative files, Sarabande correspondence with authors, author files, poetry and fiction finalists, and various book reviews and advertisements.

Addition (2011-0076) (6750 items; 9.0 lin. ft.; dated 1994-2011) includes materials from conferences, non-profit activities, grants, correspondence, marketing, staffing, finances, and author files.

Addition (2012-0046) (3188 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2011) includes correspondence, publicity files, author files, and manuscripts.

Addition (2013-0158) (5625 items; 7.5 lin. ft.; dated 2006-2012) includes author files, reviews, manuscripts, author correspondence and administrative materials.

Addition (2015-0150) (900 items; 1.2 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2014) includes administrative materials and author correspondence, foundation research and correspondence, and author files.

Addition (2015-0151) (2250 items; 4.5 lin. ft.; dated 2009-2015) includes administrative files, author files and author binders.

Addition (2016-0311) (3.0 lin. ft; dated 2011-2016) consists chiefly of author files. Also contains files related to prizes and awards.

Addition (2018-0011) (4.0 lin. ft.; dated 2016-2018) consists of publicity and author files that contain drafts of recently published works.

Addition (2019-0093) (1.5 lin. ft.; dated 2015-2017) consists of author files, including Sallie Bingham's publishing agreement and drafts of works.

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Feminist and author. The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection. Multiple additions have been added since the collection was processed; these are represented at the end of this finding aid.

The Sallie Bingham Papers provide rich documentation of the personal life, literary development, and philanthropic activities of Sallie Bingham, feminist and writer. The papers, dated 1900-2011, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1940s to 2011, are comprised of correspondence, speeches, writings, subject files, personal papers, diaries and notebooks, legal and financial papers, audiovisual recordings, and photographic media. Included also are some records of The Kentucky Foundation for Women, a philanthropic organization founded by Bingham; The American Voice, a literary journal founded by Bingham and published under the auspices of The Kentucky Foundation for Women; and Santa Fe Stages, a regional theater founded by Bingham. Arranged into the following series: Audiovisual Materials, Correspondence, Diaries and Notebooks, Kentucky Foundation for Women, Legal and Financial, Miscellaneous, Photographs, Poetry, Santa Fe Stages, Speeches, Subject Files, Writings, and Oversize Material, with the Writings, Diaries and Notebooks, and Correspondence Series composing the bulk of the collection.

The Writings Series is central to the collection, and is correspondingly substantial, comprising over half of the papers. It includes drafts, research, correspondence and publicity related to such novels as Small Victories, Upstate, Matron of Honor, and Straight Man, her memoir Passion and Prejudice, the writing and production of the plays The Awakening and The Death of Henry Flagler as well as poetry and many short, personal essays. The Poetry Series consists of individual poems, while compendiums of poetry are in the Writings Series. Many of Bingham's writings (including poems, novels, short stories, plays and essays) exist as electronic files and are available to researchers. These files are listed in the Poetry and the Writings Series. The Diaries and Notebooks Series contains material spanning her entire life -- from her adolescence in Louisville, Kentucky in the 1940s to her experiences living in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and contain many ideas for writings and references to the process of writing. The Correspondence Series also spans the same period of time, and contains family correspondence spanning many decades, as well as literary and personal correspondence between Bingham and such well-known authors, activists and artists as Judy Chicago and Gloria Steinem. The smaller Speeches Series houses writings by Bingham for public engagements, and in addition to contributing to a portrait of Bingham as a writer, documents her explication of feminist issues relating to women in the corporate world, in publishing, and women in history.

Bingham, born into a prominent Louisville, Ky. family that owned The Louisville Courier-Journal, worked for the newspaper as book page editor, 1982-1985. She also took an active seat on the board of the Bingham Enterprises, which was responsible for The Courier-Journal and other media corporations in the Louisville area. Bingham's desire to sell her shares in the stock in the newspaper resulted in the sale of The Courier-Journal in 1986. The Bingham family and the break-up of the Bingham Enterprises were the subject of at least four books ( The Binghams of Louisville, House of Dreams, The Patriarch and Bingham's Passion and Prejudice) and much media attention. Materials concerning this aspect of Bingham's life can be found in the Legal and Financial Papers Series and Subject Files Series. Audiovisual materials in the Audiotapes and Videotapes Series document aspects of Bingham's career and life through interviews and other events.

NOTE: This collection also contains numerous additions that have not been processed. For descriptions of later additions, please see below or consult the library's online catalog.

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Roundell Tristram Toke diaries and photographs from military service in China and Japan, 1900-1907 1.0 Linear Foot — 4 boxes — Approximately 150 items — Four diaries; leather case; approximately 145 photographs.

Collection comprises diaries and photographs by British officer Roundell Tristram Toke, documenting in detail his military service in China and Japan during the Boxer Rebellion and Russo-Japanese War, 1900 to 1907. The first diary is set in China; the other three in Japan. All four contain daily descriptions of weather, social and administrative activities, military engagements, rations, medical training, diplomacy, and other details, with some sketches of formations and drill patterns. The diaries are accompanied by approximately 145 photographs from China and Japan, with images of military camps, drills, equipment, engagements, destroyed areas, Russian war prisoners and their camps, towns, landscapes, harbors, a few social gatherings, and civilians. The collection also includes Toke's leather cigar case, inscribed on the inside with his postings with dates, beginning with Weihai, China, 1900.

