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"A brief history of medicine" short subject film, circa 1969 .2 Linear Feet — 1 box — 1 film reel; 2 DVD use copy

Short subject film whose sequence of still images encapsulates the evolution of medical knowledge and practices from Neolithic times to the 20th century. The style is sixties psychedelic, with fast-moving sequences and vivid colors. The still images consist of historical scenes, procedures, and individuals significant to the history of medicine, chiefly Western, but there are a few images from Eastern practices. The only sound is music from "Mass in F Minor" by the Electric Prunes rock group (1968). Produced by staff in the Audio Visual Resources at the School of Medicine at Wake Forest University for educational purposes as well as for photographic research. Although the original 16 mm film is restricted, there are two DVD use copies for viewing. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

Short subject film whose sequence of still images encapsulates the evolution of medical knowledge and practices from Neolithic times to the 20th century. The style is sixties psychedelic, with fast-moving sequences and vivid colors. The still images consist of historical scenes, procedures, and individuals significant to the history of medicine, chiefly Western, but there are a few images from Eastern practices. The only sound is music from "Mass in F Minor" by the Electric Prunes rock group (1968). Produced by staff in the Audio Visual Resources at the School of Medicine at Wake Forest University for educational purposes as well as for photographic research. Although the original 16 mm film is restricted, there are two DVD use copies for viewing. Acquired as part of the History of Medicine Collections at Duke University.

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Alex Harris photographs and papers, 1970-2015 and undated 55.6 Linear Feet — 86 boxes; 2 oversize folders — 667 photographic prints; approximately 16,062 other items

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Alex Harris is a documentary photographer, author, and professor emeritus at the Center for Documentary Studies in Durham, North Carolina. The subjects in the over 600 black-and-white and color photographs that span his career include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; they also include portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia, students on strike at Yale University, counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona, a boy tethered to electronic technology, elderly people living on their own; and the interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints. Harris's professional papers document his collaborations with other photographers and writers on books and exhibitions, including anthropologist Gertrude Duby Blom, naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South African photographers; they also cover his long career at Duke University, as teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies and its publication, DoubleTake. In addition to the paper records, there are many recorded oral histories and interviews. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

The over 600 black-and-white and color photographs in the collection date from Harris's earliest photographic work as a graduate student at Yale University, to his more recent work documenting the American South. They are organized into the following series: The Last and First Eskimos; Southern Color; North Carolina; The Idea of Cuba; Game Boy; May Day, 1970: Yale on Strike; Red White Blue and God Bless You: A Portrait of Northern New Mexico; New Mexico in Black and White; River of Traps (New Mexico); Rainbow Gathering; Philadelphia Experience Corps; Old And On Their Own; Mobile, Alabama; and Dream of a House. The subjects range widely, and include the landscapes and peoples of Alaska, the American South and New Mexico, and Cuba; portraits of older reading volunteers and students in Philadelphia; students on strike at Yale University; counter-culture people at a Rainbow Gathering in Arizona; a boy tethered to electronic technology; elderly people living on their own in central North Carolina; and views of the art-filled interior of author Reynolds Price's home. The gelatin silver and inkjet prints range in size from 8x10 inch reference prints to 24x36 inch exhibit prints; for large prints there are smaller viewing copies to facilitate research access.

The remaining series house Harris's papers, which document his many collaborations with other photographers and writers, including noted photojournalist Gertrude Duby Blom and naturalist E.O. Wilson, and South Africa photographers; they also document his long career at Duke University, as a teacher, author, and co-founder of the Center for Documentary Studies (CDS) and its serial publication, DoubleTake magazine. The Publicity and Audiovisual Materials Series contains recordings of lectures as well as publicity for exhibits and publications. The Correspondence Series includes not only Harris's letters but also grant applications, research notes, drafts and proofs, print materials, and some photographs. The DoubleTake files consist mainly of materials generated during the planning stages and early years of the magazine's existence. Materials on Harris's extensive collaborations on other publications, documentary projects, and related exhibitions make up the large Project Files Series, which includes many oral histories and interviews related to his projects, mostly on cassette tapes (use copies must be made for access). The Teaching Materials Series comprises syllabi, student writings and slides, and other materials from classes taught by Harris mainly through the CDS at Duke University. Finally, the Proof Prints Series contains a small number of proof prints related to various projects.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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African-American civil rights activist from Durham, N.C; subject of the 2002 film, An Unlikely Friendship. Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

