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25 Under 25 photographs, 2003 5 Linear Feet — 21 Items

The Center for Documentary Studies opened in January 1990 and is an outgrowth of and replacement for the Center for Documentary Photography (1980-1990). The Center combines traditions of documentary photography and film, writing, oral history, and scholarly analysis in seeking to capture life experiences. The 25 Under 25 project showcases twenty-five of America's most promising photographers, all twenty-five years old or younger. This collection contains 21 prints from an exhibit celebrating the project's initial publication, 25 Under 25: Up-And-Coming American Photographers, a Lyndhurst Book published by powerHouse and the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003.

The 25 Under 25 Photographs collection includes 21 images from an exhibit produced by the Center for Documentary Studies in 2003. The images are all taken from volume 1 of 25 Under 25: Up-and-Coming American Photographers, a 2003 Lyndhurst book published by the Center for Documentary Studies and powerHouse Books.

The exhibit prints are only a small portion of the photographs published in the book. 21 of the 25 photographers are represented in the collection, most with one print. The photographers and the titles of their projects are listed below in the collection's Description. Dates of photographs are unknown. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts (Duke University).

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Annabel Jane Wharton is the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art and culture. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan and other countries in West Asia. More recent research interests include the effects of modernity on ancient landscapes. Included in the collection are contains diaries kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008.

The Annabel Jane Wharton Papers document the professional life of Annabel Jane Wharton, the William B. Hamilton Professor of Art and Art History in Trinity College of Arts and Sciences at Duke University. Her initial area of research was Late Ancient and Byzantine art, architecture, and culture. Later research interests include modern architecture and new technologies for visualizing historical materials. The collection contains photographs, notes, and travel ephemera from research trips she took to sites in Greece, Italy, Spain, Turkey, Syria, Jordan, and other proximal countries. The Travel Binders series contains research files created by Wharton on international and domestic trips. They are composed of photographs, negatives, handwritten and typed notes, and ephemera from sites visited. The Diaries series contains appointment books kept by Wharton beginning in the late 1960s until 2008. The diaries track Wharton’s travels, administrative and professorial duties at Duke, and her personal engagements. Included among the appointments and notes are drawings in Wharton’s precise, narrow hand. The Photographs and Negatives series contain black-and-white and color photographs and negatives taken by Wharton. Some of them reflect more research trips, while others are family snapshots. The photographs are arranged by location names provided by Wharton.

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BUST Magazine records, 1993-2015 43.2 Linear Feet — 29625 Items

Debbie Stoller and Marcelle Karp began producing BUST, a third-wave feminist women's magazine, in New York, N.Y., in 1993 as a photocopied zine. Collection documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 and 20-86 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material (Girls, Fashions, The Shit, etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Accession (2001-0009) (1500 items; 2.0 lin. ft.; dated 1993-1998) documents the behind-the-scenes work required to put together BUST. Materials include issues 1-15 of the magazine; layouts and copy-editing material; biographies of contributors; article submissions; column material ("Girls,""Fashions,""The Shit," etc.); advertisement documentation; correspondence (letter and electronic mail); press coverage of BUST; promotional material; material related to the publication and promotion of the book The BUST Guide to the New Girl Order; and a variety of graphic items, including color (9) and black-and-white photographs (6), original black-and-white ink drawings, and color prints (23), as well as color slides (12).

Accession (2009-0082) (24 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2002-2007) consists of production binders for issues 20-43 of BUST magazine, published from summer 2002 through spring 2007. Each binder contains a copy of the published issue, as well as tabbed sections for each portion of the issue, including features, columns, regulars, sex files, and guides.

Accession (2010-0101) (7875 items; 10.5 lin. ft.; dated 1993-2006) includes production binders, files from the creative director, and files from the Art Department.

Accession (2013-0184) (10125 items; 13.5 lin. ft.; dated 2008-2011) consists of production binders for issues 44-71, published from 2008-2011.

Accession (2015-0040) (1400 items; 3 lin. ft.; dated 2010-2013) consists of production files for issues 64-73, production binders for issues 72-86, and 13 Syquest discs from issues 4-9.