Collection comprises autograph manuscript diaries and photographs of British officer Roundell Tristram Toke, during his service in China and Japan during the Boxer Rebellion and Russo-Japanese War, 1900 to 1907. The diaries contain daily descriptions of weather, social and administrative activities, regiment training and drills, military engagements, rations, Japanese prisoner of war camps for the Russians, medical training, foreign diplomacy, and other details. Some contain sketches of formations and drill patterns. The first diary, from 1900, describes service in China during the Boxer Rebellion, while the last three, January 1905-November 1907, detail his service in Japan as an attache` at the British Embassy in Tokyo and military consultant to the Japanese during and after the Russo-Japanese War.

Toke's diaries are accompanied by approximately 145 photographs: 40 unmounted larger albumen and 105 smaller silver gelatin prints. These images vividly document his time in China and Japan, showing military camps, officers, drills, engagements, landmark battle and burial sites such as 203 Metre Hill, Russian prisoners and their camp, towns, harbors, destroyed railroads and buildings, and Chinese and Japanese civilians. There are a few more personal photos of Western women, children, and men. A series of larger images from China depict the destruction and death caused by the conflict of 1900.

The collection includes Toke's leather cigar case, inscribed on the inside with his postings with dates, beginning with Wei-Hai-Wei in China, 1900.

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Rotary Club of Durham records, 1915-2005 19.5 Linear Feet — 10,093 Items

The Rotary Club of Durham was chartered in 1915 as part of Rotary International, an organization of service clubs. The records from the Rotary Club of Durham include bulletins, committee files, membership cards, board minutes, anniversary projects, photographs, scrapbooks, and other miscellaneous materials relating to the activities and members of the club.

The records from the Rotary Club of Durham include bulletins, committee files, membership cards, board minutes, anniversary projects, photographs, scrapbooks, and other miscellaneous materials relating to the activities and members of the club.

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Ronald Reis photographs, 1954-2014 20.5 Linear Feet — 26 boxes; approximately 4018 items

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The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work (1962-1974) contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. The later body of work (2004-2014) contains 3,719 black-and-white and color laser inkjet prints, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Reis focused his camera on street scenes primarily in New York and New England, but also in Colorado and the midwest, in Europe (Italy, England, Ireland, and Greece), and in the Middle East. His images capture anti-war demonstrations, feminist and gay pride parades, and ethnic festivals, while also documenting the more quotidian life of urban neighborhoods, street markets, and other public spaces such as Speakers' Corner in London's Hyde Park and New York City's Washington Square. The earlier black-and-white gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, while the laser inkjet prints measure 11x17 inches. There are also manuscript and printed materials such as a curriculum vitae, some correspondence, exhibition publicity, articles, and photo essays. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The images in this collection were taken by photographer Ron Reis from the 1950s to 1979 and from 2004 to 2014. The earlier body of work contains 289 black-and-white photographs, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets, and consists of documentary images taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from major European cities. The later body of work contains 3,719 laser inkjet prints of black-and-white and color documentary images taken by Reis in the 2000s, with a majority of images dated 2012 to 2013. Most of these images are of New York City street scenes.

An avid amateur street photographer influenced by Cartier-Bresson, Helen Levitt, and Louis Stettner, Reis focused his camera on street scenes in the United States, Europe, and the Middle East during the 1960s, then in the 2000s. Favorite locations chosen by Reis include London's Hyde Park Speakers' Corner, Portobello flea market, and Trafalgar Square; New York's Bryant Park, Greenwich Village, and Washington Square; and market scenes in Connecticut and Jerusalem. Other images portray anti-Vietnam War protests in Bryant Park, gay pride and ethnic festivals and parades, amusement parks, and other street scenes.

The collection is arranged in three series: Photographs, Negatives, and Manuscript and Print Materials.

The Photographs Series is divided into two chronological subseries: 1954-1979 and 2004-2014. The first subseries contains 289 11x14-inch gelatin silver prints, accompanied by negatives and contact sheets. These black-and-white images were taken by Reis during the 1960s and 1970s, primarily in Connecticut, London, and New York City, with a smaller number from Athens, Barcelona, Como, Dublin, Florence, Jerusalem, London, Rome, and Venice. In general, each 8x10-inch contact sheet is followed by selected prints from the same roll. The prints and contacts are organized chronologically.

The second subseries contains 3,719 inkjet prints, both black-and-white and color, the vast majority measuring 11x17 inches. The prints, taken between 2004 and 2014, consist mostly of New York City street scenes as well as photographs from Reis's trips to Canada, Colorado, Connecticut, Vermont, Maine, Pennsylvania, Indiana, Illinois, Missouri, and North Carolina. These photographs are described at the folder level, with folders containing up to 80 prints.

The Manuscript and Print Materials include an early curriculum vita, some correspondence, exhibition fliers, negative sleeves, articles, and photo essays.