Collection comprises master copies (4 audiocassettes and a Digibeta videotape) for Jeff Storer's oral interviews with Atwater, an African-American civil rights activist based in Durham, North Carolina, regarding her friendship with Ku Klux Klan leader C.P. Ellis. Interviews have been reformatted to compact discs and a gold DVR. Note that one segment of the video copy is silent; the audiocassettes provide the full interview.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Materials, 1956-2018 and undated, bulk 1950-2018 100 Linear Feet — 1,337 analogue and digital audiovisual resources

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. The Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Collection is primarily comprised of audio and video recordings of programs and interviews produced by Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel for television and print, centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation, particularly in New York, from the mid-1970s to the present.

Spanning 1956 to 2018, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1976 to 2018, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Audiovisual Collection documents the programs produced by a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection is comprised of over 1,300 items, including analogue and digital audio and video resources, stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's prolific output of books, educational programming, and interviews, as well as her work in historic preservation. Two hundred programs, including television interviews with notable artists, designers, and architects, and presentations by the Historic Landmarks Preservation Center, have been digitized by Duke University Libraries and are available on the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive on YouTube. Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions; and women's rights. Where resources are available on YouTube, links have been provided to the specific video. Audio resources are available through the Duke Digital Repository on request. While all master recordings are represented in this guide, the collection contains both copies of master recordings and elements that went in to creating the master recordings. For an inventory of copies and elements, contact Research Services.

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Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel collection, 1876-2020 and undated, bulk 1950-2020 651 boxes — 651 boxes; 8 oversize folders; 2 tubes; 2 frames.

Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel is an advocate for the arts, interviewer, documentarian, teacher, political organizer, and resident of New York City. Her collection comprises research files, correspondence, audio and video recordings, printed materials, photographs, scrapbooks, artifacts, and artwork, all deriving from Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel's books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits centering on the arts, architecture, and historic preservation in the United States. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Topics include: art and architecture in the 20th century; gender and society; historic preservation; media and society; social conditions in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. politics and public policy, particularly related to the Democratic Party; women and the arts; women's rights; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 document her family history and early personal life. The collection also includes some materials concerning her husband, Carl Spielvogel, whose papers are also in the Rubenstein Library. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University and are available online.

Spanning 1876 to 2020, with the bulk of the materials dating from 1950 to 2019, the Barbaralee Diamonstein-Spielvogel Collection documents the life and career of a pioneering advocate for art, architecture, historical preservation, and public policy. The collection comprises over 650 boxes of research files, correspondence, printed materials, photographs, memorabilia, artifacts, and artwork, all stemming from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's long career and her prolific output of books, educational programming, interviews, public art installations, and exhibits. The materials highlight her work with many arts and political organizations and her appointments to committees such as the Commission for Cultural Affairs and the New York Landmarks Preservation Commission. Over one hundred of her television interviews with notable artists and other figures have been digitized by the Diamonstein-Spielvogel Video Archive at Duke University.

Topics covered by the materials in this collection include broad categories such as art and architecture in the 20th century; historic preservation and the protection of cultural property; media and society; social conditions, women's rights and the arts in Slovakia during her husband's ambassadorship there; U.S. and overseas politics, particularly related to the Democratic Party; U.S. public policy, with a focus on the arts; the built environment; women and the arts; gender issues and women's rights; travel abroad; and many others. Early materials dating from 1929 to 1965 - chiefly correspondence, writings, and photographs - document family history, her education, and her earliest career in teaching. Other early dates in the collection refer to reproductions of 19th century images chiefly found in exhibit and research files.

