Collections

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Color photographs Remove constraint Format: Color photographs Level Collection Remove constraint Level: Collection

Search Results

collection icon

Zora J. Murff photographs, 2013-2015 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 25 color inkjet prints

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa. This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises twenty-five color inkjet prints from "Corrections," a documentary project by photographer Zora J. Murff. Taken in Iowa, these portraits of male and female teenage offenders on probation, parole, or charged again as adults are further contextualized by images of electronic tracking bracelets, jumpsuits, cells and detention centers, and intake paperwork. Images are accompanied by detailed captions written by the photographer. The prints measure 17 x 22 inches (image size 16 x 20 inches). As a whole, the collection documents the administration and human context of the 21st century juvenile justice system in the U.S. and Iowa.

In the artist's statement, also included in the collection, Murff writes: "From 2012 to 2015, I worked as a Tracker for Linn County Juvenile Detention and Diversion Services in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. As a Tracker, I provided services to youths who were convicted of crimes, adjudicated, and subsequently ordered to complete probation...Through employing ideas of anonymity, voyeurism, and introspection, 'Corrections' is an examination of youth experience in the system, the role images play in defining someone who is deemed a 'criminal,' and how the concepts of privacy and control may affect their future."

This work received the 2018 ADA Award for Emerging Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon
Branch of an international peace advocacy organization founded in 1915; formerly known as the Chapel Hill Branch (N.C.). Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Contains meeting agendas and minutes, directories, conference reports, group organizing information, correspondence including some with Senators Jesse Helms,John Edwards and David Price, Peace and Freedom, the magazine of the WILPF, legislative bulletins, clippings, an oral history interview with founding member Charlotte Adams, song lyrics, newsletters, videos, photographs, and other material documenting their efforts. A few of the newsletters document the activities of the Triangle Branch of WILPF. The collection also includes information files on activism for nuclear arms control, nuclear disarmament, and bans on nuclear testing that continue to document WILPF's activities to promote world peace. Also includes correspondence among WILPF members; meeting agendas and minutes for both WILFP and the Orange County North Carolina Peace Coalition; national petitions against nuclear weapons; and issues of Peace and Freedom, and the branch's newsletter. The collection also includes comprises newsletters, clippings, committee minutes, fundraising files, publicity materials for WILPF events and other groups' events, and incoming and outgoing correspondence with politicians and groups similar to the WILPF. Also includes videocassette tapes, photographs, and scrapbooks and a journal compiled by Charlotte Adams and documenting earlier years of the organization (1938-1964). Some of the audiovisual materials have use copies, but others do not; please speak to a reference archivist before use. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

collection icon
Professor emeritus of economics, University of Michigan. Stolper died in 2002. The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper (ca. 9900 items) span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the materials dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics.

The papers of Wolfgang F. Stolper span the period from 1947-1988, with the bulk of the material dated between 1960 and the mid 1970s. Most of the collection is comprised of Professor Stolper's files and notes from his work in Nigeria, Tunisia, and other missions to Africa. These work files document his career as a practitioner--literally working "in the field"--of development economics. The papers are organized into eight series: Nigeria; Tunisia; Other Missions; Writings; Speeches, Lectures, and Conferences; Schumpeter; University of Michigan and Teaching Material; and General Correspondence. The Nigeria Series, the first and largest, contains his work files from his job as head of the Economic Planning Unit (EPU) in the Federal Ministry of Economic Development in Lagos, Nigeria from 1961-62(sent there under the auspices of the Ford Foundation). As head of the EPU, Stolper co-authored the first ever National Development Plan, 1962-68for the Federation of Nigeria. As such, his papers present an extensive and thorough picture of the Nigerian economy at that time. Once top secret files, they include detailed statistical data on each industry, industrialization plans, reports on marketing board policies, maps, and demographics data. Of great interest to researchers on the Nigerian economy might be Stolper's personal diary, a 393-page typewritten account of his two years in Nigeria. The next two series pertain to his work in Tunisia (1972),and other economic missions to Africa including Dahomey (now Benin) and Togo (1967), Benin (1983)and Malawi (1981).He was sent to these countries under the auspices of USAID, the UN and the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, also known as the World Bank). The files from these three series alone make up eight of the fourteen storage boxes that house the entire collection. Also in the collection are some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Schumpeter. The collection as a whole is restricted, so that persons interested in viewing the papers during Professor Stolper's lifetime must first obtain his permission.

Stolper's name is perhaps most recognizable for the theoretical piece written with Paul A. Samuelson on what has come to be known as the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem (see "Protection and Real Wages," Review of Economic Studies, Nov. 1941). This theorem, one of the core results of the Hecksher-Ohlin model of international trade, essentially states that an increase in the relative domestic price of a good (for example, via the imposition of a tariff) unambiguously raises the real return to the factor of production used intensively in producing that good (and lowers the real return to the other factor). This paper analyzed precisely for the first time the effect of trade or protection on real wages. At present, there is nothing (aside from reprints of the article) in this collection of papers dealing with the Stolper-Samuelson Theorem.

