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Collection
The Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth was a vocational guidance service organization originally created under the leadership of Orie Latham Hatcher as the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (1914-1921), and later known as the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (1921-1937). Disbanded in 1963. The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for Alliance for the Guidance of Rural Youth and its predecessors. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives. The records document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Additional subjects addressed in the papers and photographs include economic conditions throughout the South; migration patterns from U.S. rural regions to cities; Appalachian culture, including crafts and music; community life in the South; and employment for African Americans. The collection includes 42 matted platinum prints of rural citizens and scenes in Kentucky taken in the 1930s by noted photographer Doris Ulmann, and include a portrait of her assistant and folklorist, John Jacob Niles.

The records of the Alliance for Guidance of Rural Youth (AGRY) span the years 1887 to 1963, although the bulk of the collection begins in 1914 with the creation of the organization and ends in 1946 with the death of founder and president, Orie Latham Hatcher. Additional records for the Alliance from 1947 to 1963 can be found in the Amber Arthun Warburton papers, also located in the Rubenstein Library.

The records comprise an extensive set of organizational records for AGRY and its predecessors, the Virginia Bureau of Vocations for Women (VBVW) and the Southern Woman's Educational Alliance (SWEA), and document the organization's evolution from its early focus on increasing vocational opportunities for educated southern women and rural high school girls to its later activities in providing county-wide vocational programming for rural youth. Series include correspondence, administrative files, project files, conference files, subject files, writings and speeches, publications, clippings, press releases, and photographic materials, which include prints and nitrate negatives.

Early materials in the Correspondence, Administrative Files, and Clippings and Press Releases series document the Bureau's projects, such as the speaker's bureau and the scholarship program, as well as the Bureau's relationship with other women's organizations such as the Virginia Association of Colleges and Schools for Girls, Southern Collegiate Women (later the American Association of University Women), the National Federation of Business and Professional Women Clubs (BPW), and the National Council of Women.

Strong ties were developed between the Bureau and these organizations during its formative years: Hatcher chaired national and local committees in most of these organizations, and early correspondence and administrative files center on her work with these organizations particularly concerning educational standards and vocational training in women's colleges. In these early records it is often unclear which of these activities were officially adopted by the Bureau or if they were solely Hatcher's activities.

The AGRY's activities documented in the Branch Files Series include benefits, forums, exhibits, and festivals. The New York Branch sponsored several opera benefits to help raise funds during the 1920s. The Rural Mountain Festival, sponsored by the Richmond Branch, was held in 1938. In 1932, the Alliance commissioned noted New York portrait photographer, Doris Ulmann, to photograph rural youth and other individuals in Kentucky. The photographs were subsequently exhibited by several of the branches and were used to promote discussion of vocational issues and the work of the Alliance. Forty-two of these original platinum prints are located in the Photographic Materials Series.

Organizational changes reflected modifications in the organization's goals. Although SWEA continued many of the projects started by the Virginia Bureau, emphasis shifted away from lobbying efforts aimed to open new careers for women and more towards research on women's occupational trends and model guidance counseling programs based on that research. Correspondence during the early 1920s contains letters from faculty and administrators from women's colleges throughout the Northeast and South which describe various approaches (or lack thereof) to providing vocational guidance to students. Administrative files contain information on surveys and on a vocational guidance course for college women which was developed at Goucher College under the auspices of SWEA and tested at Duke University (then Trinity College) and the College of William and Mary. The Publications and Clippings and Press Releases series also contain considerable information regarding Alliance research and activities during this time.

During the mid to late 1920s, SWEA sponsored several research projects through its Rural Guidance Project which examined vocational trends of rural girls in North Carolina and Virginia. While the Correspondence and Administrative Files series document how the projects were organized, the comprehensive data collected during these projects is extant only in resulting SWEA publications such as Rural Girls in the City for Work and the unpublished manuscript "Fifty Rural High School Girls."

