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African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

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Arthur F. Burns papers, 1911-2005 and undated, bulk 1940-1987 18.5 Linear Feet — approximately 2,675 items — 2.6 Gigabytes

Arthur Frank Burns was an Austrian-born economist, policy maker, and diplomat; chair of U.S. Federal Reserve Board from 1970-1978 and economic advisor for six U.S. presidencies. These papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created between 1940 and 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and U.S. diplomacy. There is a limited amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantive exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell. There are a few letters in German, French, and Russian.

The Arthur Frank Burns Papers cover the years 1911 through 2005. The bulk of the material was created from 1940 to 1987 and pertains to Burns's career as an economic advisor, particularly to Republican administrations, as the chair of the Federal Reserve, and as ambassador to Germany. The collection is arranged into seven series: Correspondence, Honors and Awards, Journals, Personal Papers, Photographs, Print Materials, and Research and Teaching. There are also oversize materials housed at the end of the collection. Topics of interest in this collection include but are not limited to: the United States economic system and fiscal policies; the Federal Reserve Board and related committees; recessions, unemployment, and inflation; the world economy and finance; the U.S. presidency during the time period; the Nixon presidency in particular, including the Watergate affair; presidential campaigns and elections; and diplomacy. There is a small amount of research and teaching material, chiefly from the 1920s-1930s. The most significant component of the collection is the correspondence between Arthur Burns and Presidents Eisenhower, Nixon, Kennedy, Ford, Carter, Reagan, and George H. W. Bush, as well as substantial exchanges with economists Milton Friedman and Wesley Clair Mitchell.

The most substantial and notable papers are found in the Correspondence Series, which contains letters and memoranda written from 1911-1997 both to and from Burns and/or his wife, Helen. The series is organized into three subseries, Correspondence by Individual, Correspondence by Topic, and Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns. The majority of the exchanges in the first subseries are letters written to or by presidents or vice presidents (Dwight Eisenhower, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter, Ronald Reagan, George H. W. Bush, Spiro Agnew, Hubert Humphrey, and Nelson Rockefeller). Burns's correspondence with presidents Eisenhower and Nixon is particularly extensive and reveals the making of crucial policy decisions. Also included is Burns's correspondence with economists Wesley Clair Mitchell, Milton Friedman, and George Stigler. This subseries is organized alphabetically by correspondent and then chronologically.

The Correspondence by Topic subseries contains letters and attachments primarily related to Burns's work in academia, politics, and the private sector. Finally, the Correspondence to Mrs. Helen Burns subseries contains letters written by prominent figures such as Richard Nixon, Ronald Reagan, and Mamie Eisenhower to Burns's wife, Helen, both during his life and after his death.

High-value correspondence, including originals signed by presidents and some other notable correspondents, are separately stored and restricted to use except under direct staff supervision. Photocopies of these original manuscripts have been made for researcher use. Other letters signed by mechanical means have not been photocopied, but they are filed with the photocopies of original letters.

The other series house papers and memorabilia documenting Burns' career, including photocopies of two handwritten journals (1969-1974) kept by Burns during the Nixon Administration; several folders of early research and teaching materials; honors and awards received by Burns; personal correspondence, clippings, and other materials; lectures, speeches, and articles from Burns's career as economist and ambassador; photographs of Burns, his wife Helen, and political figures and celebrities attending events; publicity items such as news clippings, interviews, and articles about Burns; and program materials for the Arthur F. Burns Fellowship, an exchange program for German and U.S. media professionals. Further description available at the series level in this collection guide.

The great majority of the Burns papers are in English, but there are roughly ten items in German and a few items in French and Russian (Cyrillic script).

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The Auxiliary Services Reference Collection contains reports, memoranda, publications, schedules, flyers, charts, news clippings and other materials about the operations of Auxiliary Services. This collection was compiled from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Dorsey & Whitney records, 1997-2008 and undated, bulk 2004-2008 7.8 Linear Feet — 12 boxes — Approximately 4,875 Items

Dorsey & Whitney LLP is a Minneapolis-based business law firm whose lawyers took on the pro bono cases of Bahraini detainees at the Guantánamo Bay detention center. The Dorsey & Whitney Records span the years 1997-2008, with the majority of the materials created between 2004 and 2008. The records consist largely of legal papers, news clippings, writings and correspondence regarding the cases of six Bahraini detainees: Jumah Al-Dossari, Abdullah Al-Nuaimi, Isa Al-Murbati, Salah Al-Balooshi, Adel Hajji and Salman bin Ibrahim Al-Khalifa, kept under extra-judicial detention by the U.S. military at Camp Delta, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba. A team of three lawyers, Mark S. Sullivan, Joshua Colangelo-Bryan and Christopher G. Karagheuzoff took on the cases of Bahraini detainees pro bono in 2004. The records in this collection document the lawyers' legal motions, public campaigns and diplomatic negotiations for writ of habeas corpus and the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees. Many of these documents are also present in electronic form. The records are arranged in four series: Case Files, Correspondence, Publicity, and Digital Files. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive.

