Collections : [David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library]

Back to top
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library
David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

The holdings of the Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library range from ancient papyri to records of modern advertising. There are over 10,000 manuscript collections containing more than 20 million individual manuscript items. Only a portion of these collections and items are discoverable on this site. Others may be found in the library catalog.

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Color photographs Remove constraint Format: Color photographs Repository David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library Remove constraint Repository: David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library

Search Results

collection icon

John Willis photographs, 2009-2011 0.5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 6 prints

John Willis created these six composite color images to articulate and consider the connections between photographic portraits taken by the Khmer Rouge of young people in Tuol Sleng prison in Phnom Penh, where an estimated 14,000-20,000 victims were executed from about 1975-1979, and images of deteriorating mural frescoes at the Emperor's Palace, also in Phnom Penh. The portraits are said to be of prison workers, and were exhibited in 2008 at the prison, now a genocide museum. Five of the historical photographs are portraits; the sixth shows a group of what appears to be Khmer Rouge soldiers in uniform. The photographer's images show that the original photographs on exhibit were defaced with graffiti and other marks by visitors to the museum. The neglected Emperor's Palace frescoes, whose images flank the victim's portraits in Willis' work, depict scenes from the Cambodian epic poem, the Reamker, which speaks to human issues of love, revenge, loyalty, and trust. The color inkjet prints were created from 2009 to 2011. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

American photographer John Willis created these six composite color images to articulate and consider the connections between photographic portraits taken by the Khmer Rouge of young people in Tuol Sleng prison in Phnom Penh, where an estimated 14,000-20,000 victims were executed from about 1975-1979, and images of deteriorating mural frescoes at the Emperor's Palace, also in Phnom Penh.

The portraits are said to be of prison workers, and were exhibited in 2008 at the prison, now a genocide museum. Five of the historical photographs are portraits; the sixth shows a group of what appears to be Khmer Rouge soldiers in uniform. The photographer's images show that the original photographs on exhibit at the genocide museum were defaced with graffiti and other marks by visitors.

Images of the neglected Emperor's Palace frescoes flank the victim's portraits, creating dramatic diptychs and triptychs, and depict scenes from the Cambodian epic poem, the Reamker, which speaks to human issues of love, revenge, loyalty, and trust.

The six color inkjet prints measure approximately 7x15 inches and were created from 2009 to 2011.

collection icon

Photographic Memory student projects, 2016 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 7 items — 6 photobooks; 1 zine

Seven creative projects produced by students in Photographic Memory: Photo Albums, Photobooks, & Zines, taught by Lisa McCarty in Spring 2016 at Duke University. The one zine and six photobooks utilize photographs and ephemera from their personal archives, and document representations of women in art; a morning walk in Durham, N.C.; Duke students at a horse race in South Carolina; the Pan Mass bicycle charity event in Massachusetts; the rapid changes in downtown Durham, N.C.; a ferry service in Hong Kong; and U.S. war memorials. Through their work, the students explored aspects of the interplay of text and image, methods for sequential storytelling, basic layout and design techniques, as well as methods for production and distribution. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Seven creative projects produced by students in Photographic Memory: Photo Albums, Photobooks, & Zines, taught by Lisa McCarty in the Spring of 2016 at Duke University. The course codes were DOCST 361S-01/761S-01, VMS 361S, and ARTVIS 361S.

Students produced their own unique zine and photobooks utilizing photographs and ephemera from their personal archives. Through their work, the students explored aspects of the interplay of text and image, methods for sequential storytelling, basic layout and design techniques, as well as methods for production and distribution.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon
online icon
Collection comprises a large photograph album likely created by an African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards. Images primarily feature informal shots of African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, though few show the races mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. The photographer took many images of U.S. Army camps and air bases, army personnel and vehicles, street scenes from Saigon and smaller villages, and took numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas. Overall, the images offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints. Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

Collection comprises a photograph album likely created by an unidentified African American soldier serving in Vietnam. There are 268 uncaptioned black-and-white and several color photographs ranging in size from 2 3/4 x 3 1/2 to 3 1/2 x 5 inches, along with 15 souvenir postcards, all carefully arranged and mounted in a large decorative travel scrapbook.

Images primarily feature off-duty African American and white servicemen in camp and off base, although few show white and black soldiers mingling. There is also a series of well-executed portraits of individual soldiers, white and black. Scenes from the streets of Saigon and perhaps other large cities abound, showing the diversity of vehicles and pedestrians; there are also some taken in smaller, unidentified towns and villages, presumably in Vietnam. The photographer took many images of markets, bars, pharmacies, and other buildings, almost always from the exteriors, as well as numerous snapshots of local citizens, chiefly women and children, often in groups, and some who appear to be frequently associated with the U.S. military base or camp.

Military locations and scenes include an air base, helicopters in flight, a crashed helicopter, military bases and personnel, Army vehicles along the roads, military police (including one African American), and what appear to be checkpoints. There are a handful of shots showing bombing raids and cleared or destroyed jungle areas.

