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Dan Kirsch papers, 1975-2004 19.1 Linear Feet — 10,840 Items

Activist, community organizer, and theater director. Executive director of Charlotte's Lesbian and Gay Community Center. He also founded One Voice, a gay, lesbian and gay-affirmative chorus in Charlotte, NC, and OutCharlotte, an annual cultural festival that celebrated LGBT culture through theater, dance, music, visual art, film and video. Collection documents the activities of Dan Kirsch and his work with various North Carolina gay and lesbian organizations. Organizations represented in the collection include One Voice, the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board, PELAG, Time Out Youth, OutCharlotte, NC Pride, and The Lesbian and Gay Community Center of Charlotte.

Accession (2005-0037) (21 boxes) documents the activities of N.C. gay and lesbian organizations. Includes correspondence, newsletters, programs, flyers, and organizational material from One Voice; organizational material, correspondence, programs, invitations, minutes, registration records, financial records (bulk 1994) from Music & Message, the Gala Choruses Leadership Conference (Sept. 2-4, 1994 in Charlotte); correspondence, newsletters, clippings, financial records (1993-1996), minutes, and administrative records for the N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride Board; fund raising material for the AIDS fund raiser Heart Strings (June 15, 1992), and Pelag benefit Our Family Celebration (Oct. 12, 1991); and files, promotional materials, newsletters, clippings, minutes, and financial records about a N.C. Lesbian and Gay Pride event, 1994. Also included are posters, t-shirts, 14 VHS video tapes, 1 CD-Rom, 50 photographs, and 25 slides.

Accession (2007-0079) (1600 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 1991-2002) contains organization files and correspondence for Time Out Youth, an organization for lesbian, gay, and bisexual youth; financial and organizational files for OutCharlotte (1995-1998); NC Pride files; conference materials; and clippings from local publications including the Charlotte Observer, Creative Loafing, and The Leader. Also included are 2 CD-Rs containing audio clips of interviews, 15 Hi8 video cassettes, 9 VHS tapes, 4 audio cassettes, and photographs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2009-0173) (2500 items; 3.6 lin. ft.; dated 1999-2004) includes materials from the planning and construction of The Lesbian and Gay Community Center in Charlotte, NC. Also includes The Center program files, administrative materials, board meeting minutes, publicity, and volunteer information.

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David X. Young films, 1955-2007 12.5 Linear Feet — Seven boxes of film reels, one box of video- and audio-cassettes, and one box of CDs and DVDs.

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Collection consists of 8mm and 16mm films, videocassettes, compact discs, and audiocassettes, deriving from artist David X. Young's work in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. His New York work includes films of W. Eugene Smith working in his loft studio in 1971, as well as experimental films dating from the 1950s to the 1980s. Homemade audiocassette mix tapes document Young's interest in jazz as well as his piano playing. Videocassettes consist of reference copies of several films and television programs on W. Eugene Smith. This collection is part of the Archive of Documentary Arts. Original recordings are closed to research access pending reformatting.

The David X. Young Films, 1955-2007, includes film reels, videocassettes, and audiocassettes produced primarily by artist David X. Young between 1955 and 1996, in New York City, Cape Cod, and Haiti. Although transferred to the Archive of Documentary Arts at the Rubenstein Library in 2012, the collection was originally acquired from Young’s estate by the Center for Documentary Studies, for use by Sam Stephenson in his research on W. Eugene Smith for the book The Jazz Loft Project (2010). As a consequence, nearly half the collection is comprised of materials relating to Young’s involvement in the production of "Let Truth Be The Prejudice," a half-hour documentary on Smith produced by CBS in 1971, as part of its Lamp Unto My Feet series. These materials include a composite print of the final 28-minute program, un-synced picture and soundtrack reels not used in the final program, and videocassette and disc copies of the reels created by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2007.

The balance of the collection consists primarily of elements related to film projects created by Young between 1955 and 1986, including Klaximo, Seven Haitian Moods, Duck Season. Many of the elements in the collection, representing these and other projects, were spooled--put together on one reel--to facilitate video transfer previous to the films being acquired by the Center for Documentary Studies.

In addition to these films, the collection contains nine audiocassette tapes, including radio broadcasts of music and spoken-word material, as well as one recording of David X. Young playing piano, and four VHS videocassette tapes, from television broadcasts of programs on W. Eugene Smith.