Alliance projects in the late 1920s and 1930s consisted of experimental and demonstration guidance programs in rural schools. These projects were located at the Konnarock Training School (Virginia), elementary schools in Albemarle Co., Virginia, Farm Life School (Craven Co., N.C.), and elementary and secondary schools in Breathitt Co., Kentucky, among others. Each of these demonstration projects also resulted in substantial Alliance publications which in most cases represent the bulk of extant documentation of each project. The Photographic Materials series contains many snapshots taken in these various communities, although most are of poor quality and unidentified; there are also negatives in this series. Additional information may also appear scattered throughout Correspondence, Clippings, and Administrative Files series.

The Breathitt County Project Files Series, provides the most comprehensive documentation of the demonstration project which grew to become the Alliance's main research activity from about 1934 to 1942. The project encompassed a wide range of activities including data collection on students' home life, teacher training workshops, vocational guidance programming through the county's Planning Council, and a visit by Eleanor Roosevelt in 1938. Particularly noteworthy in these materials are the extensive raw data files consisting of approximately 2500 autobiographical surveys of students. Additional files contain charts of data compilations and teacher reports which identify trends in students' educational behavior. Photographs of Breathitt County schools, students, and home life, chiefly taken by noted photographer Doris Ullman, are contained in the Photographic Materials Series.

SWEA and AGRY's emphasis on research and dissemination of information was reflected in the increase of published materials produced by the organization. Much of this material is contained in the Publications Series. Clippings of book reviews document the wide-spread acceptance of these publications in a newly emerging field. Several unpublished manuscripts resulting from Alliance research projects are extant in the Writings and Speeches Series and include "Occupations for Educated Women in Durham, Raleigh, and Winston-Salem, North Carolina" (1926), a bound copy of "Fifty Rural High School Girls'' (1930), and final drafts of "When Our Young Folks Come Home to the Smaller Communities" (1945).

Another strategy for publicizing the work of the Alliance was through local and national radio broadcasts. Shows were broadcast from Richmond, New York, and Washington, D.C., and gave information on specific occupations and discussed vocational guidance issues. Broadcast scripts contained in the Writings and Speeches Series feature youths interviewing each other and Orie Hatcher about career goals, a dialogue between Eleanor Roosevelt and Hatcher on the future of rural youth (1938), and a presentation by Amelia Earhart on women in aviation (1931).

The Correspondence, Clippings and Press Releases, and Subject Files series demonstrate the Alliance's shift away from relationships with women's organizations in the late 1920s and towards guidance and educational organizations such as the American Council for Guidance and Personnel Associations (CGPA), National Vocational Guidance Association (NVGA), National Occupational Conference (NOC), National Education Association (NEA), and the U.S. Department of Education in the 1930s. In many of these organizations, Hatcher chaired committees on rural youth, and representatives from these groups served on AGRY's Board of Trustees.

Numerous regional and national conference activities are reflected in the Conference Files Series, with a complete set of conference proceedings and findings contained in the Publications Series. Information on pre-1930s conferences is slim, but additional information on all conferences can be gleaned from the Correspondence and Clippings and Press Releases series. Copies of papers delivered by Alliance members and others are located in the Writings and Speeches Series.

Materials dating past Hatcher's tenure in the Alliance consist mainly of routine administrative correspondence. A more complete set of AGRY organizational records dating from 1947-1963 is located in the papers of Amber Arthun Warburton, her successor. These records continue several series started in the AGRY records such as executive board minutes, publications, project files, and correspondence.

Collection

Arthur Sperry Pearse papers, 1904-1960 18 Linear Feet — 16 boxes

Arthur Sperry Pearse (pronounced like "purse") was Professor of Zoology at Duke University from 1927 until his retirement in 1948. Collection primarily contains papers and other items relating to his academic career: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also include landscapes, people, villages, and social customs from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and smaller groups from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the Outer Banks coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consist of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures. Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the publication Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

The Arthur Sperry Pearse papers include the professional papers and photographs of A. S. Pearse's scholarly career. His professional papers span the length of his academic career and include: correspondence, writings and lectures, lab notes and data, fieldwork notes, teaching materials, clippings and printed materials, many photographs and negatives, book illustrations, and glass slides. Images are of animal and plant life, but also landscapes, people, villages, and social aspects of life from about 1915-1935 in Nigeria and the Yucatán Peninsula, and from other research trip locations in South America and Southeast Asia, 1910s-1930s. Included are snapshots of fellow scientists in the laboratory and in the field. There are also early photographs and materials regarding the Marine Biology Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C. and other marine labs, as well as images of the N.C. coast and people such as fishermen. A large group of images consists of illustrations used in Pearse's textbooks, articles, and teaching lectures.