Accession (2015-0097) (1700 items, 4 lin. ft.; dated 1997-2012) consists of production files for issues 10-50, Creative Director Laurie Henzel's notebooks, and graphic materials including original art, color and black and white photographs and color layouts.

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Caroline Vaughan photographs, 1977-1992 6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 64 items — 63 prints; one brochure

Collection comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, friends, couples, and families. Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University. Also includes several prints and a brochure from an exhibit entitled "Home Ground," featuring Vaughan's family and landscapes from two family farms, 1977-1987. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and four palladium/plantinotype prints, along with a hand-pigmented, textured print. The photographs range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11x14 inches and are all matted, captioned, and signed. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection chiefly comprises 63 exhibit-quality black-and-white photographic portraits of Durham, North Carolina citizens of all races, ages, genders, and sexual orientations, taken by Durham photographer Caroline Vaughan from 1989 to 1992 for a Center for Documentary Studies project. Subjects include activists, writers, older people, working class men, gay and straight couples, friends, and families, Many of the individuals were alumni of Duke University who were involved in sixties activism and remained in the area.

There are several photographers featured in the portraits whose work is also in the Rubenstein Library collections: Peter Goin, Alex Harris, Jeeva Rajgopaul, and Margaret Sartor.

Also includes a smaller series of black-and-white palladium/platinotype prints and a bifold brochure from a Duke University exhibit entitled "Home Ground." These prints feature Vaughan's family members posed in the studio and at two family farms in Oxford, N.C. and News Ferry, Virginia, taken from 1977 to 1987 and printed in 1992 and 1993.

The photographs were taken with large-format cameras and an instant camera (Polaroid), and printed and toned by Vaughan chiefly from 1990 to 1993. Formats include gelatin silver, Polaroids (some in color), and palladium/plantinotype prints, along with one hand-pigmented, textured print. The prints range in size from about 8 3/8 x 10 3/4 inches to 11 x 14 inches and are printed on a variety of papers. Some of the palladium prints feature a circular image format. With a few exceptions, the prints are signed, dated, and matted. Titles were taken from original captions inscribed by the photographer on the prints or mats. Some titles for some uncaptioned prints were taken from the photographer's online gallery. Many prints have data on exposure times, shutter, speed, and other data marked on the back.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive, 2004-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 40 photographic prints — 20x24 inches — 29.3 Gigabytes — 5031 files — 40 color photographic prints; 5033 digital files (4681 jpeg, 257 tiff, 68 png, 11 mp4, 10 pdf, 2 doc, 1 xls, 1 VLC, 2 txt)

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Darrin Zammit Lupi is a photojournalist based in Malta. This archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises color photographs and supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches. Acquired as part of the Human Rights Archive at Duke University.

The Darrin Zammit Lupi photojournalism archive comprises two bodies of documentary work. The earlier project, "Malta Detention", consists of color photographs, taken by Zammit Lupi from 2004-2013, of African migrants and asylum seekers in Malta detention camps. In these camps, the migrants faced many months in limbo, waiting for the outcome of their journey and holding protests about their treatment. This series includes over 1800 digital files containing low-resolution images, contact sheets, and a group of news articles. The second project, "On Board the MV Aquarius", comprises 20 color photographs and over 4000 supporting image files, documents, data, videos, news stories, and interviews compiled by Lupi in December, 2017, while on board the Aquarius, a migrant search and rescue ship operated by the non-profit organizations SOS Méditerranée and Médecins sans frontières; while there, he documented the rescue of 320 migrants on boats in the Mediterranean Sea, and their safe arrival in Pozzallo, Sicily. All prints measure 20x24 inches.

Electronic resources related to these two projects include almost 5000 born-digital image files in tiff, jpeg, and png formats. These include digital contact sheets and low-resolution files, as well as full color tiffs from which images were chosen for printing. Note: Tiff images from the "On Board the Aquarius" project are available through links in this collection guide. All other electronic files must be requested in advance and are accessible only onsite in the library reading room.