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Jacqueline End papers, 1965-2012 and undated 3 Linear Feet — 900 Items

Advertising copy writer and creative executive for a number of agencies, including: Doyle Dane Bernbach; Wells Rich Greene; Foote, Cone & Belding; TBWA/Chiat/Day. Primarily examples of creative work, including print advertisements and proofs, design layouts and sketches, photographs, correspondence and printed materials. Non-paper formats include audiotape, videocassettes, audio cassettes, DAT, CD-R and DVD-R. Clients represented include Absolut, Ascencia (Bayer), Bali and Wonderbra (now part of Hanes family of brands), K-Mart, L'Oreal, Nivea, Ralston Purina, Ricoh, Sara Lee, Sega, Trojan (Church & Dwight) and Volkswagen. Agencies represented include Doyle Dane Bernbach, Foote Cone & Belding, Forman End Dolleck, Kaplan Thaler, TBWA/Chiat/Day and Wells Rich Greene. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The Jacqueline End Papers span the years 1965-2012 and consist primarily of examples of End's creative work, including print advertisements and proofs, design layouts and sketches, photographs, correspondence and printed materials that document her advertising career with a number of agencies, including Doyle Dane Bernbach, Foote Cone & Belding, Forman End Dolleck, Kaplan Thaler, TBWA/Chiat/Day and Wells Rich Greene. Non-paper formats include audiotape, videocassettes, audio cassettes, DAT, CD-R and DVD-R. Clients represented include Absolut, Ascencia (Bayer), Bali and Wonderbra (now part of Hanes family of brands), K-Mart, L'Oreal, Nivea, Ralston Purina, Ricoh, Sara Lee, Sega, Trojan (Church & Dwight) and Volkswagen.

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Founded in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. The JWT London Office opened in 1899. Terry Bullen was an advertising executive at the JWT London Office who worked in New Business and as Director of Planning before retiring in 2001. The J. Walter Thompson Company London Office Terry Bullen Papers span the years 1979-2002 and consist primarily of presentations and research reports made by JWT. Clients represented include Allied Breweries, Ansell's Bitter (Carlsberg), Beconase (GlaxoSmithKline), British Airports Authority (BAA), Esso, Golden Wonder, Mr. Kipling, Tetley, and Warner Lambert Health Care. Also included are videocassettes, CD-R's and awards information. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

The J. Walter Thompson Company London Office Terry Bullen Papers span the years 1979-2002 and consist primarily of presentations and research reports made by JWT. Clients represented include Allied Breweries, Ansell's Bitter (Carlsberg), Beconase (GlaxoSmithKline), British Airports Authority (BAA), Esso, Golden Wonder, Mr. Kipling, Tetley, and Warner Lambert Health Care. Also included are videocassettes, CD-R's and awards information.

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Picturing Activism student projects, 2017 1.0 Linear Foot — 2 boxes; 2 optical disks — 31 items — 7 small volumes; 12 posters; 1 CD-R; 1 DVD

Collection consists of seven creative projects produced by students in the class "Picturing Activism," taught by Lisa McCarty in Fall 2017 at Duke University. The projects utilize archival and contemporary photographs, narrative, poetry, illustrations, digital documents, posters, and oral history interviews in digital audio format to explore themes related to activism, cultural experiences, and visual culture. Subjects include murals in Durham, N.C.; activism in Alamance County, N.C.; African American women, racism, and political activism; environmental crises and activism through photography; pit bull rescues and animal rights; and Chinese cooking as cultural expression. Some of the archival photographs are from the Rubenstein Library's collections. Aquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of seven creative projects produced by students in the class "Picturing Activism," taught by Lisa McCarty in Fall 2017 at Duke University. The projects utilize archival and contemporary photographs, narrative, poetry, illustrations, digital documents, posters, and oral history interviews in digital audio format to explore themes related to activism, cultural experiences, and visual culture. Subjects include murals in Durham, N.C.; activism in Alamance County, N.C.; African American women, racism, and political activism; environmental crises and activism through photography; pit bull rescues and animal rights; and Chinese cooking as cultural expression. Some of the archival photographs are from the Rubenstein Library's collections. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Vincent Cianni photographs, 1983-2012 21.5 Linear Feet — 22 boxes — 668 items

Vince Cianni is a documentary photographer based in Newburgh, New York. The Berlin series features photographs of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall, and the reunification of Germany in 1990. The Poughkeepsie Mall and the Providence House Men's Shelter series both document urban culture and decay in the 1980s. The Weddings Series contains photographs from weddings (including some transgender) from the mid-1980s. The Brooklyn project features images and recorded interviews from Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore, which relates to Hispanic American roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, mid-1990s. Cambodian kickboxing culture is explored in another set of photographs taken in 2004. The last series offers a set of oral history interviews of gays in the military, also related to a photobook by Cianni. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises photographs from six bodies of documentary work by Vince Cianni, New York-based photographer and author. Subjects focus chiefly on American culture, exploring wedding rituals, skateboarding and youth culture, urban decay, street photography, shopping mall society, men in shelters, and gays in the military. There is also a series on kickboxing in Cambodia, and a large set of oral history interviews with gay men and women in the U.S. military. Most of the prints are gelatin silver, but there are also some in color.

Accession 2007-0072 houses a series of 224 black-and-white photographs depicting roller blade and Hispanic American youth street culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, taken by Cianni during the 1990s and into 2001. Fifteen of the prints appear in Cianni's book, We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side (2001); and 68 prints are unpublished. Photographs are captioned and signed on the back. Also included are photographs of urban life in the Bronx, NY; and from the baby shower (Queens, NY) and wedding (Fairborn, OH) of a young couple who appear in other images from this series. Finally, the series houses the maquette for Cianni's book (version 1, 2000), and the printer's dummy (versions 2-3, 2001-2004).