The collection is divided into series: Correspondence, Writings, Personal Files, Political Files, Professional Files, Art and Architecture Project Files, Art and Design Project Files, Historic Preservation Project Files, Scrapbooks and Visual Arts Materials.

Taken as a whole, the collection offers rich documentation on the evolution of art and architecture in the U.S., the development of adaptive reuse and landmarks legislation, the relationship of public policy to the arts, and the interplay between public policy and the built environment. Materials from Diamonstein-Spielvogel's personal and research files also document the changing roles of men and women in the United States, and the development of U.S. gender studies; not only did she write on the subject, but her own experiences reveal aspects of women in the workforce, in politics and activist movements, and in positions of authority. Additionally, because of her work for the White House and the Democratic Party, the collection offers insights into 20th century U.S. politics, nationally and in her home state of New York.

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Carol Georgette Lake Bradley memoirs, 1922-1969, 2010-2017 9.0 Linear Feet — 7 boxes — 19.75 Gigabytes — 11 optical disks (DVD) — 2,683 electronic files (.jpeg, .tif, .pdf, .exif, .doc)

Carol Georgette Lake Bradley (1922-2006) was a distinguished graduate of Duke University, class of 1943. Collection consists of ten handwritten spiral-bound volumes containing her memoirs, in which she describes in detail her childhood, school years, World War II, experiences at Duke University, marriage, motherhood, and teaching career. Includes a narrative on the death of one of her children from polycystic kidney disease. Filed inside the volumes are letters, photographs, clippings, programs, and other memorabilia. Related materials, created by Bradley's family, comprise transcriptions, printed digital scans of the pages, and over 2500 electronic files, chiefly photographic images and texts such as transcriptions and indexes. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture at Duke University.

Collection consists of ten handwritten spiral-bound volumes containing the memoirs of Duke alumna Carol Georgette Lake Bradley (1922-2006), in which she describes in detail her childhood, school years, World War II, experiences at Duke University, marriage, motherhood, and teaching career. Includes a narrative on the death of one of her children from polycystic kidney disease. Filed inside the volumes are letters, photographs, clippings, programs, and other memorabilia.The volumes include photographs, letters, programs, clippings, and other memorabilia that have been tipped in or loosely inserted between the pages.

From about 2010 to 2017, Bradley's family transcribed, scanned, and indexed all of the memoirs; these additional resources are also part of the collection. Electronic files originally on 11 DVDs have been migrated to a library server; file contents are open to research and include scans of photographs, text, and memorabilia.

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The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture. The collection houses work created by students enrolled in documentary studies courses at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), sponsored by the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke. The student projects focus primarily on exploring and documenting the social lives and experiences of people living in and around rural and urban areas of Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina, through photography or oral history. Subjects include but are not limited to local school environments; churches and religious life; ethnic communities and neighborhoods; war veterans; the 9/11 attacks; the labor and civil rights movements as experienced by local individuals; students at Duke University; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; beauty pageants; local music scenes; and the built environment and culture of North Carolina towns, and cities. Audiovisual materials include sound recordings and moving images, and may require reformatting before contents can be accessed. Acquired by the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

Collection houses photographs, interviews, essays, and other documentary works created by students enrolled in courses or thesis projects on documentary studies at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), from 1980 to 2011. Most of the student projects focus on the social life and customs of persons living in and around Durham, Chatham, and Orange counties, North Carolina. Themes include life in cities and towns, particularly in Durham; rural life; schools and other institutions such as churches and retirement homes, and charitable organizations such as soup kitchens and orphanages; community centers such as stores, daycares, and laundromats; African American communities and neighborhoods, particularly in Durham; beauty pageants; local music; farmers and their families; immigrant life; migrant workers; midwives; the 9/11 attacks in New York City; and Duke University students and campus life. One series of images portrays the Chuck Davis African American Dance Ensemble in Durham. Oral histories of N.C. civil rights and labor activists, American war veterans, and other individuals are associated with certain courses.

