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James Van Der Zee photographs, circa 1908-1935 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 42 photographic prints

Collection comprises 42 gelatin silver prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are also fictionalized settings and poses conveying hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of parades, athletic teams, a Baptist group, a first-grade Harlem classroom, and the interior of Van Der Zee's studio. Subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats, a soldier, a female impersonator, a funerary portrait of a man in an open casket, Black Hebrews, Black Cross nurses, Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade, entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia, boxer Jack Johnson, and entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing a violin, circa 1930. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance (1920s-1930s). An early portrait of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter was taken around 1908, in Lenox, Massachusetts, his birthplace. Average print size is roughly 10 3/4 x 12 inches. Two are original vintage prints; the rest are exhibit prints created mostly in the 1980s from original negatives. Some prints are signed; all are titled and dated on the verso. Several bear the GGG Studio stamp at the 272 Lenox Avenue address. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection comprises forty gelatin silver exhibit prints and two vintage prints of images taken in the first decades of the 20th century by James Van Der Zee, noted photographer based in Harlem, New York City. Many are portraits of well-known and ordinary African Americans in Harlem. There are fictionalized scenes and poses evoking hopes, dreams, and humorous situations, as well as views of the interior of Van Der Zee's studio, Harlem parades, a Baptist church building and its congregation, and a first-grade Harlem classroom. Included is a self-portrait of the photographer playing the violin, circa 1930. Other subjects include an elegant couple in raccoon coats; a 1923 soldier; the New York Black Giants baseball team; a female impersonator; a man in an open funeral casket with a superimposed poem extolling fatherhood; a group of African American Hebrews in front of the Moorish Zionist Temple; Marcus Garvey in regalia during a parade; a Garveyite with his son; entrepreneurs Madam C.J. Walker and her daughter A'Lelia in their "Dark Tower" salon with a large group of friends; boxer Jack Johnson; and a double exposure portrait of entertainer Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. The photographs evoke the diverse and flourishing society of the Harlem Renaissance; later images exhibit a certain optimism in spite of the looming Great Depression and its effects.

Prints are arranged in chronological order. The earliest images, from 1908, are of Van Der Zee's first wife and daughter, probably taken in Lenox, Massachusetts, Van Der Zee's birthplace, and a blacksmith, probably taken in Virginia, where Van der Zee spent some time before moving to New York.

The exhibit prints were created from original negatives chiefly from 1981-1983, under the supervision of James Van Der Zee until his passing in 1983. Others were printed around 1987 by his widow Donna Mussenden Van Der Zee. All prints bear titles, dates, edition information, and copyright on verso. Most are from runs of 250 limited edition prints created for various exhibits. Some are signed by the photographer.

The majority of the prints measure 10 x 12 inches (sheet dimensions); image sizes range from 10 1/8 x 8 to 10 x 2 5/8 inches.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other materials pertain to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, and the bulk date from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority of the papers concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, and investor; his wife Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900); and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William M. Beall. Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning cotton, banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s-1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the family's travels to Europe, Russia, and other places from 1850 to 1864. Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland, and the McCleery, Pettit, and McLanahan families of Indiana and Maryland.

Collection contains correspondence, diaries and notebooks, financial papers, legal papers, genealogical documents, printed materials, and other items pertaining to the Knight family of Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland. Materials in the collection date from 1784 to 1960, with the bulk of the papers dating from the 1840s to the 1890s. The majority concern the personal, legal, and financial activities of John Knight (1806-1864), merchant, plantation owner, lawyer, and investor; Frances Z. S. (Beall) Knight (1813-1900), his wife; and their daughter Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight; as well as relatives, friends, and business partners, especially banker Enoch Pratt and William Beall.

Significant topics include: life in Natchez, Mississippi and Frederick, Maryland; plantations, slaves, and slavery in Mississippi and other Southern states; 19th century economic conditions, especially concerning the cotton market; banking and bank failures; U.S. politics in the 1850s and 1860s; the Civil War, especially in Maryland; reports of cholera and yellow fever outbreaks; 19th century family life; and the Knights' travels to Europe, Egypt, Turkey, and Russia from 1850 to 1864.

Genealogies chiefly relate to the descendants of Elisha Beall of Maryland. There are also two late 19th century albumen photographs of homes in West Virginia (James and Lizzie Brown's "Kingswood") and Maryland ("Beallview," the house of Elisha Beall). A few other images of the Knights are found in the Rubenstein Library's Picture File Collection.