Accession 2007-0200 contains 65 black-and-white prints and photographic collages of East Berlin, the destruction of the Berlin Wall and the reunification of Berlin, 1990. Prints range from 8x10 to 16x24 and are captioned and signed on back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0048 contains prints from the Poughkeepsie Mall Series (Poughkeepsie, NY, 1980s) and the Providence House Men's Shelter Series (Newburgh, NY, 1983). Forty-four black-and-white photographic prints: one 5 5/8 x 8 ½; one 5 7/8 x9; and forty-two 11x14 prints. Poughkeepsie Mall series: twenty-two 11x14 prints, 1980s. The images depict youth culture, African American culture, and urban decay.

Accession 2008-0300 contains 184 prints of weddings, including some transexual weddings, taken by Cianni during the 1980s. This series includes Cianni's MFA project, Wedding Rituals, a group of twenty-four 20x24 prints and one 16x20 print. Photographs in this series are in both color and black-and-white; many are captioned and signed on the back by the photographer.

Accession 2008-0303 contains an additional 23 8x10 duotone and gelatin silver prints from Cianni's book We Skate Hardcore: Photographs from Brooklyn's South Side. These prints include portraits and other images of Hispanic American youth roller blade culture in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York during the mid-1990s.

Accession 2009-0243 houses forty-two black-and-white photographs of Muay Thai style of kickboxing competition in Siem Reap, Cambodia, 2004: thirty-six 8x10 prints and six 16x20 prints.

Accession 2010-0187 includes forty-seven 8x10 black-and-white prints from the We Skate Hardcore series. The gelatin silver prints are signed on verso and date 1995-2003, with bulk dates 1995-1997.

In addition, the collection contains digital video, stills, and image scans, and oral history recordings, all relating to his documentary photobooks We skate hardcore and Gays in the military. Original media formats are closed to use. Most files have been mounted to the library server; for access, please contact the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Youth Document Durham and Durham Works were programs sponsored by Duke University and the Center for Documentary Studies that brought together young people ages 12–16 from diverse Durham communities to document their lives, local history, and contemporary social issues through photography, oral history, and narrative writing. The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works project records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the history and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Many of the students are African American or Hispanic and their topics often highlight social conditions and race relations in African American and Hispanic communities in Durham neighborhoods and in a few other locations, including South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of oral interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, documented through audiocassette recordings, photographs, writings, and some transcripts, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for the program from its beginnings through 2008. There is also a database created by Center for Documentary Studies staff that records the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews. This data also contains restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Youth Document Durham and Durham Works program records span the years 1995-2008 and document the process of training young people in Durham, North Carolina schools to use photography and other arts, oral histories, and writing to record the histories and members of their communities and the local issues affecting the students' lives. Although the vast majority of the projects focus on Durham, there is also one project based in South Carolina. Topics explored by participants, both interviewers and interviewees, include crime, food cultures, jobs and education, music, racism, technology, teen violence, work cultures, and tobacco cultivation and its social context. The collection is divided into four series: Interviews, Photographic Material, Project Files, and Additions.

The bulk of the collection is made up of hundreds of interviews conducted by junior high and high school students with community members, but there are also many program publications, project curricula, and administrative records for those years. The contents of each series is described in full below. There is also a Community Stories database that houses the complete information for each interview, including descriptive notes on certain interviews, and restricted information. For access to this database, please consult with a reference archivist.

The Interviews Series forms the bulk of the collection, and houses the materials generated by the student projects. Each session was organized around a topic which usually would be repeated in subsequent years, such as "Durham Works" or "Old Five Points." Folders usually house one set of interviews conducted by one or more students, and contents typically consist of one or more cassette tapes of the oral interviews, consent forms and other documentation about the interviewees, and writings by the students that came out of their experiences as interviewers. Some interviews have been transcribed. Original audiovisual materials are closed to use; viewing or listening copies need to be made before contents can be accessed. Folders are arranged in number order as assigned by Center for Documentary Studies Staff; they are not in chronological order. An alternate listing at the end of this collection inventory groups boxes by project title rather than folder number order.

In addition to oral histories and writings, the students also produced many images of their subjects and their communities. Photographic prints and negatives of their work are housed in the Photographic Materials Series. Students also produced poems and drawings, and these are chiefly found in the Project Files Series.

Supporting program materials - curriculum guides, notes on staff meetings, staff guidelines, assessments of outcomes - are found in the Project Files Series. Also housed here are additional photographic images, mostly of the project students and staff, CDs with final projects, and the many publications that came out of the Center for Documentary Studies program. These booklets contain mostly interview transcriptions but also include photographs, drawings, annotations, and poetry. Also included is a retrospective collection of Youth Document Durham participant photos and essays, edited by Hong-An Truong and published in 2005.

Later accessions to the collections are found in the Additions Series. These items consist of audiovisual materials, photographs, and some printed materials. In addition to the Youth Document Durham project, related projects included in the Additions series are the Youth Treatment Court, which seems to have been a division of Youth Document Durham, and the Connect Program, which included projects from Old Five Points as well as special group projects for youth.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.