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This collection includes two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of Jewish, Lithuanian-American merchant A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany.

This collection consists of two scrapbooks containing newspaper clippings, letters, receipts, family photographs, and the written memories of A. Michael Barker (1886-1943) of Wilson, North Carolina. Additional items not contained in the scrapbooks include family photographs, a letter, and a ketubah. The scrapbooks were named for World War I and World War II according to the approximate time of the creation of their contents and the subject matter of the newspaper clippings. Topics represented in the scrapbooks include family life, relief efforts for Jewish victims of World War I in Europe, the Zionist movement, Nazi atrocities against Jews in Europe, and the speeches of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Barker’s approximately 49 pages of memories (circa 1942-1943) detail his financial troubles, family updates, and feelings on the treatment of Jews in Germany. Most of the correspondence is between Michael Barker or Anna Harris Barker and immediate and extended family members.

Barker created the scrapbooks from financial ledgers of his businesses in New Jersey and Wilson, North Carolina, and the financial entries are largely obscured by scrapbook inserts. While he created a majority of the content of the scrapbooks, some items were added after his death, presumably by another family member.

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Advertising Council records, 1935-1999 and undated 19 Linear Feet — 12,150 items

The Advertising Council Records span the years from 1935 to 1999, and primarily consist of public service advertising campaigns developed by the Advertising Council. The campaigns are documented through council booklets, brochures, published articles, and sample advertisements which were distributed to Ad Council members and participating advertising agencies. Particular ad campaigns that are well represented include U.S. Savings Bonds and United Service Organizations (USO) during World War II; Religion in American Life; the Red Cross; the creation of Smokey the Bear and related fire prevention campaigns circa 1941 to 1951; and a campaign to explain the American Economic System, circa 1950 to 1957 (Cold War anti-communism). Various campaigns throughout the 1960s and 1970s are also represented to a lesser extent, including the War on Poverty, Equal Opportunity, and Child Abuse.

The collection is organized into two main series: General Files and Campaigns. The General Files Series contains Ad Council materials that are not specific to particular campaigns, such as annual reports, correspondence, and Ad Council promotional materials. The Campaigns Series, which comprises about two-thirds of the collection, contains pamphlets, brochures, posters, newspaper articles, and memos concerning the strategies of over 100 public service advertising campaigns. Large-format materials from both of these series have been relocated to the Oversize Materials.

Related collections in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library include the J. Walter Thompson Co. Archives: Domestic Advertisements Collection, the War Effort Mobilization Campaigns Poster Collection, the Edgar Hatcher Papers, the Warwick Baker O'Neill Records, and the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives. The "official" archives of the Ad Council resides at the University of Illinois--Urbana/Champaign.

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Alexander Blackburn papers, 1880-1999 12 Linear Feet — 14602 Items

Professor emeritus of English and Creative Writing at the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs; novelist; son of Duke University faculty member William M. Blackburn. Writings and correspondence of Alexander Blackburn, including books, correspondence, drafts, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also includes Blackburn and Cheney family history materials, photographs, and a scrapbook.

Collection contains two accessions. Accession (1999-0184) (1102 items; 6.0 lin. ft.; dated 1953-1998), consists primarily of writings by Alexander Blackburn, including books, articles, clippings, and typescripts of unpublished works. Also included are correspondence with writer Frank Waters and some other letters; memorabilia; and editorial files and an almost complete run of the literary journal, Writer's Forum, which Blackburn edited.

Accession (2010-0012) (6750 items; 9 lin. ft.; dated 1880-1990s) includes writings, drafts, books, and family history materials. Included are materials from Alexander Blackburn's mother, Elizabeth Cheney Blackburn, and the Cheney family.

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Alfred H. Love letter, 1875 0.1 Linear Feet — 3 items

Collection comprises a letter Alfred H. Love wrote to a Mr. Hacker (26 Jan. 1875) regarding his intention to take Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia for a peace meeting on 4 July 1876. Enclosures include Love's business card as a commission merchant and manufacturer's agent for woolens and yarns, along with an undated clipping regarding Love's being burned in effigy during a protest against the Universal Peace Union.

Collection comprises a letter Alfred H. Love wrote to a Mr. Hacker (26 Jan. 1875) regarding his intention to take Carpenter's Hall in Philadelphia for a peace meeting on 4 July 1876. Enclosures include Love's business card as a commission merchant and manufacturer's agent for woolens and yarns, along with an undated clipping regarding Love's being burned in effigy during a protest against the Universal Peace Union.

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Alice Mary Baldwin papers, 1863 - 1961 13.25 Linear Feet — 12500 Items

Alice Mary Baldwin (1879-1960) was a professor of history and administrator at the Woman's College of Duke University for almost 25 years. She researched and published widely, made many speeches, and served as a national advocate for women's education. The Alice Mary Baldwin Papers include correspondence, personal materials, speeches, photographs, clippings, printed materials, artifacts, and other materials documenting her personal and professional life. Major subjects include women's education, women in higher education, administration of a woman's college, vocational guidance, and employment for women. Baldwin's major research interest was the colonial clergy in the United States, and she also took an active interest in contemporary labor issues. Several organizations with which Baldwin took a major interest were the U.S. Navy Waves, the American Association of University Women, the Southern School for Workers, and the Duke University Woman's College as a whole. English.