Overall, the images in this photograph album offer a wealth of details about the Vietnam War from a variety of viewpoints.

Acquired as part of the John Hope Franklin Research Center for African and African American History and Culture.

collection icon

Priya Kambli photographs, 2006-2012 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 color inkjet prints — 17 x 22 inches — Paper size is 17 1/2 x 23 1/2 inches; individual image sizes vary and are listed in the entries.

Collection consists of forty 17x24 inch color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "Color Falls Down" by artist Priya Kambli, who emigrated from India to the U.S. at the age of eighteen. Sometimes resembling diptychs, the images juxtapose and recontextualize family photographs, personal objects such as clothing, spoons, and earrings, and contemporary self-portraits, exploring themes of migration, cross-cultural understanding, women and family, identity, and memory. This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Women Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection consists of forty 17x24 inch color inkjet prints from a body of work titled "Color Falls Down" by artist Priya Kambli, who emigrated from India to the U.S. Sometimes resembling diptychs, the images juxtapose and recontextualize family photographs, personal objects such as clothing, spoons, and earrings, and contemporary self-portraits, exploring themes of migration, cross-cultural understanding, women and family, identity, and memory.

From the artist's statement: "At age 18, a couple of years after the death of my parents, I moved from India to the United States with all my belongings in one suitcase. My photographs, which are rooted in my fascination with my parents, visually express the notion of transience and split cultural identity caused by the act of migration. In Color Falls Down these issues are seen through the lens of my own personal history and cultural identity. I re-contextualize and alter my family snapshots and personal artifacts to reveal the correlations between generations, cultures and memory."

This work received the 2018 ADA Collection Award for Women Documentarians. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

collection icon

History of Medicine picture file, 1523-2002 and undated 16 Linear Feet — approximately 2400 items

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File holds thousands of small and large images organized into series for individuals, places, and subjects related to the history of medicine and medical practice. The great majority portray notable physicians, scientists, naturalists, philosophers, and other individuals with important links to medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes in specific locations related to events in medical history. The subject categories cover many topics, with the largest groups including advertising, anatomy, caricatures, cartoons, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery. Predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, print materials (such as posters, clippings, and postcards), and many modern photographic reproductions of older works; there are also albumen photographs, negatives, slide reproductions, and other image formats found throughout the files. Forms part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Assembled by the staff of the Duke University Medical Library, the History of Medicine Picture File offers thousands of images of individuals, places, and subjects dating from the 1500s to 2002, with the great majority portraying physicians, scientists, nurses, and other individuals related to the history or practice of medicine. Places featured include hospitals and other institutions of medicine, and scenes related to events in medical history. Subject categories include advertising, anatomy, books, caricature, childbirth, embryology, medical instruments, pediatrics, physicians, and surgery, among many others.

Most of the images measure in size under 10x12 inches, but there are approximately 500 larger pieces. The predominant formats are engravings, lithographs, cartoons, clippings from magazines and newspapers, and modern photographic prints, but there are also albumen photographs and other image formats found throughout the files. Items were acquired by the Duke Medical Library from various sources over many decades and functioned as a vertical file for library students and researchers.

The oversize items range in size from 11x15 to 23x30 inches, and offer a varied assemblage of portraits, caricatures, posters, broadsides, and reproductions of artwork, in black-and-white and in color. Items include portraits and scenes with notable physicians; illustrations of various medical practices, procedures, and instruments; anatomical views, some possibly as early as the 17th century; medical advertisements and promotional literature; depictions of events in medical history in Europe and North America; caricatures; 20th century illustrations for book covers; and many other topics.

Images and prints are often accompanied by reproduction negatives and slides created by Medical Center Library staff. Many of the images in this collection were also scanned by Medical Library staff and are available through the Medical Center Library & Archives Duke Medicine Digital Repository database. For more information, please contact the History of Medicine Curator at the Rubenstein Library.

Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

collection icon
Collection comprises 23 color photographs (4"x6") of Bamako, Mali, sent to Helene Baumann by a friend in 2002, accompanied by a letter containing descriptive information for each photograph. Baumann was librarian for African and Western European Studies at Duke University, 1988-2006. Includes images of housing conditions; markets, public spaces, monuments, and buildings; and soccer matches.
collection icon

Kathy Acker papers, 1972-1997 and undated 21.0 Linear Feet — 0.03 Gigabytes

The papers of Kathy Acker, 1975-1996 and undated, are comprised, for the most part, of manuscript drafts of her novels, short stories, and other miscellaneous writings ranging from early works such as The Childlike Life of the Black Tarantula (1975) to her last novel Pussy, King of the Pirates (1996). Described as a cyberpunk author and performance artist, Acker's novels question the strictures of female sexuality and the power of language.

collection icon

Mariette Pathy Allen photographs and papers, 1968-2003 8.5 Linear Feet — Approximately 931 Items