The Negatives Series is arranged by year and month, and titles were taken from original notes on the negative envelopes. They overlap with the prints in the collection to some degree, but there are also negatives present for images that are not currently in the collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Primarily correspondence between Roma Blackburn and literary personages, including former students of her husband, William Maxwell Blackburn, professor at Duke University. Also includes poem by Rose Styron, clippings about the poet Elizabeth Bishop, and a program from Bishop's memorial service. One volume, Heart and Home: A Memoir, was written by Mrs. Blackburn. Correspondence includes: letters and postcards from Elizabeth Bishop discussing travels, intellectual life, and literary interests; letters from William Styron discussing fund-raising in memory of Professor William Blackburn for the Duke University Capital Campaign for the Arts and Sciences; letters from Alice Methfessel, close friend of Elizabeth Bishop; and letters from Professor Blackburn's former students Sean Devereaux, Guy Davenport, and Josephine Humphreys Hutcheson. (1964-1984) (46 items) (.2 linear feet)

This addition (218 items, 1942-1985) includes letters to Blackburn from Reynolds Price and Wallace Fowlie and others regarding invitations, travel plans, news, and condolences; material related to the William Blackburn Fund; correspondence from Blackburn's summers in Magog; a story by Max Steele; 23 manuscript pages of Blackburn's autobiography; copies of tributes to William Blackburn from William Styron and Max Steele as well as statistics on the number of students he taught; and photographs (61 black-and-white prints, 4 color prints, 1 color slide, and 2 black-and-white negatives) of Tennessee Williams, Fred Chappell, William Styron, Sean Devereaux, Wallace Fowlie, and William Blackburn as well as other family members. An unidentified audio tape is included. (.6 linear feet) (acc#01-0036)

Addition (2012-0038) (0.4 lin. ft., 300 items) includes personal correspondence to Roma Blackburn from family members and others, clippings and photographs of William Blackburn, and a recording of William Styron reading from Lie Down in Darkness. Also included are writings and notes by William Blackburn mostly relating to his W.B. Yeats research.

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The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

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The collection documents the personal, political, and professional aspects of the life of an important feminist writer of the twentieth century. The largest group of materials consists of documentation on all of Morgan's significant written works: DEMON LOVER; DEPTH PERCEPTION; DRY YOUR SMILE; GOING TOO FAR; A HOT JANUARY; LADY OF THE BEASTS; SATURDAY'S CHILD; her well-known feminist anthologies, SISTERHOOD IS POWERFUL, SISTERHOOD IS GLOBAL and SISTERHOOD IS FOREVER; and other materials on her poems, articles, and other writings. In addition, Morgan's papers hold many items of correspondence with a wide range of individuals, including prominent activists and feminists as well as family members and close friends. There is also a significant amount of correspondence and other material that documents Morgan's role as founder of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, and records related to her role as editor and writer for MS. magazine.

The collection documents the personal, political, and professional aspects of the life of an important feminist writer of the twentieth century. It is organized into the following series: Correspondence, Writings, Speeches and Interviews, Subject Files, Personal Files, Teaching Materials, Audio-Visual Materials, Photographic and Visual Materials, and Oversize Material. The largest group of materials consists of documentation on all of Morgan's significant written works: Demon Lover; Depth Perception; Dry Your Smile; Going Too Far; A Hot January; Lady of the Beasts; Saturday's Child; her well-known feminist anthologies, Sisterhood is Powerful and Sisterhood is Global; and other materials on her poems, articles, and other writings. In addition, Morgan's papers hold many items of correspondence with a wide range of individuals, including prominent activists and feminists as well as family members and close friends. There is also a significant amount of correspondence and other material that documents Morgan's role as founder of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, and records related to her role as editor and writer for Ms. magazine.

Seen in a broader context, the collection provides ample documentation for the study of modern feminism. Morgan's subject files (the second largest in the series) are rich in materials related to the feminist movement in the United States and around the world; and materials concerning sexual health, witchcraft, lesbian feminism, and the social, economic, and political position of women in the world (especially in the Middle East, Russia, and South Africa). There are materials on individual figures such as Bella Abzug, Jane Alpert (imprisoned revolutionary), Patty Hearst, Gloria Steinem, and Marilyn Waring. Other series hold additional materials related to Morgan's career as a writer; several of her speeches and interviews; materials from Morgan's courses she gave on feminism; and photographs and audio-visual materials.

The Correspondence Series spans much of Morgan's adult life. It is divided into two subseries: Correspondence by Name and Correspondence by Decade. The Correspondence by Name Subseries chiefly consists of Morgan's correspondence with family members, friends, fellow feminist activists and contemporary authors and critics. The bulk of the items in the Correspondence by Decade Subseries dates from the 1990s and relates to the production of Ms. magazine. The Correspondence Series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

The Writings Series documents Morgan's career as a poet, novelist, essayist and journalist. Of Morgan's eighteen books, ten are represented in individual subseries. Particularly noteworthy is the material related to Sisterhood is Global, which provides an inside view into the production of the anthology. The series also contains some of Morgan's earliest unpublished writings as well as files containing her comments on other writers' work, and single issues of periodicals in which she published her poetry. The Writings Series is also restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Responsibilities and Privacy Rights form before using the materials.

The Speeches and Interviews Series primarily contains peripheral documentation such as contracts, correspondence, and schedules. However, there are drafts of a number of her speeches and interviews.