The majority of projects focus on Durham area locales, but other cities and towns in N.C. documented include Chapel Hill, Hillsborough, Raleigh, Seagrove, Wanchese, Cane Creek, Oxford, Carrboro, Orange Factory, Rougemont, Saxapahaw, Salisbury, Northside, Corinth, and Cedar Grove. There are a few projects based in Virginia, and summer projects located in Massachusetts, Tennessee, Tel-Aviv, and France.

The collection also includes a few grant-supported projects by professional documentarians Eric Green, Kate Rhodenbaugh, Carolina Wang, and Donna Lennard, and photographic work by Bill Bamberger, a faculty member at Duke.

Black-and-white prints make up the majority of formats, but there are also many slides. The more recent additions increasingly include oral histories on audio cassettes and CD-ROMS and other project-related digital media. These are marked in the folder descriptions. Original audiovisual and electronic media are closed to use and may require the production of use copies before they can be accessed.

The courses were all sponsored by the Center for Documentary Photography, which in 1989 changed its name to the Center for Documentary Studies. Among the faculty teaching courses for the Center for Documentary Studies are noted documentarians Bill Bamberger, John Biewen, David Cecelski, Alex Harris, and Margaret Sartor, some of whom have contributed their own documentary work to the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.

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Charis Books and More, founded in 1974 in Atlanta, Ga., is the oldest feminist bookstore in the Southeast, and Charis Circle is a non-profit organization founded in July 1996 that furthers the mission of the bookstore by offering free educational and cultural events and programs to the community. Collection documents the day-to-day operation, programs, and mission of Charis Books and More and Charis Circle, and the interrelated nature of these two organizations. The financial records include those for Charis Books and More and Charis Circle. The ephemera include bookstore flyers and announcements, t-shirts, banners, framed posters, and book bags. There are also board minutes, log books, instructions, and reports for the bookstore, records for community programs (Sister Girls and Young Writers); poetry workshop materials for "Leaving Home, Becoming Home" ; 2,500 photographs; and a DVD. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

Collection documents the day-to-day operation, programs, and mission of Charis Books and More and Charis Circle, and the interrelated nature of these two organizations. The financial records include those for Charis Books and More (1983-2001) and Charis Circle (1996-2003). The ephemera (1976-2004) include bookstore flyers and announcements, t-shirts, banners, framed posters, and book bags. There are also board minutes (1983-1988 and 1997-1998); log books (1984-2001); instructions and reports for the bookstore; records for community programs (Sister Girls and Gaia Girls, 1999-2000); poetry workshop materials for "Leaving Home, Becoming Home" ; 2,500 photographs and a DVD. There are also materials prepared for and at an event held at the Rare Book Room, 2005 Apr. 12: 10 file folders, approximately 12 items, including introductory materials and materials prepared by participants at the event. There are also administrative files and financial records, 1996-2005; clippings, 2004-2006; promotional material, 2004-2006; store log notebooks, 2003-2005; approximately 30 mounted photographs; correspondence, 2005-2006; zines; t-shirts. Also includes oversized material consisting of 17 posters; 1 collage mounted on wooden board; 3 posters with 30 mounted photographs; 10 laminated signs; 1 painted wooden sign. There are also administrative and programming materials for both Charis Books and More and the Charis Circle organization, many of which were created by Linda Bryant, a founding owner. Also includes newsletters, newspaper clippings, some posters, and a fabric banner. There are also two oversized foam-core posters from the Girls Speak Out/SisterGirls group based at Charis Books and More. There are also program fliers and planning materials for Charis Books and More as well as Charis Circle; also contains information about the Charis Board and its members, store log books and correspondence, some ephemera from the store's programming, news coverage, and fliers from other community events. Acquired as part of the Sallie Bingham Center for Women's History and Culture.