The Dorsey & Whitney Records span the years 1997-2008, with the majority of the materials created between 2004 and 2008. The records consist largely of legal papers, news clippings, writings and correspondence regarding the cases of six Bahraini detainees: Jumah Al-Dossari, Abdullah Al-Nuaimi, Isa Al-Murbati, Salah Al-Balooshi, Adel Hajji and Salman bin Ibrahim Al-Khalifa, kept under extra-judicial detention by the U.S. military at Camp Delta, Guantánamo Bay Naval Base, Cuba.

A team of three lawyers, Mark S. Sullivan, Joshua Colangelo-Bryan and Christopher G. Karagheuzoff took on the cases of Bahraini detainees pro bono in 2004. The records in this collection document the lawyers' legal motions, public campaigns and diplomatic negotiations for writ of habeas corpus and the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees, as well the surrounding issues of the Bush administration's responses to terrorism, the civil rights of prisoners of war, and the use of interrogation and torture at U.S. installations. Many of these documents are also present in the form of electronic files.

The records are divided into four series: Case Files, Correspondence, Publicity, and Digital Files. The Case Files Series (nine boxes of the thirteen in the collection) comprises petitions, filings, documents relating to the Combatant Status Review Tribunal (CRST), and a wide variety of legal records regarding the six Bahrainis' and other concurrent Guantánamo detainee cases. The Correspondence Series includes exchanges between client detainees, Department of Justice officials, Bahraini diplomats and officials, U.S. senators and congressmen, law scholars, and colleagues of the Dorsey & Whitney team representing the Guantánamo detainees. The letters and writings in this series cover issues and problems related to the legal status of Guantánamo detainees, human rights violations at Camp Delta, and diplomatic efforts for the release and repatriation of the Bahraini detainees. The high-profile case of Jumah Al-Dossari, detained in 2001 and eventually released without facing any charges in 2007, is covered in depth in this series, becoming an emblematic example of the abuse and torture at Guantánamo Naval Base and detrimental consequences of long term solitary confinement. Also covered in depth in the Correspondence Series is the Graham-Levin-Kyl Amendment approved by the Senate on November, 15 2005, which prohibits all habeas corpus claims by Guantánamo detainees and allows military tribunals to rely on evidence gathered by the use of torture. The Publicity Series brings together news articles regarding Bahraini Guantánamo detainees, commentaries addressing the legal process and human rights issues, and interviews with Dorsey & Whitney lawyers about the conditions at the military base and the legal and living situation of the detainees. The clippings in the collection were published by major news press and online media outlets worldwide, and include seven folders which hold many Arabic language news clippings. Many of the legal team's documents are also present in the form of electronic documents which are organized into folders described in the Digital Files Series. Also present is a twelve-minute unclassified audio recording on CD-R of the CRST hearing for Al-Murbati, and printed images of the families of the detainees. Original electronic files and recordings are closed to access but use copies may be requested; please contact Research Services.

The Dorsey & Whitney Records are composed of materials predominantly in the English language. There is also a considerable amount of Arabic language items in all three series. These chiefly consist of affidavits, letters by detainees and their relatives, and news clippings. Most of the Arabic language materials have English translations, with the exception of the news clippings.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints, negatives, slides, and CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography. Duke Photography is a department of the Office of Public Affairs and Government Relations. Chris Hildreth is the current director; the department also includes assistant director Les Todd and six other staff photographers.

The majority of images in the collection are faculty and staff portraits taken by Duke Photography staff; a few pictures of students or of other individuals not affiliated with Duke are included. The collection contains photographic prints of various sizes, both black-and-white and color; contact sheets; negatives, including black-and-white 35mm negatives, positive 35mm color slides, and other sizes; and seven CDs of digital files. Most of the items are undated but appear to be from the 1980s through around 2000. Most items include a job number assigned by Duke Photography, either on the back of photographs or on the plastic sheets housing the negatives.

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Faith Holsaert papers, 1950-2011 10.2 Linear Feet — 6525 items

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Faith Holsaert is a Civil Rights and LGBT community activist. The collection contains correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Correspondence, newsletters, publications, and other materials relating to the activities of Faith Holsaert from the 1960s to the present. A large portion of the collection consists of correspondence and ephemera from her involvement in the Civil Rights movement, including SNCC, and the women's rights movement. Also includes materials from the writing and publishing of Hands on the Freedom Plow, some of which is restricted. The collection also has a large amount of personal memorabilia and materials relating to Holsaert's childhood and family.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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Franco Modigliani was an economist, Nobel Prize winner, and professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). Collection contains correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings that documents the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials.