The Alice M. Baldwin Papers contain materials relating to Dean Baldwin's career as an educator, historian, and administrator, especially during her tenure at Duke University. Her papers include official, personal, and professional correspondence, printed matter, photographs, clippings, and other materials concerning the development and administration of the Woman's College at Duke University, the role of women's colleges in society, and the activities of business and professional women. Correspondents include other women educators, administrators of government offices and charitable and social organizations, former students, and Duke University faculty and staff. Among the major subjects besides the Woman's College are the Southern School for Workers, Inc., North Carolina and Southern labor issues, the U.S. Navy Waves program, and the education of women in general. The collection is organized into several series. The first series, Personal, includes documents related to Baldwin's family, genealogy, and education. The second series, Correspondence, consists of materials concerning her research and publications as well as general correspondence. Major correspondents include Nora C. Chaffin, Charles C. Crittenden, Katherine E. Gilbert, Meta Glass, Orie L. Hatcher, Louise McLaren, and Belle Rankin. The series is organized chronologically.

The third series, the Alphabetical File, is the largest series of the collection, and consists of professional and personal correspondence, student papers, and the office files of Baldwin. The file is arranged alphabetically by subject. Among the organizations Baldwin had an interest in were the American Association of University Women, the Institute of Women's Professional Relations, the National Association of Deans of Women, and the North Carolina Council of Women in Education. She also served on the boards of various state and federal commissions and committees dealing with the role of women's colleges in society. Her participation in the U.S. Navy Waves program is well-documented, as is her interest in the Southern School for Workers and other progressive organizations. The fourth series is Writings, which includes final versions, drafts and notes for a number of monographs and articles. Included are extensive notes from her graduate research on New England clergy. Of particular interest in this series is a 90-page manuscript, "The Woman's College As I Remember It," Baldwin's account of her hiring as the first woman with faculty rank at Duke, and the academic challenges involved in the establishment of the Coordinate College for Women there.

The fifth series is Speeches and Addresses, and is comprised primarily of notecards used by Baldwin in making presentations to a variety of groups. The next series is Photographs, and includes photographs of a European trip and excursions to the New England shore, as well as other personal photos. The sixth series is Clippings, and includes clippings on churches, labor relations, and prohibition. The following series is Printed Materials, and consists of several bound volumes, including the "Baldwin Annual" of the Baldwin School, dedicated to Alice Mary Baldwin, and J.B. Rhine's New World of the Mind, dedicated to Baldwin by the author. The final series, Artifacts, consists of two pins given to Baldwin Delta Gamma Kappa and Phi Beta Kappa, and a key from Duke University's White Duchy.

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Alix Kates Shulman papers, 1892-2014, bulk 1968-2014 39.5 Linear Feet — 29,625 Items

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Prominent feminist, author, and political activist in the 1960s and 70s. Author of MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN (1972), ON THE STROLL (1980), and DRINKING THE RAIN (1995). The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to 2000). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel MEMOIRS OF AN EX-PROM QUEEN is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

The materials in the Alix Kates Shulman Papers span the dates 1892 to 2000, with the bulk of materials dating from 1968 to 2000. These materials include: manuscripts, notes, clippings, published books, correspondence, photographs, audio and videotapes, microfilm, address and date books, family and business records. The primary focus of the collection is Shulman's writing and literary career. The secondary focus is the women's liberation and feminist movements, in which Shulman was and continues to be very active (from 1968 to the present). However, feminism and feminist activism are inextricably intertwined with Shulman's writing career, and her 1972 novel Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen is regarded by many as the first novel to "come out of" the women's liberation movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s.

Other topics covered by the collection include: her teaching and other academic work; her public speaking and conference activities; and her involvement in political activities besides feminism. This collection sheds valuable light on the concerns and tensions within the women's liberation and second-wave feminist movements. In particular, the materials document debates and disagreements among those active in the movement with regard to sexuality, marriage and domestic relations, women's financial situation and careers, health care, civil rights and cultural expression. Many of these issues are raised in Shulman's own work, including her novels, essays, short fiction, personal letters and her teaching materials.

The collection is divided into seven series. The Personal Papers Series contains Shulman's family history papers, photographs, biographical papers, and her personal correspondence (with writers, academics, political activists and family members). Notable correspondents include Ros Baxandall, Jay Bolotin, Kay Boyle, Rita Mae Brown, Phyllis Chesler, Judy Chicago, Andrea Dworkin, Candace Falk, Marilyn French, Lori Ginzberg, Hannah Green, Erica Jong, Kate Millett, Honor Moore, Robin Morgan, Tillie Olson, Lillian Rubin, Sue Standing, and Meredith Tax. The Political Work Series contains material relating to Shulman's involvement with feminist and other liberal political groups, including Redstockings, New York Radical Women, the PEN Women's Committee, No More Nice Girls, the Women's Action Coalition, and Women Against Government Surveillance

The Literary Work Series contains a variety of materials relating to Shulman's literary career, including financial and other dealings with publishing houses, notes and research, photocopies of publications, reviews of her work, articles and notes she collected regarding the literary scene, and original manuscripts. This series contains information about her early children's books; several books she edited of Emma Goldman's writings; her essays and short fiction; her novels Memoirs of an Ex-Prom Queen (1972), Burning Questions (1975), On the Stroll (1977), In Every Woman's Life . . . (1980); and her memoirs Drinking the Rain (1995) and A Good Enough Daughter (1999). A small amount of correspondence regarding book reviews of other authors' work is also included.

