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Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers. The photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or from Korea. The images depict soldiers at work and enjoying recreational time. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Collection includes an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

Album contains 106 black-and-white and color photographs carefully arranged and mounted in a black-leaf photograph album, bound in Japanese-style lacquered covers inlaid with mother-of-pearl. Photographer may be an African American soldier named Tommy, who served in the U.S. Army's 511th Operation and Maintenance Service (OM SVC) Company during the Korean War. It is unclear whether the photographs are from Japan or Korea, as the latter was strongly influenced by Japanese culture until the end of World War II.

The images depict soldiers in and out of uniform and often engaged in recreational pursuits. Many photographs depict both white and African American soldiers together. Other subjects include local women and children; women with servicemen; the countryside and Japanese-style buildings; and family members and others back home. Included with the album is an early 20th century 10 1/2 x 14 inch portrait of four African American children.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

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Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

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Akea Brionne Brown photographs, 2016-2018 2.5 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 33 prints

These thirty-three color inkjet portraits are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown, and explore the life of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

These thirty-three color inkjet photographs are from the body of work "Black Picket Fences" by Akea Brionne Brown and explore the lives of middle-class African Americans in the suburbs of Baltimore, Maryland. Taken in part to confront stereotypes of African American neighborhoods and majority black American cities as dangerous and violent, the images chiefly portray family groups and individuals in interiors of homes and in outside environments such as front yards and streets. The majority of the prints measure 19 3/8 x 24 inches. Two are sized slightly smaller at 15 3/4 x 20 3/4 and 15 x 20 1/4 inches.

The prints are accompanied by the artist's statement, in which she writes: "The project manifested through my own personal critique and observation of the suburban landscape as an ideologically 'white space.' I began to consider the importance of representation and exposure in relation to the formation of black identity, the performativity of blackness, and the ways in which the home transforms into a place of familiarity and/or unfamiliarity depending on who enters the space. In turn, this body of work aims to highlight an often overlooked group in contemporary American culture: the black, suburban middle class."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of Color. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 and undated 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

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Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. They are organized into the following series: The Last and First Eskimos; Southern Color; North Carolina; The Idea of Cuba; Game Boy; May Day, 1970: Yale on Strike; Red White Blue and God Bless You: A Portrait of Northern New Mexico; New Mexico in Black and White; River of Traps (New Mexico); Rainbow Gathering; Philadelphia Experience Corps; Old And On Their Own; Mobile, Alabama; and Dream of a House. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia; students on strike at Yale University; counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona; a boy tethered to electronic technology; elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina; and views of the art-filled interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document his many collaborations with other photographers and writers, including noted photojournalist Gertrude Duby Blom and naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his long career at Duke University, as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake magazine. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's letters but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Amanda Berg photographs, 2014-2015 1.0 Linear Foot — 7 items; 17 x 34.5 inches

Collection comprises seven panoramic color photographs measuring 17 x 34.5 inches, whose central panels portray older women who worked in manufacturing and are now retired or laid off; images set along each side of the portraits feature the sites where they once worked. The images were taken by documentary journalist Amanda Berg in five North Carolina locations - Banner Elk, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Massey Hill, and Newland - in 2014 and 2015. They form part of the multi-artist project "Where we live: a North Carolina portrait." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises seven panoramic color photographs measuring 17 x 34.5 inches, whose central panels portray older women who worked in manufacturing and are now retired or laid off; images set along each side of the portraits feature the sites where they once worked. The images were taken by documentary journalist Amanda Berg in five North Carolina locations - Banner Elk, Fayetteville, Lumberton, Massey Hill, and Newland - in 2014 and 2015. They form part of the multi-artist project "Where we live: a North Carolina portrait," funded by the Annenberg Foundation and directed by photographer Alex Harris.

The photographer writes: "As I reflect on the history of documentary photography, my photographs in this exhibition call attention to the evolution of the camera and possibilities of digital art. The resulting panoramas invite the viewer to project their own story into the frame, while considering the relationship between industry, identity, gender, and social mobility in North Carolina."

The collection was acquired as part of the Archives of Documentary Art at Duke University.

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Americans for Immigrant Justice (formerly Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center [FIAC]) is a not-for-profit legal assistance organization dedicated to protecting and promoting the basic human rights of immigrants of all nationalities. The Americans for Immigrant Justice records span the years of 1980-2017. The collection contains project files and correspondence regarding immigrant detention policy and conditions in the state of Florida, particularly concerning the Haitian community; legal documents regarding the same, including restricted and confidential legal files; and audiovisual material produced by or for AIJ. The bulk of materials are organized by subject and detention facility.

The Americans for Immigrant Justice (AIJ) records, formerly the Florida Immigrant Advocacy Center (FIAC), span the years of 1980-2017. This collection contains extensive documentation of the events and crises surrounding asylum, deportation, detention and abuses that took place within Florida detention centers from the years 1980 to 2017, as well as documentation regarding issues of repatriation. It records the efforts of AIJ to advocate on behalf of immigrant and refugee populations, mainly in Florida, during this time. The majority of material in this collection deals with Haitians seeking asylum in the U.S., but also includes major material on Cuban and Central American refugees, then minor files on Chinese, Middle Eastern, and other immigrant populations. Many files focus on Cheryl Little's work with child refugees and detainees and their asylum claims, and on discrimination against female immigrants. Files also include material on interdiction at sea and related court documents, government immigration policy pre- and post-9/11, documentation on hunger strikes at various facilities, material related to the Haitian Boat crises, and documentation of raids on immigrant populations. The detention facilities of particular concern in this collection include Guantanamo, Krome, and Turner Guilford Knight correctional facilities, as well as Florida's county jails.

