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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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Bruce Davidson photographs, 1955-2008 6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 229 photographic prints

Bruce Davidson (b. 1933) is an American-born photographer, and a member of the Magnum Photo cooperative agency. Collection consists of 229 photographic prints, mostly black-and-white, with color work present in several series. Subjects range widely, with a focus on human interactions, minority and disenfranchised communities, urban street photography, and landscapes influenced by human activity. Locations include Chicago; Paris; England, Wales, and Scotland; Sicily and Venice; Los Angeles and the California Pacific Coast Highway; and New York City, including East Harlem, Central Park, the subway, and other locations. Also included is a large series of portraits chiefly of celebrities, and images deriving from commercial assignments. Several portraits of African Americans from Mississippi, South Carolina, and New York City were taken in 1962 while Davidson was documenting civil rights actions. Other short series feature nude female studies, French fashion shows, and scenes from the film production of Zabriskie Point by Antonioni. Sizes range from approximately 6x9 to 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The images in this collection were taken by photographer Bruce Davidson over the course of his career, from 1955 to 2008. Genres include street photography, interiors, landscapes, and portraits, all offering a complex view into interactions between people, and between humans and natural and built environments. Most were shot in black-and-white with a large-format camera, though there are also chromogenic and dye transfer color prints in several series. Most of the series in the collection house a small selection of prints from each project; the largest series, Portraits, contains almost 50 prints.

Some of Davidson's earliest photographs were shot in Montmartre, Paris in the 1950s, where he documented the solitary life of the widow of an Impressionist painter. He later returned to Paris in 1962, 1999, and 2005. He traveled the streets of New York City in the 1960s, exploring life in the Lower East Side, East Harlem, and Central Park, and continued this work from the 1970s into the 2000s. There are several series exploring Los Angeles, dating from the 1960s to the 2000s, as well as a series of images taken in Chicago during a visit in 1989. A few images are from Venice and Sicily.

Also present is a large series featuring portraits of U.S. actors, authors, politicians, artists, a conductor, and a rock musician. This series contains the earliest work in the collection, several portraits taken in 1955 of an aging couple in Arizona. A separate series, Time of Change, contains three portraits of African American rural and urban citizens in Mississippi, South Carolina, and New York City, taken in 1962 while Davidson documented the civil rights and suffrage movements in those locations.

Other series in this collection feature images of people, animals, and landscapes in England, Scotland, and coal mining communities in Wales; portraits of passengers on the New York subways; and photographs taken at fashion shoots and at filming locations for Zabriskie Point. Also included is a series of images from commercial assignments and commissions (1983-1997).

Image titles were taken from the prints or from the Magnum Photos website; a few other titles and captions derive from donor notes. Prints with no known titles are noted as such. Significant markings on the prints are also noted, as are legacy identifiers, which include various alphanumberic codes assigned by Davidson, the Magnum cooperative, and a private collector.

The prints are unmounted and were created with traditional processes, chiefly silver gelatin (black-and-white) on paper, with large-format color work present in the Chicago and Subway series, and a few smaller color prints scattered in the Commercial and California series. Print sheet dimensions are given to the nearest 1/8 inch and include variations on 8x10, 8 1/2 x 11, 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 sizes.

Many of the images in this collection were published in photobooks and in journalistic publications, and have been exhibited widely.

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40 volumes of Tatiana Warsher's bound manuscript, Codex Topographicus Pompeianus, detailing the archaeology and architecture of Pompeii, Italy. Volumes include typescripts, maps, photographs, and foldout pages describing streets, buildings, and art in and collected from Pompeii. This set of volumes was assembled by Michael Rostovtzeff, Warsher's mentor and a fellow scholar on Roman antiquities.

The Codex Topographicus Pompeianus consists of manuscript volumes written by Tatiana Warsher between 1937 and 1957. Her mission and motivation in writing the Codex is explained in an undated preface in Volume 3 (focusing on Regio I, Insula 3):

"The work that I am now undertaking, the first completed section of which I offer in the following pages, is to be a descriptive album of photographs of all Pompeii thus far excavated, taken systematically, Insula by Insula. The illustrations are to be accompanied by a running description which will state briefly the essential features of each building in the Insula and of almost each particular illustrated. The need for such a complete and thorough work is great. It is superfluous for me to remark that Pompeii offers an inexhaustible source of first hand material for our study of the ancient world. Every archaeologist knows that in the ruins of Pompeii are hundreds of subjects for research, until now hardly touched upon, which when treated will contribute vastly to our knowledge of ancient Roman life. My album - Codex topographicus - will place this tremendous store house of material within easy reach."