The fourth series, Writings, contains notes, drafts, manuscripts and reprints of any articles found in the collection but excluding those related to Joseph Schumpeter. Some highlights include drafts of "Investments in Africa South of the Sahara," notes and drafts of his book Planning Without Facts: Lessons in Resource Allocation from Nigeria's Development, and articles on smuggling in Africa.

The fifth series, Speeches, Lectures and Conferences, contains material (excluding those pertaining to Schumpeter) from public speaking engagements and conferences attended by Professor Stolper. One item that might be of interest is a speech recorded on magnetic tape titled "Problems of our Foreign Aid Program" that dates from around the 1950's.

Another of Professor Stolper's research interests is the history of economic thought, and this collection's Schumpeter Series contains some notes, papers and drafts of Professor Stolper's work pertaining to Joseph Alois Schumpeter. Stolper was afforded a unique and personal relationship with Schumpeter, studying under him first at the University of Bonn and then at Harvard, and also through Schumpeter's position as a close friend of Gustav and Toni Stolper (Wolfgang's father and stepmother, respectively). Included in this series is a book (in German) that Professor Stolper co-wrote with Horst Claus Recktenwald and Frederic M. Scherer titled Uber Schumpeters »Theorie der wirtschaftlichen Entwicklung«, 1988.

The addition (02-0207) (8625 items, 14 linear feet; dated 1892-2001) contains correspondence with colleagues, including Paul Samuelson, Gottfried Haberler, and other prominent economists; class lectures (1930s); as well as writings about J. A. Schumpeter, economic development, and other topics. Also writings, reports, diaries, and other documents (mainly 1960s) about the economies of Nigeria, Tunisia, Liberia, Togo, and the Ivory Coast. In addition, there are 12 black-and-white and 18 color photographs; one x-ray; and 16 electronic documents on 3 floppy disks. This addition is unprocessed.

collection icon

Will Inman papers, 1910-2009 69.5 Linear Feet — 42,754 Items

The correspondence, diaries, manuscripts, clippings, and printed material in the Will Inman Papers span from 1939-1999, and serve to document the life and literary career of the poet, essayist, editor, educator, and publisher.

Inman was a prolific corespondent and maintained regular correspondent relationships with his friends and family, as well as with his readers and other editors and authors. He also regularly wrote to political and social figures during the 1960s. These letters to public and political figures express admiration and voice concerns about political events and social conditions. Inman protested in favor of civil rights, ending the war in Vietnam, and various environmental causes, and his letters reflect his thoughts and opinions on these subjects. Inman was also in regular contact with the editors and publishers of various literary magazines and the letters to these individuals document his efforts to publish his work. The collection holds many of Inman's out going correspondence as he regularly kept copies of his own letters.

Inman's copious diaries provide almost daily detail of his life from 1950-1994. In his diaries Inman recorded daily events, poetic inspirations, and his responses to world events. The diaries also include information about the poetry he is working on and several include typescripts of completed poems.

Inman also kept detailed records concerning his completed writings. He kept typescript copies of his poems and other writings, ordering them chronologically into notebooks, and recording publication information onto the typescripts. In organizing this collection, Inman's notebooks were discarded, but the typescripts maintain the order they held while bound in the notebooks, and serve to provide a chronological overview of Inman's published and unpublished writings.

This collection also contains copies of several of the anthologies and literary magazines where Inman published his work and several of the poetic monographs that Inman authored.

Inman regularly published his early work in newspapers in North Carolina. The collection contains clippings of these early published works as well as clippings of Inman's mid 1960's newspaper column "Conchsounds in the Hills."

There are also photographs of the McGirt family from ca. 1910, chiefly mounted in albums, as well as Inman's baby book from 1923. (16 accessions from 1998 and 1999) (35,475 items, 59 linear feet; dated 1910-1999)

The addition (accession #2001-0195) (1676 items, 2.7 linear feet; dated 1940-2001, bulk 1976-2001) comprises mainly personal correspondence to and from Inman and Jimmy Santiago Baca, 1971-1995, including typescript poetry. It also includes typescript poetry by Inman as Bill McGirt, 1940-1956; other poetry by Inman; professional correspondence; and a journal kept by Inman, 2000-2001.

The addition (accession #2002-0143) (2250 items, 3.60 linear feet; dated 1982-2001) consists primarily of incoming and outgoing personal correspondence. Topics include Inman's poems, publication work, and his political activites. There is also poetry and prose by Inman and others, and 20 black-and-white and 148 color photographs.