Prominent subjects throughout the collection include the establishment of and research projects at the Duke University Marine Laboratory, the promotion of forestry as a scientific discipline at Duke, Pearse's role as editor of the journal Ecological Monographs, and his research interests: marine biology, ecology, crustaceans, parasitology and parasitic diseases, microbiology and biological adaptation, and forestry.

Correspondence primarily reflects his role as editor of Ecological Monographs which includes correspondence concerning receipt of drafts for publication, recommended revisions, and future publication dates. Other prominent topics include Pearse's involvement with professional organizations, various symposiums and conferences, publications, research in Nigeria and the Yucatán, and the founding and early operations of the Duke University Marine Laboratory at Beaufort, North Carolina. Also, in 1938-1939, there is a series of correspondence between Pearse and President William Preston Few concerning lack of support for and conditions within the department and Pearse's consequent resignation as departmental chair.

Other materials include research notes, tables, and sketches; graduate student correspondence, plans of work, and dissertation abstracts; manuscripts of various publications authored by Pearse including Animal Ecology and his 1952 autobiography, Adventure: Trying to be an Ecologist; laboratory and field notebooks containing research notes and statistics from Nigeria, the Yucatan, Wisconsin, and various other research locations.

There are many photographic prints, nitrate and safety negatives, and glass-plate lecture slides, all documenting Pearse's research travels, particularly in Nigeria and the Yucatán, but also in Alabama, Florida, and coastal North Carolina, Japan, China, Burma, the Phillippines, Colombia, and Venezuela. Images include local flora, fauna, landscapes, villages, localized crafts and industries, and indigenous peoples, as well as maps, charts, tables, drawings, and photographs used in Pearse's lectures and publications.

Collection

European tourist travel negatives, between 1910-1915 36 items — 1 box — 34 nitrate negatives; 2 original processing envelopes — 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white travel images taken mainly in European cities. Subjects chiefly focus on popular tourist landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to be all women and at least one young child. Locations identified by library staff include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are unidentified, as are the photographer and subjects. It is assumed that some locations are in London or England, as one of two commercial photograph processing envelopes from the London firm Selfridge's accompanying the negatives is marked "English trip 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

This early 20th century collection of 34 nitrate sheet negatives features black-and-white tourist travel images mainly taken in European cities sometime between 1910-1915. Subjects chiefly focus on landmarks such as gardens, parks, bridges, buildings, and statuary. The travelers seem to include women and at least one young child. Identified cities include Paris and Bruges, but other locations are uncertain, as are the identities of the photographer and subjects. Two commercial photographic processing envelopes are from the London firm Selfridge's; one is marked "English trip, 1913." The negatives are sized 3 5/8 x 4 7/8 inches.

The dating is taken in part from the 1913 date on the processing envelope and from a billboard advertising a musical being staged in Paris.

Forms part of the Lisa Unger Baskin Collection, acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection

Griffith J. Davis photographs and films, 1946-1991 6 Linear Feet — 7 boxes; 1 film reel container