The papers of John Knight concern his business relations with the Beall family of Maryland; his plantations in Mississippi, Hyde Park and Beverly Place, and their management; the purchases, expenses, and medical care of the enslaved people who lived and worked on those plantations; investments in cotton land in Mississippi, Louisiana, and Arkansas; economic conditions in the United States, especially concerning the cotton market; the effects of the Civil War, especially in Maryland; and the family's trips to Europe. His notebooks keep careful track of expenses and income, as well as travel. The many land deeds, indentures, slave lists, bills of purchase, and other financial and legal documents in the collection, some dating to the 1700s, chiefly relate to his activities as an attorney and landholder. Many also relate to the legal and financial activities of the Beall family, particularly to William M. Beall. John Knight was also interested in medicine, so the collection holds memoranda books and other papers with prescriptions, receipts, and instructions for medicines treating ailments of the time.

Papers of his wife, Frances (Beall) Knight, include 21 diaries and some correspondence, as well as financial and legal papers. Her diaries describe in detail life in Natchez, Mississippi, religious life, family members, visits, the weather, and health. Of particular interest are her travel diaries, which document the family's travels to Europe, with side trips to Egypt, Turkey, Russia, and other places. Her later papers deal with her financial activities as a relatively young widow, and her role as guardian of her two grandchildren, Knight and Alexandra McDannold, who lived with her after the early deaths of their parents, Fanny Knight McDannold and Thomas McDannold.

The ten diaries of Frances (Fanny) Beall Knight, the daughter of John and Frances Knight, document in some detail their trips to Europe, and details of her father's death abroad in 1864; the collection also contains some of her school and family notebooks and correspondence. Later papers refer to her husband, Thomas Alexander McDannold, who may have been the author of at least one of the anonymous notebooks in the collection, and their two children, Alexandra and John.

20th century dates in the collection refer to a typed draft of a paper on 19th century packet ships, and an article from a Maryland history magazine.

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Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs picture campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

Collection comprises a photograph album in two sections, containing a total of 261 black-and-white prints that feature the athletic and social activities of young female campers. The photographs were taken by an unidentified teenage girl. The first section of the album comprises 51 photographs (with captions) taken during the summer of 1916, twenty-six of them at Camp Mascoma, in Enfield, N.H., including shots of the Shaker Bridge and scenes of campers canoeing and swimming, among other activities. There are also 8 photos taken at Lost River, near North Woodstock, N.H.; 6 photos of girls with other family members at Wollaston Beach in Quincy, Mass.; and 11 photos of Boston's Franklin Park, a children's May Party, and other activities. The second section of the album contains 210 photographs (of which only 35 have captions and 10 are loose) taken during the summer of 1917 at Camp Teconnet on China Lake in China, Me. These photographs depict campers swimming, canoeing, playing basketball, doing calisthenics, posing singly and in small groups, etc. There are also many photographs of campers dressed in elaborate costumes (of dowagers, gypsies, clowns, Native Americans, etc.), including several featuring campers in male attire, impersonating Charlie Chaplin, WWI soldiers, playboys, waiters, etc.

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Collection comprises a stannotype photograph showing five female suffragists standing in a row. One woman holds a banner from the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis, Mo. Another has a "Votes for Women" sticker on a suitcase at her feet.

Collection comprises a stannotype photograph showing five female suffragists standing in a row. One woman holds a banner from the Equal Suffrage League of St. Louis, Mo. Another has a "Votes for Women" sticker on a suitcase at her feet.

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Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Todd Webb photographs, 1948-1979, bulk 1948-1951 1 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 prints

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, outdoor advertising, doorways, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 25 gelatin silver prints of images taken in France by noted American photographer Todd Webb. The majority were taken from 1948 to 1951, with some from the 1970s, on the streets of Paris, particularly in the Latin Quarter, with other images from small towns and rural areas in Provence and one from Le Cannet, on the French Riviera. Subjects include streets, storefronts, squares, restaurants, doorways, outdoor advertising, and other city scenes, some with pedestrians and other figures. Paper sizes are 8.5 x 11 and 11x14 inches. Image dimensions are noted for each print entry. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by an amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. Nightingale from 1920 to 1921, while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's photographs are of value not only for the image content, which includes street scenes, vendors, modes of transportation, shrines, temples, pagodas, monasteries, towers, and landscapes, but also for his lengthy contextual commentary written on the back of each card. The majority of the images were taken in Hangzhou (referred to as Hangchow), Suzhou (Soochow), Mount Putuo island (Pu-tu), and Shanghai, China, but there are also a few images from other cities (Ningbo, Chang'an, and Harinen?), and a set of 11 images were taken in Japan. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of 143 stereographic images of areas in southeastern China, taken by amateur photographer and American lighting engineer Frederick B. (F.B.) Nightingale from 1920 to 1921 while he traveled on business as a representative of General Electric. Nightingale's collection is of value not only for the image content, which includes many street scenes with individuals in addition to well-known sites and landscapes, but also for his lengthy captions on the back of each card, commenting on food customs, architecture, folklore, commerce, and religious beliefs and practices, as seen from a Westerner's perspective.