The Academic Work Series contains materials relating to Shulman's graduate work at NYU; her teaching at Yale, the University of Colorado at Boulder, NYU, and the University of Hawaii at Manoa; as well as her relationships with her students. The Public Speaking Series contains materials relating to Shulman's participation in literary and political conferences and gatherings, personal interviews, lectures and book talks.

Portions of the Restricted Materials Series either may not be photocopied without prior permission of Ms. Shulman or the relevant author, or may not be accessed until a future date. The same organizational categories have been applied to the restricted materials as were used in the unrestricted materials to help researchers easily access overlapping and related materials that have been boxed separately due to the restrictions. The Oversize Materials Series contains miscellaneous oversize materials of a biographical and literary nature.

Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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On February 13, 1969, Duke University students in the Afro-American Society occupied the the main administration building to bring attention to the needs of black students. These needs included an African American studies department, a black student union, and increased enrollment and financial support for black students. This and subsequent events became known as the Allen Building Takeover. The Allen Building Takeover Collection contains announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, ephemera, clippings, a bibliography, photographs documenting Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969), student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to remembering the Takeover, including the 2002 Allen Building lock-in. Major subjects include African American students and civil rights demonstrations. English.

The collection features materials documenting the Allen Building Takeover at Duke University. The Subject files include photographs, announcements, flyers, publications, correspondence, handouts, reports, transcripts, and ephemera relating to Black Culture Week (Feb. 4-12, 1969), the Allen Building Takeover (Feb. 13, 1969) and student demands, statements by Provost Marcus Hobbs and by Duke President Douglas Knight, student convocations and demonstrations both in support of and against the Takeover, and later events on the Duke campus and in Durham, N.C. Photographs were taken by student participant Lynette Lewis and show the students inside the building during the Takeover. Also included are clippings of newspaper and magazine coverage of the Takeover from the campus paperThe Chronicle, as well as local, state, and national media.

In addition, the collection contains clippings and artwork related to anniversaries and remembrance of the Takeover. Students created artwork in this collection while participating in the 2002 Allen Building lock-in, an event commemorating 1960s activism at Duke and an opportunity for students and administrators to discuss the racial climate on campus.

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The American Dance Festival (ADF) serves the needs of dance, dancers, choreographers and professionals in dance-related fields by supporting the creation of new modern dance work; preserving modern dance heritage; building wider national and international audiences for modern dance; enhancing public understanding and appreciation of the art form; providing a sound scientific/aesthetic base for professional education and training of young dancers; and providing a forum for information on dance education. The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research. English.

The American Dance Festival Reference Collection includes clippings, announcements, programs, and other materials pertaining to ADF performances and events held on the Duke University campus. This materials was collected from a variety of sources by the University Archives for use in reference and research.

Please note that the official repository for information about ADF is the American Dance Festival Archives.

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The Duke University chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers is an academic group for Engineering students at Duke University, formed in 1932. Records contain correspondence, annual reports, meeting announcements, planning materials for the Engineers Show, a newsletter, minutes, membership lists, membership certificates, photographs, and clippings. Major subjects include the American Society of Civil Engineers, Duke University, the School of Engineering, civil engineering study and teaching, professional development, student societies, and the history of civil engineering. Materials range in date from 1932 to 1983 (bulk 1944-1970). English.

Contains correspondence, annual reports, notes from field trips, photographs, and other materials pertaining to the activities of the Duke University student chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers from 1932 to 1983 (bulk 1944-1970).

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Anthony family of Burlington (Guilford Co.), N.C. Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).

Collection primarily comprises 32 albumen photographs and one tintype (circa 1861-1954 and undated), most of which are accompanied by identifying information and feature formal portraits. Nineteen of the photographs represent Newlin or Anthony family members. Among the other thirteen, five are images of the Letterboat, Perry, and Holt families; four are unidentified images of World War I soldiers, possibly associates of Joseph Jonathan Newlin; and one is a print of evangelist "Cyclone Mac." The tintype is of an unidentified Confederate soldier, possibly James Rieh, whose letter of 12 May 1861 is in the collection. Other materials include John Anthony's bank account book (1906-1907); his personal account book (1892-1922), with entries for housekeeping and farm expenses and income; and a commonplace book for M. G. Newell (1938?). In addition, there are a few letters (1910-1958), clippings (1950-1974), and printed materials (1922-1961).