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Dunlap family papers, 1733-1984 3.2 Linear Feet — 741 Items

Family with members in both Ripon, Wis., and Ann Arbor, Mich. Collection contains letters and photocopies of letters between family members, naturalization papers; a poem by Helen E. (Richley) Healy; copies of an undated memoir by Gertrude (Clark) Dunlap; an undated chronicle of the early years of James E. Dunlap; several other memoirs, journals and diaries; descriptions of a voyage in an American clipper ship; Civil War letters; genealogies of various families including the Dunlap, Dunlop, Life, Clark, Cooke, and Delamere families; original photographs; and a land deed. The 2007 addition (2007-0168) (600 items; 2.5 lin. ft.; dated 1821-1910 and undated) contains genealogies and family histories of the Dunlap and Life families and biographies of the family members; diaries dated 1865, 1867, 1873-1898, and 1910; autograph books; letters and a scrapbook from the Civil War; daguerreotypes and ambrotypes; and a bayonet presumably from the Civil War. Also included are transcripts of several of the letters and diaries.

Collection contains letters and photocopies of letters between family members, naturalization papers; a poem by Helen E. (Richley) Healy; copies of an undated memoir by Gertrude (Clark) Dunlap; an undated chronicle of the early years of James E. Dunlap; several other memoirs, journals and diaries; descriptions of a voyage in an American clipper ship; Civil War letters; genealogies of various families including the Dunlap, Dunlop, Life, Clark, Cooke, and Delamere families; original photographs; and a land deed.

The 2007 addition (2007-0168) (600 items; 2.5 lin. ft.; dated 1821-1910 and undated) contains genealogies and family histories of the Dunlap and Life families and biographies of the family members; diaries dated 1865, 1867, 1873-1898, and 1910; autograph books; letters and a scrapbook from the Civil War; daguerreotypes and ambrotypes; and a bayonet presumably from the Civil War. Also included are transcripts of several of the letters and diaries.

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Hypes family papers, 1700s-2010 4 Linear Feet — 6 boxes; 1 oversize folder; 1 pamphlet binder — Approximately 2250 Items

Materials from the branch of the Hypes family that descended from Henry Hypes of Xenia, Ohio: Samuel Henry Hypes (1826-1916); his son, William Findlay Hypes; his grandson, Samuel Loomis Hypes; and his great-grandson, William P. Hypes. Collection includes a wide range of material from the Hypes family, particularly William Findlay Hypes, Samuel Loomis Hypes, and William P. Hypes. William Findlay Hypes' materials highlight his career at Marshall Fields and Co. of Chicago and his service as President of the Y.M.C.A. of Chicago, with emphasis on his family's world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. in 1924-1925. Hundreds of postcards and photographs collected by the family are contained in the papers, including images from India, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), China, Europe, Egypt, and many more places, most unlabeled. Some material from Samuel Loomis Hypes' army service during World War I is also included, the most noteworthy being 24 black and white photographs featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States, including photographs of African American soldiers. Materials from William P. Hypes relate to his work with the Y.M.C.A. in the mid-twentieth century. The family's research into their genealogy and family history, unidentified family photographs, and smaller amounts of correspondence and material from other family members are also included.

There is a wide range of material from the Hypes family's many generations present in this collection. Some early material exists from Henry Hypes, including an inventory of his property upon his death, and some correspondence from relatives. Other early materials include family photographs, which are largely unlabeled and undated but include formats such as tintypes, a daguerreotype, cartes de visite, negatives, and others.

The Hypes' attempts to reconstruct their family tree resulted in several letters between extended family members and distant cousins, as well as genealogical maps and notes, dating from the early to mid-twentieth century.

The majority of the collection dates from William Findlay Hypes and his family. W.F. Hypes' materials include correspondence and clippings about his career with Marshall Fields and Co., as well as news coverage of his world tour on behalf of the Y.M.C.A. from 1924 to 1925. The collection also contains photographic prints, negatives, and postcards from this trip, featuring images from India, China, Japan, Egypt, Ceylon (Sri Lanka), Europe, and other unidentified places. The photographs are largely gelatin silver prints, and many have silvering. The majority of photographs are amateur shots presumably taken by the Hypes family. However, there are several sets of images which were clearly purchased by W.F. Hypes or other family members as travel souvenirs, including a set from India taken by H.R. Ferger and a set from Taormina, Italy. These all appear to date from the early 1900s. Many types of postcards are present, including real photo postcards and tinted color postcards. Several postcard books were purchased as souvenirs. Most postcards have been sorted by location; real photo postcards have also been sleeved to better protect the images. Real photo postcard locations include Norway, Manila, China, Japan, and a set from the Canadian Rockies.

