Search

Back to top

Search Constraints

Start Over You searched for: Format Compact discs Remove constraint Format: Compact discs

Search Results

collection icon

Arthur Einstein papers, 1978-2001 and undated 54 Linear Feet — 30,000 Items

Advertising executive for Lord Geller Federico Einstein, Lord Einstein O'Neill; Arthur Einstein Advertising, an advertising and consulting firm; and Loyalty Builders LLC, a marketing services company. Collection spans the years 1978-2001 and includes advertising agency credentials presentations, correspondence, print advertisements, audiocassettes, videocassettes, compact discs, 16mm films, clippings and other materials that document Arthur Einstein's career as an advertising executive and consultant. Companies represented include Bankers Trust, Compaq, DDB Needham, Foote Cone Belding, IBM, the New York Stock Exchange, Oppenheimer Funds, Saab and Steinway. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection spans the years 1978-2001 and includes advertising agency credentials presentations, correspondence, print advertisements, audiocassettes, videocassettes, compact discs, 16mm films, clippings and other materials that document Arthur Einstein's career as an advertising executive and consultant. Companies represented include Bankers Trust, Compaq, DDB Needham, Foote Cone Belding, IBM, the New York Stock Exchange, Oppenheimer Funds, Saab and Steinway.

collection icon

Cuthbert Simpkins Interviews on John Coltrane, 1971-1974 3 Linear Feet — 65 original audiocassettes (with CD use copies for patron access)

Author and medical doctor Cuthbert O. Simpkins (b. 1947) wrote the first biography of jazz saxophonist and composer John Coltrane (1926-1967), titled Coltrane: A Biography (Perth Amboy, NJ: Herndon House Publishers, 1975). The collection contains audio recordings of interviews Simpkins conducted with various family members, friends, and colleagues of Coltrane between 1971-1974 as a part of his research.

The Cuthbert Simpkins Interviews on John Coltrane comprises 65 audio cassettes of interviews conducted by Simpkins between 1971-1974 while researching his 1975 biography of Coltrane. Simpkins interviewed family members, friends, musicians, and other associates from throughout Coltrane's career. The interviews address such topics as: Coltrane's family history, his childhood in North Carolina, the development of his musical style, his influence on other musicians, and his personality. Many also contain personal anecdotes related to Coltrane from throughout his life. The materials include multiple interviews with Calvin Massey, Jimmy Garrison, Larry Young (Khalid Yasin), Ornette Coleman, and others. The audiocassettes have been digitized for patron access, and portions of some interviews have been transcribed, with the transcriptions included in the collection.

collection icon

David Tegnell Interviews on John Coltrane, 2003 0.6 Linear Feet — 2 audio microcassettes (with CD copies for patron use)

Author David Tegnell (b. 1946) has conducted significant research on the family history of jazz saxophonist and composer John Coltrane (1926-1967). As a part of this research, Tegnell has interviewed over fifteen relatives and associates of Coltrane; two of whom - Betty and Tim Jackson - are represented in the collection.

As a part of his research into Coltrane's family history, Tegnell has interviewed over fifteen relatives and associates of Coltrane. The collection currently comprises two interviews with Betty and Tim Jackson, who were childhood friends and classmates of Coltrane's, conducted on March 3 and 7, 2003. Topics include the social life and church history of High Point as well as anecdotes related to Coltrane's life and musical career. The interviews were originally recorded on two microcassettes, which are closed to patron use. CD use copies of the interviews are available for patron use.

collection icon

Duke Ambassadors records, 1947-2004 0.25 Linear Feet — 7 Items

The Duke Ambassadors were an independent, student run, thirteen piece dance band founded by Sonny Burke '37 that was a staple of the Duke University social scene for thirty years. This collection is one compiled artificially by the Office of Alumni Affairs and contains material pertaining to the music and the origination of the Duke Ambassadors including one folder of background information and four CDs. Materials in the collection date from 1947-2004, bulk 1947-1957.

