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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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William Clair Turner, Jr. earned his B.S. in Electrical Engineering from Duke University in 1971, his M.Div. from Duke Divinity School in 1974, and his Ph.D. in religion in 1984. He has held several administrative positions at Duke, including Assistant Provost and Dean of Black Affairs and Acting Director of the Afro-American Studies program. In 1982 he became a full-time faculty member in the Divinity School, directing the Office of Black Church Affairs before being appointed Professor of the Practice of Homiletics. He has pastored several churches, including his current position at Mt. Level Baptist Church and was previously ordained in the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination. The collection documents Turner’s academic and personal activities. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons.

The collection documents the academic and personal activities of William C. Turner, Jr., Duke alumni and faculty member at Duke Divinity School. Materials include personal and administrative correspondence regarding Turner’s roles as pastor and administrator, manuscripts of lectures and sermons, syllabi and notes for courses taught, notes from classes taken while a student, subject files, and records of the United Holy Church of America, Inc. denomination in which Turner was deeply involved and on which he wrote his Ph.D. dissertation. The collection also includes VHS, CD, and DVD recordings of some of his sermons. Major topics covered include black student life at Duke; Turner’s involvement in the Department of Afro-American Studies, Office of Black Affairs, and Office of Black Church Studies; Turner’s academic work on the Holy Spirit and black spirituality; pastoral work in African American churches in Durham; and the history of the United Holy Church of America, Inc.

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The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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In 1938, the School of Forestry at Duke was founded as the first graduate school of forestry in the South. In the 1970s, the school expanded its program to include a broad range of resource and environmental studies. In 1974/75, it became the School of Forestry and Environmental Studies. Collection contains memoranda, brochures, newspaper clippings, conference materials, annual reports, photographs and slides relating to the Duke School of Forestry and Environmental Studies from roughly 1960 through 1979.

Collection contains alumni newsletters, publications, technical papers, department brochures, conference programs, memoranda, annual reports, as well as documents relating to the proposed phasing out of the Forestry School in 1975 and resultant student protests. Also includes papers from the 1965 Tropical Forestry Symposium sponsored by the School of Forestry, black and white photographs of the arboretum, and color photos and slides of School's field days in 1977 and 1979. Removed photographs from albums and interleaved in folders for preservation.

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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a 16-page 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, a segregated unit of African American soldiers stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a major supply route from India to China. Mounted on loose pages, the 44 black-and-white snapshots include posed and candid images of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work and at rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, and a large Stilwell Road sign, along with various shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a 16-page, 8 1/2 x 11 inch photograph album belonging to an unidentified member of the 45th Engineer General Service Regiment, one of at least four segregated units of African American soldiers active, stationed in Ledo, India beginning in 1942. Their charge was to build a portion of the Stilwell Road, a military supply route from Ledo in Assam, India, through Burma, to Kunming, China.

The album's original binder is no longer present. Mounted on the loose pages are 44 black-and-white snapshot photographs, most measuring 3 x 4 1/2 inches, some with brief captions in ink. The images include posed and candid snapshots of individuals and groups of African American soldiers, at work on the base and during periods of rest. Soldiers identified in the captions include Charley Woodard, Clarence Benson, Charles J. Greene, and Cain Walker. There are also photographs of buildings on the base, including Battalion Chapel, headquarters (labeled "The Gateway to Hell"), Harmony Church, a large Stilwell Road sign, along with varied shots of military equipment, a "Coolie Camp," the "laundry man," and the Taj Mahal. There are a number of blank pages, and there are some photographs missing.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Gjon Mili photographs, circa 1939-1949 0.25 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 20 prints — 20 prints

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints of images taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Milin. Through new tecniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash which Mili developed at MIT, the black-and-white images, some of which were used by Life magazine, portray human locomotion and the movements of other physical phenomena such as cascading water, frozen in time. Human subjects include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of the photographer Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 20 gelatin silver prints taken during the 1930s and 1940s by photographer Gjon Mili. Using new techniques of strobe lighting and electronic flash that he developed at MIT, Mili created stop-action and multi-image frames portraying the movement of the human body (reminiscent of the more scientific locomotion studies of Étienne Jules Marey and Eadward Muybridge) and of objects such as an egg breaking in a pan, a jet from a siphon bottle, and a cascade of water. Human subjects in the collection include two African American children playing with paddleballs, a man in the shower, a man aiming a racket at a shuttlecock, and female nudes. One image is of Mili photographing a stream of water with his camera.