An earlier trip to Europe and the Middle East by W.F. Hypes and his wife is described in letters between them and their daughter Muriel. This trip appears to have been taken in May and June, 1910. Since most of the collection's photographs are undated, some could date from this trip instead of the world tour trip from 1924-1925.

One part of the collection is closed to researchers: there is a small amount of nitrate and safety negatives. These appear to be taken by W.F. Hypes, and include family photographs, scenes from Jamaica, and scenes of a tiger hunt during the Hypes' Y.M.C.A. tour. The tiger hunt images are available as prints in the photographs portion of the materials. All negatives are closed to researchers.

Along with the extensive amount of photographs and postcards, W.F. Hypes' portion of the papers includes souvenir booklets and other collectibles from his travels. Also present are materials from the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893, including a set of tickets as well as a stock certificate. Hypes' political leanings can be inferred from a Republican National Convention ticket for the 1904 election, as well as a small, movable medal that spins and denounces William Jennings Bryan.

Another noteworthy part of the collection comes from Samuel Loomis Hypes, W.F. Hypes' son, who served as a captain in the U.S. Army's 803rd Pioneer Infantry during World War I. This portion of the papers contains 24 black-and-white photographs (18? June-19 July 1919) featuring crowds awaiting the signing of the Treaty of Versailles and the shipping of troops back to the United States. Photographs often have captions in white ink. There are six crowd scenes in Paris and outside Versailles before and after the signing of the treaty. However, the majority of the photographs follow the movement of ships and troops out of Brest Navy yard, including the USS Imperator and the USS Philippine. There are group photos of the 803rd's officers and one photograph of a German submarine. Among the 4,000 troops aboard the Philippine were many African American soldiers, and there are photographs of these men playing in the 803rd's regimental band and of a boxing match they held during the voyage, as well as other photos. The collection also contains two postcards showing group photographs of soldiers [officers?] taken at Plattsburgh, N.Y., in 1916 - probably at the large World War I military training camp there.

Other materials from Samuel Loomis Hypes include his officer's record book, honorary discharge following the war, as well as clippings about Sugar Hollow, a North Carolina development begun by Hypes and his wife in the 1950s.

Finally, the collection also includes several files from William P. Hypes, an officer in the Y.M.C.A. in the 1960s and 1970s, particularly from his work towards the Y.M.C.A. World Action program.

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McKeen-Duren family papers, 1720-1945 and undated, bulk 1855-1900 12.6 Linear Feet — 16 boxes; 1 oversize folder — Approximately 3240 items — Approximately 3240 items

Collection documents in great detail the histories of the McKeen and Duren families, particularly of Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. Topics of note documented through correpondence, diaries and journals, other peronal papers, printed material, and images include: religious thought and institutions in New England; the education of women and the careers of female educators; photography throughout the 19th century; the Civil War and its effects on New England society; westward migration patterns; social life in Massachusetts and Vermont; family relations in the 19th century; 19th century New England women writers and their activities; and New England genealogy. There are also many clippings in the scrapbooks debating the abolition of slavery, many written by minister Silas McKeen. The photographs series is large and offers many fine examples of 19th century portraiture and photographic processes, including ambrotypes, cyanotypes, daguerreotypes, tintypes, albumen prints, postcards, and early gelatin silver and platinum prints. The majority are portraits but there are also interiors of family rooms and images of educational institutions, especially Abbott Female Academy in Andover, Massachusetts (now Abbot Academy), whose principal over several decades was Philena McKeen. Three photograph albums round out the photograph series.

the histories of the McKeen and Duren families, particularly of Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. Topics of note documented through correpondence, diaries and journals, other peronal papers, printed material, and images include: religious thought and institutions in New England; the education of women and the careers of female educators; photography throughout the 19th century; the Civil War and its effects on New England society; westward migration patterns; social life in Massachusetts and Vermont; family relations in the 19th century; 19th century New England women writers and their activities; tourism in 19th century England, Scotland, Switzerland, and Egypt; and New England genealogy. There are also many clippings in the scrapbooks debating the abolition of slavery, many written by minister Silas McKeen.