In Volume 36 (focusing on Regio IX, Insula 3), Warsher's preface sheds light on her modest views of her research and its value for future scholarship:

"This is only a rough draft of a book that someone else must write, as Lawrence Richardson has now done with the house of Dioscuri. I have always considered my work that of laying foundations upon which others may build. I have repeatedly urged young students to concentrate their efforts on a single house in the hope that by doing so we shall preserve the fast-vanishing evidence of the excavations. No house merits such a study more than the Casa di Marco Lucrezio. Its difficult plan, its rich paintings, its epigraphical problems, its history are all fascinating. The[sic] let someone take what I offer here as a basis for farther study, elaborate and finish it."

Scholar Lawrence Richardson's biography of Warsher explains that her Codex underwent multiple revisions as she created and distributed new copies of each volume for her mentor, Michael Rostovtzeff, as well as for other scholars and libraries. The volumes in this collection represent the most complete set available in a single research library.

Each volume describes a specific region and zone within Pompeii, indicated by the volume's title. Warsher's photography, cartography, and research about each area's geography, architecture, archaeology, and artwork is included alongside pages of her typescript descriptive text, often written in multiple languages (including English, Latin, Italian, German, and French). Tables of contents are transcribed if included in the volume, as well as production dates and any introductory dedications by Warsher.

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Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize photography collection, 1996-2019 10 Linear Feet — 8 boxes — 91 prints — 36 Gigabytes — 4 digital video files in .mov, .wmv, and mp4 formats (Cozart collection)

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection houses the work of seven documentary artists, all recipients of the Lange-Taylor Prize: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos. Their portfolios total 91 color and black-and-white photographic prints, some of them image collages, and four oral history digital videos. The projects examine a wide variety of topics: the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in mountainous villages of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics institutionalized in the U.S.; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor documentary prize is awarded by Duke University's Center for Documentary Studies to a writer and a photographer in the early stages of a documentary project. The collection comprises the work of seven documentary artists: Rob Amberg, Mary Berridge, Steven Cozart, Jason Eskenazi, Jim Lommasson, Dona Ann McAdams, and Daniel Ramos, totaling 91 color and black-and-white prints and four digital video files of interviews, all awarded the Lange-Taylor Prize.

The projects examine the culture of boxing gyms; the effects of highway construction in the Appalachian mountains; the experiences of HIV-positive women; Jews in the mountains of Azerbaijan; the lives of older schizophrenics; the experiences of Mexican immigrants and their families who have settled in Chicago; and "colorism," prejudice within one's own racial community based on one's skin hue, documented and relived through graphic prints and oral interviews. Several of the collections include paper copies of the artist's statements regarding their projects.

Some of these documentary artist's work was displayed as part of "Hand and Eye: Fifteen Years of the Dorothea Lange-Paul Taylor Prize," an exhibit at the Center for Documentary Studies from September 19, 2005-January 8, 2006.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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I sell the shadow to support the substance : Sojourner Truth, [1864] 1 photograph — print on card mount ; mount 17 x 11 cm.

Albumen photographic portrait on cabinet card featuring full-length image of Sojourner Truth; facing front but turned slightly to her left; in a dark dress with light collar, cap, and shawl; holding her knitting while seated; with her left arm resting on a small table that has a decorative table cloth and holds a notebook and vase of flowers. The room has a patterned rug. There are five spatters of ink or another substance on the surface of the photograph, along with a few spatters on the mount.

"Entered according to act of Congress in the year 1864 by Sojourner Truth in the clerk's office of the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan."--Verso of card mount.

Albumen photographic portrait on cabinet card featuring full-length image of Sojourner Truth; facing front but turned slightly to her left; in a dark dress with light collar, cap, and shawl; holding her knitting while seated; with her left arm resting on a small table that has a decorative table cloth and holds a notebook and vase of flowers. The room has a patterned rug. There are five spatters of ink or another substance on the surface of the photograph, along with a few spatters on the mount.

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James H. Karales photographs, 1953-2006 and undated 18 Linear Feet — Approximately 15,000 items

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Noted American photojournalist who worked for LOOK magazine; resident of New York, N.Y. The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly-complete photographic archive of photojournalist James Karales, active from the 1950s to the 1980s. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. His major projects include images from Rendville, Ohio, a coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam during the war; New York's Lower East Side; Oregon logging; and individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups - the Martin Luther King, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), and Civil Rights Series. Other smaller projects include images of California, New Mexico, and other subjects. Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to almost all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and over 1100 color slides. There are also many print materials and some correspondence and audiovisual materials. Acquired by the Center of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection spans the years 1953 to 2006 and houses a nearly complete photographic archive of well-known 20th century American photojournalist James Karales. The majority of the images in the collection originated from Karales' documentary work for Look magazine during the 1960s. The collection is organized around the following project series: Rendville, Ohio, a declining coal mining town and one of the first racially integrated towns in Appalachia; Vietnam, where Karales documented many scenes from the Vietnam War - the largest series in the collection; the Lower East Side, featuring street scenes and portraits from that New York City neighborhood; and Logging, where Karales documented the Pacific Northwest logging industry's practices and culture. Finally, Karales also shot many images of individuals and events of the Civil Rights movement during the 1960s, housed in three inter-related groups: the Martin Luther King Series; Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) Series; and the Civil Rights Series.