Materials which Morgan collected over the years concerning American and international feminism are located in the Subject Files Series. The materials cover a number of topics, including women's economic, political, and social status, and feminist action - especially in South Africa, the Soviet Union, and the Middle East; rape, abortion, terrorism, female genital mutilation, and pornography; and the first feminist demonstration against the Miss America Pageant. Significant figures represented in the subject files include Marilyn Waring, Patricia Hearst, and Gloria Steinem. Two subseries contain administrative information about Ms. magazine and the Sisterhood is Global Institute. The Subjects Series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

The smaller Personal Files Series offers materials related to Robin Morgan's education, early critical writing, and her many trips overseas. The series also includes material that Morgan requested under the Freedom of Information Act from the FBI and CIA about her own activities.

The documents in the Teaching Materials Series are primarily related to Morgan's academic positions at New College (Sarasota, Fla.) and the University of Denver, and the courses she taught on feminism and writing. The files include both administrative documentation as well as actual course material, but there are also clippings related to feminist protests on campus.

The Audio-Visual Materials Series contains numerous interviews on cassette tapes that Morgan conducted in the Middle East, a recording of her reading of selected poems from A Hot January, and a videotape about the production of Saturday's Child. Permission is not granted to publish interviews conducted in the Middle East; the researcher is responsible for obtaining permission to publish. Original copies of audiovisual materials are not open to use; however, use copies are available to researchers.

The Photographic and Visual Materials Series provides a small visual supplement to the other documents in the collection and includes portrait photographs of Morgan taken by the press and by her close friends, as well as snapshots of social gatherings. This series also includes two painted portraits of Morgan. The series is restricted: patrons must sign an Acknowledgment of Legal Rights and Responsibilities form before using the materials.

Later additions (Accessions 2009-0069, 2010-0176, 2015-0060) have not been fully processed, but boxlists are available in the Detailed Description portion of this finding aid. Some portions are restricted or closed.

For collections related to the Robin Morgan Papers, see the Phyllis Chesler, Merle Hoffman, and Kate Millett Papers, all located in the Duke University David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library. In addition to Robin Morgan's own papers, the Library also holds the records of the Sisterhood is Global Institute, founded by Morgan in 1984.

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Dr. Robert Edward Dawson (1918-2008) was an African American ophthalmologist and citizen of Durham (Durham County), North Carolina. This collection primarily documents Dawson's professional and civic responsibilities, both local and national. Materials include meeting agendas and packets; reports; memoranda; correspondence, speeches, and writiings. The collection details Dawson's medical practices, teaching, and board memberships at Lincoln Community Health Center, Lincoln Hospital, and Durham County General Hospital/Durham County Hospital Corporation. It also documents his lengthy and high-level involvement with Meharry Medical College and the National Medical Association, as well as a wide array of other organizations and institutions. Personal materials involve Dawson's military service, memorabilia, his documentation for building his house, and his retirement.The collection also contains black and white and color photographs as well as negatives, mostly of family members. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

This collection primarily documents Dawson's professional and civic responsibilities, both local and national. Materials include meeting agendas and packets; reports; memoranda; correspondence, speeches, and writiings. The collection details Dawson's medical practices, teaching, and board memberships at Lincoln Community Health Center, Lincoln Hospital, and Durham County General Hospital/Durham County Hospital Corporation. It also documents his lengthy and high-level involvement with Meharry Medical College and the National Medical Association, as well as a wide array of other organizations and institutions. Personal materials involve Dawson's military service, memorabilia, his documentation for building his house, and his retirement.The collection also contains black and white and color photographs as well as negatives and one tintype, mostly of family members.

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Documentary photographer and writer based in western North Carolina. Collection contains 16 gelatin silver prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album book that the Center for Documentary Studies turned into a traveling exhibit. Also includes 32 prints displayed in the Allen Building exhibition. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

Collection consists of 2 series, each holding prints from Amberg's Sodom Laurel Album, first published by the University of North Carolina Press in 2002. Acquired as part of the Archive for Documentary Arts.

The 16 gelatin silver prints in the Traveling Exhibit series were used in a 2003 traveling exhibit created by the Center for Documentary Studies. The series includes images of Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco planters and workers, and scenes from Madison County, North Carolina.

The 32 Allen Building Exhibit prints were used in an exhibition at Duke University's Allen Building. They include both 11x14 and 16x20 gelatin silver prints. Scenes include Dellie Norton and her family, tobacco workers, cemeteries, and folk arts.

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Rob Amberg photographs and papers, 1975-2009 15 Linear Feet — 457 Items

The photographs and papers of documentarian Rob Amberg span the years 1975-2009. The gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints in the collection represent three bodies of work: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture. Amberg focuses primarily on the social life and customs of the rural South, especially in the mountains of his home state of North Carolina. Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century. Amberg's papers account for the rest of the collection and are organized into five series: Correspondence, Printed Materials, Subject Files, and Writings and Research, and Audio. Acquired as part of the Archives of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Rob Amberg Photographs and Papers span the years 1975-2009. The photographs consist of 8x10 and 11x14 inch gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints. Amberg's focus as a photographer is primarily the social customs of the rural South, especially in his home state of North Carolina. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century.

The collection is arranged into three project series: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress ; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture.

Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. Many of Amberg's images in this last series were funded by the Rural Advancement Fund to document the rural Carolinas, and by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. Captions and numbering are taken from original notes on the back of each print. Series are arranged in alphabetical order by title of project.

Amberg's papers are organized into five series. The Correspondence Series contains incoming messages regarding exhibits and the publication of Amberg's books as well as photographic work in other published materials.