The majority of the images were taken in Suzhou (referred to in captions as Soochow, 55 images), Hangzhou (Hangchow, 44), Mount Putuo Island (Pu-tu, 14), and Shanghai, China (13), but there are also a few photographs from other cities (Chang'an, Ningbo, Harinen?), and a set of 11 images taken in Japan. There is also one photograph of overgrown land on Nightingale's Pasadena, California property called "Palawoo." Several images feature Nightingale, and one shows the porter carrying his camera equipment. The majority of the images are crisp with little fading. A few are stamped with small identification numbers.

Subjects include numerous temples, pagodas, monasteries, monuments, tombs, and other historic sites, some of which no longer exist. Nightingale was able to capture some images of temple interiors, and he often noted which religious sites allowed entry to women. There are many photos of street life, river traffic, modes of transportation, and Chinese vendors and pedestrians going about their daily business.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by an Italian soldier stationed in Ethiopia during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War and the subsequent Italian occupation of the region. The soldier is unidentified, but his name may be the one that is embossed on the lower right-hand corner of the album's leather cover. On the first page of the album is a postcard announcing the Italian troop's victorious entry into Addis Ababa. Comprises 133 black-and-white photographs, ranging in size from 2"x1" to 4.75"x6", of the A.O.I. (Africa Orientale Italiana). The photographs are divided into groups by city, and many have captions written in Italian. Cities and other locations mentioned include Axum, Scire, Gondar, Cheren, Asmara, Lake Tana, Adua, and Addis Ababa, among others. In addition to images of military maneuvers, there are photographs of social customs and conditions (markets, native buildings, hairdos, priests, pilgrims, ceremonies, families, etc.), wildlife, and landscapes.

Collection comprises a photograph album maintained by an Italian soldier stationed in Ethiopia during the Second Italo-Ethiopian War and the subsequent Italian occupation of the region. The soldier is unidentified, but his name may be the one that is embossed on the lower right-hand corner of the album's leather cover. On the first page of the album is a postcard announcing the Italian troop's victorious entry into Addis Ababa. Comprises 133 black-and-white photographs, ranging in size from 2"x1" to 4.75"x6", of the A.O.I. (Africa Orientale Italiana). The photographs are divided into groups by city, and many have captions written in Italian. Cities and other locations mentioned include Axum, Scire, Gondar, Cheren, Asmara, Lake Tana, Adua, and Addis Ababa, among others. In addition to images of military maneuvers, there are photographs of social customs and conditions (markets, native buildings, hairdos, priests, pilgrims, ceremonies, families, etc.), wildlife, and landscapes.

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"Stewardess" aboard the ship; resident of Grimsby[?], England Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

Collection comprises a manuscript journal and log book (59 pgs+ blanks) authored by Thompson while on a voyage between England and Jamaica from March 25 to April 28, 1935. However, the journal actually closes with a description of her train trip home on April 29. Includes Thompson's 33 black-and-white photographs, 2 telegrams she received from a Captain Greenhill, her certificate of discharge, and an Irish sweepstakes ticket for the Derby syndicate (dated June 5) that she purchased during the voyage. In addition, Thompson copied into the journal a 3-pg informational article on bananas, written by H.C. Bower, and kept a record of the ship's log for the trip. The S.S. Tetela was a cargo and occasional passenger ship that belonged to the banana-importing firm Elders & Fyffes, a wholly owned subsidiary of the United Fruit Company.

All the entries in the piece indicate that Thompson was an experienced sailor and had navigational training, "Started work this morning. The ship's Log Book had been filled up last trip, and they couldn't get a new one at Rotterdam, so the entries for the last few days had been made on odd sheets of paper. I re-wrote these on official paper and.... Continued making all entries during the trip (pgs. 1-2)." The Tetela sailed from Southampton and arrived at Port Antonio, Jamaica, a fortnight later. Over the next week, the ship took on a large cargo of bananas at Montego Bay, Bowden, and Kingston, where five passengers joined the ship for the homeward voyage. The ship birthed at Garston Docks, Liverpool, two weeks later. In the journal, Thompson does not record what duties she carried out as stewardess. Instead, she recorded weather, passing ships, as well as sea life, but mainly focused on describing, with an active sense of humor, staff activities, meals, gossip, recreation, and teasing aboard ship. She also detailed a day trip she took to Port Antonio, the loading of bananas as cargo, as well as her contacts with officials of the United Fruit Company and family members of the ship's staff. The photographs document much of her description, but include several images of Thompson taken by the Tetela's captain.

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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.