The collection contains legal documents related to the activity of AIJ, including affidavits of detainees held in Florida facilities, and other court documents, such as court pleadings and briefings; reports on facility conditions; correspondence, including correspondence between detainees and their families, letters from concerned citizens, and formal correspondence between AIJ and other organizations and officials; case studies and reports on immigration and refugee crises, and reports of abuses and conditions in Florida detention facilities; FBI interviews with detainees; related articles and speeches; restricted material, including medical records; and promotional and educational videos produced by or for AIJ, documentary footage of missions and events, and press conference and news footage.

The series in this collection include the Detention Series, the Immigrant and Refugees Series, the Restricted Series, the General Organizational Records Series, the Audiovisual Series and the Photographic Materials Series. The bulk of the material for this collection belongs to the Detention Series and the Immigrant and Refugees Series.

Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

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Azel Hull Fish lantern slide lecture sets and photographs, 1890s-1940s 9 Linear Feet — 6 boxes — approximately 2300 items

The chief component consists of roughly 2000 lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

The chief component consists of a large collection of lantern slides used by college professor Azel Hull Fish in lectures about the history of California, the Panama-Pacific Exposition, Plymouth Colony, the settling of the American West, social and economic development of the U.S., works of art, and other historical and philosophical subjects. The slides are arranged by subject group and number roughly 2000. Additional materials consist of photographs, some loose, but most mounted in photograph albums. Some of these were souvenir albums with views of California and other Western states by commercial photographers. Also included are some pamphlets, chiefly lecture texts, and a slide projector.

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Collection comprises 23 color photographs (4"x6") of Bamako, Mali, sent to Helene Baumann by a friend in 2002, accompanied by a letter containing descriptive information for each photograph. Baumann was librarian for African and Western European Studies at Duke University, 1988-2006. Includes images of housing conditions; markets, public spaces, monuments, and buildings; and soccer matches.

Collection comprises 23 color photographs (4"x6") of Bamako, Mali, sent to Helene Baumann by a friend in 2002, accompanied by a letter containing descriptive information for each photograph. Baumann was librarian for African and Western European Studies at Duke University, 1988-2006. Includes images of housing conditions; markets, public spaces, monuments, and buildings; and soccer matches.

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Oracles and books on divination (01-045)(28 items, 1.8 linear feet; dated ca. 1970s-1990s and undated), including 17 decks of tarot and other cards, many enclosed in fabric or leather. Shore designed two of the decks, "The Earth Alliance Deck" and "The Earthrise Deck." Also includes sets of runes and I Ching coins, a pendulum, an edition of the I CHING, a rune book edited by Ralph Blum, and other printed material regarding the I CHING and tarot cards.

The addition (01-248) (5131 items, 19.2 linear feet; dated 1953-2000, bulk 1970s-ca. 1998) documents Shor's work on dreams. Includes 41 volumes of meditation and dream journals by Shore (1974-1999); other journals and dream documentation and interpretation by Shor and others; correspondence; and dream-related periodicals, including Dream Network Bulletin. There are also drafts of Shor's poems, short stories, essays, and dream handbooks (ca. 1953-2000), including Unexpected Gifts, Open Channel, Dreaming with Angels, Shared Dreaming, Dream Tool Kit: How to Remember and Encode Your Own Dreams, Small Gifts, and The Swan; records from the Dreamgate Shared Dreaming Project; notes on or from other dream-related workshops; 11 black-and-white and 3 color photographs; and 197 computer disks containing circa 9800 electronic documents.

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Benjamin Lowy photographs of Iraq, 2003-2008 3 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 32 items

The collection consists of thirty-two 9x13 inch untitled digital color inkjet photographs taken by Benjamin Lowy, documenting the U.S. military presence in Iraq from 2003 to 2008. The prints are arranged in two series: Windows and Nightvision. Images in the Windows series were taken from the bulletproof windows of the armored Humvees in which Lowy spent most of his time while on missions in Iraq; they depict street scenes with Iraqi civilians, tanks, soldiers, checkpoints, military impoundments, street life, urban Iraqi culture, and a war-ravaged Iraqi landscape. Taken through U.S. military-issue night vision goggles, photographs in the Nightvision series reveal greenish images of late-night raids, prisoners and soldiers, landscapes, families, women, and street scenes. The images in this collection were published in 2011 as a photobook titled Iraq | Perspectives. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The collection consists of thirty-two 9x13 inch untitled digital color inkjet photographs taken by Benjamin Lowy, documenting the U.S. military presence in Iraq from 2003 to 2008. The images were published in 2011 as a photo book, Iraq | Perspectives.

The prints are arranged in two series: Windows and Nightvision. Images in the Windows series, reproduced as sixteen 13x19 inch color digital inkjet prints, were taken from the bulletproof windows of the armored Humvees in which Lowy spent most of his time while on documentary missions in Iraq. The images include street scenes with Iraqi civilians, tanks, soldiers, checkpoints, military impoundments, and images documenting urban Iraqi culture, and a war-ravaged Iraqi landscape. Images in the Nightvision subseries, consisting of sixteen 13x19 inch color digital inkjet prints, were taken through U.S. military-issue night vision goggles, and reveal late-night raids, prisoners and soldiers, families, women, night landscapes, and street scenes.

All the images were shot with a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera and printed on Epson Professional Paper. They are arranged in original order as received from the photographer.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.