The Printed Material Series consists of publications which include or feature his images. Publications in the series are both national and local, including The New York Times and Harper's.

Amberg worked and contributed to a number of non-profit organizations dealing with farm worker's rights and other social issues. Collections of materials relating to these non-profits are housed in the Subject Files Series. Printed materials in this series include annual reports and publications by each organization. Most of the materials include photography work by Amberg.

Included in Amberg's papers is the Writings and Research Series. Content includes multiple versions of the manuscripts to The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress and Sodom Laurel Album, a publisher's draft of Quartet: Four North Carolina Photographers, a number of interview transcripts, and other writings by Amberg and others.

The final grouping in the collection is the Audio Series which includes a piece entitled Interstate 26 produced by Leda Hartman and a copy of the musical recording which accompanies Sodom Laurel Album.

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Rick Lang photographs of Florida and other Southern states, 1985-2016 12 Linear Feet — 13 boxes — 229 photographic prints; 258 contact sheets; approximately 3100 negatives; approximately 40 printed items — 6.0 Gigabytes — 1 thumbdrive — 105 files (104 .psd, 1 .pdf)

Rick Lang was a photographer and faculty member at the Creadlé School of Art, Winter Park, Florida. Collection comprises 229 black-and-white photographs documenting the American South, particularly Florida and Louisiana, with an emphasis on roadside advertising and signs, small businesses, and weathered buildings. There are also a few images from New Mexico and Arizona. Print sizes range from 11x14 to 20x24 inches. Accompanying the prints are 104 digital image files and one pdf, over 3000 negatives, and 258 contact sheets. In addition there are print materials chiefly associated with Lang's solo and group exhibits, including three photobooks, and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 229 large-format black-and-white photographs by Rick Lang, taken from 1990 to 2013, documenting the communities and landscapes in Florida and other states of the American South, particularly Lousiana, with an emphasis on roadside advertising and signs, weathered buildings, and small businesses. There are also a few images from New Mexico and Arizona. Also includes 104 digital image files selected by the photographer, and one .pdf inventory.

Prints were created by Lang using gelatin silver or pigmented inkjet processes. Print sizes include 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches.

Accompanying the prints is a set of over 3000 negatives and 258 contact sheets, offering many additional images that are not present in the large-format prints series. Film negatives are closed to use; for more information on access, contact the Rubenstein Library.

The collection is completed by a small amount of printed materials chiefly associated with Lang's solo and group exhibits. Includes three photobooks and condolences sent upon his passing in 2013.

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Reynolds Price papers, 1880-2014 and undated 151 Linear Feet — 1 Gigabyte — 1,300 document (MS Word and text formats) and digital image files; approximately 1 gigabytes. — 354 boxes

Reynolds Price (1933-2011) was a novelist, short story writer, poet, dramatist, essayist, translator, and James B. Duke Professor of English at Duke University, where he taught creative writing and literature beginning in 1958. He was an alumnus of Duke and of Oxford University, which he attended on a Rhodes Scholarship. He received fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts, and his books were nominated for the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. The collection is comprised of correspondence, writings, serials, clippings, speeches, interviews, legal and financial papers, photographs, audiovisual materials, and digital materials reflecting Price's career and personal life. Personal and professional correspondence document his education at Duke University, especially his studies under William Blackburn; his period abroad as a Rhodes Scholar at Merton College, Oxford; and his literary work and interaction with other authors, including Stephen Spender, Eudora Welty, and Allan Gurganus. Writings include manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, outlines, and notes produced in the creation and publication of all his major works, including: A Long and Happy Life; Kate Vaiden; A Palpable God; Clear Pictures; A Whole New Life; The Collected Stories; The Collected Poems; A Letter to a Godchild; Ardent Spirits; The Good Priest's Son, and many other books, individual stories, poems, and essays.

The (1) Correspondence Series is divided into the Correspondence, chronological subseries and the Correspondence, alphabetical by name subseries. The chronological correspondence subseries consists of letters to and from family, friends, teachers, and admirers of Price's work. The alphabetical correspondence subseries comprises correspondence between Price and other writers, literary figures, celebrities, and close friends including Eudora Welty and Stephen Spender. The (2) Writings Series contains various writings by Price and is divided into the Books, Scribner's Files, Uncollected Fiction and Nonfiction, Price Writing in Serials, Reviews by Price, Addresses and Speeches, and Audiovisual Recordings of Price Regarding Writing subseries. The Books subseries is composed chiefly of drafts, typescripts, and proofs of Price's novels, plays, autobiographical works, and volumes of poetry.

The (3) Events Series contains materials documenting Price's achievements, his education, and performances of his dramatic work and his speaking engagements, as well as performances, and presentations of interest to Price. The (4) Personal Papers Series has expanded significantly following the author's death. The Series contains many of the books, letters, art and photographs kept in his home, including personal health and financial records. The Series also includes personal scrapbooks, his postcard collection, and a collection of family home movies. Price's teaching career in the Duke University English Department is documented by the (5) Duke University Series. And manuscripts sent to Price by fellow authors and students make up the (6) Writings by Others Series.