Online
Griff Davis (1923-1993) was a photojournalist, diplomat, and film maker from Atlanta, Georgia. The collection contains photographic materials and papers related to three photo essays illustrated by Davis: one on African American writer Langston Hughes; another on artists Hale Woodruff and Charles Alston; and one on the Palmer Memorial Institute, a private preparatory school for African Americans in Sedalia, N.C. Films in the collection were taken by Davis and include two home movies and six color and black-and-white 16mm films documenting people, politics, and agricultural life in Liberia during William Tubman's presidency in the early 1950s. Completing the collection is a photo album, "Progress in Liberia, Nov. 1949-Feb. 1950," containing twenty large black-and-white photographs, assembled to promote a partnership between the government of Liberia and the Liberia Mining Company. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Griffith J. Davis Photographs and Films collection dates from 1949-1991 and comprises two main series: films and a photo album made in the 1950s in Liberia and documenting life there during part of William V. Tubman's presidency; and photographs, contact prints, hundreds of digitized nitrate and safety negatives, and related papers documenting three photo-essays, one on African American author Langston Hughes; another on artists Hale Woodruff and Charles Alston; and one on the Palmer Memorial Institute, a private junior and senior high school for African Americans in Sedalia, N.C. The digitized negatives are also available through the Duke Libraries Digital Collections website.

Photographic materials include two sheets of photographic contact prints taken by Davis when he visited Methodist missionaries Mr. and Mrs. George Way Harley in Ganta, Liberia. Subjects include African masks and the Ganta Mission. A letter written by Davis describes his visit with the Harleys.

Other Griff Davis images in the collection are found in an album entitled "Progress in Liberia, November 1949 - February 1950," containing a map of Liberia and twenty large black-and-white gelatin silver prints with typed captions. Subjects feature Liberian landscapes, construction projects, bridges, railroads, and port scenes, with some images featuring native Liberian workers. The album was assembled to promote the partnership with the Liberian government and the Liberia Mining Company; in the first image, President Tubman is signing a contract with mining officials.

The audiovisual components include two home movies taken in Monrovia, and six color and black-and-white films taken in Liberia by Davis in the 1950s during William V.S. Tubman's presidency. Davis was asked by Tubman to document modern life in Liberia in 1952. In 1956 and 1957 he made films while stationed in Liberia with the United States technical assistance mission and the Liberian Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Films depict a wide range of subjects, activities and events, including the country's people, industry, leaders, and rural life. Titles include Pepper Bird Land (1952), Liberia 1956 Presidential Inauguration of William V. S. Tubman & William R. Tolbert, President and the Press Exhibit (1956), Gold Coast Prime Minister Kwame Nkrumah Visits Liberia (1953), Progress Through Cooperation (1957), home movie Coketails for Dorothy, Monrovia Children's Birthday Party (1956), and Night Village Dancing in Liberia (1956).

Collection

Hypes family papers, 1700s-2010 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 1 pamphlet binder — Approximately 2250 Items

Materials from the branch of the Hypes family that descended from Henry Hypes of Xenia, Ohio: Samuel Henry Hypes (1826-1916); his son, William Findlay Hypes; his grandson, Samuel Loomis Hypes; and his great-grandson, William P. Hypes. Collection includes a wide range of material from the Hypes family, particularly William Findlay Hypes, Samuel Loomis Hypes, and William P. Hypes. William Findlay Hypes' materials highlight his career at Marshall Fields and Co. of Chicago and his service as President of the Y.M.C.A. of Chicago, with emphasis on his family's world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. in 1924-1925. Hundreds of postcards and photographs collected by the family are contained in the papers, including images from India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, Europe, Egypt, and many more places, most unlabeled. Some material from Samuel Loomis Hypes' army service during World War I is also included, the most noteworthy being 24 black and white photographs featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States, including photographs of African American soldiers. Materials from William P. Hypes relate to his work with the Y.M.C.A. in the mid-twentieth century. The family's research into their genealogy and family history, unidentified family photographs, and smaller amounts of correspondence and material from other family members are also included.

There is a wide range of material from the Hypes family's many generations present in this collection. Some early material exists from Henry Hypes, including an inventory of his property upon his death, and some correspondence from relatives. Other early materials include family photographs, which are largely unlabeled and undated but include formats such as tintypes, a daguerreotype, cartes de visite, negatives, and others.

The Hypes' attempts to reconstruct their family tree resulted in several letters between extended family members and distant cousins, as well as genealogical maps and notes, dating from the early to mid-twentieth century.