The bulk of the manuscript material is housed in the Correspondence Series, which chiefly consists of exchanges between members of the McKeen-Duren families. The earliest correspondence originates from New England, the McKeen family having been established in the area by brothers James, William, and Samuel McKeen, who emigrated from Ireland in the early 18th century. Beginning around 1823, letters exchanged between Silas McKeen and the father of Serena McKeen (she married Charles Duren) appear. A significant later portion of the correspondence was written by Silas to his son Charles, who served as a Union soldier during the Civil War. The family's exchanges then began to stretch westward during a period in which Philena and Phebe McKeen taught at the Western Female Seminary, Oxford, Ohio, and when Charles McKeen Duren moved to Iowa following the Civil War. Prominent topics in the letters from the latter half of the 19th century include Phebe and Philena's literary and publishing activities; education in New England and the Midwest; the Civil War and its effect on New England citizens; and routine family topics such as health, religion and morality, and social activities. There are very probably references to the abolition movement and slavery: the McKeens, Silas in particular, were outspoken abolitionists.

A rich variety of written communication is found in the Writings Series, divided into two subseries, Manuscripts and Volumes. The Manuscripts subseries contains handwritten copies of a variety of types of writings by members of the McKeen-Duren families. The Volumes subseries contains often unattributed handwritten drafts and notes on fictional pieces; essays, probably written by Phebe or Philena; and sermons, most likely written by Silas McKeen. There may be material related to Silas McKeen's writings on slavery.

The collection is notable for its extensive Photographs Series. Almost all photographic formats across the 19th century can be found here, including many albumen prints, chiefly in the form of cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards; cyanotypes; cased and uncased ambrotypes and daguerreotypes; and tintypes. Also present are gelatin silver and platinum prints. The series is divided into four subseries: Albums, Cased Images, Oversize Prints, and Prints. One family member, perhaps Phebe, was reportedly an amateur photographer, but direct evidence of this remains to be discovered. Interior photographs of the family home show multitudes of photographs hung on the wall. Subjects in the collection's images include family members from babyhood to old age, family friends, travel in England, Europe, and the Middle East, pets, and horses. Other families portrayed in the photographs include Page, Deming (?), Grovenor, and Dunlevy. There are only a few landscapes but there are images of Abbot Academy buildings, grounds, and students with their teachers (Andover, Massachusetts). Some of the photographic items, particularly the cased images, are fragile and should be handled with care.

The Diaries and Scrapbooks Series contains many personal journals and diaries, spanning the years 1804-1900, and scrapbooks, circa 1838-1902. The diaries are quite detailed and were chiefly written by the female members in the McKeen family; topics revolve around family health problems, visitors and travel, readings, the weather, and emotional or religious experiences. There may be passing references to slavery; there is one reference to a prominent abolitionist, later imprisoned, who visited the McKeen house. The scrapbooks house pasted-in clippings pertaining to family members, and many published short pieces written by Silas, Phebe, and Philena McKeen. There are also handwritten extracts of letters, as well as prescriptive pieces and poems, and a series of pages from Civil War periodicals. There are quite a few clippings in the scrapbooks on slavery and abolitionism, as well as references to issues pertaining to statehood; many of the anti-slavery pieces published in New England serials were written by Silas McKeen from the 1830s to the 1850s. The clippings folder in the Printed Material Series contains similar loose items.

The Financial Papers Series contains notifications of contributions to missionary institutions, receipts for good and services, society memberships, and subscriptions. A number of ledgers, some in bound volumes, are also found here.

The Genealogy Series contains extensive handwritten accounts and notes originating from the early 19th century, documenting the ancestry of the McKeen-Duren families and related branches, as well as two hand-written bound volumes containing detailed genealogies of the Duren, Gould, Prichard, and Freeman families. There are also a few printed materials, including obituaries and memorial pieces.

The Legal Papers files contain the earliest documents in the collection (1720). Items include land grants and deed transfers, inheritance inventories, loan notices, service contracts, wills and will abstracts, writs of indenture or apprenticeship, powers of attorney, and other documents.

An assortment of printed items, clippings, and ephemera pertaining to members of the McKeen-Duren families can be found in the Printed Materials Series, including invitations, event programs, announcements, obituaries and memorial pieces, short story reprints, copies of a course curriculum, a copy of the Abbot Academy journal, cards, and other assorted materials, including a hand-drawn map, perhaps the local vicinity where one of the families lived, found in the ephemera folder.