The 2017 Aquarius migrant rescue project include many additional related digital files: these include nine videos in mp4 format, taken by Darrin Zammit Lupi. Five document the MV Aquarius rescue and a transfer of refugees from another ship; three are interviews with an Italian rescuer and two migrants; and one is a news report video narrated by Lupi. The interviews describe conditions in detention centers in Libya and on board the escape boats.

Other supporting documents and digital content for the 2017 Aquarius migrant project comprise press releases in English, French, Spanish, Italian, Korean, and other languages; shot lists; demographic data summarizing the makeup of the migrants on board the rescue ship; screen shots of Reuters social media posts relating to this story, featuring Zammit Lupi's images; and scans of a 17-page journal kept by Zammit Lupi while aboard the rescue ship.

All image titles, captions, and other descriptions have been taken from the originals.

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Farm Security Administration photographs, 1939-1942, 1939-1942 .5 Linear Feet — 1 box — 11 photographic prints

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, and were created in the 1980s by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad, using the dye transfer process. Subjects are diverse and include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State and tobacco cultivation in Puerto Rico; and scenes with people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. Together, the images reveal the subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection of eleven color photographs taken from 1939 to 1942 by Farm Security Administration photographers Jack Delano (7 prints), Russell Lee (3 prints) and Marion Post Wolcott (1 print). The color prints are sized 11 x 14 inches, with image sizes ranging from 6 1/2 x 9 3/4 to 10 x 13 inches. They were created by photograph collector and gallery owner Tennyson Schad in the 1980s, using the dye transfer process.

Subjects include industrial settings such as a Pennsylvania steel mill and a sawmill in Maine; rural settings such as a wheat field in Washington State; and photographs of people, including a group of African Americans fishing near a cotton plantation in Mississippi. There are several photographs of tobacco cultivation and communities in Puerto Rico, where photographer Jack Delano settled short after this project. Together, the images reveal the diverse subject and stylistic choices made by these notable photographers commissioned for the FSA project.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jasmine Clark photographs, 2013-2017 1.5 Linear Feet — 1 flat box — 36 prints

Titled "After Eisenhower" in reference to the outgoing President's speech about military power, this body of work by photographer Jasmine Clark consists of 36 16x20 inch color inkjet photographs of signs, symbols, slogans, and advertising that permeate the streets and outdoor spaces of military-based towns. The images convey complex themes of patriotism, Christianity, masculinity and feminity, and other iconographic expressions of "Middle America" culture. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Titled in reference to outgoing President Eisenhower's speech regarding the dangers of military power, this collection consists of 36 16x20 inch color inkjet photographs from the documentary project "After Eisenhower" by photographer Jasmine Clark. Clark documented signs, symbols, slogans, murals and advertising that permeate the streets and outdoor spaces of an anonymous military town or towns. No locations are recorded for the photographs, but they were all or almost all taken in California. The images convey complex themes of patriotism, Christianity, masculinity and femininity, and other iconographic expressions of "Middle America" culture.

From the artist's statement: "The photographs in 'After Eisenhower' are influenced by my upbringing in a United States Marine Corps community in Twentynine Palms, California...My sister and I were exposed to the ideologies of American patriotism and nationalism. We learned the critical distinction between the two; namely, that the embedded framework of American nationalism is inseparable from and in service to the systemic cultural narrative that brown skin and other physical characteristics are negative."

"The military is intertwined in the established patriotic, national and Christian identity. How is patriotism learned and sustained without any direct military relationship and in a society that oppresses any aspect of your identity? President Dwight D. Eisenhower's farewell presidential address warned about the implications of military power and its impact on American culture. In response to my curiosities and Eisenhower's warning, my work probes how American patriotic identity manifests when its symbols, e.g., the national anthem and the American flag, are conflated with complex and polarizing issues such as racial discrimination, religion, gender identity, and nationalism. The saturation of these oversimplified messages is disconcerting. They are meant to have clear meanings. However, these places and artifacts suggest more problematic truths about American life and our relationship to our military."