This is an artificial collection compiled by the Office of Alumni Affairs and contains material pertaining to the music and the origination of the Duke Ambassadors including one folder of background information and four CDs. Information about individual arrangers and performers on the CDs can be found in the Collection Control File. Reference copies of the CDs will need to be made for patron use. Materials in the collection date from 1947-2004, bulk 1947-1957.

collection icon
Anne and Frank Warner were folklorists and folk song musicians. The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials from as early as 1899 to as late as 2000, documents the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north.

The Anne and Frank Warner Collection, with materials dating from 1899 to 2000, is a record of the Warners' active life of collecting, recording, and producing music and publications associated with traditional American folk song culture and African-American music traditions, primarily from along the eastern seaboard areas, in the Appalachian Mountains of western North Carolina, and as far as New Hampshire to the north. The bulk of the materials date from the 1930s through the 1980s, and are organized into six series: Correspondence; Subject Files; Folk Materials; Writings; Audiovisual Materials; and Prints and Negatives. Through handwritten correspondence with a wide variety of folk singers and musicians, subject files, printed materials, film, video, photographs, and the Warners' own studio albums of folk songs, these materials document early methods for recording and collecting songs - the 20th century development of American ethnomusicology. Moreover, as an invaluable resource for studies in traditional American folk life, the collection also includes field audio recordings and photographs of folk singers, songwriters, and musicians in their element, at home with their families, singing and playing their instruments. Notable individuals referred to in the Warner Collection include: William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Bill Doerflinger, Lena Bourne Fish, ("Yankee") John Galusha, David Grimes (of the Philco Corporation), Wayland Hand, Rena and Nathan Hicks, Buna Vista and Roby Monroe Hicks, Ray Hicks, Peter and Beryl Kennedy, Alan Lomax, Bessie and Frank Proffitt, Carolyn Rabson, Carl Sandburg, Pete Seeger, Charles K. ("Tink") Tillett and family, and Charles L. Todd. The Warners were actively involved with a number of organizations, among them: the American Folklore Society, the Country Dance and Song Society of America, Duke University, the Library of Congress, the Newport Folk Foundation, the New York State Historical Association, and the YMCA. The Warners published a number of essays concerning traditional American folk culture and music in Think Weekly, the Appalachian Journal, Country Dance and Song, the Long Island Forum, A Celebration of American Family Folklore, and Come for to Sing. In addition to these, Ann Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs in the Frank and Anne Warner Collection, 1984, remains the authoritative compendium of the Warners' research in and collection of traditional American folk music.

The Warners' personal and professional relationships with various people and organizations can be traced through materials in the Correspondence Series, 1934-1985. Significant exchanges with the American Folklore Society, the Library of Congress, with William Rose Benet, Carl Carmer, Wayland Hand, Alan Lomax, Carl Sandburg, and Pete Seeger are extensively documented in the files. More correspondence can be found elsewhere in the collection - organized topically in the Subject Series, and according to correspondents' names in the Folk Materials Series.

The Subject Files Series, 1899-1984, houses documentary materials that give a wider context to the Warners' life and work. This series includes information about the Warners' genealogies, Frank Warner's work with youth and his career in the YMCA, material germane to the lawsuit that developed over the song "Tom Dooley," information on and clips about various performances and recordings, and other materials.

The Folk Materials Series, 1938-1982, contains correspondence between the Warners and many of the traditional American folk singers and musicians that they visited; for some of the individuals there is more information than correspondence alone. This series is organized by state, city or region, and then individual or family, for example: North Carolina, Appalachia, Rena and Nathan Hicks. The states represented are: North Carolina, New Hampshire, New York, Virginia, and West Virginia. The Warners' correspondence with both Rena and Nathan Hicks and Bessie and Frank Proffitt comprise the most extensive files. The series materials provide essential documentation for understanding the communities and the world views of the musicians.