There is also a small group of supporting materials in the Manuscript and Printed Materials Series and the Audiovisual Materials Series that includes biographical documents such as Karales' curriculum vitae; Karales' essays on photography and teaching; publicity for exhibits and other events; correspondence with publishers; digitized images of Vietnam photos on a CD; and clippings, magazine layouts, and other materials related to Karales' published work. One recently dated item is an audiocassette of remarks on Karales' life and works made by Sam Stephenson at the opening of an exhibit of Karales' work at the Rubenstein Library at Duke University.

Publications where Karales' works appeared include Look, Life, Saturday Review, Pageant, Coronet, Popular Photography, Time-Life books, and several encyclopedias. Karales also produced commercial work for corporate annual reports. The collection does not include Karales' photojournalistic work from East Germany (1970), or Gheel, Belgium (1961). A number of Karales' images from the U.S. civil rights movement achieved iconographic status, and were - and still are - widely reproduced. His work is represented in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art in New York.

Formats in the collection include contact sheets, which serve as a thumbnail guide to most but not all of the prints and negatives in the collection; black-and-white proof prints and finished prints ranging from 8.5x14 to 16x20 inches; original negatives (closed to research use); and several hundred color slides. Unless otherwise noted, the photographic items are arranged in the following sequence in each series: contact sheets, prints (from smallest to largest), slides, negatives, and finally, duplicates. There are also digital jpeg files for selected images in certain series (Vietnam, Rendville). One print in the Civil Rights series was created by documentary photographer Alex Harris for an exhibit at Duke University and is noted in the collection guide's entry for this print.

Beginning with the contact sheets, researchers using the collection can note any identifying codes for the image, which may include Karales' job number (Karales assigned most of his jobs or photographic projects alpha-numeric codes), roll number, and frame (image) number, in that order. Whenever possible, Rubenstein staff have included these numbers with individual prints and negatives and within the collection's inventory to aid in matching nd discovery. In addition, staff have noted where film rolls are located within folders. For finished prints (typically 11x14 inches and larger), individual descriptions and unique Rubenstein library identifiers (beginning with "RL") have been assigned. There are a few images that have no identifying numbers and could not otherwise be identified from contact sheets or negatives. Such captions appear in brackets.

In order to facilitate the use of the materials, please consult with a Research Services archivist before coming to use this collection.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Collection spans the pastoral career of United Methodist minister Julius Logan Brasher. Brasher was minister at six congregations in New Jersey from the early 1940s to 1976, when he and his wife Lois Brasher relocated to the Brasher home of Gadsden, Alabama. Collection contains Brasher's diaries and pastor's record books, materials from the churches where he ministered, sermons and accompanying notes, subject and name files, correspondence, photographs, and printed materials.

The Julius Logan Brasher Papers document the personal and pastoral life of the Methodist minister. Son of Holiness Movement minister John Lakin Brasher, Julius Logan Brasher attended Drew Theological School. He served as a Methodist minister in New Jersey from 1937 to 1976, after which time he retired to his original home of Gadsden, Alabama. He continued to serve as a pastor and religious advisor in that community through 2011. Brasher's activities as a minister at six churches in New Jersey and two in Alabama are documented throughout the collection. Collection contains Brasher's diaries and record books, sermon notes, church files, name and subject files, correspondence, photographs, some printed materials, and one audiotape.

Diaries files comprise diaries, calendars, and pastor's record books kept by Brasher between 1946 and 1977. Entries contain notes about parishioners, appointments, and sermons given.

The sermons and religious writings files contain full-length sermons as well as notes and cue cards used by Brasher to give sermons at churches throughout his career, including his years as a student at Drew Theological School. Topics range from weekly Sunday services to weddings, memorials, and holidays. Some sermon notes are folded into the church program during which the sermon was given. Many sermons are undated. Other writings include some of Brasher's academic papers from Seminary as well as narrative religious writings from throughout his career. A portion of the sermons arrived alphabetically sorted by Brasher, referring to the titles of the sermons.

