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Start Over You searched for: Format Cartes-de-visite photographs (card photographs) Remove constraint Format: Cartes-de-visite photographs (card photographs) Names Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture Remove constraint Names: Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture

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Faithfull family papers, 1864-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 22 items

The Faithful family focuses on the family of Rev. Ferdinand Faithfull and Elizabeth Mary Harrison of Headley Rectory in Surrey, England, and their eight children. Among the children were Esther Faithfull Fleet (1823–1908), who was both a book illustrator and the mother of seven children. The youngest child, Emily Faithfull (1836?-1895), was an feminist reformer, philanthropist, printer, publisher, novelist, and lecturer. Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet.

Collection comprises 14 letters, an envelope autographed by Emily Faithfull, an invitation completed by her, a printed invitation acceptance, a carte de visite and two copies of a mounted albumen photograph of her, along with two illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet. The letters, all written by Emily Faithfull, include routine correspondence and thank you notes; other topics include the capacity of Victoria Press to do law work; an honor bestowed on her by the professional women's organization, Sorosis, in New York; a statement in the Guardian newspaper claiming that in a speech she repudiated women's rights as it applied to her work; a request for early assistance with preparations for Christmas in order to provide relief for "some very distressing cases;" and inquiries regarding the printing of her "Jubilee Address" or its distribution. There is one letter to Henry Ward Beecher asking him to hand out notices regarding her upcoming lecture, and mentioning Lucretia Mott's plans to address the audience. Several letters feature the stamp or embossed stamp of the Victoria Press. The carte de visite was produced by the London Stereoscopic & Photography Co., and the mounted photographs by W. & D. Downey of Ebury Street, London. The illustrated pieces completed by Esther Faithfull Fleet include a calling card hand decorated in ink and watercolors (?), and a watercolor painting of a parrot.

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Harriet Elisabeth Beecher Stowe (1811 June 14-1896 July 1) was an American abolitionist and author. Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

Collection comprises an introduction and a letter written by Harriet Beecher Stowe, along with a carte de visite of her. There is an undated introduction she wrote for the second edition of Narrative of Sojourner Truth. Stowe's statement appears as an introduction in some copies of the 1853 edition. In the introduction, Stowe discusses the African-American abolitionist and women's rights activist, remarking on her mental energy and revelatory powers as a Christian, and attests to Truth's character. She then mentions that the sales of the work will "secure a home for [Truth in] her old age ..." There is an undated letter Stowe wrote from Northampton Depot on Aug. 10 to Mr. Ward, informing him that although she is disposed to support his request, she is under pressures that limit her use of the pen. The carte de visite features a textured surface, and was created by the Howell studio in New York.

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Helen Paterson Allingham papers, 1868-1916, 2015 3.6 Linear Feet — 4 boxes — 11 items

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items. The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte de visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

Collection primarily includes four sketchbooks by Allingham, but also contains four letters, a carte de visite, and two exhibit labels. The four sketchbooks date from 1868-1916, and feature sketches and drawings made in graphite, watercolor, and pen and ink. Subjects are varied, and include English cottages and buildings, architectural features, sailboats and coastal scenes, figures, landscapes, and botanical items.

The letters, dated 1881-1882 and undated, include three written by Allingham. There is one to Marcus B. Huish regarding her painting, The Tea Party, which she reports is incomplete, but she plans to finish before it is exhibited. There is a letter to a friend to whom she sends autographs, then describes her country place and garden, along with her 4-month-old son. Another letter focuses on the difficulty of finding unfurnished rooms. The final letter in the collection is written by Andrew Halliday to Dr. Watkins, regarding Allingham's address. There is also a carte-de-visite of English women's rights activist Emily Faithfull, with her signature, along with two modern exhibit labels on Allingham.

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Lucretia Mott papers, 1848-1887 and undated 0.1 Linear Feet — 11 items

Lucretia Mott was a Quaker teacher of Philadelphia, Pa.; a Hicksite; an abolitionist; and a promoter of women's rights, temperance, and peace. Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst.