The Writings Series, 1938-1985, contains a variety of materials, including documents that the Warners published in journals dedicated to folk life; grant applications; materials germane to the production and publication of Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs; words to recorded and unrecorded folk songs in the collection, including some songs by Frank Warner; and Anne Warner's hand-written field research journals and notebooks.

An extensive collection of songs, interviews, and other recordings on audio tape reels, cassette tapes, phonograph albums, and compact discs are housed in the Audiovisual Materials Series, 1940-2000. Several motion picture films and video tape recordings also document the Warners' work and performances. Many of the items in the Audiovisual Materials Series are documented in written form in the Writings Series, including the sound recordings of folk songs and interviews collected in the Library of Congress master tapes, and which are not included in Anne Warner's book, Traditional American Folk Songs.

The Prints and Negatives Series, 1933-1969, extends the Warner collection's scope to include photographic images as well. There are 239 black and white prints, which are arranged alpha-numerically into lots from Lot 1 through Lot 9E. Within the lots, the prints are identified by number. In the pictures, the Warners have captured images of many traditional American folk musicians and singers. The Warners themselves appear frequently throughout the collection. The photographic documentation of the Warners' travels contains pictures of folk singers and their homes and families, including: Nathan, Roby Monroe, Buna Vista, Ray and Linzy Hicks; Lena Bourne Fish; Bessie and Frank Proffitt; the Tillett family; Louis Solomon; and Carl Sandburg.

collection icon

Fred Chappell papers, 1944-2019 and undated 158 Linear Feet — 5.9 Gigabytes

The fully processed portion of the Fred Chappell Papers spans the dates 1960-1997, with the bulk being dated after 1970. There are several additions covering the years 1998 through 2015. The collection consists of correspondence; writings by Chappell and other authors; printed material (primarily serials containing stories, poems, and articles by Chappell but also clippings); legal and financial papers; speeches and addresses; interviews; and other material. Documents relate to Chappell's personal life and career, both as a student and writer at Duke University, where he studied under well-known creative writing teacher William Blackburn, and as a writer and professor at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNC-G). The collection documents the entire length and breadth of Chappell's multifaceted career, beginning with the years just after he completed his undergraduate studies at Duke and started his first novel at the urging of Hiram Haydn, an editor to whom Blackburn had introduced him. Letters, manuscripts, and notebooks provide insight into Chappell's developing literary career, his academic activities at UNC-G, and his growing involvement with a large network of writers, including a number of his former students. Many prominent American authors, especially Southern ones, are represented in the collection. Among the most frequent correspondents are Kelly Cherry, Grace DiSanto, George Garrett, Marianne Gingher, Dana Gioia, Donald Hall, Heather Ross Miller, Robert Morgan, Eve Shelnutt, and Dabney Stuart. Notebooks, manuscripts, typescripts, proofs, and printed material document the development of Chappell's career across all the genres in which he writes. Supporting material in non-print media, including photographs and audio and video cassettes of readings, document public aspects of his career.

The Correspondence Series, arranged chronologically in Incoming and Outgoing subseries, discloses the range of Chappell's interests and activities in the literary community. The letters not only provide a portrait of his development as a poet and novelist but also demonstrate his active roles in supporting the careers of other writers and promoting the literary community. These latter activities are documented by his numerous affirmative responses to a broad range of requests to read drafts of works-in-progress, write recommendations for other writers for grants and awards, write reviews and provide blurbs for new publications, serve as the judge of contests, speak at conferences and workshops, and serve in various advisory and editorial capacities for literary journals. The correspondence also provides much information about his teaching career and his legacy of students who develop successful careers of their own, such as Cherry, Miller, Morgan, and Shelnutt. The bulk of the outgoing correspondence dates to 1990 or after, when, at the request of the Rare Book, Manuscript, and Special Collections Library, Chappell began retaining copies of all outgoing correspondence.