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The Archives document the history of Benton & Bowles advertisements; the merger of the D'Arcy MacManus Masius and Benton & Bowles companies; the early careers of William Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles; employee training, recruitment, and management; corporate publications; and marketing research. Includes material from three companies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles, Benton & Bowles, and D'Arcy MacManus Masius. Specific formats include memoranda; correspondence; reports; corporate publications, such as house organs, research reports, manuals, credentials, and employee reference material; press releases and a press book; speeches; clippings; photographs in color and black-and-white, and negatives; films and DVDs of advertisements; book manuscripts; audio tapes; financial papers; and a scrapbook. Clients represented in the Advertisements Series include the Procter & Gamble Company, General Foods Corporation, Allied Chemical Corporation, Avco Corporation, Colgate Palmolive Co., Florida Citrus Commission, International Business Machines Corporation, and West Point Pepperell. The unprocessed addition (554 items, dated ca. 1950s-1980s) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Acquired as part of the John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising, and Marketing History. (01-103).

The D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B) Archives consists of advertising agency records spanning the years 1929 to 1995. The bulk of the material dates from the 1950s to the mid-1980s. The Archives includes material that documents aspects of three advertising agencies: D'Arcy Masius Benton & Bowles (DMB&B), Benton & Bowles (B&B), and D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius (D-MM).

The Archives as a whole provides a comprehensive overview of Benton & Bowles advertisements (1932-1995) and commercials (1950s-1980s), primarily those created by the agency's New York office. Other major topics include the advertising careers of William B. Benton and Atherton W. Hobler; research and publication about the history of Benton & Bowles by Gordon Webber and Frank Smith; television programs created by B&B in the 1950s; aspects of employee training, recruitment, and management; and marketing research. The Archives also documents the merger of the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency with Benton & Bowles to form DMB&B in 1985. There is very little information in the Archives about the D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius agency prior to the merger. Also, material about Benton & Bowles offices other than New York is limited, and found mostly in B&B house organs.

The D'Arcy-MacManus Masius Files comprise a very small amount of materials in the Archives. Although the D'Arcy agency had its roots in 1906, the Items gathered here date only from 1972-1985, mainly 1981 to 1985. They consist of corporate publications, notes, and clippings. The 75th Anniversary edition of "Between Us" contains an overview of the history of D'Arcy-MacManus & Masius, especially of the D'Arcy Advertising Company, and its clients. Profiles, a resource book, provides information on all of the divisions of the D'Arcy -MacManus Masius Worldwide group of advertising agencies.

The Benton and Bowles Files are by far the largest part of the Archives. They include primarily print advertisements (the largest series in the Archives), but also over 500 films, significant documents relating to the work of the agency, photographs, and corporate publications. The Benton & Bowles Files span the years 1929 to 1985, although most of the material dates from 1950s and after. Item types in the collection include internal memoranda; reports; speeches; printed material (manuals, leaflets, pamphlets, and house organs); photographs; research notes; credentials; employee training material; press releases and clippings; book manuscripts; audio tapes of oral history interviews; and financial papers. The Benton & Bowles Files provide documentation of the history of print and television advertising; television programming; the history of the B&B agency and its corporate culture; corporate communications; marketing research; and advertising executives.

The earliest Items in the B&B Files are two small bank books recording account activity of the fledgling agency from 1929 to 1935 and copies of William ("Billie") Benton's long letters to his mother, 1929-1938, in which he confides details of his new advertising agency as well as family matters. A small number of other Items date from the 1930s and 1940s and illustrate isolated aspects of the agency's business in that period.

Long series of various agency house organs begin in 1947 and provide the most complete and continuous views of Benton & Bowles, its clients, advertising campaigns, personnel, and various offices in the U.S. and abroad.