The majority of the collection dates from William Findlay Hypes and his family. W.F. Hypes' materials include correspondence and clippings about his career with Marshall Fields and Co., as well as news coverage of his world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. from 1924 to 1925. The collection also contains photographic prints, negatives, and postcards from this trip, featuring images from India, China, Japan, Egypt, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Europe, and other unidentified places. The photographs are largely gelatin silver prints, and many have silvering. The majority of photographs are amateur shots presumably taken by the Hypes family. However, there are several sets of images which were clearly purchased by W.F. Hypes or other family members as travel souvenirs, including a set from India taken by H.R. Ferger and a set from Taormina, Italy. These all appear to date from the early 1900s. Many types of postcards are present, including real photo postcards and tinted color postcards. Several postcard books were purchased as souvenirs. Most postcards have been sorted by location; real photo postcards have also been sleeved to better protect the images. Real photo postcard locations include Norway, Manila, China, Japan, and a set from the Canadian Rockies.

An earlier trip to Europe and the Middle East by W.F. Hypes and his wife is described in letters between them and their daughter Muriel. This trip appears to have been taken in May and June, 1910. Since most of the collection's photographs are undated, some could date from this trip instead of the world tour trip from 1924-1925.

One part of the collection is closed to researchers: there is a small amount of nitrate and safety negatives. These appear to be taken by W.F. Hypes, and include family photographs, scenes from Jamaica, and scenes of a tiger hunt during the Hypes' Y.M.C.A. tour. The tiger hunt images are available as prints in the photographs portion of the materials. All negatives are closed to researchers.

Along with the extensive amount of photographs and postcards, W.F. Hypes' portion of the papers includes souvenir booklets and other collectibles from his travels. Also present are materials from the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, including a set of tickets as well as a stock certificate. Hypes' political leanings can be inferred from a Republican National Convention ticket for the 1904 election, as well as a small, movable medal that spins and denounces William Jennings Bryan.

Another noteworthy part of the collection comes from Samuel Loomis Hypes, W.F. Hypes' son, who served as a captain in the U.S. Army's 803rd Pioneer Infantry during World War I. This portion of the papers contains 24 black-and-white photographs (18? June-19 July 1919) featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States. Photographs often have captions in white ink. There are six crowd scenes in Paris and outside Versailles before and after the signing of the treaty. However, the majority of the photographs follow the movement of ships and troops out of Brest Navy yard, including the USS Imperator and the USS Philippine. There are group photos of the 803rd's officers and one photograph of a German submarine. Among the 4,000 troops aboard the Philippine were many African American soldiers, and there are photographs of these men playing in the 803rd's regimental band and of a boxing match they held during the voyage, as well as other photos. The collection also contains two postcards showing group photographs of soldiers [officers?] taken at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916 - probably at the large World War I military training camp there.

Other materials from Samuel Loomis Hypes include his officer's record book, honorary discharge following the war, as well as clippings about Sugar Hollow, a North Carolina development begun by Hypes and his wife in the 1950s.

Finally, the collection also includes several files from William P. Hypes, an officer in the Y.M.C.A. in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from his work towards the Y.M.C.A. World Action program.

Collection

Ida Grady scrapbook, circa 1927-1930 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box

Online
Nancy Ida Grady, a native of Asheville, N.C., graduated from Duke University's Woman's College in 1928. Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Scrapbook contains photographs, postcards, calling cards, invitations, programs, poems, and other assorted ephemera and memorabilia. Among the programs are several from church services in Durham and Asheville, theatre productions including performances by the Taurian Players and the YWCA, and several guest lectures at Duke. Also present are exams, quizzes, and study questions from courses at Duke in Bible study, religions of China and Japan, Egypt and Mesopotamia.

The scrapbook has been disassembled and foldered for preservation purposes. Detached clippings and assorted ephemera are housed in envelopes. Nitrate negatives are closed to use; digital scans are available with advance request.