The Franco Modigliani Papers span the years 1936 to 2005, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1970s to 2003. Through correspondence, extensive research notes, unpublished writings, lectures and presentations, teaching materials, published materials, photographs, audiovisual materials, scrapbooks, and clippings, the papers document the career of a noted economist and Nobel Prize winner, from his earliest student work in Italy through his 40-year tenure of teaching and research at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. The most current items are a DVD recording of his memorial held at MIT in 2003, and a thesis by an Italian graduate student on Modigliani's macroeconomic views on the Italian and European economy, of the same year. The many annotations written by Modigliani's wife and collaborator, Serena Modigliani, found throughout the collection, provide further information contextualizing the materials. The collection is organized into the following series: Correspondence; Writings and Speeches; Teaching Materials; Professional Service; Engagements; Printed Materials; Personal Files; Audio and Visual Materials; and Electronic Formats. Oversize materials are described at the end of the collection guide.

Researchers will find ample documentation in the collection on Modigliani's work on the life-cycle hypothesis of savings, leading to the Nobel Prize in 1985. Other materials represent his work on topics and issues such as monetary policies, both domestic and foreign; pension trusts; public debt; econometric modelling; international finance and the international payment system; the effects of and cures for inflation; stabilization policies in open economies; and various fields of finance such as savings and investment, credit rationing, mortgages, the term structure of interest rates, and the valuation of speculative assets. Extensive documentation can also be found in the collection on Modigliani's key participation in the design of a large-scale model of the U.S. economy, called the MPS (an abbreviation deriving from collaborators MIT, Pennsylvania State University, and Social Science Research Council), sponsored by the Federal Reserve Bank, a model used by the U.S. government until the 1990s. Other documents reveal Modigliani's analyses of the forces of economics and politics in the United States as well as in Italy and the European Union as a whole. His views on various social issues, including the arms race, are found throughout the papers, especially in the many editorials and commentaries he wrote for newspapers and other publications. The materials in this collection reveal the high value that Modigliani placed on collaboration with other economists and with graduate students, with whom he exchanged letters, notes, and drafts of writings and commentary. Researchers examining the correspondence and writings will find the comments, replies, and writings of his many colleagues on the same range of topics. Significant correspondents or collaborators documented in the collection include European and American economists such as Albert Ando, with whom he collaborated on the MPS model, Mario Baldassarri, John Bossons, Jacques Drèze, Merton Miller, Paul Samuelson and James Tobin. Many other major economists of the twentieth century, as well as many political and academic individuals, are represented in smaller amounts of writings and correspondence.

In addition to illuminating Modigliani's distinguished academic career and his collaborative approach to teaching and research, the materials in this collection offer insights into how he contributed significantly throughout his life to European and United States economic growth and reform, through professional service as an analyst, advisor, and expert witness. Organizations that benefited from this work include the Federal Reserve Board, the Federal Reserve Bank, the U.S. Congress, and the Treasury Department. Other organizations with whom Modigliani participated and corresponded and are represented in many series in the collection are the offices of the International Economic Association, the American Economic Review, the National Science Foundation, and the National Academy of Sciences.

The Correspondence Series, second largest in the collection, spans all of Modigliani's career, and consists chiefly of professional exchanges initiated by his colleagues in the U.S. and in many other countries. Many of the exchanges are in Italian, though most are in English. Numerous correspondents requested that Modigliani review their writings, and in most cases a draft of their manuscripts can be found in the folder, often accompanied by Modigliani's comments. The correspondence also contains more routine exchanges concerning student advising, academic committees, and activities related to Modigliani's non-academic service. There is very little personal or family correspondence in the collection, though there are some exchanges between Franco Modigliani and his son Andr, sociologist at the University of Michigan, and with his granddaughter Leah, a financial analyst with Morgan Dean Stanley Witter, with whom Modigliani collaborated on a formula for measuring stock risks.

The largest in the collection, the Writings and Speeches Series is subdivided into several subseries, the most extensive of which, the Research and Writings Subseries, contains a wealth of notes, data, subject files, and writings that underpinned and informed nearly all of Modigliani's most significant published works. These extensive files document the evolution of Modigliani's thought on a wide range of economic, social, and political topics, and the amount of materials in this series contributed by his colleagues serves to underscore Modigliani's collaborative approach to research and writing. As much as a third of the material is in Italian. Many of Modigliani's speeches and lectures given around the world, including his Nobel lecture on the life-cycle hypothesis of saving in 1985, can be found in the Speeches and Lectures Subseries. The Non-Academic Writings Subseries contains other writings by Modigliani directed chiefly at a popular audience, in the form of newspaper articles and editorials; while the Writings by Others Subseries houses individual writings, in both manuscript and published form, by Modigliani's colleagues that were not part of the Research and Writings files.