The prints range in size from 8x10 to 11x14 inches. Most are vintage prints, created from the 1930s to the 1940s; only one bears a date - 1943. A few are mounted on thin board, but the majority are unmounted paper prints. All are stamped with the photographer's name and "From the Richard Checani Collection." One print bears the stamp "Life Photo, to use" referring to Mili's work for the magazine. A few bear penciled captions such as "cartwheel" and "nude descending a staircase," and one penciled notation explains the genesis of the image: "Full frame (35 mm) shot by Wallace Kirkland, who was at my side, G [jon]." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Aaron Siskind photographs of Harlem, circa 1933-1941 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box; 24 print

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. The images, produced for two photo projects, "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world," feature portraits of African American men, women, and children; street scenes; images from the Apollo and Lafayette theaters, a night club, and a church; and the interiors and exteriors of tenement buildings. The gelatin silver prints measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8/1/2 inches to 11 3/4 x 8 3/4 inches. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, there are 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of 24 black-and-white signed prints by photographer Aaron Siskind, documenting life and conditions in New York City's Harlem neighborhoods from about 1933 to 1941. These were the earliest years of Siskind's long career, and a period of experimentation in which he mingled photography with a social purpose with images emphasizing form and light rather than social content.

The majority of the images feature portraits of African American men, women, and children in various settings: on the street; in the Apollo and Lafayette theaters; in a night club; taking part in a church service; playing around abandoned houses; and posing in the bedrooms and other interior rooms of tenement buildings. A few images focus only on buildings or outdoor settings.

Siskind included these and other images in two photo projects in which he played a central role: "Harlem document" and "The most crowded block in the world." "Harlem document" was sponsored by the Photo League of New York. The second project unfolded from about 1939 to 1941 after Siskind left the Photo League; to a large extent, this project carried on the work of documenting street life in Harlem.

The gelatin silver prints in this collection are all signed by Siskind. They all measure 11x14 inches, with the image dimensions ranging from 9 1/8 x 8 3/4 to 11 3/4 x 9 7/5 inches. The year these particular prints were created is unknown. Some of the images have two copies in the collection; thus, this collection holds 19 unique images represented by 24 prints. Titles and dates originate from those accompanying original negatives donated by Siskind to the Eastman House; titles assigned by a former collector, present on the back of the prints, are also given in a separate note field in the collection guide entry for each print.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Ida Grady scrapbook, circa 1927-1930 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

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Nancy Ida Grady, a native of Asheville, N.C., graduated from Duke University's Woman's College in 1928. Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other assorted ephemera and memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

The scrapbook has been disassembled and foldered for preservation purposes. Detached clippings and assorted ephemera are housed in envelopes. Nitrate negatives are closed to use; digital scans are available with advance request.

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Michael Francis Blake photographs, circa 1912-1934 and undated 1.0 Linear Foot — 3 boxes — 243 items

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Michael Francis Blake was one of Charleston, South Carolina's first African American studio photographers. The collection consists of 118 original photographs of African American men, women, and children, both singly and in family groups, most of them taken by Blake from the 1910s to his death in 1934. Formal studio poses predominate. Some prints are stamped with Blake's studio location in Charleston, S.C., though some formal images shot in the collection were taken in other locations, including out of doors. There are some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Formats comprise 91 photographic postcards and 28 black-and-white prints, many on cardstock mounts; there are also eight copy negatives. Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including a portrait of the photographer. Collection includes a complete set of copy prints and the original album from which most of the prints were removed and rehoused. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of 118 photographs of men, women, and children as single individuals, family groups, and other group shots. The great majority of the subjects are African American. The photographs represent the work of Michael Francis Blake, an African American photographer from Charleston, S.C., from the 1910s to his death in 1934; the majority were taken in his studio on #384 West Sumter Street. The location of photograph #28 has been identified as just outside of Blake's studio. Some of the photographs are stamped with Blake's name and studio addresses. However, not all of the photographs have been positively identified as having been taken by Blake.

The great majority of the photographs were originally housed in a photograph album entitled "Portraits of Members," also included in the collection, but have been rehoused for preservation purposes. Ninety-one of the photos are photographic postcards and the others are either mounted photographs or snapshots. The predominant style of the portraits is the formal studio pose, standing or seated. There are also some informal snapshots that may or may not have been taken by Blake. Some photographs were taken outdoors in front of a backdrop and with props such as rugs, chairs and plants to recreate a "studio" portrait. Some have what appear to be shopping lists and other notations written on the backs, and a few have names, ages, and street addresses, presumably of the sitter.

Thirty-six individuals in the photographs have been identified, including one portrait of the photographer, Michael Francis Blake.

The collection includes original prints, handling prints made from original negatives, and eight safety film copy negatives.

Each original print has been assigned a unique identifier. All but one have been digitized and are available online through the Duke Digital Collections.