The Writings by Chappell Series is divided into subseries by genres with the exception of one subseries based on format, the Notebooks Subseries. Since Chappell writes with relatively few hand corrections on any particular stage of his work, the development of an individual work is often apparent only by comparing various complete drafts in manuscripts, typescripts, and proofs. The notebooks are particularly valuable in this regard, providing what often appear to be the earliest versions of works. The notebooks also indicate the facility with which Chappell moves from one genre to another, as most of them are not devoted to a single work or genre but rather include poems, stories, novel fragments, essays, reviews, translations, and drafts of correspondence following one after the other. This versatility is further reflected by the Printed Materials Series, which contains extensive serials with Chappell's publications in multiple genres, especially fiction, poetry, and reviews. At the end of this series, the Clippings Subseries documents his public and critical reception with copies of reviews and essays about his work and publicity about it.

The Miscellaneous Series contains a variety of flyers, leaflets, newsletters, and examples of fan mail that further demonstrate his literary career. Prominent here are such items as the proofs for a 1990 symposium about his poetry and newsletters of the Fellowship of Southern Writers. It also contains two small subseries of audio and video cassettes of readings, interviews, and work by other authors.

The Writings by Others Series contains manuscripts from well-known contemporary writers, ex-students, and aspiring writers seeking advice. Chappell's reactions to the manuscripts are written on many of them, often as the first draft of a letter or requested recommendation. Most writers are represented by only one or two items, but Cherry and Shelnutt are both represented by more than a dozen pieces that, together with their frequent correspondence, outline the development of their respective careers.

Later additions to the collection include incoming and outgoing correspondence, drafts and writings of Chappell's poetry, honors and awards, and printed materials and publications featuring Chappell or his work. Most accessions include bound volumes as well as writings and manuscripts by other authors or poets. There are also some oversize materials, audiovisual materials, clippings, and photographs. These additions have been loosely sorted but have not been incorporated physically or intellectually into the originally processed collection. Please consult Research Services with questions about using these materials.

collection icon
John Hicks was a jazz pianist, composer, and educator professionally active in music since the 1960s. The John Hicks Papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks; a variety of personal files documenting his history in music; and a large collection of audio and moving image materials containing concerts, rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks.

The John Hicks Papers span the dates of 1950 through 2015, with the bulk of the materials dating from the 1980s and 1990s. The papers consist of compositions composed, arranged, or performed by John Hicks or Elise Wood; and personal files, including business records, press materials, photographs and correspondence. Also included is a large collection of audio and moving image materials, consisting chiefly of concert recordings of Hicks from the 1980s through the 2000s, but also containing rehearsals, interviews, and piano lessons with Hicks. There are audio and moving image materials in audio cassette, LP, CD, VHS, Betamax, and DVD formats.

collection icon
Established in 1864, the J. Walter Thompson Company (JWT) is one of the oldest and largest enduring advertising agencies in the United States. Peter A. Schweitzer was an executive with JWT in the New York and Detroit offices, serving as Chief Executive Officer of the agency 2001-2004. Collection spans the years 1916-2005 with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-2000 and includes texts for speeches and presentations, correspondence and other administrative records, printed materials, photographs and slides, and audiovisual materials (audio and video cassettes, CDs and DVDs) that primarily document Schweitzer's career as an executive, especially with JWT's Detroit Office. Companies represented in the collection include Brouillard Communications, Burger King, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Nestlé, Rolex, and Unilever. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History.

Collection spans the years 1916-2005 with the bulk of materials spanning 1980-2000 and includes texts for speeches and presentations, correspondence and other administrative records, printed materials, photographs and slides, and audiovisual materials (audio and video cassettes, CDs and DVDs) that primarily document Schweitzer's career as an executive, especially with JWT's Detroit Office. Companies represented in the collection include Brouillard Communications, Burger King, Ford, Kodak, Kraft, Nestlé, Rolex, and Unilever.