The Advertisements Series is the largest section of the Archives and contains comprehensive files of print advertising campaigns developed mainly by Benton & Bowles from 1932-1980. The series includes primarily proofs, along with some tearsheets, of consumer and trade advertisements, most from U.S. magazines and newspapers. Files for a few clients include unusual material, such as packaging or client newsletters. Most of the advertisements were removed from large scrapbooks into which B&B employees had pasted them; many have suffered glue damage, but they remain an invaluable source for studying the development of a number of advertising campaigns over long periods of time. Longtime clients of B&B included Procter & Gamble and General Foods, among many others. Neither the Advertisements Series nor any other part of the Archives contains substantial documentation of the creative processes behind the advertisements and advertising campaigns.

For additional information about the Advertisements Series, see the data collection sheets in the Information Folders about the DMB&B Archives. The data collection sheets provide notes about: languages, other than English, used in the advertisements; countries, other than the United States, for which advertisements were produced; the use of celebrities in the advertisements; themes or social and political issues that can be studied in the advertisements; and the use of comic illustrations. The data collection sheets also note the existence of collateral literature for certain advertising campaigns. The Information Folders also contain a list of Benton & Bowles clients and the dates of agency-client relationships.

The Audiovisual Series (RESTRICTED) contains over 500 reels of 16mm film varying in lengths from 200' to 1600'. The majority of the films are compilations of commercials created mainly by Benton & Bowles for many different clients. Also included are several dozen reels of vintage television programs (shows created or sponsored by B&B), several stockholders' meetings, speeches, new business presentations, and outtakes. At the time of this writing, most of the films have not been viewed in their entirety, indexed, or reformatted. However, a selection of films has been reformatted for research use.

Addition (accession #2001-0103) (554 items, 7.5 linear ft.; dated [ca. 1950s]-[1980s]) comprises 16-mm film reels of commercials. Brand names and clients include Crest, Post cereals, Scope, Yardley, Hardees, Grape Nuts, Hasbro, and Pampers. Viewing of commercials is restricted until videocassette use copies are made. For a container list, contact Research Services.

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David Goldblatt photographs and films, 1960-1976 3.6 Linear Feet — 5 boxes; 3 film reels — 257 Items

Collection comprises 251 black-and-white photographic prints taken by David Goldblatt during the 1960s of black and white South African miners at work, and South African Afrikaners. Collection also includes copies of three 16 mm films, "Soweto," "On the Mines," and "Some Afrikaners," created by Goldblatt in 1976 from his still images. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts, Duke University.

Collection comprises 251 silver bromide black-and-white photographic prints taken by David Goldblatt in South Africa during the late 1960s. Accompanying the photographs are also three 16 mm films, Soweto, On the Mines, and Some Afrikaners, created in 1976 from his still images; DVD viewing copies are available for these films. Goldblatt captured these images of gold miners and Afrikaaner people in different regions of South Africa, traveling from his hometown west of Johannesburg to the Western Cape province and the Karoo.

The photographs in this collection were published in Goldblatt's first two books: On The Mines (1973, with Nadine Gordimer) and Some Afrikaners Photographed (1975).

The On the Mines series features images from the late 1960s of both white and black South African gold miners, in groups and individually, both inside and outside the mines. The images in the Some Afrikaners series, shot from 1961 to 1968, depict the everyday life of the white South Africans known as Afrikaners, and the environment in which they lived. Subjects include school, recreation, mealtimes, buildings, decorum and dress; there are group pictures as well as individual portraits.

Print sizes vary: there are 8x10 inch prints; uncropped work prints of custom sizes and shapes on paper no larger than approximately 12 1/2 x 12 1/2 inches; and prints mounted on 12 1/2 x 13 inch tan mat boards. Most have notes with printing instructions, with occasional captions on backs of prints or beneath prints on mat boards. Acquired as part of the Archive of Documentary Arts at Duke University.