The addition (accession# 2003-0124 and 2003-0181)(2775 items, 3.6 linear feet; dated 1957-2003, bulk 1970-1989) contains published and unpublished typescript poetry written by Will Inman. Also includes literary newsletters, periodicals and brochures; a notebook containing poetry, biographical information and professional correspondence; and a paperweight.

Addition (2009-0263) (500 items, 0.6 lin. ft.; dated 1976-2009) includes correspondence, poetry by Inman and others, press releases and reviews, official documents (such as his birth certificate, insurance information, and medical documents), and materials from Inman's death and funeral.

collection icon

William J. Anderson photographs and papers, 1920s, 1947-2011, bulk 1960-2008 7.0 Linear Feet — 9 boxes — Approximately 1000 items — 7.0 linear feet; approximately 1000 items

Collection features the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color. Anderson's images primarily document the Deep South, especially Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on portraits of African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and Civil Rights movement events. Two significant bodies of work were taken at Daufuskie Island and a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina; other images were taken in Mexico, Central America, and France. Also includes Anderson's professional papers, fliers, and posters, chiefly relating to exhibits, and a sketchbook. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises the photographic work of African American photographer, sculptor, and professor of art William J. Anderson, from his earliest years as an art student in the early 1960s, to the late 2000s. Fifty-one large black-and-white gelatin silver prints are accompanied by over 500 negatives spanning his career, as well as contact sheets, slides, and smaller photographs in black-and-white and in color.

Anderson's images primarily document African American culture and society in the Deep South, particularly in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi, and South Carolina, with a focus on African American adults and children, families, the elderly, church gatherings, jazz musicians, poverty and homelessness in the city and country, life on the Sea Islands, and political rallies, riots, and Civil Rights marches and commemorations. Two significant bodies of work were taken on Daufuskie Island and in a recreated African Yoruba village, both in South Carolina. Other images, many of which are available only in negative format, were taken in San Francisco, Louisiana, Mexico, Central America, and France. Most of the images from Mexico and Central America date from the 1960s and are among his earliest work. There are also many images, spanning his career, of his sculptures and other artwork, and photographs of his exhibition openings. Additionally, there are some family photographs and negatives, a few of which appear to date from the 1920s and 1950s.

The large prints range in size from approximately 10x14 to 16x20 inches, and are all labeled with a title and date and print number, assigned by the photographer; they are arranged in original print number order. The other photographic work is mostly unlabeled and arranged in original order as received.

The collection also includes Anderson's professional correspondence, printed materials such as clippings, posters, and fliers, and other papers, all chiefly relating to exhibits and loans, and a sketchbook on the human form from his earliest student days, about 1957. Among the correspondence is a copy of a letter written by Coretta Scott King, thanking him for his participation in a commemorative event.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture at Duke University.

collection icon

Wallace Fowlie papers, 1911-1998 and undated 5 Linear Feet — 516 Items

Writer, critic, translator, and faculty member at Duke University specializing in modern French literature. The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

The Wallace Fowlie Papers span the years 1911 to 1998 and consist mainly of correspondence sent to Fowlie, but also texts from Fowlie's personal library, publications on French literature authored by Fowlie, typescript and handwritten drafts by Fowlie, amd clippings pertaining to Fowlie's career. A significant portion of the correspondence comprises exchanges between Fowlie and Thomas and Kit Foster. These letters mainly address personal and family matters (health issues, vacations and meeting with mutual friends), but also cover projects Fowlie was working on, teaching positions accepted and rejected and class progress, and other matters of professional relevance. There is also a folder of correspondence with Fowlie, almost entirely in French, that was maintained by John M. Dunaway, a Romance Languages professor at Mercer College in Georgia. It includes a few color photographs. Other smaller amounts of correspondence come from Robert Heslen, a former student of Fowlie, and well-known writers/artists including René Char, Jean Cocteau, André Gide, Alexis Léger (Saint-Jean Perse), Marianne Moore, Anaïs Nin, and others, discussing literary matters and their writings and careers. There are letters from Fowlie to Walter Muther. A folder of general correspondence contains single letters from a variety of colleagues and friends. Selections from Fowlie's library are sorted into works and translations by Fowlie, and works he used privately or for his own research.

collection icon

Veronica Melendez photographs, 2011-2012 1.0 Linear Foot — 1 box — 20 color inkjet prints — 17 x 22 inches

Twenty 17x22-inch color inkjet prints from the body of work "Le pido a Dios que no me olviden," or "I ask God that you not forget me," by photographer Veronica Melendez document the Latin American community in the Washington, D.C. metro area, primarily in Maryland and Virginia. The images are of people, cultural events, religious scenes, and symbols that recall faraway countries of origin as well as contemporary realities in these Latin American communities. Melendez's work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of the American South. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The title of this project, "Le pido a Dios que no me olviden," translates to "I ask God that you not forget me." It is taken from a letter written to the artist's mother the day she emigrated from Guatemala to the United States in 1982. These words inspired Veronica Melendez to start documenting through photography the Central American community in the Washington, D.C. metro area, particularly in Maryland and Virginia.