Collection

J. H. Chappell collection, 1922-1927, 1967 4.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes; one pamphlet binder

J. H. Chappell graduated from Duke University in 1926 and was a college athlete. The collection includes Trinity College and Duke University memorabilia, student notebooks, correspondence, photographs and corresponding nitrate negatives, and other materials collected by Chappell during his years at Trinity College during its transition to Duke University. The memorabilia and ephemera include class grade reports, athletics events fliers, pins, banners and pennants, and Durham-specific advertising.

J.H. Chappell's papers relate to his time as a student at Trinity College and Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, 1922-1927, and include student notebooks, letters, photographs, and memorabilia, and other materials. One box includes a few Trinity College banners and pennants as well as pennants believed to be associated with Trinity Park High School. Of particular note is a pennant for the Hesperian Literary Society. Also included are Chappell's letters earned in athletics.

Ephemeral items include Chappell's admission card, class schedule cards for his four years, his membership certificate for the Order of the Tombs, grade reports, event fliers and programs, athletics memorabilia including ticket booklets and schedules, and Durham-specific business cards and advertisements.

There are photographs and negatives of Trinity/Duke athletes (football, baseball and track) as well as students playing in the snow on what is now East Campus. There is a 1925 panoramic photograph of the Duke University student body and faculty as well as of company c. 13th engineers at Fort Humphreys, Virginia (1927) in addition to a mounted photograph of a baseball team. The players are not in uniform but a few are wearing caps with a "D" on them. The negatives, most of them nitrate cellulose film, are closed to use; corresponding prints are in the collection.

Collection

John Ridlon papers, 1846-1936 and undated 8.0 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 oversize folders; 1 pamphlet binder

Physician, surgeon, and professor specializing in orthopedic medicine, practicing in New York State and Chicago, Illinois. Collection consists of medical case files and casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographs, ephemera, diplomas, and medical illustrations dating chiefly from the 1890s-1920s, relating to Dr. John Ridlon's career and extensive research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of illustrations in the form of medical case photographs and photographic prints of early X-rays. Accompanying the papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's medical military training at a base in Plattsburgh, N.Y., and some during his service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. Duplicate and similar images are found in glass plate and nitrate film negatives. A set of 49 glass lantern slides of his time in the WWI medical camp were used to illustrate lectures about his experiences; a reprint of the lecture text is in the collection. There are also a handful of photographic portraits of Ridlon. Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P.D. Wilson, R.K. Ghormley, J.E. Goldthwait, A.B. Judson, R.W. Lovett, H.W. Orr, S.W. Mitchell, and H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

This material, which documents John Ridlon's medical career, consists of medical case files, casebooks, articles and papers, correspondence, photographic materials, diplomas and ephemera, and medical illustrations, relating to Ridlon's research and writings on orthopedics. Case files - a large majority of them pediatric - include tubercular infection of the joints, scoliosis and other deformities, spondylitis (spinal arthritis), and limb or joint injuries. There are hundreds of medical illustrations in the form of photographs mounted on board, photographic prints of early X-rays, and printed illustrations on loose sheets that show patients, symptoms or deformities, and treatments such as surgery, braces and casts; many of them were used by Ridlon in his published works.

Among the bound volumes are six casebooks (1889-1892); four letterbooks (1873-1903); an autograph manuscript, "Some comments on the principles and practice of Hugh Owen Thomas" (undated); a scrapbook of figures and illustrations (undated); three volumes composed of reprint clippings and manuscript notes (undated); and a bound volume of 88 reprints (1888-1923). There are also many diplomas and certificates received by Ridlon from various educational institutions.

Correspondents include: R. Osgood, A. Steindler, P. D. Wilson, R. K. Ghormley, J. E. Goldthwait, A. B. Judson, R. W. Lovett, H. W. Orr, S. W. Mitchell, H. Cushing. In addition to discussing medical cases and research, letters also document Ridlon's involvement with two charitable institutions: the Home for Destitute Crippled Children (Chicago) and the Country Home for Convalescent Children.