A folder of Oversize Material housing diplomas awarded to members of the McKeen-Duren families completes the collection.

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Southgate-Jones Family papers, 1760-2008 22.4 Linear Feet — circa 13,456

The Southgate-Jones family papers, 1794-1990s (bulk 1912-1933), are largely comprised of both business and personal correspondence, but also include printed material; photographs; genealogical information; business records in the form of volumes, reports, and minutes of meetings; clippings; and legal and financial papers. Several generations of Southgate and Jones family members are represented, including James Southgate, James H. Southgate, Mattie Logan Southgate Jones and James Southgate ("South") Jones. These individuals were involved in business, educational, political, civic, social and cultural activities in Durham and North Carolina during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Areas include insurance, real estate and tobacco businesses, banking, the administration of Trinity College, the women's suffrage movement, the Durham Civic Association, and Durham Masonic Lodge No. 352. The collection is useful for studying the history of Durham and North Carolina, the regional application of national policy toward farmers during the 1920s and 1930s, and the family history of prominent citizens.

A significant portion of the collection was generated by James Southgate Jones as President of the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham. This organization was one of twelve created by the Federal Farm Loan Act of 1916, to encourage farmers to purchase land with low interest, long term loans financed by the sale of stocks and bonds to investors. The bank was liquidated in 1942. The majority of correspondence dating before 1930 in the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham Series contains documents relating to the sale of farm land in North Carolina and, to a much lesser extent, Virginia; the financing of loans; and, after 1930, the increasingly harsh economic situation farmers faced as banks foreclosed on their loans. There is also discussion of foreclosure policies, relief programs, and the Hull-Wolcott Bill of 1933 in later correspondence. Included are communications with investment brokers in New York and Boston, property owners, real estate agents in North Carolina and elsewhere, prospective clients, banks in North Carolina and other states, and to a lesser extent the United States Treasury Department. There is also correspondence between James Southgate Jones, other officers of the bank and members of its Board of Directors. The series contains some financial reports from other land banks in Nebraska, Chicago, California, and Washington, D.C. Also included in the financial papers subseries are: lists of property owned, money loaned, farms for sale, farms purchased, and foreclosures; receipts for the sale of land and stock; balance sheets; and bank expenditures.

Other family business endeavors are documented in the Correspondence and Business Records Series. Both series contain information about the business endeavors of tobacco merchant T.D. Jones, including letters and notes from tobacco merchants throughout the Southeast who sold his products. Volumes in the Business Records Series record the financial affairs of J. Southgate and Son, an insurance agency begun by James Southgate and later headed by James H. Southgate; agencies affiliated with J. Southgate and Son; and Southgate Jones and Company Real Estate, headed by James Southgate Jones. Scattered Correspondence, 1890s- early 1910s, and a letterbook of James H. Southgate (1901-1906), relating to J. Southgate and Son, concern these businesses. As President of Southgate Jones and Company Real Estate, James Southgate Jones handled property in North Carolina, such as farmland and Durham homes and businesses as well as property in Virginia and New York. The bulk of the Correspondence between 1912 and 1914 deals with the promotion of North Carolina land to prospective buyers, especially in the North and West; and efforts of businessmen to make deals with Jones. These letters may be useful for examining the development of Durham between 1910 and 1920. There is limited correspondence regarding early land stock business unaffiliated with the North Carolina Joint Stock Land Bank of Durham.

Information on the civic and political activities of family members is located in the Correspondence, Printed Material, Writings and Speeches and Miscellaneous Series. Correspondence, particularly after 1916, was generated almost exclusively by Mattie Southgate Jones's involvement in the Durham Civic Association and a variety of women's clubs. The Miscellaneous Series contains materials relating to her involvement with the North Carolina State Fair, suffrage, and a Durham campaign for a waste disposal program. Correspondence about the suffrage campaign, 1918-1922, discusses soliciting names for petition drives, lobbying state senators, and political strategy and organization. Mrs. Jones was responsible for petition drives on the Trinity College campus. Other suffragist leaders with whom she frequently corresponded include Gertrude Weil, who served as Vice President and President of the North Carolina Equal Suffrage Association. A letterbook (1897-1902) kept by James Southgate concerns his involvement with the Masons, Elks and Templars. In addition to a small number of letters pertaining to his insurance business, the bulk are to other Lodge members and pertain to the Grand Chapter, the national organization and other business of Durham Masonic Lodge No. 352, including the sponsorship of an Orphan Asylum in Oxford, North Carolina. James H. Southgate's letterbook (1901-1906) contains a small amount of correspondence, 1903-1904, concerning his position as a Trustee of Trinity College, and includes discussion of the Bassett affair and the formation of Greensboro Women's College.