collection icon

Kathleen Hannan papers, 1979-2007 0.6 Linear Feet — 150 items

Kathleen Hannan is a songwriter, teacher, and musician based in Hillsborough, North Carolina. Her music relates to feminist, environmental, and LGBT community issues; she has also written songs for children. She is a past winner of the North Carolina Arts Council's Songwriter Fellowship, and was also a finalist in the Triangle Folk Music Society's songwriting contest. The collection includes sheet music, lyrics, photographs, clippings, correspondence, press releases, 1 cassette tape, and 3 compact discs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The collection includes sheet music, lyrics, photographs, clippings, correspondence, press releases, 1 cassette tape, and 3 compact discs. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

collection icon

Kentucky Foundation for Women records, 1985-2017 62.0 Linear Feet — 168 Gigabytes

Sallie Bingham was the founder and first Executive Director of the Kentucky Foundation for Women and profoundly shaped its goals. The overall purpose of the Foundation is to support feminist women in the arts. The collection includes materials about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art, and women's culture. Additionally, the collection includes grant applications and files, files for the publication, The American Voice, and information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, among other materials.

The Kentucky Foundation for Women Records span the dates 1985-2017. The collection provides a rich source of information about grassroots feminist activism, philanthropy, not-for-profit organizations and artistic patronage, feminist art and women's culture. The records of the Foundation include a range of materials, primarily a large number of grant files, including applications and supporting materials of those awarded grants. Also notable are the files for its publication, The American Voice, which include correspondence, copy-edited drafts of poetry and other writings, business records, other publications, miscellaneous ephemera, broadsides, and books of poetry. In addition, there is information on the Hopscotch House and Wolf Pen Writers Colony, miscellaneous correspondence, subject files, annual reports, newsletters, and brochures. The records consist primarily of files, but videocassettes, audiocassettes, and compact disks are also included. The collection is divided into four series: Administrative Files, Project Files, American Voice Files, and Grant Files.

The Administrative Files Series contains Foundation newsletters; administrative correspondence; minutes of Board of Directors meetings; and financial, legal and tax papers. The Project Files Series contains papers on short-term special projects, as well as long-term projects such as the Hopscotch House and the Wolf Pen Women Writers Colony. The American Voice Files Series contains information regarding the publication of the feminist literary journal The American Voice. The series contains correspondence between the editors ( Frederick Smock and Sallie Bingham) and contributors; copy-edited drafts of poetry, prose, and non-fiction essays; business records; broadsides; chapbooks (i.e. hand-bound books); miscellaneous publications; and a partially complete run of the journal. Some of the better-known authors to be published in The American Voice include: Paula Gunn Allen, Isabel Allende, Wendell Berry, Jorge Louis Borges, Kay Boyle, Jo Carson, Andrea Dworkin, Elaine Equi, Doris Grumbach, Joy Harjo, Fenton Johnson, Robin Morgan, Marge Piercy, Reynolds Price, Joyce Carol Oates, and Anne Firor Scott.

Finally, the largest series, the Grant Files Series, contains documentation on the evolution of the Foundation's grant program over the years, as well as files on those projects that received grant monies from the Foundation from 1986 to 1993. The Foundation awarded grants to both men and women, though women are in the majority. The grants supported the work of visual artists, writers, scholars, musicians, composers, documentary and fiction filmmakers, playwrights, painters, sculptors, puppeteers, quilters and other fabric artists, political activists, advocates for physically handicapped women, and those concerned with women and religion and women's employment issues. A unique concern of the grant givers was supporting the exploration and improvement of the situation of women in Appalachia, encouraging women to explore and study the wilderness, and defining and encouraging the emerging field of Ecofeminism.

The addition (Accession 2001-0012) (2208 items, 3.8 lin. ft.; dated 1986-1999) continues to document the process of publishing The American Voice. Materials include correspondence, board minutes, grant applications and evaluations, financial statements, video (3) and audio (4) cassettes and one audio compact disc, and information files for volumes 32-49. Also included are writings by Sallie Bingham. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

The addition (Accession 2007-0126) (5 lin. ft.) consists primarily of files documenting the organization's grant program, and also includes project files, files related to the feminist literary journal The American Voice, publications, and files from Hopscotch House.