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Renée Jacobs photographs, 1979-2015 15 Linear Feet — 16 boxes; 1 oversize folder

Renée Jacobs is a documentary photographer and photojournalist whose project, "Slow Burn," documents the abandonment of Centralia, Pennsylvania due to an underground coal mine fire in the mid-1980s. Her archive includes negatives, contact sheets, gelatin silver work prints and exhibit prints, digital inkjet prints, and publication materials deriving from the project. There are also oral history interviews on audiocassette with residents of Centralia, as well as some correspondence, a 1979 federal government report on Centralia, and color photographs and negatives taken by another photographer who visited the town in 1987. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

This collection contains Renée Jacobs' archive of her project Slow Burn: A Photodocument of Centralia, Pennslyvania. Slow Burn, first published in 1986 by University of Pennsylvania Press, chronicles Centralia’s demise from an underground coal mine fire and depicts a singular epic event in Pennsylvania history, representing the confluence of environmental, scientific, bureaucratic, and emotional tragedies. As an award winning photojournalist, Jacobs moved into a house in Centralia’s impact zone in 1983 to document, in photographs and interviews, the end stages of the tiny anthracite coal town’s unsuccessful fight to resolve the intractable problems that began with the mine fire in 1962 and culminated in the razing of the town by the federal government.

Photographer Shelby Lee Adams has written of the project stating:

"Where once there was familiarity with open doors and trusting hearts, in a community that could be your home anywhere in America, an invisible cancer grew. It’s the unseen, slow-moving nature of this underground burning that took Centralia apart. The human spirit doesn’t want to believe, see, or hear what can destroy our sanctified special places in the world. Renée Jacobs faithfully and compassionately documents in pictures and words the confusion, uncertainty, and fighting spirit of Centralia’s residents—and the painful destruction and relocation of the residents of this little Pennsylvania town. Slow Burn is a compelling story about—and for—all of us.”

The archive consist of more than 200 rolls of 35mm black and white film, the accompanying contact sheets, more than 1,000 silver gelatin work prints, contemporaneous news articles, oral history interviews and vintage exhibition prints. Additionally, the archives include maquettes for the original 1986 book and the 2010 re-issue, as well as prints with printer’s notations.

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Reginald Sellman negatives, 1911-1935 1.5 Linear Feet — 3 boxes

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Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two prints, all taken by amateur photographer Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935, chiefly in Baltimore, Maryland and environs. There is also a detailed handwritten index to over 100 images. Subjects include Susie Ford, possibly Sellman's fiancée; his wife Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman, and their son Bruce Darden Sellman. Places featured include Baltimore residences, streets, bridges, railway stations, monuments, parks, and hospitals and medical institutions such as Johns Hopkins Medical School and the Biedler and Sellman Sanatorium, founded by Reginald Sellman's father, William A. B. Sellman. There are many snapshots of family members, and photos taken during hikes, camping trips, and visits to parks. Maryland locations include Baltimore County historic sites and parks: the Owing's Mills area, Gwynn's Falls, Chatalonee, Loch Raven, Druid Lake, the Chesapeake's Eastern Shore, Elk River, and the Patapsco River. The Sellmans often visited relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are also many images taken in early 20th century Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, Kinston, and Raleigh, including the Raleigh Methodist Orphanage. Some photographs feature commercial fishing scenes and cotton transport.

Collection consists of 898 nitrate negatives and two small prints, all taken by amateur photographer and Baltimore resident Reginald Sellman from 1911 to 1935. They were originally stored in four black cases, one of which has been retained for the collection. The collection also includes Sellman's meticulous hndwritten index cards. The images are arranged in original chronological order and listed by the photographer's original identification number has been retained; the titles were also taken from the original index cards.

The snapshots were chiefly taken in Baltimore, Maryland and Baltimore County, and depict buildings, streets, bridges, railway stations, parks, rivers, and monuments, and many family members, especially Reginald's friend (possibly fianceé) Susie Ford, and later, his wife Obedience, and their son Bruce. There are quite a few photographs taken on day trips to historic sites and parks in Baltimore County such as St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Chattalonee, Gwynn Falls, Owings Mills, Massey, and Lake Roland. Sellman clearly enjoyed being outside; there are many images of activities such as camping, hiking, and visiting parks and Eastern Shore recreation areas.

Reginald's father, William A. B. Sellman, was the founder of a Baltimore sanatorium, thus there are views of hospitals, including many marked "B.S.S.," almost certainly the Biedler Sellman Sanatorium on Charles Street, where Reginald Sellman was listed as a physician; a few interior shots of the "B.S.S." include an operating room. There are also exterior views of medical teaching institutions such as Johns Hopkins Hospital. In one of the two positive prints in the collection, Susie Ford is shown wearing a nurse's uniform.

There are images of apartment buildings and houses where Reginald and other family members lived, and some interior shots of rooms. There are many casual snapshots of family members. Later images depict Sellman's young son, Bruce, as a baby and young boy, along with his mother, Obedience (Bedie) Darden Sellman (O.D.S.). She first appears in the images as Obedience Cox Darden, at her own commencement at a nursing school in May 1914.

Reginald and Obedience Sellman often visited her Darden family relatives in North Carolina; thus, there are many vacation photographs from the 1920s taken in Raleigh, Beaufort, Goldsboro, La Grange, and Kinston, N.C. Depicted are train stations, relatives' houses, railroads, street scenes, and businesses, some owned by relatives. A long series features scenes from the Methodist Orphanage in Raleigh, possibly where relatives worked. Zylpha or Zylphia Darden, Obedience's cousin, often appears with baby Bruce. There are many scenes from Beaufort, N.C., with commercial fishing, streets, and the waterfront.