For her work "After Eisenhower," Clark received the Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Emerging Documentarians in 2017.

Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Jess T. Dugan photographs, 2006-2017 3.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 58 prints — 58 prints

Collection comprises two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan. The first comprises 40 large color digital photographs of transgender and non-conforming people over the age of fifty, living throughout the United States. The portraits are of single individuals as well as couples, and were chiefly taken in outdoor and street locations. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum prepared for a major move and renovation. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke Unviversity.

Collection consists of two bodies of documentary work by photographer Jess T. Dugan.

The first, entitled "To Survive on this Shore," comprises 40 large color inkjet photographs of transgender and gender non-conforming people over the age of 50, living throughout the United States. These portraits are part of an interdisciplinary project titled "To Survive on this Shore: Photographs and Interviews with Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Older Adults." They portray single individuals as well as couples, chiefly in outdoor settings such as parks and streets. All images measure roughly 15 x 20 inches. The interviews conducted for the project are not included in this collection. For this work, Dugan received the 2017 Archive of Documentary Arts Award for Women Documentarians.

The second series, "A Moment Collected: Photographs at the Harvard Art Museum," offers 18 black-and-white portraits of staff at the Harvard Museum of Art, taken from 2006-2008 as the museum and its employees prepared for a major move and renovation. The prints form a 2011 limited-edition portfolio and are housed in a custom hinged portfolio box with accompanying textual narrative.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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The J. Kirk Felsman Fellowship Collection contains 97 digital photographic prints from the series "Waves of Childhood: Photographs taken by Syrian Girls in Za'atari Refugee Camp" facilitated by 2014 Felsman Fellow Laura Doggett. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The J. Kirk Felsman Fellowship Collection contains 97 digital photographic prints from the series "Waves of Childhood: Photographs taken by Syrian Girls in Za'atari Refugee Camp" facilitated by 2014 Felsman Fellow Laura Doggett. The world's second largest refugee camp, Za'atari Refugee Camp in Jordan is home to nearly 50,000 Syrian refugee children. For three months, Laura Doggett mentored a group of Syrian girls ages 14-18 in a media workshop to gain artistic and technical training in photography and video, with encouragement to reflect on their own stories and those of their community. The color digital photographs are printed on Premium Luster 11"x17" photo paper.

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Justin Kimball photographs, 2007-2016 2.0 Linear Feet — 2 boxes — 80 prints — 13x19 inches — 13x19 inches — 80 prints

Collection comprises 80 color inkjet prints selected from photographer Justin Kimball's projects, "Elegy" and "Pieces of String." The images were taken between 2007 and 2016 in small towns in Massachusetts, New York State, and Pennsylvania, places whose cultural fabric and economic livelihood have been deeply affected by 20th century deindustrialization. The images in the "Elegy" series depict working class neighborhoods, abandoned buildings and industrial sites, and people gathered on streets and porches, leaning out of windows, and playing ball games. The images in "Pieces of String" are of the interiors of abandoned houses and other buildings, taken as the photographer accompanied his brother, an auctioneer, to these properties; all that is left, as revealed in the images, are the artifacts of the former residents' lives, and the decay of the building and the contents within. All prints measure 13x19 inches. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection comprises 80 color inkjet prints selected from photographer Justin Kimball's projects, "Elegy" and "Pieces of String." The images were taken between 2007 and 2016 in small towns in Massachusetts, New York State, and Pennsylvania, places whose cultural fabric and economic livelihood have been deeply affected by 20th century deindustrialization.

The images in the "Elegy" series depict small town life - working class neighborhoods, streetscapes, abandoned buildings and industrial sites, and people gathered on streets and porches, leaning out of windows, and playing ball games. The images in "Pieces of String" were taken in abandoned houses and other buildings as the photographer accompanied his brother, an auctioneer, to these properties; all that is left, as revealed in the images, are the artifacts of the former residents' lives (including a box labeled "pieces of string too small to save"), and the decay of the building and the contents within.

All prints measure 13x19 inches. A printed inventory and full artist's statement and biography is included with each set of prints.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.