The extensive genealogical research of Mattie Southgate Jones is located in the Correspondence, Genealogy, Pictures and Miscellaneous Series. Additional information on family members can be found in the Clippings, Legal Papers and Financial Papers Series. The majority of letters written in the Correspondence Series between 1922 and 1934 consist of contacts made by relatives in North Carolina and elsewhere, in response to Mrs. Jones's queries. The largest amount of material relates to the Jeffreys, Jones, Southgate, and Wynne families. Photographs in the Pictures Series correspond to written information, and often unidentified loose photographs can be matched to labeled ones in albums.

The Correspondence Series contains a small amount of commentary, 1861-1863, on the Civil War, including letters from family members serving with the 1st North Carolina Cavalry Regiment. One letter includes an account by a civilian of the Union cavalry expedition from New Bern to Tarboro and Rocky Mount, North Carolina in July, 1863. The series also contains correspondence between family and friends. Included are a number of letters, 1906-1930, between James Southgate Jones ("South") and his uncle James H. Southgate, mother Mattie Southgate Jones, and brother Lyell Jones, written while he was away at school or traveling. Letters, 1909-1910, that South and Lyell wrote during a trip out West describe new surroundings, particularly New Mexico. There are also letters from South, Mattie, and other family members to Lyell from 1912-1913, during his extended illness and stay at the Winyah Sanatorium in Asheville, N.C. Other correspondents include James Southgate and Celestia Muse Southgate Simmons.

The collection also includes lantern slides, tintypes, daguerrotypes, and cartes-de-visites in the Picture Series. Subjects include family members and Durham businesses, streets and homes in the late nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries.

Additions to the collection have not been interfiled, and include business records, photographs, scrapbooks, a cookbook, and autobiographies of some family members. Please consult the detailed list below for more information.

The papers of James Southgate (1832-1914) form a separate collection in the Duke University Special Collections Department. Collections in the Duke University Archives related to the career of James Haywood Southgate include the William Preston Few Papers, the Trinity College Board of Trustee Papers, and the John Carlisle Kilgo Papers.

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St. Clair Dearing papers, 1864 0.25 Linear Feet — 2 Items

Dearing was a Georgia military officer. The collection includes a daguerreotype and a deck of playing cards.

St. Clair Dearing was a Georgia military officer during the Civil War. The collection includes a daguerreotype of Dearing and two other officers as well as a deck of playing cards made by Dearing.

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University Archives photograph collection, 1861-ongoing 45 Linear Feet — Approximately 51,000 items

The University Archives Photograph Collection was compiled by University Archives staff from a variety of sources for use in research and teaching. The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. Subjects include Duke University administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors; Duke University athletics, academic programs, events, student life, reunions, commencements, and other activities; and scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. Also included are some photographs separated from other University Archives collections.

The University Archives Photograph Collection consists of approx. 51,000 photographic prints, negatives, slides, illustrations, and a few daguerreotypes. The majority of the collection was generated by Duke University News Service, Duke University Photography, student publications, and university publications. The collection is arranged into four series: People, Activities, Buildings, and Separated Photographs. The People Series (33 boxes, approx. 16,500 items) includes portraits and other photographs of individuals related to Duke University, such as presidents, trustees, administrators, faculty, staff, students, alumni, and visitors. The Activities Series (44 boxes, approx. 22,000 items) consists of photographs of University groups and events, including commencements, reunions, athletic teams, academic departments, campus demonstrations, student activities, and other group photographs. The Buildings Series includes scenes of Duke University's West and East campuses, the Trinity College campuses (Durham, N.C. and Randolph County, N.C.), campus facilities, campus architecture, Durham, Randolph County, and other related buildings and locations. The Separated Photographs Series (3 boxes, aprrox. 1,000 items) consists of images separated from other University Archives collections for preservation and access.