Collection includes a quote accompanied by Mott's autograph, along with three letters, including one regarding arranging a meeting, one regarding the death of Margaret Pryor, and one written by Mott to Thomas M'Clintock regarding the death of her brother and with news of other mutual acquaintances. There are also five items from an 1879 autograph book, including albumen photographs of Mott and an unidentified man, a copy of the same quote and signature of Mott, an address for a letter, and a newspaper obituary for John G. Saxe. Includes a 5.5"x7.75" albumen studio portrait of Mott that has some hand-tinting, taken by F. Gutekunst in Philadelphia in 1861, along with an undated carte de visite of Mott, also taken by Gutekunst.

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Marie folder, 1875 July 16 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 item

Marie was an artist born in 1852 without arms, who completed her works with her mouth. Collection comprises a folder on the artist Marie that was distributed at her exhibition during a Utrecht fair on 1875 July 16. The folder contains a handbill describing the artist and her work in Dutch, printed by J. P. Nobels in Haarlem; a carte de visite of Marie by J. van Crewel & Fils, Anvers; and her autograph in French with a quote and a note that she has written it using her mouth.

Collection comprises a folder on the artist Marie that was distributed at her exhibition during a Utrecht fair on 1875 July 16. The folder contains a handbill describing the artist and her work in Dutch, printed by J. P. Nobels in Haarlem; a carte de visite of Marie by J. van Crewel & Fils, Anvers; and her autograph in French with a quote and a note that she has written it using her mouth.

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Collection comprises 48 stereographic photographs, 5 cartes-de-visite photographs and a clipping regarding Martha Maxwell. The cartes-de-visite photographs feature full-length portraits of Maxwell, two seated at her taxidermy work and three standing while holding a gun. Several of the stereographic photographs are also portraits, most often showing Maxwell positioned within displays of her taxidermy birds and mammals; however, the majority of the stereographs depict her displays at the Centennial Exhibition and at the Rocky Mountain Museum in Boulder. The clipping describes the birds and mammals represented at her Centennial Exhibition display and provides a review of her work.

Collection comprises 48 stereographic photographs, 5 cartes-de-visite photographs and a clipping regarding Martha Maxwell. The cartes-de-visite photographs feature full-length portraits of Maxwell, two seated at her taxidermy work and three standing while holding a gun. Several of the stereographic photographs are also portraits, most often showing Maxwell positioned within displays of her taxidermy birds and mammals; however, the majority of the stereographs depict her displays at the Centennial Exhibition and at the Rocky Mountain Museum in Boulder. The clipping describes the birds and mammals represented at her Centennial Exhibition display and provides a review of her work.

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The Noyes and Balch families resided primarily in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone. The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. There is a photograph album containing 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are also loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises correspondence, including 136 letters (603 pages); 3 diaries; a photograph album and loose photographs, as well as a wooden box in which the family stored letters from Catharine Porter Noyes. The collection centers around Catharine, who detailed her experiences while teaching newly freed slaves at plantations on the Sea Islands of South Carolina, from 1863-1864 and 1869-1870. She described the challenges of her teaching situation, social events and celebrations, local attitudes about freed blacks and her teaching them, black funeral and religious practices, and general conditions on the islands. She included her hand-drawn maps of the area, indicating its relation to the mainland. In addition to these letters from the Sea Islands, there are letters Catharine wrote while she was in Illinois and at the family home in Jamaica Plain, Mass., before she made her trip South (1854-1863). There are also family letters written to Catharine, 1860-1892, especially from her sister, Ellen (Nellie); Ellen's husband, F. V. “Frank” Balch; and her cousin, Mary, who taught with Ellen in South Carolina, among others family members. Another set of letters were written by Ellen to Frank while he served as secretary to U. S. Senator and abolitionist Charles Sumner (R-Ma) in 1864 in Washington, D.C.; and by artist Emily E. Balch to Richard Noyes Stone.

The collection also contains a diary maintained by a 12-year-old girl, probably Ravella Balch, and there are two diaries maintained by Emily E. Balch in 1929. Common topics in all the letters include family news, health matters, visiting, travel plans, reading, lectures and church services attendance, theater performances, and pastimes. The photograph album contains 32 black-and-white photographs of Noyes and Balch family members, as well as family friends. There are 31 cartes-de-visite and one tintype; two of the cartes-de-visite have been hand-painted. The majority of the photographs are labeled, several in ink in a later hand. In addition to the photograph album, there are 17 loose black-and-white photographs, dated 1877-1957, including 4 cartes-de-visite, 6 tintypes, and 2 photo postcards.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture, and as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.