Modigliani spent the greater part of his professional life serving in a number of roles that helped shape the national economic policies in Europe, particularly in Italy, and the United States. The Professional Service Series documents Modigliani's work for various U.S. agencies and organizations. It includes materials from his work under the Federal Reserve Board (FRB), from about 1964 to 1983; these files include agendas, minutes, notes, correspondence, papers, and statistical output relating to FRB meetings and MPS Economic Model. Other files house information relating to his frequent Congressional testimony; his work with the International Economics Association during the seventies and eighties, including conference papers and programs, minutes from executive committee meetings, nominating committee reports, and correspondence; and his other periods of collaboration with the Central Bank, the National Academy of Sciences, the office of the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury, and others. Materials on Modigliani's lengthy service to Italian and other European governments can be found primarily in the Research and Writings Subseries of the Writings and Speeches Series and the Correspondence Series.

The papers in the Teaching Materials Series document Modigliani's career as a professor of economics through lecture notes, syllabi, and some student papers, all filed in the Modigliani as Teacher Subseries. Materials derive chiefly from his tenure at the Massachussetts Institute of Technology, although there are some materials from earlier appointments. There are some materials, chiefly class notes, from Modigliani's own student days in the United States in the Modigliani as Student Subseries.

The Personal Files Series is one of the smallest in the collection. It contains materials pertaining to Modigliani's life in Italy and his forced emigration to the United States in 1939, diplomas and honorary degrees, and a number of folders containing biographical information and articles honoring Modigliani's life and work.

Spanning several decades of internationally-recognized work and the awarding of a Nobel prize in 1985, the materials in the Engagements Series, though routine in nature, document the extent to which Modigliani spoke to academics and the ordinary public about issues in economics, via lectures, conferences, and interviews. Files in the Commitments Subseries include routine correspondence, travel arrangements and itineraries, and some writings related to the lecture or speech. The small Calendars Subseries contains appointment books and calendars dating from 1971 to 2003.

In addition to manuscript materials, the collection holds a great number of published writings. These are chiefly housed in the Printed Materials Series and take the form of reports, journals, books, and many reprints of articles. Most of the materials are written by Modigliani, but there are substantial numbers of publications by others in this series. Almost all of the few dozen bound publications originally found in the collection have been cataloged separately for the Duke online catalog and will be housed in the rare books and Perkins Library stacks. They can be accessed by searching the online catalog; a note in the record indicates their original link with these papers. Although nearly all of Modigliani's article-length published works are represented in this series, including early articles from the 1930s, some titles may not be present.

The Audio and Visual Materials Series serves as a repository for photographs, videocassettes, audiocassettes, microfilms, and a few CD-ROMs, which contain interviews, lectures, and speeches given by Modigliani, with a few including contributions by his colleagues. One CD-Rom contains the proceedings from a posthumous conference held in 2005 in remembrance of Modigliani. Family scrapbooks preserved on microfilm are made up of clippings, programs, and other memorabilia related to significant events in Modigliani's career. Use copies may need to be made of some items. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this collection.

Digital formats in the collection are grouped under the Electronic Formats Series (RESTRICTED), which contains correspondence, course materials, data, and drafts of writings and speeches. The contents of the disks have been migrated to the Special Collections server. A disk directory is available for use. Please consult with Research Services staff before coming to use this series.

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Horse & Buggy Press print and graphic design projects, 1996-2017 4.0 Linear Feet — 7 boxes — 185 items

Collection of fine art print and graphic design projects by Horse & Buggy Press in Durham, North Carolina, commissioned chiefly by non-profit organizations, small firms, individual authors and artists, and community events organizers. Formats include catalogs, broadsides, posters, newsletters, pamphlets and brochures, programs, and jacket and packaging designs for six audio and film recordings. Smaller projects include exhibit and book announcements, business cards, invitations, and menus for local restaurants. Chiefly consists of letterpress work, but there are also examples of offset and digitally printed items. Many projects involved the work of other artists and designers, and many were printed in limited editions. Content often includes poetry, prose excerpts, and quotes. Books and zines printed by Horse & Buggy Press have been separated from this collection and individually described for the Duke University Libraries catalog.

Collection of fine art print and graphic design projects by Horse & Buggy Press in Durham, North Carolina, commissioned chiefly by non-profit organizations, small firms, individual authors and artists, and community events organizers. Formats include catalogs, broadsides, posters, newsletters, pamphlets and brochures, programs, and jacket and packaging designs for six audio and film recordings. Smaller projects include exhibit and book announcements, business cards, invitations, and menus for local restaurants.

Chiefly consists of letterpress work, but there are also examples of offset and digitally printed items. Many projects involved the work of other artists and designers, and many were printed in limited editions. Content often includes poetry, prose excerpts, and quotes. Books and zines printed by Horse & Buggy Press have been separated from this collection and individually described for the Duke University Libraries catalog.