Accompanying the professional papers is a set of 118 black-and-white photographs taken during Ridlon's service as a surgeon in the U.S. Army Medical Corps during World War I. The photos were taken by several photographers at a medico-military training camp in Plattsburgh, N.Y., around 1916. Ridlon reported on these experiences at a medical conference in 1917 and used a set of 67 glass lantern slides to illustrate the lecture, 49 of which survive in the collection; a reprint of this paper is also available in the collection.

In the same series there is a set of 30 glass plate negatives and still image nitrate film negatives; these materials are closed to use but contain duplicate or similar images found in the print photographs. Finally, there are several portraits of Ridlon, chiefly photographs taken in his office and examination room, taken in 1911. A glass plate negative with a bust portrait of Ridlon rounds out the photographic series.

The collection also contains several folders of ephemera, early professional diplomas and certificates, letters of recommendation for Ridlon's Chicago appointment in 1892, and his obituary.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Collection

Joseph John Spengler papers, [ca. 1896]-1987 111.8 Linear Feet — 60,387 Items

Chiefly correspondence, printed material, critiques of publications, bibliographies, class notes, and other papers relating to his career, publications, and affiliation with different economics associations (26,378 items, 52.7 linear feet; dated 1928-1987). Some are photocopies of Spengler's correspondence with William Richard Allen. The collection also includes manuscripts of some of his works, information concerning Duke University's administrative policies and staff, reprints of published articles relating to his career, and a charcoal portrait. (1-9-87, 88-010, 93-180, 00-213) No container lists exist for these accessions.

Addition #93-294 (34,009 items, 59.1 linear feet; dated [ca. 1896]-[ca. 1976], bulk 1914-1960) contains primarily business and Spengler and Kress family correspondence, especially between Dot and Joe ([ca. 1919]-[ca. 1976]). Also includes manuscripts for Dot's genealogical novel, Family Saga in America ([ca. 1930s]) and Joe's work, Life in America; as well as Dot's journals and diaries (1924-1939, 1969). There are Christmas cards, postcards, and newspaper clippings; photographs of family and friends, including 2 tintypes, 32 cartes-de-visite, 1 color and 91 black-and-white prints, and 76 healthy nitrate negatives; and lace knitted by Dot's grandmother.

Also includes 6 photograph albums kept by Dot, two of which contain pictures taken by her with a brownie camera in and of Piqua, OH (1914-1919). The other albums contain photographs and memorabilia depicting Dot's life as a college student at Miami University, OH (1919-1921); and two showing views of the Spengler's homes, friends, and life in Tuscon, AZ, Tampa, FL (1930-1938), and Durham, NC and Duke University (1932-1940). The latter also records the 1938 Duke University faculty baseball team.

Collection
Online
Mason Crum (1887-1980) served on the faculty in the Department of Religion at Duke University from 1930 to 1957, specializing in race relations and Christianity, as well as the social history of the Gullah community of the South Carolina Sea Islands. The papers contain correspondence, printed material, writings, clippings, slides, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and and a sound recording. Subjects of interest include religious aspects of race relations and segregation, African American religion and churches, Gullah dialect and culture, Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the Lake Junaluska, N.C. retreat. Photographs are of the Sea Islands, Lake Junaluska, Mason Crum's family, former slave Charles Baxter, and images relating to the Washington Duke family and Durham.

The Mason Crum papers include correspondence, printed material, hand written and typewritten manuscripts of books and articles, clippings, photographs, negatives, and glass slides, and an audio tape, dating chiefly from 1931-1959. Crum acquired the materials over the course of his career as a professor of Biblical literature who had interests in African American history, psychology, race relations, and recent Methodist church history. His major area of research was the Gullah communities of Edisto and St. Helena, two of the South Carolina Sea Islands, with the bulk of work here dating from the 1930s; the result of the research was Gullah, published by Duke University Press in 1940.

Other areas of interest reflected in the papers are moral education, pastoral counseling, and religious pageantry. Crum's concern with Christianity and race relations is shown by his participation in cooperative efforts in education, and in the teaching of one of the first Black studies courses in the South (1954).

Also included in the papers are photographs from the Sea Islands, from Junaluska, N.C., and more personal images of family, children, and relating to the Washington Duke family in Durham, N.C.