The twenty 17x22-inch color inkjet prints, all horizontally oriented, document people, cultural events, religious scenes, and symbols that recall faraway countries of origin as well as contemporary realities in these Latin American communities. The artist's statement is included. This work won the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Documentarians of the American South.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.

collection icon

Tom Rankin photographs and papers, 1977-2016 33.5 Linear Feet — 28 boxes; 2 film reels — Approximately 13,650 items — 33.5 linear feet; approximately 13,640 items

Tom Rankin is a documentary photographer, filmmaker, folklorist, professor of art and documentary studies, and former director of the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University. Collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Photographs from the South focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region, as well as portraits of individuals, including portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown, and Southern landscapes. An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes. Finished prints range from 8x11 inch contact prints to 11x14, 16x20, and 20x24 large-format prints. Supporting materials include manuscripts, publications files, and two films, all deriving from Rankin's career and art practice. Includes a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of his work, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta." Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The photographic work of Tom Rankin in this collection consists of 147 black-and-white and color photographs documenting the American South and China. Southern photographs were taken from 1980 to 2007, and focus on religious sites, rituals, and communities in the Mississippi Delta region; these prints form the largest series, "Sacred Space." Another body of work features portraits of Mississippi writer Larry Brown. A third body of work, "Portraits from the American South," offers views of Southern people, cultures, and landscapes in both color and black-and-white.

An additional documentary project from 2016 took Rankin to China, where he photographed semi-rural landscapes, often taken with high-rise buildings in the far distance or adjacent to industrial structures, as well as bridges and rivers, markets and live fish vendors, and a few street scenes.

Print sizes range from 11x14, 13x19, 16x20, and 20x24 inches, with many housed in window mats. Along with these prints, there are also 8x11 inch black-and-white matted contact prints. All titles were created by the photographer.

Selected photographs from this collection have been exhibited at the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke and other locations. A selection of Rankin's photographs was published in a book, Sacred Space: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta (1993).

Supporting materials in this collection include a digital audio recording of a talk by Rankin at the exhibit opening of work from the Sacred Space series, "Near the Cross: Photographs from the Mississippi Delta," as well as paper records related to his career and art practice, including book publications and book layouts. Also in the collection are two motion films, Dance Like a River (1985), directed by Barry Dorfeld and Tom Rankin, and Four Women Artists (1977), directed by Bill Ferris.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

Thomas Chapin papers, 1870s-1999, bulk 1979-1999 84.9 Linear Feet — 28,117 Items

The collection (100 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1979-1998) contains audio cassettes and compositions by Thomas Chapin, as well as clippings, programs, memorial messages, and other items about him. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of audio cassettes before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-355)

The addition to the collection (60 items, 2.5 linear feet; dated 1981-1999) includes published materials on Chapin or featuring his music. There are publicity materials; scrapbook items, such as programs or clippings; articles about Chapin from the internet and elsewhere; copies of original scores; compact discs; phonograph records; genealogical information, and other biographical information about him and his trio. Technical Services staff may need to make use copies of sound recordings before use. No container list was created for this accession. (99-0467)

The addition to the collection (15300 items, 29.40 linear feet; dated 1870s-1998, bulk 1980-1997) comprises primarily correspondence; financial records; scrapbooks, graphic materials (98 color photographs, 1 color slide, 6 black-and-white photographs, 24 black-and-white negatives, 17 contact sheets, 1 print, 1 watercolor, and 2 chalk drawings), posters, and other materials detailing Chapin's musical career, especially performances of the Chapin Trio; notebooks and appointment books; and musical scores by Chapin and others. Also includes recordings on 17 reel-to-reel tapes, 8 CDs, and 5 audiocassette tapes of performances by Chapin and others; 3 electronic computer files; and 24 small musical instruments of plastic and metal. (01-0157)

The addition (2002-0281 and 2003-0125; 12,657 items, 50.5 linear feet) consists primarily of studio and demo recordings of Chapin's music on audiocassette, vinyl, and reel-to-reel tape. Also contains a number of collages by Chapin, documenting another of his forms of expression; personal items, especially photographs and correspondence, reflecting his close relationships with family and friends; videos and film reels of recording sessions, tours, and other events, including Chapin's memorial service; sheet music and music books; clothing and hats; 3 hand instruments; performance posters; and business items.