The Churches files relate to Brasher's activities as a pastor at United Methodist churches in New Jersey and Alabama. The files contain church programs, newsletters, correspondence, and printed materials collected and created by Brasher. Files from Gadsden UMC include memos and notes from the Julius Brasher Discussion Class. The following churches are represented in the series: • First Congregational Church of Chester, NJ (Chester, NJ): 1939-1942 • Blairstown United Methodist Church (Blairstown, NJ): 1942-1946 • Denville Community Church (United Methodist) (Denville, NJ): 1946-1955 • Rutherford United Methodist Church (Rutherford, NJ): 1955-1962 • Westwood United Methodist Church (Westwood, NJ): 1962-1968 • Plainfield United Methodist Church (Plainfield, NJ): 1972-1976 • Walnut Grove United Methodist Church (Walnut Grove, AL): 1978-1979 • Gadsden United Methodist Church (Gadsden, AL): 1979-2011

Correspondence files contain letters received by Brasher beginning with his tenure at Drew Seminary and throughout his career. Primary among the correspondents is his father, John Lakin Brasher. The elder Brasher wrote letters to Julius and the rest of the family several times a week from the 1930s through the 1950s. Other correspondents include parishioners, friends, and other family members. Name and Subject Files contain correspondence, printed materials, notes, and writings on subjects assigned by Brasher. Among the name files is a folder with Brasher's correspondence with Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam, a social reformer and Methodist Bishop. Oxnam was accused of being a communist by Donald Jackson. Some correspondence relates to these accusations, and Brasher's support of Oxnam. Subject files include Brasher's files from Drew Theological School, the Rotary Club, the Northern New Jersey Cabinet, and his work on the Board of Education trustees and the Board of Discipleship Trustees.

Photographs are mostly undated black-and-white snapshots from Brasher's church communities in New Jersey. Common subjects are Sunday school classes, church picnics, headshots of congregants, and promotional images of the churches where Brasher was pastor.

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Leon S. Adler papers, 1943-1993 5.5 Linear Feet — 105 items

Collection comprises letters, military service and medical records, two photograph albums, and printed items maintained by Leon S. Adler, along with a scrapbook maintained stateside by Roslyn "Posy" Adler between 1943 and 1945 to record Leon's naval service, from his training and teaching at Ft. Schuyler, N.Y., to his service as part of the fleet which occupied Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, following the war. Includes two printed items, a copy of the book U.S.S. Biloxi published around 1945, and a CRAM'S WAR ATLAS, dating between 1941-1945, along with a U.S. Service flag from World War II.

Collection comprises letters, military service and medical records, two photograph albums, and printed items maintained by Leon S. Adler, along with a scrapbook maintained stateside by Roslyn "Posy" Adler between 1943 and 1945 to record Leon's naval service, from his training and teaching at Ft. Schuyler, N.Y., to his service as part of the fleet which occupied Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, following the war. Includes two printed items, a copy of the book U.S.S. Biloxi published around 1945, and a CRAM'S WAR ATLAS, dating between 1941-1945, along with a U.S. Service flag from World War II.

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Park-Lambuth-Sherertz family papers, 1825-1989 2.5 Linear Feet — 1000 Items

The Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families were Methodist missionaries to China, Japan, and Africa. The collection includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; a videocassette; photographs; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Materials range in date from circa 1825 to 1989.

The collection (01-108) (160 items, 1.2 linear feet; dated 1825-1970s) includes the family Bible; correspondence to and from members of the three families; graphic materials; printed material; poetry; and typescripts of essays regarding family members' daily lives and work as missionaries in China, Japan, and Africa. The families mentioned are ancestors of Olive Sherertz Lanham (Duke '43). Includes 2 color prints, 5 black-and-white prints, and 2 albumen prints.

The addition (01-146) (375 items, .6 linear feet; dated 1898-1977) contains letters; reports; diary entries; genealogical information; 1 videocassette; 2 black-and-white photographs, 1 black-and-white print, and 1 albumen print. There are also other items, chiefly relating to the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families' life and work in China and Japan.

The 2002 addition (02-179) (100 items, .2 lin. ft.; dated 1825-1981 and n.d.) consists primarily of memoirs and correspondence documenting the families' ancestry and experiences in China and Japan (1825-1981 and n.d.). Also includes newspaper clippings about family members.

The 2004 addition (07-080) (375 items, 0.6 lin. ft; dated circa 1890-1989 and undated) contains letters, biographical sketches of family members, clippings, writings, and photographs documenting the members of the Park, Lambuth, and Sherertz families. Materials range in date from circa 1890 to 1989.