Other earlier vacation spots depicted that Reginald visited with Susie Ford include the Eastern Shore, with Tollchester Beach and its amusement part and piers; Harper's Ferry, West Virginia; and the Blue Ridge in Virginia. The last images from 1935 feature Susie Ford's grave and monument in Mount View Cemetery (undentified state); she probably died in spring 1914.

Also in the collection are four sets of handwritten index cards listing each negative's identification number, roll of film and frame, caption, and technical details such as camera settings, exposure, film number, and date when image was developed. The cards are filed at the beginning of each group of negatives represented by the set. One original black storage case has also been retained, as well as advertisement and leaflets featuring photographic supplies, and an envelope of paper corner mounts.

Apparently, Sellman also photographed with glass plates, but these are not present in the collection. There were also several places in the storage case where the film negatives were missing; in these cases, only the titles remain, taken from the index cards.

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R. B. Holmes photographs, 1910-1926 and undated 7.6 Linear Feet — 208 items

The images in the collection were taken by British photographer R. B. (Randolph Bezzant) Holmes and possibly others from his studio who traveled with him. Holmes was the owner of the R. B. Holmes & Co. photography studio in Peshawar, Pakistan. Of the 208 prints in the collection, one hundred two are loose, 11.5 x 9.5" black-and-white photographic prints of Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan. The remaining 106 prints are mounted in three commercial albums whose subjects range widely, from Afghan War-period images of the Khyber Pass, Landi Khana, Ali Musjid, and the Kabul River; to pastoral scenes around Nowshera, street scenes in Peshawar city, and panoramic views of the Peshawar Valley, to views from India, including the Jhelum and Liddar valleys, Srinagar, lower Himals, Harabal waterfall, Shalimar, and the Taj Mahal in Agra, to images of Waziristan and the Khyber railway. The sizes of the mounted prints range from 8.25"x5.75" to 11.25"x9", along with some panoramic prints. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Of the 208 prints in the collection, one hundred two are loose, 11.5 x 9.5" black-and-white photographic prints of Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan. The majority of these detailed images were taken during the end of the Anglo-Afghan war in 1919 and depict large British military camps and vast landscapes, sometimes with camel caravans or military convoys. Some scenes show the remains of villages, military features such as towers, and religious structures. There are portraits of individuals, including camel drivers, a sniper, a female spinner, a young woman dressed in traditional wear, and various groups. The landscape views include the Khyber Pass, Tanai Gorge, Kabul River, Khargali Ridge, Dal Lake, Nanga Parbat, and the Sikkim Himalaya. Military camp views, many in panoramic scale with fine detail, include Landi Khana, Dakka Plain, and Landi Kotal.

The remaining 106 prints are mounted in three commercial albums whose subjects range widely, from Afghan War-period images of the Khyber Pass, Landi Khana, Ali Musjid, and the Kabul River; to pastoral scenes around Nowshera, street scenes in Peshawar city, and panoramic views of the Peshawar Valley, to views from India, including the Jhelum and Liddar valleys, Srinagar, lower Himals, Harabal waterfall, Shalimar, and the Taj Mahal in Agra, to images of Waziristan and the Khyber railway. The sizes of the mounted prints range from 8.25"x5.75" to 11.25"x9", along with some panoramic prints. There are 12 gelatin silver prints. The images of Waziristan (Box 6) are out of copyright. There are also several photographs from the Diwan and Mela Ram studios in the Waziristan images. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

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Ralph Gibson photographs, 2019 2.5 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 208 prints — 8 x 11 1/2 inches (188); 17 x 22 inches (20)

Ralph Gibson is an American photographer based in New York, N.Y. Collection consists of 208 photographs taken by Gibson in 2019 for his photobook, Sacred Land: Israel before and after time(2020). In addition to the 188 small single-image printer's proof prints, there are 20 large diptych prints, in which juxtaposed color and black-and-white images explore the nature of Israel and surrounding regions of Galilee, Jordan, and Palestine, through contemporary and ancient landscapes, architecture, city and country scenes, and portraits of a wide variety of people. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 188 individually printed 8 1/2 x 11 inch printer's proofs and 20 17 x 22 inch print diptychs by photographer Ralph Gibson, from his book Sacred Land: Israel before and after time, published in 2020 by Lustrum Press.

As a project, "Sacred Land" offers a portrait of Israel and the surrounding regions, including Palestine, Jordan, and Galilee, which juxtaposes past and contemporary experience through the narrative device of the diptych. Subjects include landscapes, rural and city life, found objects, architecture, antiquities, and portraits of a wide variety of people.

The untitled archival pigment inkjet prints are signed and dated by the photographer, and the printer's proofs are marked on the versos with the page numbers where the images appear in the photobook.

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Raleigh Sears was a member of the American Expeditionary Force, stationed in Siberia during World War I. Collection includes photographs and postcards from Sears' travels during his military service. Some of these are labeled as being from Vladivostok, Russia; others are of an unidentified Asian country, and still others are of Honolulu and miscellaneous naval vessels. The majority of the photographs are black and white prints or images sized 3.5x5.5 inches; most do not have labels or descriptions. There are also 4 panoramas that will require additional conservation work. In addition, there are some miscellaneous papers from Sears' post-war work on railroads, as well as research and photocopies about his military service.