Documentary photographer based in New York City. Collection contains five portfolios of Allen's work, dating from the 1960s to 2003, totaling 131 color and black and white prints that document aspects of human sexuality, gender identity, the connections between people and art, and the social life of people in Philadelphia and New Jersey suburbs and beaches. The prints are arranged into these series: Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them; The Woman Who Lives Inside: Portraits of Men as Women; NJ/PA 1968; People and Art; and the Gender Frontier. A final series consists of a group of papers and publications by and about Allen. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

Collection contains five portfolios of Allen's work, dating from the 1960s to 2003, totaling 131 prints that document aspects of human sexuality, gender identity, the connections between people and art, and the social life of people in Philadelphia and New Jersey suburbs and beaches. The first series, Transformations: Crossdressers and Those Who Love Them contains eleven 15.5 x 23 inch color prints mounted on 24x31 inch mat board. These photographs are from the book of the same title published in 1990 that documents crossdressers in everyday life. The second series, The Woman Who Lives Inside: Portraits of Men as Women, is a portfolio of 16 gelatin silver and 15 color prints. The third is entitled NJ/PA 1968, containing 28 black and white, 16x20, gelatin silver prints. Images include people at the New Jersey beaches, east coast suburbs, and Philadelphia. A fourth series consists of 30 16x20 gelatin silver prints entitled People and Art, shot between 1968 and 2000. Photographs include artists at work, people looking at art, the Venice Bienniale 1999, Paris, London, and Budapest. Finally, the fifth series consists of 31 color and black and white prints from Allen's 2004 book, The Gender Frontier, documenting transgender and transsexual people in relationships, at conferences and political rallies, and undergoing corrective surgeries. This series also includes many portraits of different transgender people. Two CD-Rs of Allen's images are also included in the Papers Series, which also houses printed materials, brochures, and articles that include photographs by Allen. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts.

collection icon
The Roland Alston family was an African American family residing in Durham, North Carolina. William Roland Alston, known as "Roland," became the head gardener for Mary Duke Biddle at Pinecrest and later for the Semans family at Les Terraces, both properties located in Durham. The collection comprises nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family.

The Roland Alston family papers comprise nine folders containing transcripts, some edited and some final, of eight oral history interviews Judy Hogan completed with Roland Alston. The original audio tapes or cassettes for the interviews are not included with the collection. Topics include his work for Mary Duke Biddle and the Semans family; growing up on a farm in Chatham County; Durham and regional businesses, especially those for gardeners; his family life; and his views on relationships between people, including employers and employees, men and women, and parent and child. Also includes 5 black-and-white and 5 color (one hand colored) uncaptioned photographs, including individual and group portraits, presumably of members of the Roland Alston family. The photographs range in size from 4 x 5 inches to 8 x 10 inches.

collection icon

Rob Amberg photographs and papers, 1975-2009 15 Linear Feet — 457 Items

The photographs and papers of documentarian Rob Amberg span the years 1975-2009. The gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints in the collection represent three bodies of work: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture. Amberg focuses primarily on the social life and customs of the rural South, especially in the mountains of his home state of North Carolina. Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century. Amberg's papers account for the rest of the collection and are organized into five series: Correspondence, Printed Materials, Subject Files, and Writings and Research, and Audio. Acquired as part of the Archives of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The Rob Amberg Photographs and Papers span the years 1975-2009. The photographs consist of 8x10 and 11x14 inch gelatin silver prints and pigmented inkjet color prints. Amberg's focus as a photographer is primarily the social customs of the rural South, especially in his home state of North Carolina. He has a special concern for documenting the way in which industrial and economic progress seems to be erasing many aspects of rural culture at the turn of the twenty-first century.

The collection is arranged into three project series: The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress ; The Sodom Laurel Album; and The Vanishing Culture of Agriculture.

Images range from landscape shots taken before and during construction of an interstate highway in the N.C. mountains, to portraits of individuals and families affected by the changes in rural culture. Images also depict agricultural activies such as tobacco cultivation and dairy cattle farming, as well as work in the poultry industry. Many of Amberg's images in this last series were funded by the Rural Advancement Fund to document the rural Carolinas, and by the Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation. Captions and numbering are taken from original notes on the back of each print. Series are arranged in alphabetical order by title of project.

Amberg's papers are organized into five series. The Correspondence Series contains incoming messages regarding exhibits and the publication of Amberg's books as well as photographic work in other published materials.

The Printed Material Series consists of publications which include or feature his images. Publications in the series are both national and local, including The New York Times and Harper's.

Amberg worked and contributed to a number of non-profit organizations dealing with farm worker's rights and other social issues. Collections of materials relating to these non-profits are housed in the Subject Files Series. Printed materials in this series include annual reports and publications by each organization. Most of the materials include photography work by Amberg.

Included in Amberg's papers is the Writings and Research Series. Content includes multiple versions of the manuscripts to The New Road: I-26 and the Footprints of Progress and Sodom Laurel Album, a publisher's draft of Quartet: Four North Carolina Photographers, a number of interview transcripts, and other writings by Amberg and others.

The final grouping in the collection is the Audio Series which includes a piece entitled Interstate 26 produced by Leda Hartman and a copy of the musical recording which accompanies Sodom Laurel Album.