This collection consists largely of unlabeled photographs dating from Raleigh Sears' military service in the American Expeditionary Force during and immediately following World War I. The photographs are supplemented by captioned postcards, some color tinted, which appear to date from the same period. The postcards and photographs include images from the travels of Sears' unit, including stops in Hawaii, Asia, and Siberia. The majority of these photographs are of scenery, rather than of the troops or military images. However, there are notable images of ships, posing sailors and soldiers, and buildings like a YMCA.

Hawaii appears only briefly in images that are labeled as Honolulu. The photographs from Asia document the scenery, buildings, and people of an unidentified country: it is likely either Japan or China. Occasionally these photographs include images of an American soldier interacting with local people or posing for a picture. There is no label confirming that this man is Sears. The postcards also include images from Asia, at times uncaptioned. Some of the Asia postcards are scenery in Yokohama, Japan.

The scenes from Siberia are easier to identify. There are several photographs of dead, snow-covered men on the ground, usually with other soldiers looking over the corpses. It is unclear where in Siberia these events occured, and no labels exist for those photographs. The postcards from Siberia are typically of scenes from Vladivostok, including the arrival of troops and views over the port.

The collection also includes 4 panoramic images: 3 rolled photographs and 1 folded postcard. Two photographs and the postcard are scenic photographs of Vladivostok. The third panoramic photograph is a formal portrait of troops, unlabeled and undated.

There are also five photographs of Raleigh Sears' family members.

The photographs in this collection are accompanied by David and Robert Alexander's research on Raleigh Sears' military service, as well as a few miscellaneous papers from his post-war life. The most significant of these his an insurance policy from a railroad company, which reveals that he was a coal chute man in 1926. The rest of the collection includes some documentation on the life of Robert Alexander.

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Press photographs of Hartford, Connecticut Black Caucus protests and meetings, 1967 September-October 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 50 photographic prints — Print sizes: 8 1/2 x 6 1/2 inches; image sizes vary.

The Hartford Times was a daily newspaper for Hartford, Connecticut. Collection consists of 50 black-and-white press photographs taken by Hartford Times staff of Black Caucus protests and marches in Fall 1967, and associated community meetings. Subjects include Black Caucus members, African American residents, student protesters, state and city officials, police, religious leaders, and the press. Protest images show Black Caucus members marching through Hartford and gathering in the State Capitol Building and in Bushnell Park. Individuals highlighted in the images are: John Barber; Boce W. Barlow, Jr.; Rev. Collin Bennett; Lewis Fox; George B. Kinsella; Rev. Robert A. Moody; Robert Morris; and Wilber Smith. Acquired as part of the John Hope Center for African and African American History and Culture, and the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 50 black-and-white press photographs taken by Hartford Times reporters of Black Caucus protests in Hartford, Connecticut in September and October, 1967, and associated community meetings. Individuals featured in the images include Black Caucus members, African American citizens of the North End, other Black and White activists, student protesters, state and city officials, police, religious leaders, and the press.

About a quarter of the prints are of protest images, and show Black Caucus leaders and members marching peacefully through Hartford and gathering in the State Capitol Building and in Bushnell Park with college student supporters. Images of meetings show speakers as well as the audiences.

Among the individuals highlighted in the images are: John Barber, Black Caucus spokesperson; Boce Barlow, Jr., first Black State Judge and State Senator; Collin Bennett, Black City Council member; Lewis Fox, local attorney and Board of Education member; George B. Kinsella, Hartford's mayor; Rev. Robert A. Moody, a Black Baptist minister and community activist; Robert Morris, Black Caucus spokesperson; and Wilber G. Smith, Black attorney, civil rights activist and, later, State Senator. Many other state and city officials are also present in the meeting images.

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Bound photograph album containing 48 photographs taken by Sir Percy Moleworth Sykes during his travels in a mountainous region of Central Asia, now the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of China, with his sister, Ella Sykes. The gelatin silver prints measure approximately 4 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches and are window-mounted two to a page with calligraphic captions in white ink. Subjects include landscapes, strategic buildings such as forts and trading posts, and local Uighur, Beg, Kyrgyz, and Kazak people and their dwellings and animals, as well as British, Russian, Turkish, and Chinese people and officials. Specific locations in captions include Kashgar, the Tuman River, Yarkand, Khotan, Merkit, Bulunkul, the Pamirs, Tashkurgan, Muztagh Ata, Karakul lake, Tian Shan mountains, and Osh. The images are large, crisp, and rich with detail, offering views of a remote area and its culture during tensions in the decades following the Russo-Turkish War.

Sir Percy and Ella Sykes co-authored a book based on this journey, titled Through deserts and oases of Central Asia (1920, available online), and many images in the photograph album were used as illustrations, and are noted in this collection guide. It is clear from the narrative written by Ella Sykes (Part I in the book) that she was also taking photographs during their travels, but according to the album's title statement, the images in this album all were taken by Percy Sykes.

The folio photograph album (11 3/4 by 9 1/2 inches) is bound in half green morocco leather over green cloth boards, and comprises 25 pages with a calligraphic title page in white ink; the volume label inside front cover reads "Kodak Ltd series H album."

All titles were transcribed by library staff from the original album captions. Staff also assigned individual identification numbers to the photographs in sequence as they appear in the album.